By on November 7, 2013

2014 BMW i8

When Toyota teamed with General Motors, they gave us the Vibe/Matrix twins. With Subaru, a trio of rear-driven sports cars with boxer power up front. So, what will Toyota deliver in its partnership with BMW? How about the ultimate hybrid supercar based off the bones of the Lexus LFA, for starters.

In an effort to join the ranks of Ferrari, Porsche, McLaren and even Mercedes-AMG in the eco-friendly supercar sweepstakes, Toyota will jointly develop a halo car with BMW that aims to take the ideas behind the LFA, swap its V10 for a hybrid powertrain, and package the deal for around $300,000.

For Toyota, that means teaching the Germans how to weave carbon fiber and offering its expertise in chassis craftsmanship, as well as its research in high-performance hybrid technology. On the other side, BMW offers mass production capabilities to make as many plastic and carbon fiber baskets as desired, as well as an array of engines that offer the same amount of power as the LFA’s V10, but with less cylinders, a smaller size, fewer emissions, and better mileage, such as the M5’s 4.4-liter 552-horsepower turbo V8.

No matter what happens, Toyota is wasting little time getting started (it took a decade to bring the LFA from the light table to the showroom); the word on the street is that a BMW i8 is residing in the automaker’s testing grounds near Mt. Fuji, undergoing stress tests in regards to its carbon fiber frame and emissions trials on the plug-in hybrid’s engine.

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7 Comments on “Toyota Teams With BMW to Deliver Ultimate Hybrid Supercar...”


  • avatar

    The regulations and speed limits continue to make “supercars” impractical as daily drivers.

    If I ever felt the need to go “alternative energy” or “green”, I’d buy a performance Model S.

    Thing is there’s no such thing as “alternative energy” or “green”. All useable energy on the Earth comes from the sun and is stored in plants or photosynthetic organisms. Nuclear power requires extensive amounts of fossil fuel to mine, is not practical for powering vehicles and the waste requires considerably more energy to store and secure from the terrorists.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      A lot of that is true. However, there may be performance advantages to hybrid supercars, especially if they can get the batteries to weigh less. We’ve seen the Porsche 918—which costs WAAAAY too much—and the upcoming NSX. There’s also talk of the next GT-R sporting a hybrid powertrain. And I wouldn’t be surprised if the Audi R8, or some other Audi, went that direction in the future. Meanwhile you can still get your analog, petrol-only supercars with brands like Corvette, Aston Martin and Ferrari (the last of which has adamantly insisted it has no plans for electric or hybrid vehicles)…

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Now look at that styling there, it rocks. First time I’ve said that about any BMW’s styling since pre-2002.

    Now, 300k is getting beyond what a BMW badge with Toyota engineering will support. You’re past Bentley territory. Uh oh.

  • avatar
    marc

    I would expect TTAC staff to be more critical when reposting others’ stories. A lot of stories about Toy/Lex seem to originate in Australia, and their pricing structure is way different from ours, not just because of the exchange rate. $300,000 estimates from Aus are meaningless. This could be LFA v 2.0 or a 911 competitor. Using these Aus estimates will give no clarity on this.

  • avatar
    84Cressida

    I see absolutely no benefit in this to Toyota. THey made the LFA by themselves and can make an awesome sports car if they want. BMW’s reliability and involvement will only hurt their brand.


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