By on June 12, 2014

2014 Infiniti Q50

In its fight against the big premium brands in Europe, Infiniti is calling upon some German-designed American firepower for its Japanese-made, Euro-market special Q50 sedan.

Automotive News reports the Q50 will receive a 2-liter turbo-four from an $319 million Infinti-only line inside Nissan’s engine plant in Decherd, Tenn.; total overall production is expected to reach 250,000 annually while employing 400. The same engine will be used by Mercedes in its next-generation C-Class launching this year from the German automaker’s factory in Vance, Ala.

The plan, set to begin in late June, is part of a product-sharing agreement between parent companies Renault-Nissan and Daimler, as well as a checkbox for Infiniti’s to-do global portfolio expansion list.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

16 Comments on “US Nissan Plant To Supply Engine For Euro-Special Infiniti Q50...”


  • avatar
    RetroGrouch

    US built engines in US built German cars… Is that a first? I know BMW imports engines to the US for Spartanburg production.

  • avatar

    I liked the Q50, but I’d never buy one.
    I’m not a fan of bifurcated center stacks and I prefer the Infiniti M37.
    Very strong V6.

  • avatar
    tedward

    Every impression I’ve read of the car to date has been overwhelmingly negative, and it all seems to revolve around the steering rack. Their new system, which apparently shouldn’t be on sale at all, should absolutely not have been the default option for their press fleet for sure. Perhaps they should be focusing more on a re-launch of the vehicle, a major change to their trim ladder which forces the system on the better specced cars and a re-think of their press fleet mix before they go ahead and invest in new drivetrains which no one has been prepped to desire.

    I think they have a potential disaster on their hands. I personally know no one who is talking about buying, or even talking about at all, the Q50, while the G35 and 37 both drew lots of attention.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    The Q50 seems to have a bit of an identity crisis. The old G35/G37 was the value priced, gruff, slightly undercooked alternative to the 335i. The second gen IS (F aside) was a snoozebox and the TL doesn’t really compete in this class, so if you wanted a Japanese BMW, you bought a G.

    All of that is out the window, the IS F-sport is now the Japanese BMW, the BMW 3 series is the German Lexus, and the Q50 has robot steering that everybody, and I mean EVERYBODY hates. Other than that, what is it?

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Of course it has robot steering – it was test-driven by a robot with red hair.

  • avatar
    afedaken

    Is this infinity-exclusive mill another SR20 variant, or something new and tasty?

  • avatar
    wmba

    The post here should probably explicitly say that the turbo 2.0t engine is a Merecedes engine, and that Infiniti contracted to make it for them.

    This deal was announced almost exactly 4 years ago, the ground-breaking at Smyrna, TN was announced two years ago, etc. etc. This announcement is to tell everyone they’re starting production in a couple of weeks.

    They’re also supposed to be making a 4 cylinder diesel for thenselves and Mercedes as well.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Does anybody remember when a guy bought a Cadillac and found there was a Chevrolet engine in it? He raised a fuss and GM began stating that engines were supplied from various GM divisions to cover their butts. Could this be the beginning of another kerfuffel, with people buying a Japanese car and getting an engine from another maker? That might be especially important to people who buy Japanese for durability and get an engine designed by Germans whose engines have a reputation for expensive repair and maintenance.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      You know, that’s a really good point. And it’s not like Nissan’s own engines aren’t fun and capable in the first place. But then, I’m pretty sure it’s a Euro-only engine, where Japanese cars aren’t necessarily desirable for reliability. The Europeans buy European cars primarily because they address market values better, such as having turbocharged, low-displacement engines for tax reasons, as well as diesel offerings.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      I know this is America and all, the land of the attorney, but I have difficulty believing that someone would have the gall to sue a carmaker because of the nationality of the engineers who developed the engine.

      I would think there are limits to racist attitudes in 2014, but then I see how our sports teams act, and I have to wonder.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Does anybody remember when a guy bought a Cadillac and found there was a Chevrolet engine in it?”

      It was Oldsmobile buyers suing because they got a Chevrolet 350 instead of the Oldsmobile 350.

      http://openjurist.org/594/f2d/1106/general-motors-corporation-engine-interchange-litigation-oswald-v-general-motors-corporation


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Miquelon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States