By on November 7, 2013

Chevy Cruze Wagon

Unless you pay a visit to Mr. Lang’s lot on the right day or really love Volkswagen, the only wagons available for Americans today are mostly Teutonic, and all come with a high price tag. According to GM North American President Mark Reuss, that’s a problem, and one he’d like to fix pronto.

Aside from filling holes in markets GM doesn’t have anything for as of yet — including compact vans like the Ford Transit Connect, or a Panamera-fighter for the Buick lineup — Reuss wants to give consumers “a contemporary wagon for mainstream America” that is more affordable than anything on the lots of BMW, Mercedes-Benz, or even Cadillac. He also promises, for what it’s worth, that the wagon won’t have faux-wood paneling as an option. Sorry, hipsters.

One easy candidate would be to bring over the Cruze Wagon from Europe; Reuss already has eyes on a five-door hatchback version of the compact when the second generation rolls off the ramp, but why stop there? Sometimes not even a hatch is enough for some tasks, and since there are no small pickups or utes around anymore (in the United States, anyway), a business case could be made in federalizing the Cruze Wagon for sale on our shores.

Of course, if a Cruze meets the criteria for “a contemporary wagon for mainstream America,” then what does that say about the Teutonic tourers or the art and science behind Cadillac’s CTS? Are they too Lady Gaga for the masses?

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194 Comments on “GM Seeks “Contemporary Wagon” For Americans...”


  • avatar
    threeer

    I’m probably only one in a half dozen that would actually fork over the money for such, but “if” they brought the Cruze wagon with at least a manual transmission option, I’d seriously consider it as my next vehicle when I return from my duty here in Saudi. Provided they make it in America, it’d be ideal for me as I do a lot of dog hauling for rescue groups when I’m back Stateside. I love the thought of a Jeep Wrangler, but the fuel economy of one alone is enough to make me a little hesitant. With perhaps a more sporting suspense setup option (RS package, maybe) and the manual, I’d most likely have my next car…and I wouldn’t even need it to be brown…:)

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      I would suspect they will have limited options to help manage inventory. So having maybe just the most powerful engine and LT2 and LTZ specs.

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      I never understood why GM did not offer the current Cruze hatchback and wagon here. They have the tooling all paid for, just add it to Lordstown assembly with the sedan. Now we have to wait for the next generation Cruze to be introduced. Better than nothing I suppose. I hope they offer both additional body styles in ALL trim levels, LS to LTZ.

      • 0 avatar

        FUGM. Thats a spittin’ image of a Saab 93 Combi that came here in ’06 without the diesel that sold huge in UK and EU.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        Ditto for Ford and the Fusion wagon.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Ford doesn’t think people in the US will buy the Fusion wagon. At least not enough for them to justify bringing it here. The redesigned Edge will be our Fusion “wagon”.

        • 0 avatar
          mjz

          And the Fusion (Mondeo) hatchback too. Why are we continually denied the full range of other body styles that are available for the same models in other countries? They say that Americans don’t buy hatchbacks or wagons here, but they don’t offer them, so how can we? We are still one of the largest car markets in the world. This is maddening to me. I just don’t comprehend the thinking behind these “brilliant” decisions.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            It’s because our safety and ermissions standards differ from the rest of the world. Its the best trade protectionism that big-money can buy at work.

            On the other hand, since Ford became a global company (rather than merely having foreign operations), they’re now using their lobbyists and paid-for politicians to push for unified standards, so that they can cut costs and gain economies of scale.

            I don’t like this answer either, so I challenge you to find a better one.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Compact cars sell just fine as wagons. It’s a segment where buyers are frugal enough that they won’t move up to SUVs but still need the versatility.

      • 0 avatar
        BigDuke6

        ” they won’t move up to SUVs but….. ”
        The only UP buyers are moving to with an SUV is off the ground. And that does fook all for handling. Give me a wagon any day. Most “SUVs” are just wagons with big wheels and tall suspensions.

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          You forgot tall price tags also. They are all way more expensive then their car platform mate.

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          SUVs also have taller bodies permitting more upright and comfortable seating and easier to use cargo space. Talk of handling is irrelevant–you may buy a car for that, but they don’t. Thinking or expecting others to share the likes & preferences of an enthusiast is as foolish as an otaku thinking others like or want to watch movies subtitled.

    • 0 avatar
      BTEFan

      ‘…dog hauling for rescue groups when I’m back Stateside’.

      Best reason for more wagons ever! Thank you so much for rescuing dogs and bringing them to forever homes.

      A Cruze wagon would have a low step-in hieght for smaller dogs and senior dogs, and flip fold seats for the bigger dogs. I always thought the Honda Element would be a good dog car, but the rear windows don’t roll down, and doggies don’t care for that!

      There’s an Opel Insignia wagon that is offered in Europe – that would be a slightly larger, albeit more expensive, wagon option for the Buick Regal.

      Ford did some great business with the old Focus Wagons up here in Canada. HOpefully they follow and send a nice small wagon or a Fusion (Mondeo) wagon our way too.

      And thank you again for helping with dog rescues.

      • 0 avatar
        sfvarholy

        +1

        That is why I drive a secondhand E46 wagon. Couldn’t find a used V70 in my price range at the time because they are now rare as hen’s teeth in the Southern US.

        I’ve got two retired Greyhounds and a part-whippet. Most SUV’s believe it or not have so little cargo area behind the rear seats. In fact, the Nissan Pathfinder would have required me to fold down the back seats to carry the Greyhounds because there is only about 2 feet (if that) of space. Certainly far less than even my former A3.

        What’s the sense in dealing with all the negatives of an SUV if there is no cargo space? I certainly was not going to get a Suburban.

        By the way, the V70 has a deceptively big cargo area behind the seats.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        That’s one of the things I miss most about being away from home…thanks. Meanwhile, I really do hope GM brings the Cruze wagon over and maintains a manual tranny option. I know there’d be precious few buyers, but I’d most likely be one of them. Doggies gotta be hauled, ya know!

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    VW may not sell 500k Jetta wagons, but they sell plenty of them, and I imagine they make a nice profit on every one. Time for the wagon to come back into style. Not that it was ever out of style in New England.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      But VW also doesn’t have a small to midsized CUV that anyone wants. If they had a small CUV, with a TDi, and it wasn’t the current Tiguan, I could see them lose Sportwagon sales.

      • 0 avatar
        FractureCritical

        I would disagree with that. I don’t think there are many that are so invested in the VW brand that they would forego other maker’s CUV options if they were so inclined.

        I do think there is an honest desire for wagons, and it’s people with what i’d call ‘equipped’ active lifestyles that demand real access to a roof rack at reachable heights, easy entry and egress for large dogs, a desire for better fuel economy, and sometimes just a distaste for climbing up into the driver seat.

        a good wagon is a wonderful thing. The VW gets it right on pretty much every front except for the emblem on teh grill, and everything else hovers in the $40k and up range. The E class is sweet, but at $50+k, it’s top of the heap.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Fair enough. The only reason why I brought it up is that I think their are plenty of VW customers that buy a Sportwagen that would like AWD. I doubt VW will make the Sportwagen AWD.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          That market demographic you’re describing has Subaru written large on it.

          They honestly desired so many wagons that Subaru stopped building them for lack of interest.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I guess all the people that wanted an AWD CUV/Wagon and had a VW bought a Subaru. Poor VW of America.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            People who bought Subaru products usually morph into repeat buyers. VW buyers OTOH, not so much.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I think it more likely that Subaru figured out that any lost sales would be made up for by the added profit of the rather more expensive Outback. Subaru did it and got away with it, Volvo tried and got spanked.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            ” Subaru did it and got away with it, Volvo tried and got spanked.”

            How do you mean exactly?

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            krhodes is right. They figured out that the people who bought their wagons would buy an Outback “SUV” instead and they would laugh all the way to the bank. All the other manufacturers do the same thing, but at least they change the sheet metal a bit to make it a bit of a different vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          Syke

          I’m one of those people. I own a personal hobby/business bicycle shop, I ride regularly (bordering on daily), and I’d love a small four cylinder wagon. Something with a long flat roof that’s lower than my Scion xB, that’ll hold my Thule two bike roof carrier.

          Proper height means I can wash the entire roof without standing on a stool. While height is no big deal when you’re racking up a 18lb aluminum/carbon road bike, it becomes something when your putting up a couple of vintage three speed roadsters that weigh 35+ lbs apiece.

          I don’t need AWD, and don’t particularly want it. I’d prefer a manual, but can live with an automatic. I need a base (repeat, base, I will do a little optioning) price of under $25k. I want real world 35mpg highway.

          And I’m new car shopping next summer.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The Sportwagon is also ugly. Sorry but it just is.

        • 0 avatar
          Wheatridger

          Yes, the Sportswagen is ugly, like most modern VWs… like most contemporary cars, in fact. We learn to live with them anyway. Surprisingly, the Cruze has the cleanest, least overwrought styling I see these days.

          I was a lifelong VW/Audi buyer who tried the Subaru option ten years ago. My Forester was very likable on short trips at low speeds, but over 50mph it was far too loud, and after a half-hour, not very comfortable. Unlike my VWs, which often had me fixing small problems, the Subaru had a few big ones: a broken diff at 60k, the most expensive TB/HG job I’ve ever done, and finally a burst evaporative emissions charcoal canister that required four dealership trips and $1800 to fix, just before selling it. My time in a bloated, loaner Outback and a test drive in a gutless last-gen Forester cured me of the Subaru habit

          Now the family has a MkV GTI and a Tiguan. My ideal car would be something right in between the two.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      It does seem like VW nearly abandoned the wagon market for now. The Jetta SportWagen is still based on 2-generations old Gold, uses the unloved 2.5L engine instead of 1.8T in 2014 Jetta, and it has MSRP about $5K more than similarly optioned Jetta SE. No wonder almost no one buys them. Here in San Antonio, people buy VW cars pretty well. I see anything from Golf through CC everywhere. But I have seen a Jetta Sportwagen maybe once or twice.

      • 0 avatar
        brettc

        Beauty is in the eye of the beholder! I like the looks of the current Golf based cars, which is why I own one.

        Keep in mind that the new Sportwagen will probably be out in Spring or Summer 2014 as a 2015 model. Those are nice looking cars and the 1.8T should be the standard engine. The 2014 Sportwagens are essentially overbuilt 2013 models although the 2014 TDI wagons do come with a standard back up camera and LED license plate bulbs.

        As for the Cruze wagon, yes please! Offer it with a diesel and an automatic and that would be good enough. Of course a manual option would be good too. And offer brown for a colour choice. :)

        Here in Maine I still regularly see Accord wagons, Camry wagons, Corolla wagons, and old and new Jetta and Passat wagons along with the occasional old Mercedes wagon. Then there are modern Subarus which are somewhat wagon-like (although not like they used to be). For the GM theme, I also sometimes see Celebrity wagons, Century wagons and Cavalier wagons. So they’d probably do well in the Northeast.

      • 0 avatar
        CanuckGreg

        They seem to sell pretty well here in Canada, particularly in TDI form. My wife has a 2010 Sportwagon with the 2.5L/5 speed powertrain, and while the motor is admittedly somewhat unrefined, it gets the job done.

  • avatar
    bikemobile

    Something the size of the 2005-2009 outback wagon. Better packaging for rear seat leg room. Turbo four, 3.6 v6. Awd or rear wheel drive. I want one.

  • avatar
    7402

    Bring ‘em on. Perhaps they could channel the old Chevy Celebrity wagon. Oh wait, that was a scaled-down imitation of the Volvo 740.

    As much as I hate to admit it, the typical CUV is essentially a modern station wagon in tall-boy configuration.

    I’ve been driving Japanese, German, and Swedish wagons since the seventies, but the next 2-box vehicle in our garage will probably be a CUV.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    My wife has an 07 Rabbit 5 door. It’s nice, but the extra room of a (midsize) wagon would be even better. If it werent for the carbon buildup issues we would have got a Passat 2.0T wagon. But it would be really nice to be able to buy something like a Camry or Accord wagon, which don’t need premium gas and don’t have the weird VWAG issues (like carbon build up on the valves). I don’t know if I could buy a Chevrolet even today, but hopefully this will be good and spark that market again.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Sounds like it is time to dust off the “Chevy Nomad” name and trick out the slow selling Malibu into something that will help add volume to the architecture.

    Cruze wagon looks great. Opel Insignia wagon is also an obvious choice, would help Buick stand out. The Opel wouldnt really be mass market priced though. Bringing the Cruz wagon (maybe in diesel) would not eat into GM crossover sales quite as much as a larger wagon might, so I suspect it will be a diminutive wagon or MPV as all automakers seem to want to protect the bloated profits from crossovers by eliminating wagon options from the US market.

    So look for something that wont really be a competitor to any of GM’s volume crossovers IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      I agree a Regal wagon would not be a huge seller, but say it sold 1000 units month that would represent something like a 6% bump for Buick. Not bad, especially since it is not competing against anything else in their lineup (there is no Buick version of the Equinox).
      Anyone know what the Acura TSX wagon sales are like since that is the nearest competitor.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Poor.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Kyree is being nice, they are probably worse than poor since TSX sales are poor in the first place. Acura has been aiming for 10% of TSX sales to be the wagon. With 1100 TSXs sold last month, that gives us 110. Yuck.

          Acura’s goal has been 4000 TSX wagons sold in the US per year. Meanwhile, they move way more than 4000 CR-Vs per week.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Acura’s goal has been 4000 TSX wagons sold in the US per year. Meanwhile, they move way more than 4000 CR-Vs per week.”

            *Shakes my head*

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Shazam!

            http://www.blogcdn.com/www.autoblog.com/media/2009/03/nissan-gtr-r35-wagon-580.jpg

            Bring it.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I need the “Shut up and take my money” Futurama meme.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @bball

            +1

            Other than South Park and some of the MacFarlane stuff, do any of today’s cartoons inspire such meme?

          • 0 avatar
            Richard Chen

            TSX Wagon sales YTD: 1,764, down almost 50% from 2012.
            RDX sales YTD: 36,872, up 64%.

            Source: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/honda-october-sales-rise-on-record-cr-v-and-strong-civic-sales-acura-posts-over-17-percent-increase-on-record-sales-of-truck-of-the-year-candidate-mdx-230227331.html

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        You forgot the Buick Encore and Enclave–direct competition to a Regal wagon.

        • 0 avatar
          N8iveVA

          Encore is much smaller that a Regal(Insignia) wagon and the Enclave is much bigger.

        • 0 avatar
          mike978

          The Enclave I consider too big and too expensive to compete directly against a Regal wagon. The Encore is an interesting competitor though, hadn`t thought of that.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          The Enclave is a large, soft-riding luxury crossover that competes most directly with the Acura MDX and Infiniti JX/QX35. Meanwhile the Encore is a semi-premium subcompact CUV that competes with the Fiat 500L and MINI Countryman. That does leave room for a Regal wagon, which would compete with Volvo’s upcoming V60, and which would be an interesting alternative to the Theta-sized crossover that Buick might otherwise release…

    • 0 avatar
      wstarvingteacher

      This comment moved downstream quite a distance. It was in response to the comment about a malibu wagon badged as a Nomad.

      Great idea and I can get behind the size. Have owned chevy wagons from 77 (impala) and 57 (210). I sure could get behind it and expect I would buy one. Next new car comes in 4 years and I would love to make it that one. Only thing. Don’t make it a three door. I have always thought that two side doors on the passenger side and one on the drivers side is adequate.

      Need to get Zachman’s endorsement here.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “what does that say about the Teutonic tourers or the art and science behind Cadillac’s CTS? Are they too Lady Gaga for the masses?”

    Mostly too expensive for the masses, the only exception might be the Jetta wagon which is a niche car in the ‘States.

    Cruze. Wagon. $21,999. Can ya dig it?

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Ah, but what is the lease payment and are there incentives? The Equinox will certainly lease for less and possible cost less when comparably equipped.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Good points.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I’d rather have the Cruze wagon though. It would certainly get me in a Chevy dealer.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I think its a winner.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I do too. I don’t know how many they would sell, but my mother would buy one. She has an HHR now, and she is having trouble finding a replacement. Despite the hate that vehicle gets, its perfect for carrying her work stuff (laptops, iPads, other tech items, and rolling bag), its easy to get in and out off, and has been cheap to own. The best fit now is an Equinox or Escape.

          • 0 avatar
            fredtal

            I was just thinking of all the HHRs and Prowlers I still see on the road. Maybe there is a market for wagons, how ever small it may be.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @fredtal

            Prowlers?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I’m guessing PT Cruiser. But a Prowler wagon would be ridiculous.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            To Photoshop!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            PT Crowler

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Seems like the C-Max would be a comparable HHR replacement!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            She doesn’t like that it doesn’t have a flat load floor in the back, and the hybrid adds $ to the price. If Ford made a gas only version of the C-Max for the US, I think she would buy one.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I actually did not know it was hybrid only. That’s a disappointment. People need options, and a lot of people (like me) avoid hybrid items.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Why avoid the hybrid?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Hybrid or Plug-In Hybrid only.

            I own one, and I really like it, but if a gas version was offered at around $21K, I may have bought that instead. It would really depend on a number of things though. I think thats why its hyrbid only. I can’t compare it to the gas version unless I look at the Escape or Focus.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Because the hybrid battery is a consumable item, which WILL eventually fail or be barely working. Then you’re left with a $7k bill to pay.

            I recently had my dad avoid a pristine 08 Highlander Limited for this reason.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Ah.

            What do Prius fanbois do, just buy another Prius?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m really not sure. I did know a Civic Hybrid owner who bought theirs new, then dumped it the moment it started showing battery issues, on a dealer. They replaced it with a Focus hatch, non-hybrid.

            Maybe enough people will sour on the idea that hybrids will go away? I hope.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            For most hybrids that aren’t Civics, “eventually” hasn’t gotten here yet.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    SS Wagon. Done!

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    The problem with his ‘desire’ is that America is now inundated with station wagons–going by the name of Crossover SUV. The only successful ‘wagons’ here are Subaru’s Outback pair and, as mentioned, the Volkswagen–which is more touted for its diesel range than any real carrying capacity.

    Crossover SUVs are nothing but jacked-up station wagons. They give a higher ride which offers a more commanding view of the road and are notably comfortable–at least in some cases. This is true enough to the point that some insurance companies call them Sport Utility WAGONS rather than SUV which refers to truck-based body-on-frame styles like the old Bronco, Blazer and yes, even Jeep Wrangler. Until those designations get straightened out to more universally agree with the way at least one insurance company marks them, station wagons per sé are pretty much a no-go.

    • 0 avatar
      Scott_314

      Yes, but, I don’t like the way most crossovers look and prefer the low look of a sedan with a back rather than a squished SUV.

      I think the car at the top is extremely sharp looking, especially in the dark purple.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I agree; I don’t like the look of the SUWs either. Worse, they’re hardly ‘utility’ with that squashed-in backend with less storage available than even a typical sedan. Higher cubic footage, perhaps, but you simply can’t carry anything of size back there if the rear seats are up and quite honestly the 7-passenger monsters are overkill UNLESS you have a large family. The Honda Pilot would be a great, true SUV IF they’d drop the third row of seats and lower the price.

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          The real issue with crossovers is high center of gravity and corresponding poor handling. My CTS wagon handles much better than the current-gen SRX. It also gets better mileage and is quicker.

          • 0 avatar
            Secret Hi5

            I’m surprised it took so many posts before that point was made. (That a wagon handles better than a tall CUV/SUV)

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    In my fantasy land, someone will make an affordable wagon with thin c and d pillars. Bonus points if its a regular non-crossover/AWD wagon but still has some semblance of practical ground clearance. Oh and it can’t be a Subaru with all of their headgasket, wheel bearing, and CV boot issues. If my 4runner were 4 inches lower to the ground and rode smoother, and got atleast 25mpg in mixed driving, it would be the perfect vehicle for me for everyday use as well as hiking/camping trips. As it is, the 18 mpg average keeps it parked during the week.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      It shouldn’t be impossible to go to a good under-body shop to get your 4runner lowered. If done right, the ride would improve and so would you gas mileage. Additionally, an air dam across the front *behind* the bumper (similar to most factory dams, not the sport style) would help block more air from getting under the rig and improve mileage even more. That and some simple tuning mods like a more open air intake and cat-back pipes (all relatively inexpensive) could see you averaging 22-25 mpg at least at highway speeds. Of course, that all depends on how you drive, too.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      I have a 1995 Taurus wagon that would fit your bill if you jacked it up. The fact that I can see so well out of it, and it hugs the road so well, is why I am still driving it. But it won’t pass current pedestrian, side impact, and rollover standards; which in part is how we got to this point today.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Sounds like you want one of those rare Lancer wagons ;)

      I see them occasionally and they always throw me off from the rear view. I’m like hey.. that’s a weird Volvo. No wait, no it isn’t.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Taurus wagon isn’t a bad idea, nor is that Lancer, I had forgotten about those. My family owned a 1990 Civic Wagon that was about perfect, if a little low to the ground and with a fragile and stiff double wishbone suspension. We rented a 1994 Corolla Wagon in Russia one year that was a billygoat in the steppes and mountain foothills. I wouldn’t turn down one of the elusive Corolla Alltrac wagons from the late-80s early 90s either, known as the “Carib” elsewhere in the world. 1st gen CRV is another prime candidate, rumor has it the floorpans and some 4wd components are basically the same as that aforementioned 1990 Civc wagon.

        What I like about the 4runner is the simple and durable frame and rwd+longitudinal engine layout. Easy to work on and tough, but the frame is also heavy and may contribute to the slight body quivers over bumps. The cargo area is very long and roomy, owing to the boxy rear end. It rides very truckish, much more so than my previous mazda, which had macpherson struts in the front and much lighter, narrower wheels (225 width 15s vs 265 width 16s). The 4runner jitters over bumps, with fresh shocks mind you, whereas the MPV rides basically like a sedan (it is based on the 1st gen Mazda 929).

        This beasty looks about perfect, but much too old to be a reliable daily driver and highway car:

        http://indianapolis.craigslist.org/cto/4123697152.html

  • avatar
    TorontoSkeptic

    This sounds great. I have a Pontiac Vibe which is, in my mind, the best option for “a contemporary wagon for mainstream America.” (well I live in Canada but you get the idea…)

    However it’s small and if there is another kid in the future, something bigger will be required. That Cruze wagon looks like just the thing. For low 20s I would definitely be interested.

    I hate that wagons have become this $50k lux item when they are the ultimate functional family car, I say go GM go.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    You’ll be hard-pressed to get me to let go of my Legacy GT wagon, GM. But I thoroughly encourage you to try.

    • 0 avatar
      joeb-z

      Me too. My 2005 Legacy GT manual wagon just passed 80K miles. Exhaust work, front mounted intercooler and dyno tuned for 280HP. Bilsteins. Ordered it new as soon as I saw they would actually sell that configuration which they did for only two years. I’d be a tough sell as I intend to run the Suby into the ground. Yes my rear bearings went (warranty), the turbos go also on these and the shifter reminds my of my old John Deere 40. The intercooler is a joke if you bump the boost. Above 12 psi or so the sides just let go, which is pretty clever if they plannned it that way.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    I may be wrong, but hadn’t the move to CUVs rather than wagons been helped along my CAFE regulations? Even though they are really just jacked up cars (and usually heavier, less efficient, and worse handling as a result) CUVs help a company’s average truck MPG so they can sell more big trucks.

    In any case, I hope GM does make a good effort here as I am a big wagon fan. While they are looking at market niches, perhaps they could also make their first (more than half-hearted) effort at making a competitive minivan?

    Years ago I had a 2001 BMW 525iT with a manual trans and sport suspension. Though rear seat leg room wasn’t great I believe that wagon had more cargo space than an X5 and I thought it was a lot nicer to drive.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      That is the story we have always been told. But, while I could see it being the case for the huge wagons of old; I find it hard to believe that say a Cruze or Fusion wagon gets any worst mileage than the sedan version, and the main holdup would be the manditory federalization and crash testing versus the take rate.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Other way around. It is not that wagons hurt the car average, it is that the help the super-profitable big truck average.

        Then there is the greed aspect. I am SURE BMW would rather have sold me an X3 for $5k more than my wagon. So you see X3 adverts all over – when have you ever seen one for the 3 wagon. Dealers barely stock them. So a chicken and egg situation. Do they not sell because no one wants them, or is it lack of availability?

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      I would say you’re right, but as a personal opinion it also opened the door for import models as well. Not for CAFE, but for something called the “Chicken Tax” which it seems nearly everybody is bypassing by selling ‘trucks’ as ‘passenger vehicles’ and flooding our markets with vehicles that have essentially wiped out the American automobile market as such. Sure, the top selling vehicle in America is a sedan, but the top selling vehicle CLASS is the CUV/SUV. It seems fully 50% of the cars you see on the highways today are CUV/SUVs followed by sedans and finally (but not by much) pickup trucks. I’ll admit I drive an SUV–but it’s a true BoF model, not a unibody station wagon on steroids.

      • 0 avatar
        scwmcan

        You do realize that the top selling vehicle in the states is a pickup truck not a sedan ( hint ford f-series). It was also the domestic car companies ignoring their cars and focusing on SUV’s and Trucks as much as competition from abroad that killed the American car., the domestics have introduced much better cars in the last few years though.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    This is a perfect story for some of the commentariat. Today, it provides opportunities to complain about the lack of wagons in the US market. Later, when those wagons don’t sell, there will be an opportunity to complain about the incentives that will be needed to move them at a loss.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Stop making sense. You are ruining people’s dreams.

      I want a Ford S-Max Titanum, in brown, with the downsized ecoboost V6 coming out, and with AWD. Oh, its going to be $53,000? I’ll just have an Explorer Sport instead.

    • 0 avatar

      COTD

      • 0 avatar
        olddavid

        Please do not initiate that absurd daily epithet here. You’d be inundated with comments solely with the intention of gaining that accolade, rather than the discussions of merit we mostly enjoy now.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      If someone in the ’60s said that, in the 2010s, there would be five cheap, high power, RWD, manual transmission sport coupes on the market (ok, four high power ones), but that young auto enthusiasts would be whining about station wagons, heads would explode.

      The only reason wagons are “cool” is because the “un-cool” people are driving CUVs, SUVs and minivans (and the shrinking of the minivan market is almost making them “cool”). If all those vehicles went away the “un-cool” people would drive wagons.

      I have purchased the sedan version of cars when available, and would be open to a wagon. But in the end I would probably not choose a wagon for the body rigidity, noise insulation, and safety of objects in the trunk (both from theft and from flying in a collision) of a sedan. For f*cks sake, if you are young, and single and pass up an FR-S or a Mustang or a Genesis Coupe because you *need* a wagon, then wow. There is a place called U-Haul.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Wagons are far more popular on this corner of the internet than they are in the real world. The interest goes no further than keystrokes from just a few people.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I’ll concede large RWD Volvo/Dodge style wagons may be an extreme minority, but why do five door hatches seem to do so well?

          Another foot or two on those and you have a small wagon, which sounds very similar to what Reuss is proposing.

        • 0 avatar
          Beerboy12

          The Pacific North West still worships the wagon, Foresters and Sport wagons are as super common.

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          I value the intersection of utility, handling, driving position (more legroom since I’m very long-legged) and fuel economy that a wagon provides. I realize that makes me an outlier, but, for me, a well-executed wagon (preferably RWD) beats a CUV every time.

          Just to take one data point, look at the size of the tires on a CUV. They are massive. All that unsprung weight affects handling and, ironically, on FWD CUVs the larger contact patch degrades traction in icy conditions leading to loss of steering and control.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        Enthusiasts are car hipsters.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “… if you are young, and single and pass up an FR-S or a Mustang or a Genesis Coupe because you *need* a wagon, then wow.”

        Do you work for the insurance companies or something?

        I’m not a huge wagon fan myself, but not all of us have dreams of sports cars either. I personally like old vehicles, so I could see going for a ’79 Buick Estate over a 2 year old Camaro LS.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      Well, I actually owned a wagon . . . a Saab 9-5, which I was very fond of despite being a repair queen. It could carry a surprising amount of stuff, was quite comfortable for 4 persons and got an easy 30 mpg at highway speeds. Being my wife’s car, when it was time to replace it, she insisted on a Honda Pilot. Unlike the Saab, the Pilot has been stone reliable, but it’s slow, ponderous and, if you drive very carefully, will get 22 mpg on the highway . . . much, much less in town.

      Yes, it does carry more stuff and, in a pinch it can carry 7 passengers (if the two in the wayback are willing to suffer). But its sheer mass makes it positively frightening in snow, even with 4 true snow tires mounted.

      The Acura and the VW are just a bit smaller than the Saab, which is why I’m not interested in them.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    Maybe with CAFE standards coming we will see less SUVs and a return to wagons. At least some of us can only hope.

  • avatar
    ash78

    I’ve gone from a huge, huge wagon proponent (for 15+ years) to a much less devoted fan. After being left high & dry for so many years, milking our ’01 Passat for as long as we can, my life has changed so much that I really think a “crossover” fits the bill a lot better.

    First off, I hate that moniker. A Chevy Traverse is just a huge, ugly wagon with extra ground clearance. Ingress/egress with small kids in a taller vehicle is worth the price of admission.

    But then I make another short logical leap and say “I probably need a pickup. If I’m going to take the performance and economy hit of a crossover, why not go a little further for a lot more utility and flexibility?”

    Crossovers aren’t weaning me off of SUVs, as they’re intended. They’re weaning me up from wagons to trucks. IMHO, more wagons are just too little, too late in our household. We’ll be a minivan + truck family in a couple years. It’s inevitable. Too few manufacturers struck while the iron was hot, not just for us, but for a lot of the US market.

    (I still think the E-Class wagon is the best looking mainstream vehicle in production right now. My wagonlust never really goes away.)

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “A Chevy Traverse is just a huge, ugly wagon with extra ground clearance.”

      I have to disagree, the Lambda models are minivans in guise. Transverse FWD w/AWD option and minimal off-road capabilities say it all, just add the sliding door and you have a Chevy Venture.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Minivans were just high roof wagons anyway. I think we get a little too caught up in the marketing.

      • 0 avatar
        ash78

        I’m with you, but danio is also right. A minivan is also a wagon, just differentiated by sliding doors and an extra-tall cabin. I’m obviously very liberal with my definitions, but BOF and the drive wheels are major factors.

        I’m also a Ford Flex fan, but can’t live with the styling on a daily basis. Add sliding doors and I’ll reconsider :D

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          The styling is about the only thing I LIKE about the Flex. And being a Ford is what kills it for me. After owning two Fords and the never-ending troubles I had with both of them… I won’t ever voluntarily buy another new Ford.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Obviously you don’t like Ford products, but what do you specifically dislike about the Flex?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            BBall has an MKT and wanted a Flex, yo’ bes’ tread carefully.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Haha. I do love me some Flex. The only complaints I could see someone having with it has to do with size and style. Its gigantic and has a different look to it.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      (I still think the E-Class wagon is the best looking mainstream vehicle in production right now. My wagonlust never really goes away.)

      Mine hasn’t either; and I still enjoy my old Taurus. But wagons were never fitted with seperate A/C for the rear seats, AC outlets, and cupholders. And tall wagons/CUVs are still easier to put small children and child seats into, and you can slide into the smaller ones without having to fall into them like a wagon, or climbing into them like a BOF SUV.

      My wife drives a Durango, and I drive the Taurus, and I am happy with that. The Durango is mostly used for family transportation, but the Taurus can do it if needed. The rest of time, I much prefer to commute alone or with one of my sons in the Taurus than her Durango; the tall seating position and blind spots makes it work to keep up with your surroundings when driving in DFW traffic (especially on a windy day); and it just not as relaxing as the wagon. And even at 180,000 miles; the Taurus averages roughly 3-7 MPG better, depending on amibiant temperature.

      With so many carbuilders offering so many CUV/SUV models, adding a wagon does not seem like too much to ask; especially if it is already being built for the European market.

      • 0 avatar
        ash78

        jhefner: That’s exactly it — crossovers have gotten so much attention (and sold in such great numbers) that they’re much more competitive and honed to the market’s needs than possibly any other vehicle segment, save for minivans. Nowhere else do you get so much for the money, as well as so many (acceptable) compromises made at the same time. Yes, compromise usually breeds blandness, but modern engineering has really minimized the downsides of those compromises.

        The E-Class wagon is amazing, but once you start looking at it, it’s really hard not to choose an R-class or ML (or even GL) instead. The performance differences are minimal, so the wagon often loses out.

  • avatar
    Ron

    Best vehicle I ever owned was a 2000 Volvo V70. Perfect for driving across the country and loading up at Costco.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    This sounds like another one of those vehicles that Americans clammer for, yet when they actually have the opportunity to buy one, no one’s home. I can’t see many conquest sales from VW or Subaru owners.

    What might be more tempting, however, is if they put one of these up for sale with a Volt 2.0 drivetrain. Those interested in a Volt already march to the beat of a different drum and they’d probably actually buy a Volt station wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      To be honest with you, I haven’t heard anyone clamoring for a new station wagon outside of the internet. I have a few car buddies who think a CTS-V wagon would be neat, but your average person could care less about wagons. As far as the buying public is concerned, a station wagon just another CUV that doesn’t sit quite as high.

      That being said, I want a full side wagon based off the current Impala in green with faux-wood. Call it a Kingswood.

      • 0 avatar
        FractureCritical

        the dodge Magnum did not do poorly.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          It kinda did. Hence, cancelled.

          • 0 avatar
            FractureCritical

            it’s a common misconception. According to Ralph Giles, one guy at Chrysler axed the Magnum and that guy got axed in the bankruptcy nonsense.

            The Magnum actually moved about 4000 units a month on average before it got killed. For reference sake, that’s twice as many A4’s as Audi moves every month, and not far from how many 3 Series BMW sold around the same time frame.

            It’s certainly not CamCord numbers, but there’s clearly market share there to be had.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        I mean, they could not care less. Derp.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I like the Volt idea, but as far as conventional wagons go the plebs will buy what you tell them to in marketing. If you make wagons seem “cool” the masses will follow, just look at how some salivate over a regular five door hatch with folding seats. How many of those do you see around, I see quite a few everyday in my bldg’s lot (Kia Rondo, Kia Soul, Focus 5 doors, Pontiac Vibes) and those don’t even have the extra room a wagon offers.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I see camo’d Chevy Orlandos driving in GM convoys with Volts around these parts. I know there was talk of a Volt Orlando, but I can’t tell if what I’ve seen has a front charging port. It could very well be just another generic GM CUV.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      On second thought, maybe not. Sales of the C-Max and Prius V (which are the current vehicles directly in the small, fuel-efficient, station wagon market) have been lackluster. GM is quite unlikely to wade into a market with their version of the same vehicle when the Toyota and Ford equivalents aren’t selling.

      That leaves the cheaper, non-hybrid (but sportier) VW and Subie station wagon fanboys, and they’re pretty damn loyal to their products (and unlikely to switch to a Chevy).

  • avatar
    danio3834

    “He also promises, for what it’s worth, that the wagon won’t have faux-wood paneling as an option. Sorry, hipsters.”

    It’s OK, you can buy that stuff by the roll.

  • avatar
    dolorean

    I would be the first standing in the door of the Chevy dealer for a Cruze RT or SS wagon with 6 spd manual. It or the five door would be a perfect substitute for my ’08 Saturn Astra XR 5dr. My preference would be for the CRD; however, the 1.4T would be a feasible option.

    Help me, Mr. Reuss! You’re my only hope!

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Wait – you mean GM may actually build a diesel manual wagon – in brown?!?!?!

  • avatar

    #1 BRING BACK THE DODGE MAGNUM.

    The Magnum with a pentastar and 8-speed would rock.

    #2. NO WAGON WITHOUT A V6 or a diesel.

    If I need to carry the amount of mass that requires this much volume then OBVIOUSLY I need enough torque to carry it!!!

    Keep those whack 4-cylinders for the econobox-cars.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    “GM Seeks ‘Contemporary Wagon’ for Americans”

    …but do Americans seek a wagon?

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      If they do, there’s always the Toyota Venza, a contemporary wagon made in America especially for Americans.

      OTOH there’s also the Subaru line of AWD wagons. Sturdy little cars in a class all their own.

      My idea of a contemporary wagon for Americans was my 1972 Olds Custom Cruiser with seating for 9 and a rear-facing third seat, with dual-action rear door/tailgate.

      That was my wife’s car for the eight years we lived in Germany with the military and it served us well at a time when the only minivan on the mrket was the VW Kombi.

      The wagons on the market now don’t sell all that well and the high-priced variety is for upscalers, not Joe Sixpack and Sally Homemaker. That’s why Detroit got out of the wagon business and Lee Iacocca introduced the minivans.

      Pch101 is right. If GM’s new wagons don’t sell well there’ll be pi ssing and moaning about incentives. This is a no-win scenario. I hope GM reconsiders this strategy to plug a hole in their offerings.

  • avatar
    Pebble

    Crossover SUV? F U, buddy. What we need is something along the lines of a 90s Taurus wagon, with third seat. A real wagon, not jacked up, not SUVized, one I can take to the aftermarket customizer and have woodgrain installed if not available OEM.

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    Wagons have not been done well in this country lately. There have been some good parts of what (I think) the right idea is:

    The Dodge Magnum tacked towards a sport/power ideal that I think was the right thing to do for a wagon. people looking for off-roady or gobs of cargo space or even super economy have super-saturated market offerings in all those categories.

    The jetta TDI wagon hits a good nerve in that it gets some of the fuel economy, but is also somewhat fun to drive, has decent interior space, and looks decent. But it’s limited in that it’s still a friggin VW.

    The BMW 3 series comes closest. It goes damn fast, it pegs low 30’s mpg, and it’s a sporty mix of a car. but it’s small and costs $42k, min.

    the peanut butter and chocolate perfection would be a regal wagon, and I would make it available only in GS trim. Hear me out:

    Wagons are a distinctive shape. rather than down-play it as an economy offering like Acura and Audi have, make it a flag waving feature of performance. Teh Prius uses this concept to perfection. It’s a hybrid that looks like nothing else but a hybrid. so it sells way better than any other hybrid that’s derivitive of another car. the same statement can be made with wagons and perforamce, like the magnum did, and it works.

    no one who wants a wagon is going to buy a wagon becuase it’s cheap or slow. If you want cheap or slow, both options are widely available. this is where Audi screwed the pooch in that they offer a wagon that’s bereft of options and it sits next to a Q5 that’s significantly cheaper and comes with bigger motor options. it’s silly. If I wanted something slow, I’d get an SUV/CUV.

    and last, for f’s sake, acutually market the car. Wagons offer significant benefits over SUV’s, and I suspect car makers are hesitant to point out that wagons can be faster, more fuel efficient, more fun to drive, easier to load and unload (esp. the roof rack) and are way, WAY more dog friendly but for the fact that they would essenitally be shooting their own (very lucrative) SUV sales pitch right in the foot.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Chrysler sold a wagon based on the 300 architecture. It was a scorcher when equipped with the right power train, and very elegant if in all-black.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        They are hot because they are all stolen.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Yeah, that is a problem, not just with any one brand, but pretty much across the board.

          I saw a police-demo film recently that showed a brand new Enclave being winched onto a tiltbed truck at a shopping center in less than two minutes, start to finish, with a crowd of onlookers gawking.

          No one questioned the taking of this SUV from the Costco parking lot. Not their business even though the alarm was going off on the car.

  • avatar
    1998redwagon

    i hear it and i get all excited and then …… nothing.

    seriously i bought a 2013 passat sedan to replace the 1998 passat wagon (i know, i know fanboy alert). i wanted a specific exterior / interior color combination that was hard to find. the dealer did find it and make getting it easy. a lot of work for them that i appreciated. when we picked it up the salesman asked if it was the perfect car and i replied, close. the only way it could be better would be if it was a wagon. he was exasperated. i was serious.

    if the cruze wagon was here when i was looking last august it would have been on the list. it would have been a tough call between a cruze wagon, the passat sedan and the jetta wagon (a bit small in the back seat) and hard to beat. i tried a 6mt eco version of the cruze and liked it. the wagon would have been hard to beat if it came with a stick, esp if it was rated 35+ mpg

  • avatar
    1998redwagon

    btw i like long wagons without the sloping rear roof line, i dont like sitting up high, i dont like jacked up wagons nor ugly blocky roof rails (looking at you subaru), i dont have to have awd and i dont have a lot of money. in general i hate cvts and love manuals.

    i hear there are 5 others out there just like me. we are an endangered species on the brink of extinction and we are going to have a convention. maybe npr will cover it.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    It will be Impala Classic. And they will call it something athletic, like Equinox.

  • avatar
    redav

    IMO, wagons for c segment cars are a no-brainer. Wagons for larger cars become increasingly meh. I understand why Americans prefer their SUVs, but I would still opt for a wagon in most cases.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    “GM Seeks ‘Contemporary Wagon’ For Americans”

    Bring back the Buick Roadmaster Estate Wagon, but this time faux stained concrete on the sides or maybe faux distressed natural bamboo.

  • avatar
    Omnifan

    Wagons? Yes!! But not ones like the Cadillac or Dodge Magnum. Needs decent headroom and good visibility along with cargo capacity.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      I was really mad that Dodge killed the Magnum, but then I realized they didn’t. It is now the Durango. Now that the RWD (in base form) Durango is unibody and IRS the Magnum would be super redundant.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Getting in and out of a Durango can be a real hurdle for kids. Our 7-yo twin grand kids have a hell of a time climbing into my wife’s Grand Cherokee.

        When we had our ’72 Olds Custom Cruiser and our own kids were that age, no problems.

        • 0 avatar
          racer-esq.

          And people say kids these days have it easy.

          The RWD Durango is pretty low. Not quite Magnum low, but I can see Chrysler execs not being able to justify both of them on the showroom floor.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            My wife and I are close to 68 and helping grandkids claw their way into a GC can be hazardous to our backs.

            GM is going to do what ever they decide to do, but trying to fill this wagon-niche would be ill-advised IMO, even if they build them in Europe or elsewhere and import them into the US.

            We’ve already got the Venza and the Subaru wagons, built right here in the US.

            The other wagons currently on sale in the US, built by other mfgs are niche sellers. None of them are money-making bread-and-butter cars. There’s no demand for them.

            I’m surprised that the Mazda5 doesn’t sell any better because that is truly the right size mini-minivan with a wide range of applications at a price that will fit the majority of overstressed budgets.

            I can’t see GM building a wagon for the mass market. What mass market? It’s a niche.

            Then again, GM can do no wrong. We, the people, bailed them out once before and we’ll do it again and again if need be.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I agree with highdesert, it’s not a full market to try and sell to.

            I really think Toyota doesn’t want the Venza seen as a wagon though. It’s a “CUV,” even though it’s dreadful and has a terrible interior – and is overpriced.

            And I don’t think Subaru makes any wagons anymore, unfortunately.

            The Mazda5 would sell better if it weren’t so ancient.

          • 0 avatar
            jhefner

            “The RWD Durango is pretty low. Not quite Magnum low, but I can see Chrysler execs not being able to justify both of them on the showroom floor.”

            My wife and grandkids would disagree with you; she has worn a spot on the driver’s set from dragging herself inside; and I really need to get her a set of running boards. It does have the 18″ wheels (2007.)

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        I agree. The Durango is the Charger of SUVs. If they would offer some sort of deal on them for once, I’d probably have one.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “…Panamera-fighter for the Buick lineup”

    It’d better be at a HELL of a discount. Like 50% less. And the Cadillac badge seems more suited for a 4-door fastback type sedan.

    The HTS.

  • avatar
    tedward

    This makes good sense, and I’m trying to say that objectively despite my rabid pro-wagon bias.

    First point: Wagons are trending as cool beyond just us guys. The merc. E-class wagon is an outright status symbol right now, with an extremely wealthy demo for the car setting the stage for this over the last few years. Luxury brand wagons may no longer be for enthusiasts (no manuals), but they are doing some seriously heavy lifting in the image department if only because of their wealthy customer base. It’s not everywhere, but it is spreading in from the coasts. Wagons are starting to be the subject of an increasing number of projects as well (like mine!)

    Second: VW sells more than enough Sportwagens to justify the segment for them. They seem to hover between 2 and 3k a month. Which is actually not bad considering the complete and total lack of marketing behind this car as well as a their smaller dealer network.

    Third: Subaru. While the Outback has since abandoned wagon status, Subaru proved the wagon can build a customer base with the right demographics for future success. Subaru did this while consistently offering sub par transmissions and with some serious drive-train reliability issues, so it’s not nothing.

    Fourth: They have a diesel now. You can’t really do a wagon in the CAFE marketplace without alternative propulsion. With a diesel they can now sell this thing without harming their passenger fleet averages.

    Fifth: Wagon, SUV, Minivan. Hate two, love the third. While SUV’s may be all-conquering right now the same was said about wagons and vans in the past. We’ve since seen popular perception run screaming from the reigning king as soon as the public internalizes what has happened to their demographic mix. No one wants to be associated with other owners who are indifferent to cars, or more importantly, to what their cars say about them. Having a toe in the water, however tepidly, means GM can expand the program and will have a foothold when tastes shift yet again.

    Sixth: I think they want the diesel to be paid for they can use it as a range extender is future Volt-ish vehicles. Perhaps they want the wagon shape in the mix for similar reasons.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      1. The E-class/Volvo wagons may cause PDIs (Panty Dropping Incidents) amongst the stiletto heel wearing crowd. In reality, women who do lunch buy these things. The stiletto heel wearing and PDIng bunch have bought GLKs and S90s cause their commute sucks and you can throw a lot of stuff in the back.

      2. VW is kinda like drinking Midori. You just do it once.

      3. Subaru appeals to those who want to make many “green” overtures. Earth goddess/organic/yoga/marathon training/Hillary in 14 types

      4. Lord knows TTAC/the internet/common sense shows the disadvantage of paying more to pay less

      5. Will C/SUVs every fad to just being the domain of guys with bad haircuts? Nope, they’re way too handy. Psst and they’re a lot easier for the elderly to get in and out of. Wait,C/SUVs may develop a rabid following along the bad haircut/elderly man crowd

      • 0 avatar
        FractureCritical

        agree on point #4, but just imagine: if there’s that many one-time sportwagen customers, imagine how many there’d be if they came back for repeat buisness!!

  • avatar
    NeinNeinNein

    What about the NEW Audi RS6—sure its expensive and not coming to our shores—but dang!! The car is faster than a 911, is actually one of the fastest production cars and in league with other supercars and holds groceries! You cant say that it aint one helluva car! 550+ BHP!!!

    http://www.topgear.com/uk/audi/rs6/road-test/avant-driven

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    I drive a 2008 9-3 wagon and i will never, ever go back to a sedan. The 9-3 has it’s weaknesses but to me at least, it looks SENSATIONAL for something with this much utility. Crucially,I have fit items into the vehicle with less than an inch to spare something like eight times in the past two years, as a result i would never go any smaller or it becomes a tad pointless.

    This is important because a lot of the CUV’s my wife keeps hassling me for actually offer less space. I am not too sure how they manage that but as an example, my brother in laws Audi Q5 has less boot (trunk) space and a smaller rear entrance (teehee, rear entrance).

    This brings us to another point, modern wagons look a lot better than they used to but that’s because they are less boxy and therefore not as good as a utility vehicle. Get any “sexier” and it’s getting a tad pointless.

    On another note, an easy solution for GM is just bring in both the Cruze and the Commodore Sportwagon, Holden absolutely NAILED the commodore wagon.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    “Consider” is not the same as paying for a new one. I am sure we will get a Cruze wagon, then will get dropped due to low sales.

    Common excuse “I wanted one, but my wife refused to drive a station wagon like her mother had”.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I think that is going away because almost everyone 35 under didn’t ride in a station wagon as a kid, or remember it. I turn 30 in December, and we had weird crap cars, trucks, and minivans. Once the 90s rolled around, it was minivans and SUVs for everyone. Station wagons in traditional form were dead.

      The funny thing is, my generation doesn’t have an issue with buying SUVs/CUVs, even through thats what many of our parents owned. Plus, trucks are always cool.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        “… Once the 90s rolled around, it was minivans and SUVs for everyone. Station wagons in traditional form were dead.

        “The funny thing is, my generation doesn’t have an issue with buying SUVs/CUVs, even through thats what many of our parents owned. Plus, trucks are always cool.”

        To understand what you saw; buy the documentary “Wagonmasters”, or see it if is shown locally. The two guys who made this video did a good job of capturing the wagon’s demise.

        In a nutshell, the 80s-90s was when the primary role of women evolved from that of being a full-time housewife to a working or “soccer mom.” To the up and coming woman working outside the home, the station wagon was a symbol of their stay-at-home mom’s lifestyle; and since they also now played a more active role in choosing the family car; rejected the station wagon of the past era for the fashionable mini-van that was just introduced. Following 9-11 and constant cloud of unseen threats we live under; many then gravitated to the SUV for the percieved security they provided; anlong with a commanding view of the highway.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        Heh, you and I are the same age. My brother regrets his Escape as he calls it a car with SUV gas mileage. I think he would have been happier with a wagon, or just getting a full sized SUV. I also agree with you on the stigma of wagons. I have none. But I’m an oddball consumer.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I’m waiting for the next Navigator, just like Lincoln dealers. I was at one yesterday, and they could give a rats @ss about MkWhatever. A new Navigator and a Lincoln based on the Mustang. That’s all they want.

          And next time you’re in Detroit, I’ll buy you a birthday beer and coney.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Pontiac Grand Safari’s, butt-ugly polyester clothes, Strat-O-Matic and that kid down the block that always had the Cubs winning the world series, and 8 Track tapes. Some memories of my youth need to remain memories.

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      My wife doesn’t like SW as she think they look like a hearse.

      I like SW because they don’t have the high ride of an SUV.

      What I like about CUV is the apparent ease of entry. I would love a Patriot. Other than that, I don’t see the point.

  • avatar
    tornado542

    FOR THE LOVE OF GOD PEOPLE IF YOU WANT A WAGON GO BUY THE MAZDA 5!!!! IF YOU DONT YOU ARE ALL FULL OF IT!

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Yep, one of my daughters-in-law drove a Mazda5 for four years and it was an excellent, problem-free little minivan, perfect for her and the little ones.

      She did trade it this year for a 2013 Honda Odyssey when Honda had their summer-sales event. Her kids are bigger now and ingress/egress is no longer a problem for them.

      The Mazda5 cost her ~$18K in 2009, still brought $12K in trade (on paper) with high mileage (76K+ over 49 months of ownership).

      It’s never been back to the dealer for anything and Jiffy Lube did all the oil and filter changes. Still had the original tires. Balding, but original tires.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      For some of us, the Mazda 5 does NOT qualify as a station wagon.
      It simply does not have the load capacity behind the second row of seats.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      In fact, even Mazda calls it a Minivan, not a Wagon.

      • 0 avatar
        Augie the Argie

        I beg to disagree with you Vulpine, the Mazda 5 holds 39 cu.ft. behind its 2nd row, a larger load than most SUVs such as the RAV4, Highlander or even its bigger brother the CX9. I bought a 2yr old model Touring model with 28k for 14k, a real bargain. Had put 52K extra miles and still going strong The truth is, there are no nice modern SW to replace it. The Cruze Diesel would be a nice option, still lament the Grand C’Max not coming to the NA market. I think there is sth out there for the good old SW and not just limited to TTAC readers….
        There are just NO good options at a fair price.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          You just emphasized my argument about the CUVs in general. I owned a 2002 Saturn Vue capable of carrying 100 cubic feet with all seats down; an 8′ ladder with right-side (passenger) seats down (and still able to carry a passenger) and your 39 cu. ft. or more with all seats up. The interesting thing is that State Farm Insurance labeled it a Sport Utility Wagon, not SUV. And as I said, Mazda themselves calls the M5 a MiniVan right on their web page.

          The thing is that cubic footage isn’t the only thing that makes a wagon a wagon. It needs the length to carry a decent sized object in the back. Our older station wagons could once carry full half-sheets and more of plywood or wallboard with the tailgate closed. That means a 4’x4′ flat floor between the wheels and from tailgate to seat back. Many of them could carry a 6′ ladder with the back seats folded and full 8′ lumber, plywood, etc. with the tailgate down similar to pickup truck tailgates.

          There is not ONE CUV capable of carrying outsized loads today. Only the largest SUV can even try and most people who look at them tend to get a pickup truck instead. Why? Because there’s nothing physically smaller that can really carry what they want to carry. I need a pickup myself to carry the once-a-year load I have to carry but at one time a conventional station wagon WOULD have carried it–albeit with the tailgate down.

          Station wagons offered lower load beds than pickups, as did the El Camino, Ranchero and the few other US “utes” we had. This made loading and unloading easy as well as offering a more aerodynamic vehicle than a conventional pickup. Even at their largest, a station wagon got nearly 50% better gas mileage than a pickup truck of the day and almost certainly would again today. You don’t need they 7″ or higher ground clearance that the typical pickup truck now offers (in many cases 11″+) which alone means higher drag and lower fuel mileage.

          The point is that the Mazda 5 does NOT qualify as a ‘Wagon”. It’s too tall; it’s too short (in length) and it carries a sliding door. It’s a minivan. And I need 48cu.ft. behind the seats, minimum. 4’w x4’L x3’h. I would prefer 4’x5’x3′ or 60cu.ft.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Do they make it in a RWD N/A V8 version?

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @raph,
        Holden can make a LHD, 400hp version without much of a problem. I actually was riding in a (RHD)one a week ago. All this depends on the business case for Sports Wagons in the US. No brainer in Europe where SUV’s are not that common and they are used as a large car for business here.

  • avatar
    raph

    LS7 powered SS wagon, SOLD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    A guy can wish can’t he.

  • avatar
    MK

    Oh goodie goodie goodie!!!!

    Yet another chance to watch Internet fanpages beg and plead for something to be brought to the US market……only to see them stay away in droves when the mystical magical Euro wagon hits the showroom.

    “Too expensive” , “..not a diesel..”, “..they said it would have a manual..”, “..why doesn’t it come in brown?”

    This should be fun.

  • avatar
    Hoosier Red

    Love my CTS SW. Very disappointed it won’t be continued. With young kids it is so easy to throw stuff in the back. I’ve put the seat down and napped during practices. It would be easy to load the top if necessary. And frankly I prefer a wagon’s styling over most any sedan. The fact that nobody else wants them meant I got a screaming deal from the dealer. This one may have to be a keeper because I still doubt the commercial viability of the wagon in America – much to my disappointment.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    Mark Reuss is looking at what he did at Holden and he helped introduce the wagon version of the Commodore.
    http://www.themotorreport.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/2009-hsv-clubsportr8-tourer-roadtestreview-04-thumb.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Very nice but it won’t fly here. If you look at what GM, Toyota, and the other major players sell around the world you begin to see the US market usually gets the most vanilla models.

  • avatar
    Illan

    Let me add more fuel to the speculation. A Malibu Station Wagon.


    t appears wagons may also have some fans in GM’s boardroom, if a quote from General Motors’ Mark Reuss is any indication.
    When asked by Automotive News whether or not a wagon version of the new Malibu might be coming, he replied by saying it was an “interesting idea.””

    http://rumors.automobilemag.com/gms-reuss-calls-malibu-wagon-interesting-idea-42705.html#axzz2k22JZysR

  • avatar
    CelticPete

    Wagon angst should be regulation angst. Its foolish regulations that keep all these models and variations out of the states. What car fans should be pushing for is streamlined regulations that would allow cars driven in Europe and Asia to be driven here – without being recertified.

    One certification to rule them all. This would allow say the RS6 to come right over here. And the wagons companies like Ford already make could come here as well. It’s the same thing with manual transmissions.

    Everyone is always but it wouldn’t sell..but they DO sell. We need to think globally not locally. The standards they have on the autobahn are good enough for us here – and vice versa.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Well, if GM was serios about taking on BMW they would keep GMH alive and expand HSV.

    Like I stated GMH can’t build everyday cars, but should be developed along with HSV into a prestige marque to take on the Germans and other Europeans.

    But, Detroit being Detroit already went bust due to poor decisions by goverment (regulations, tariffs, barriers), UAW and manufacturers.

    Here is a great BMW competitor, it’s a great GM wagon.

    http://www.topspeed.com/cars/holden/2013-hsv-gen-f-clubsport-r8-tourer-ar155683.html


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