By on January 9, 2016

GrandNational 011

If you were looking for at least one wild-ass auto show rumor to see you through the weekend, look no further: Bloomberg (via AutoGuide) is reporting that Buick may show “a sporty coupe concept” this weekend prior to the opening of the North American International Auto Show in Detroit on Monday.

The sports car, reported to be “about the size of the Chevrolet Camaro,” is expected to debut Sunday night. AutoGuide is now speculating that model will be called — drum roll, please — Grand National!

Many speculated (us included) that the surprise Buick model would be a redesigned Enclave crossover. That speculation makes a fair bit of sense when you consider GMC is also pipped to reveal an all-new Acadia. However, considering the lack of leaking evidence to support the Enclave hypothesis, and now a supposed inside source speaking to Bloomberg on the reveal plans, a “sporty coupe” seems to be a valid option.

(After all, General Motors needs to amortize that Alpha platform somehow, and the Cadillac ATS isn’t pulling its weight.)

The original Grand National — along with the related Turbo-T, T-Type and GNX models — were built from 1982 until the end of the second-generation Regal in 1987, skipping a year in 1983.

Buick will reveal the mystery model alongside the Chinese-built Envision crossover Sunday night.

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94 Comments on “RUMOR: Buick Resurrecting Grand National in Detroit?...”


  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Yes Please.

    T-Top as well.

  • avatar
    ajla

    The TriShield is the one GM brand that *should* be using a turbo V6.

    If this concept actually exists, it would be cool if it was a CTS-sized coupe with a turbo version of the 4.3L (maybe debored to 3.8L?), rather than crampy Camaro with a 3.0T.

    They’ve already got the Camaro, Corvette, and ATS to keep the hotshoe track drivers happy so build a fast cruiser.

    • 0 avatar
      wumpus

      Considering they no longer have *any* other brands between Chevy and Caddy, they might as well use the Buick name for something other than “Chinese exports”. My memory of Buick was pretty much “a caddy in the front seats, but not so much in the back.” As such, using a turbo to match a Caddy platform would work well. Also it might make a better place to put the fancied up chevy platform instead of diluting Cadillac.

  • avatar
    Marone

    Sadly, it is not what it once was.

    It’s too late. Who wants anything performance oriented with a Buick badge on it anymore? They have one of the oldest buyer demographics there is. Even a CTS-V would be more desirable. There are just too many other choices.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I don’t think the demographics of Buick are what they once were. The Enclave has brought the average down substantially. Toyota has taken over as the old person brand, specifically the Camry.

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        You know, I DO see more and more doddering grey hairs in Toyota’s of various kinds. The boomers went and got old.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Agreed. That makes sense as well. Those of new car buying age in the late 1970s/early 1980s that were burned by Detroit and never returned are now the old timers. My dad’s condo in Jupiter is filled with Toyotas and Hondas. When my late grandmother was in one of these places in 1985 the vast majority of the residents had American iron. Most younger people don’t have that automatic aversion to at least looking at domestic vehicles and if they were raised in families with pickups and SUVs they are likely domestic buyers now.

          As for Buick the average age seems to have dropped. I for one, hope to see a proper Grand National. Not FWD/AWD and please at least one iteration that is two door. And even if the basic models are cruiser type cars, at least make a good performance suspension an option. This should be a no brainer. All the right parts are already there with the parts bin from the Camaroo and Cadillac. Go fast with class.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            On the coasts at least, people of all ages buy Toyotas and Hondas while Buicks are still exclusively for older folks. My neighbor’s wealthy young French husband drives a freaking Avalon, and he’s about half my age. Everyone on both sides of their family is tall, so Avalons are what they drive.

            Saying old people drive Buicks might not be as en pointe as saying nobody buys Buicks though. The majority of Buicks on the road in San Diego and central Virginia were on the road when Bill Clinton was president. They’ve filtered down from their original retired owners to tweakers, but they soldier on, reminding people not to buy Buicks.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            “The ad helped lower the median age of SE buyers from the lower 60s to 45, Toyota said.”
            http://www.autonews.com/article/20141110/RETAIL03/311109996?template=mobile

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Humbug! And I still don’t like Toyota’s cars, even if I am a doddering greymuzzle.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Buick is second to Lincoln in age of buyers.
      http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/automotive/sc-cons-0528-autocover-buick-lexus-youth-20150522-story.html

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2014/10/04/24-7-wall-st-cars-oldest-buyers/16587437/

        Good point. The 57 average was an anomaly, and Buick has shot back up to over 60. They’re the only non-luxury brand in the top-10 for oldest buyers and their customers are older than most premium cars brands’.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Using 2013 stats when the Encore and Verano were released is not update to date.

    • 0 avatar
      dougjp

      I hear you, especially the “too late” comment because GM has been asleep at the switch, but I don’t agree.

      There are so many boomers, many with cash. Many looking for something to get the juices flowing/ways to spend it while still needing to compromise a bit.

      All they need is some excitement to go along with luxury and comfort, and oh yes, old fashioned visibility/sight lines without needing cameras (Cadillac ATS and Camaro won’t work for this reason).

      Remember, these are the folks with the classic muscle cars and memories of speed. Sell these people horsepower and torque? Not a problem at all.

  • avatar
    That guy

    Build it, but only if it’s a bit bigger than the Camaro. I’d like a back seat that is more than just a decoration.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    Would be great in performance (limited edition) as well as “personal luxury coupe” versions, as in something very comfortable- a touring car, not a track monster. A nice, quiet, well-appointed, affordable cruising car that is RWD and a two door would create a nice niche for itself. Not challenging Mercedes, but instead going just below it, as well as well-off people who dont advertise it with the three-pointed-star or even a Cadillac crest.

    Would compete well with the Chrysler Barracuda that exists only in my head (Dodge is supposed to use the name for a Challenger replacement.. oh well).

    Maybe then Lincoln could respond to these imaginary cars with a new Mark coupe based on a lengthened Mustang platform: standard 3.0 T/T V-6, optional 5.0L V-8 (in tuned form). Priced higher than the Buick and Chrysler, but not too much higher. Should be better appointed as well.

  • avatar
    raph

    Is it going to be a 2dr RWD Sedan? No? Don’t waste the money GM.

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      it needs to be a twin turbo V6 rwd

      GM does have that high feature turbo v6… they just need to put it in a camaro?

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      My XTS VSport is tuned to 550 lb-ft and can handle ecm calculated 700+ lb-ft. That is up from the stock 369 lb-ft. It’ll spin the tires at 50 mph flooring in 90F degree heat.

      So I defitiely see and AWD system mated to the 3.0TT in the future.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        I know the CTS-V and ATS V and V-sport get a lot of positive, even glowing reviews but we ought to hear more about the XTS V-sport with a 410hp Twin turbo V6 and AWD. With the new CT-6 finally out and the XTS probably being phased out in a year or two I’m sure dealers will be throwing some money on the hood for the remaining models.

        http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/12/capsule-review-2015-cadillac-xts-vsport/

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      It broke on Autoblog, and yes, it is RWD, two doors, twin turbo V-6.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Buick comprised 7% of GM’s US sales in 2015, and was the only GM brand to lose sales in a bull market. It almost doesn’t matter what they do.

    Rumors of a Buick Grand National sound like another short term Holden-esque product originating somewhere else, desperately trying to inspire life into the brand. It could be interesting, but only True Believers will buy in when they see the price.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Sales of Cadillac, GMC, and Chevrolet were all up and sold on the same lot. Buick sales remain ranked 4th in luxury/near-luxury, ahead of Acura, Ininfity, and Audi.

      • 0 avatar
        JD23

        How does the average transaction price for Buick compare to that of Acura, Infiniti and Audi? Buick is not even distant competition for Audi; I would not be surprised if Audi’s average transaction price were over twice that of Buick.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I’d love to see a sales-per-dealer number for Buick. It’s got to be one of the lowest in the industry. Their volume is probably dependent on their huge dealer body needing to turn a few at any price.

    • 0 avatar
      jrhmobile

      I don’t see how you figure that.

      The new Camaro and Caddy ATS/CTS siblings are built on an all-American developed and manufactured platform. The old Camaro and G8/SS sedans were built from Holden stock, but the operative term in that phrase is “old.” As in past tense.

      In the present day, GM has a newer, lighter and all-American platform for developing RWD coupes and sedans.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    *Yawn* The Grand National of the 80s was about exciting as a loaf of white bread. It was quick in a straight line for the times, but that’s all. Didn’t handle or brake worth a damn.

    • 0 avatar

      Why does it all have to be about handling?

      Why cant there just be a roomy, elegant, and comfortable coupe?

      Tired of cars riding in constant sport mode.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Yes, yes, yes. Call it R-I-V-I-E-R-A.

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Was the original ever considered elegant (keeping in mind, it was named after stock car racing and used George Thorogood in ads)? I’m admittedly a little too young to remember who bought them new, but I’m pretty sure every one I’ve ever seen was driven by a guy who found shirt sleeves oppressive.

      • 0 avatar
        JD23

        “Why cant there just be a roomy, elegant, and comfortable coupe?”

        Does such a market still exist? I think most members of the personal luxury coupe demographic are either dead or driving SUVs.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        Grand National was a performance car. Lots of other choices if you wanted a comfortable cruiser. Problem with the GN was that it was a one-trick pony.

      • 0 avatar
        Brian E

        I have a “roomy, elegant, and comfortable coupe”. It’s a Honda Accord. Nobody else bothers competing with it anymore but they still sell a decent number of them. How many of those buyers would buy something from GM is a different question…

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @Flybrian

        Because the people who wanted wallowing barges that only went fast in a straight line are mostly dead now?

        It doesn’t need to be an M3, but it shouldn’t be a Coupe de Ville either. There is a happy medium in there of comfort and excellent driving dynamics. The base Germans do this exceedingly well.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Didn’t handle or brake worth a damn.”

      I don’t care about those things (beyond basic safety).

      I want a large-ish, comfortable car that is fast in a straight line, looks cool, has better build quality than what FCA puts out, and can be had new for under $50K.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Who cares how it handles, the “sporty” 4 cylinder cars being shoved out of factories has made that whole concept a laughable notion. They ride horrible and what do they have to show for it? A turbo 2L 4 cylinder-pathetic. No this needs to be a comfortable turbo charged V6 cruiser with impressive straight line performance.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Did you ever drive a G-body? Decent suspension and seats wasn’t an option for any price. They were as comfortable as what the Soviet Union was turning out at the time.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      I’m sure the class dominating, magnet shocks will be available.

    • 0 avatar

      Sounds like the Camaro. I’m surprised they’re not just slapping a Buick badge on the SS.

  • avatar
    mcs

    Sounds like a badge-engineered version of the Camaro to me.

  • avatar
    dwford

    I think everyone is getting a bit crazy with the Grand National talk. Where is the logic in adding such a car to the Buick brand, especially since the ATS is already in the showroom. Do you Buick is going to sell some slightly decontented ATS as the next Grand National? Makes no sense.

    How about a new Riviera coupe built on the new LaCrosse chassis? Makes more sense to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      The ATS has nothing going for it, if this is a 2 door vehicle to begin with that solves several of the problems. So long as they don’t try to stick a 4 cylinder in this they can’t lose.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Both brands are screwed up from the product standpoint.

      My only other thought is turbo != luxury, in fact its becoming rather run-of-the-mill. For both brands to succeed, its going to be with options you can’t get in most lesser brands/models. Time for standard V6 and LS V8s across most product lines and for Cadillac to offer real EVs- no more turbo crutches. Ever. The last part isn’t going to be easy but if Nissan can find a way to do it so can the semi-premium GM “luxury” brand.

  • avatar
    readallover

    So, it will be a Firebird.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “Makes no sense.”

    Well, this is GM…

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    GM is also bringing back the Monza, Cutlass Supreme, Nova, Citation & Allante, all to be built in China and exported to the U.S.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    Please, make it have a trunk that is big enough for what I carry in it. Make it have more headroom than the Camaro. And it HAS to be RWD. If you do the above, I will at least give it a test drive. Don’t screw it up like you did the Camaro.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It seems GM is going back to its old ways, too many models to attempt to gain a bigger slice of the pie.

    I’d bet my balls it will be built on a shared Camaro platform. Maybe the guys at Holden could design a better looking Buick, than Buick. To finish of the suspension tuning let HSV tweak it. You’d end up with a really nice vehicle.

    All this talk of horsepower for the sake of horsepower is ridiculous. Why not just build a good quality reasonably powered and well handling drivers car.

    I’d also bet my balls that many of the “big and most horsepower” comments are from those who have never driven 10/10s. If you need power to drive fast then you just don’t know how to drive.

    I would look at the base with a 3.6 for starters, then work my way up to a 6.2 and that’s all I would offer. If you want more than that, just go out and buy a Camaro.

    This vehicle is targeting a different demographic than the Camaro/Mustang customer.

    Make the vehicle feel like a good handling prestige vehicle, not a go kart.

  • avatar
    George B

    Why? Back when the original Grand National came out, the GM G-Body platform was mainstream and the Grand National helped sell lower trim levels of the Regal. Now RWD two door domestic cars are nostalgia cars that mostly sell to baby boomers either side of retirement age. GM already makes the Camaro, Corvette, and ATS Coupe competing for different parts of that shrinking market.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      “the Camaro, Corvette, and ATS Coupe”

      For big, fat old guys with arthritis? Nah, make it easy-enter, comfy and fast and get the last of the ‘Nam generation’s $$.

      • 0 avatar
        redmondjp

        Most of this generation that I know personally are now driving CUVs like the CR-V and RAV4. Easy to get into and out of, easy to see out of (at least out the front), 4×4 just because you might need it, and rides reasonably well.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Exactly. The 2 door market is essentially dead, and even the 4 door market isn’t far behind, so why come out with a coupe? Because GM. At least they finally gave GM a midsize SUV.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Jesus tap dancing Christ.

    They could have done this all the way back in 2013 – instead of a Chevy SS, pull from the Chinese Park Avenue parts bin on the interior and for the front clip (assuming it passes US standards – or modify as needed) and call THAT a Grand National. They could have even kept it as the current SS pricing and content/features and no one would have batted an eye.

    Given how ridiculously poor the SS sold, it certainly couldn’t have done worse.

    Now we’ll get some bastardized Alpha frankencar that probably stickers for $60K.

    So feckin’ stupid.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      APaGttH,
      I quite surprised at the poor take up of the SS as well. I wonder if this is the intent of GM?

      I do think it will become one of a few vehicles that will retain it’s value, though.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        Agree with you on the retained value bit, but the SS was always going to have a tiny niche. There was a time when a vehicle like the SS served a real purpose in that they increased sales on the more plain jane versions. If this were 30 years ago there would be the caprice and impala (the rwd version) siting next to this car in the showroom. That isn’t the case now unless you are in a Chrysler showroom I guess. A civilian Caprice would have made more sense to go against Chrysler’s rwd models. This was just a niche car.

  • avatar

    This sounds awfully like another product rather than another car.

    Whatever it’s based on, the cynic in me says it’s gonna be just a realignment of what they already have, to try and pull in those GM-Tolerant buyers who have already escaped.

    A rebirth would be nice. Wake me when it arrives.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Buick, grasping at straws, building cars from 1982.

    The demographic that used to buy the Grand National now buys the SVT Raptor.

    If Buick wanted to replicate the GN, they would hop-up a car that’s popular now, like a crossover.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      Further to this: the Buick Regal Coupe on which the GN was based was the most popular car in America at the time (as the Olds Gutless Supreme). Releasing a supercar-spec version was relevant.

      Re-badging an ATS coupe is not relevant. The market has rejected that car; smoothing-out some of the Cadillac creases won’t help. I predict that Buick will get a bit of press coverage for the next few days, followed by tumbleweeds and crickets chirping when the car makes it to dealers.

      A 400hp version of the SRx replacement would be relevant, but I doubt GM would do this.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    I like the fast cruiser idea being thrown around. Too many cars ride like junk these days.

    I’m a child of the 80s, started driving in the early 90s, and now have enough money to buy something like this. People my age might’ve had a Grand National poster right next to their Lamborghini poster.

    The throwback styling of the current Mustang and Camaro is reminiscent of the cars my Dad grew up with. Yeah, the 80s weren’t the greatest decade for automobiles, but that’s what people my age grew up with.

    No one has done 80s throwback styling yet. I think a new Grand National with the mean/boxy look of the original, with a decent ride, and the 3.0L twin turbo would be more appealing to me than a Camaro.

  • avatar
    jrhmobile

    Frankly, I’m looking forward to whatever Buick brings out today to show as its new “sporty coupe.”

    -If it’s the son of Grand National, I’m more than OK with that. For all the abuse that’s been heaped on the ’80s Regal Grand National, it was actually a pretty competent hot rod for its day. Looking at its “handling” prowess and braking ability in 2015 terms is really an unfair comparison. About the only complaint that’s been offered here that I totally agree with is that yes, ’80s Grand National bucket seats really did suck. I’ve never seen a well-used GM A-body that didn’t have smooth shiny surfaces on the door panels and the console from occupants constantly bracing themsleves in the turns.

    -If it’s the son of Riviera/Reatta, I’m OK with that too. As I’m becoming one of those “men of a certain age” I can trade some of my boy-racer tendencies for a fast, comfortable cruiser that eats up highway miles and provides a little satisfaction along sweeping back roads. Buick essentially invented the personal luxury coupe with the ’63 Riviera and rode it out to the late ’90s. Stepping back into that niche addresses its legacy and, with modest sales goals, can deliver for Buick’s new-age lux legacy.

    And now for the wild card:

    -If it delivers the son of the Chevy Cobalt SS, I would trip on that ride too. Translate that cut-rate hot rod into something a little more posh with the same performance and driving dynamics would really pop with the “Wow — that’s a Buick?” theme and take it in a whole new direction. Not only could it slay ’em at the drag strip, it could eat ’em alive at an autocross or on the road course too.

    In short, I’m happy that Buick is trying something new, and I’ll probably be happy with whatever they show. Why slam them before we even know what’s coming?

    • 0 avatar
      Mackie

      Well said. I’m in my mid-forties and would consider a car like this if it ticked all the right boxes. A good balance between ride and handling… not too small… not too big… lots of power… quiet… and heaps of style. Most luxury brands have a sporty coupe in their lineup, so why not Buick? True, Buick is not a pure luxury brand, but if GM wants Buick to be considered as a viable alternative to pure luxury brands, then adding a car like this to the lineup makes sense. The only thing I fear is that there may not be a manual option.

      GM knows it won’t be a volume seller, but it should help reduce Buick’s “old man’s car” perception. A solid SUV lineup will bring in the money, but it won’t change brand perceptions much. I’m happy to see some attention is still being paid to vehicles that are not SUVs and crossovers.

      • 0 avatar
        JD23

        “A good balance between ride and handling… not too small… not too big… lots of power… quiet… and heaps of style. ”

        Wouldn’t it make more sense for Cadillac to have a vehicle meeting those criteria? The ATS coupe definitely does not qualify.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      No, we’re not basing it on “2015”. It had exceptionally poor brakes and handling for the ’80s (or ’70s). To the point of irresponsible, considering what the engine would put out. If sold today that way, all would have to be recalled and crushed on the spot for liability reasons.

      • 0 avatar
        jrhmobile

        Aww Dude.

        The Thunderbird of the day was no better. Really. Or Mustang five-liters, for that matter. Your SVO may have out-handled a Grand National on a tight autocross course, but it’d never have run with it without a lot of performance upgrades. Chrysler had no equivalent — Hell, they were hot-rodding Dodge Dakotas. And euro-rides in this league were multiples more expensive than Buick/Pontiac/Chevy A-Bodies.

        Let’s be real. In the mid-’80s, “performance suspension” consisted of stiff springs and big sway bars. That reduced body roll, sure. But it actually aggravated the tendency for rock-hard street radials to slide when limits were reached. Anti-dive and anti-squat was more theoretical than effective suspension design. And live axles with drum brakes resulted in bumper-scraping nose dive with any V8 intermediate of the era — whether it was a Monte SS or a Thunderbird Elan.

        Then you say if these cars were sold that way today they’d be considered defective. Isn’t that basing it on “2015”? Or 2016, actually? You’re wrapping yourself around your hopping axle here …

        • 0 avatar
          MRF 95 T-Bird

          The 89-97 MN-12 T-Bird, Cougar and MarkVIII were an improvement over the previous Fox body versions. I’ve owned both. With independent rear suspension and the 4.6 they are a cut above GM FWD G-Body GM-10 W-Body replacements. Though the upmarket 3800SC versions were quite fine.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            But those MN12 Birds were so heavy. I got a 95 Cougar and it was closer to the Crown Vic than the Mustang in spirit, unlike my 68 and 88 models. I have a soft spot for the pre-facelift Mark VIII though. I wish I could skip the air suspension though.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          The Grand Nationals had awesome top end, but that’s about it.

          Even the dudes in GNXs would decline a race against my SVO, from stoplight to stoplight. But they raced everyone else. They couldn’t get the power down, off the line. And they knew I had it tuned to 20 lbs of boost and would sidestep the clutch.

          Same with the 5.0 Mustangs. They could definitely put the power down from a dig. The Grand National crowd even feared my buddy’s tank of Mustang GT convertible, bone stock with 2.73 gears!

          I got to ride shotgun in a cousin’s Grand National while hammering it on a mountain road. Scary to say the least. Its brakes faded to nothing! Stopped on a lookout to cool the brakes and the front hubcabs melted and fell to the gravel!! I died laughing

          I mean I’m glad various OEMs have stepped up to the plate and offered factory hot rods, but at the same time, the GNX went for $30,000 base price, or two IROCz’s at the time. How much is that today? $70K??

          • 0 avatar
            MRF 95 T-Bird

            Yes, MN-12’s are a bit large, roughly 3300lb compared to the Fox body 2800lb. Think of them as a gentleman’s Mustang. The trunk is large and you can seat 2 in the back in reasonable comfort.

  • avatar
    callmeishmael

    If Buick revives the GN we’ll have proof that the new management has already settled back into having GM produce the answers to questions that no one asked.

    • 0 avatar
      Mackie

      The original Lexus RX and Nissan Murano were also “answers to questions that no one asked”. Look how that turned out. I’m not suggesting that this is the same thing—the world won’t suddenly be trading in their tall wagons and hatchbacks for sporty coupes—but a car like this can change perceptions and benefit the brand as a whole.

      • 0 avatar
        callmeishmael

        Good points. If GM can mix and match from its parts bin to come up with another Buick then more power to them. It might be good for GM, if they’re considering a nostalgia play, to remember that back when we Boomers were young it was, “Old men drive Buicks. Cool old men drive Rivieras.”

  • avatar
    olddavid

    What is wrong with a brand that caters to a, uh, mature demographic? What I have noticed, especially since turning 60, is people are not getting younger. But there is a segment that is foolish enough to delude themselves, and I for one, wouldn’t waste a sixty second ad on them. They check their beliefs by wetting the pointer finger and holding it into the air.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Calm down, it would just be a special trim and engine package. Sorry, yes on a Regal. Sure it’s fwd now, but nothing else makes sense.

    It’s not like GM would put a special body on a Camaro or CTS platform or something. Then it’d be its own model. Not happening. And certainly not outrunning the Corvette. Nothing of the sort, get real this is GM.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    If they’re reviving the GNX they need to revive the wheels too, wheels with actual thick tires, stuff that won’t break on potholes.

    If its an Infiniti Camaro I anticipate many chip mods for the turbo, and many owners breaking things and spouting “Thats the last GM for me! Im going back to Toyonda!”.

    And please keep a formal square roof, Im getting sick of round low roofs.

  • avatar
    daver277

    If it’s the size of a Camaro, it’s not a sportscar.

  • avatar
    SCfanboy

    Great first step Buick, now bring back the Riv.

  • avatar
    DrSandman

    Oh please Oh please oh please oh please! GNX! GNX! GNX!

    I need a back seat for tall kids and a trunk. Oh, and a twin turbo V6, for about $40k. Thanks. Check’s in the mail.

  • avatar

    Lets think about this one for a minute.

    According to GM Authority, GM December 2015 sales were up 5.7% over December 2014. 290,230 units.

    Alpha platorm cars:

    ATS up 40% but that’s only a total of 3451 cars
    CTS down 7.96% – 2441 cars
    Camaro down 9.04 – 5,366 cars

    So far all I see is a loser platform. And a loser looking division that’s decided to manufacture whole automobiles in China. If the loser division releases a new car on a loser platform, who cares?

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    Enough with the old folks comments. All I read is how millineals have no jobs or prospects and hate cars anyway…why build anything catered to such a demographic.

    And yes, the original Grand National didn’t handle. It was the 80’s, nothing handled. It was still awesome. It wasn’t until the 90s that obtainable cars lime the SER, Miata, and Civic Si brought handling to the masses. Know what, id take a Grand National in a heartbeat over any of those. I have owned Miatas. Fun Cars, but the Grand National I drove was on another planet as far as making me smile.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Aside from obvious sports cars, some ’80s cars did handle/stop exceptionally well, if you knew where to look. But the Grand National went out of its way to $uck at these two things. Meaning it ran the normal suspension and brakes your granny’s Olds Cutlass or Regal Limited did, with white sidewalls and wire-wheel hubcaps. Aside from straight line dynamics, that’s what made the Grand National a complete joke, if not a legal tort.

      The GNX did absolutely nothing to help stop or turn it.

      The Mustang GT, including the 5.0 LX, ‘Bird T-Coupe, as well as the Z28/IROC/TA, Shelby Charger, Daytona Turbo, and anything of the sort in the ’80s, did execute/include an upgraded suspension and brake setup that went far above the base/regular cars they were based on. OTOH the Grand National was a traditional/old skool “Muscle Car” in the truest sense of the word.

      And yes I wanted one then as I do now. By the way, even the base MR2, 1st gen would’ve, and still would knock your socks off!

      • 0 avatar
        redmondjp

        I was going to school at GMI (now Kettering Univ) in Flint during the mid-80s when the Grand National was being built. Buick used to bring over their R&D test mule cars to the GMI spring car show on campus every year.

        I second all of the comments above about the Grand National – it did one thing well and that was to go fast in a straight line, but even then, it had difficulty getting the power to the ground, with a big wheel-hop issue. Otherwise, it didn’t stop or turn well, and these cars were rattletraps from day one. They look way cooler than they are to drive.

        There were plenty of other American cars, yes even GM cars, that were much better cars in many respects – the Corvette, Z28 Camaro, and Trans Am come to mind. Heck, even a V6 Firebird was overall a much nicer driving and handling car (a classmate had a new one).

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    Both GN or Riviera would be a good idea ..
    GM have a good platform, and they could use “detuned” ATS / CTS engines ..

    There’s lack of nice “personal luxury cars” on the market today (sth between cheap-sporty-Camaro .. and expensive-classy-Cadillac).
    Not every car need to handle like M3 and be a “Nurburgring-record-beater” .. so “powerfull-cruiser” would be a very attractive concept .

    Challanger is a nice, big, comfortable car .. , probably closest to a modern interpretation of an traditional Personal-lux-car > but big-3 could do even better ..
    GM could try sth under Buick brand and Ford could bring back T-Bird or Lincoln “Mark” based on (relatively good) “Mustang equipment”..

    American cars(especially Muscle- and Personal-luxury) have fans all over the world .. and automakers will sell a lot of them, if they will(not chase germans .. but) keep their “american style/character)..


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