By on April 4, 2014

03-2013-mitsubishi-outlander-phev-paris

Already available throughout Europe, the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is now just arriving in United Kingdom showrooms at a post-credit price tag of £28,249 ($47,000 USD).

Autoblog Green reports the plug-in hybrid SUV without the £5,000 credit would start at £33,249 ($55,000 USD), but with the credit, the starting price is around the same level as its diesel-powered sibling, thus allowing UK consumers to pick the SUV they want without worrying too much about affordability.

As for what they will get out of their Outlander PHEV, the hybrid has a range of 32 miles in all-electric at a limited speed of 75 mph, and can tow over 3,000 lbs.

On sale now, the first SUVs will arrive in May, with the PHEV arriving in the United States in 2015, which will share a facelift with its U.S.-based gasoline-powered twin. No word on how the PHEV will be priced in the U.S.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

29 Comments on “Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Arrives In UK Showrooms Minus Premium Price...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    “as its diesel-powered sibling, thus allowing UK consumers to pick the SUV they want without worrying too much about affordability.”
    Does this statement make the assumption people want the hybrid over the gas or diesel, or is it just worded strangely?

    And $50,000 for a Mitsubishi crossover? Seriously?

    • 0 avatar

      Everything costs more where they don’t have as much free market as us.

      That’s why we need to get as much freedom as the third world were labor costs almost nothing.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        That’s what Mexico is for.

        Besides we have the lowest cost of manufacturing of any 1st world car building nation. But don’t let your ideology get in your way.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @u mad scientist
        Here an interesting pictorial representation of the world and economic freedom.

        The US might not be as free as you might want to believe. Or is there some kind of ‘exceptionalist’ attitude influencing your judgment.

        The US economy is mostly free. Actually your good friends and neighbours to the north have a freer economy as do only a few others globally.

        It seems these freer economies have fared the GFC better than the not so free economies.

        http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/84/2014_World_Map_of_the_Index_of_Economic_Freedom.svg

    • 0 avatar
      IndianaDriver

      Just about every other country has higher car prices than the U.S. – some drastically. You have to make a pretty serious commitment to the car as a buyer.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      I suppose the day may come when Americans may finally get it through their heads that everywhere else does not have pricing on the US version of reality, where every little state, city, town and hamlet gets to add sales tax on your bill for the privilege of living in or visiting the place, but where the PRICE is the PRICE, all taxes included.

      What a concept.

      From Mitsubishi’s UK website on the Outlander PHEV:

      ” All new vehicle prices are List Prices. For passenger cars the List Prices include VAT at 20% and the cost of delivery to the dealer’s premises, but exclude Government Road Fund Licence and First Registration Fee (£55)”

      So, the price is actually £27,600 including delivery, minus the £5,000 credit. Hmm, at today’s exchange rate, that comes to $37,500. And it’s not the basic model either.

      As a quick google search would show.

      Here’s another blinder: there is no sales tax on used vehicles either. The Value Added Tax obviously does not apply to diminished value. Here in North America, each owner of a vehicle gets hosed. Over and over. Products are priced and second hand values get adjusted accordingly in the UK.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Pre-tax car prices in the US are still lower. Comparing prices that include VAT with US prices that include sales taxes only increases the gap, as there is no US state with that high of a tax rate. (State sales taxes vary between zero and about 10%, and there is no US federal sales tax.)

        The MSRP of a standard Outlander is about $23,000. A Ford C-MAX Energi plugin has an MSRP of about $33,000, not including any tax credits.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @wmba
        Also, many will realise that the US has more disparity than many OECD nations.

        When you have some people working for peanuts, you then can have products as cheap as the US.

        The cost of vehicles is relative to the income of what people earn.

        Median income in the US isn’t that great.

        My view is just because you can operate a large vehicle for less doesn’t make a nation better.

        I mean, it is probably cheaper to own and operate a vehicle in Columbia than the US. Does this mean Columbia is the better country?

    • 0 avatar
      charly

      British prices include VAT, which IIRC is 16% in the UK. There is also exchange risk which often means that smaller currencies pay higher import prices.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Exchange rate risk is a factor in some markets, certainly. Paying with the reserve currency helps.

        Americans also benefit from what is effectively a bulk discount. The US is a coveted market because of its sales volumes, which produces price competition.

        Automakers value scale, so they are willing to give up some of the margins that they earn elsewhere in order to gain the volumes that are possible for those who succeed in the United States.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Everything costs more in other 1st world nations. Other than minor things like healthcare, education, and retirement.

    But hey, I got to pay a bargain price for a new 3-series, lucky me! Hope I don’t get cancer or want to put a kid through college.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      So that’s why people are flocking to Cuba, wow learn something new everyday.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        There is a big difference between Cuba and the rest of the first world. There IS a happy medium in there between everyone for themselves and lip-service communism, you know.

        Have you ever actually spent time outside the United States, Hummer? given the woeful percentage of Americans who even possessed passports prior to needing one to go to Canada and Mexico, it’s usually a safe bet to make.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          I’ve spent about two years outside of the US all together, including attending school in the Netherlands for a semester. If paying your own way isn’t for you, then there are plenty of places to go. As for the chance that the US will still offer an alternative to being a perpetual child, you’re not helping.

          • 0 avatar

            It could be said that the real reason why Americans are so eager to “pay their own way” for everything is the satisfaction of not seeing people who “don’t deserve it” getting any part of the benefits.

            Of course, this means that the companies that cater to this mindset, whether they be HMOs or private contractors, get to reap the proceeds and charge as much as the market is willing to bear. Nothing wrong with that if you happen to be a C-level exec or a contractor who makes six figures and then some.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I’m perfectly happy to pay my own way, and I certainly do. I just also see a societal need to help others in times of need. Or the benefit of having college graduates not starting life with a mountain of debt. Not to mention that having health insurance normally tied to your employment status is simply astonishingly stupid.

            But hey ‘Murica! Best darned country in the world in every possible way! As long as you don’t get laid off, that is. And/or sick. Or be unable to get a decent education because you can’t afford it.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            It is the same psychosis you suffer from that has created the majority of people’s times of need. Taking from others is not a virtue. Redistribution diminishes overall production. The misanthropists that have succeeded in brainwashing you into thinking that up is down and slavery is social justice don’t have your best interests at heart. Their medium game is the elimination of the pesky middle class, something they’re well on their way to achieving under the banner of environmentalism, the creation of whimsical rights, and the elimination of ones that are a hindrance to statists. If you really are confused about whether or not you’re still a sentient being at this point in time, ask yourself what should be a simple question: can the government do anything efficiently? You’re probably tempted to come up with what passes for a clever retort in your mind, but that doesn’t change the futility of what you’ve been conditioned to believe.

  • avatar
    Daniel Latini

    Among other things, I criticized the non-hybrid Outlander for noisiness. The Prius V is a bit of a hair-shirt too though, so they could make for an interesting comparison.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Is this a real Mitsubishi? Looks suspiciously like a disguised Dodge Journey to me. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, is it? After all, it was once said that the Dodge Journey was possibly the world’s finest vehicle!

    Anyway, it’s available with a diesel in Europe, perhaps a manual, it’s kind of a wagon, so, is it available in brown? If so, step right up, have we got the vehicle for you!

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I’m sure the four or five recent Mitsubishi owners will come out of the woodwork and disagree, but I don’t trust a company who can barely build a competent ICE powered vehicle to pull of EVs of any kind. Partnering with PSA or Renault (or whomever I can’t recall) for bread and butter cars doesn’t sound like a horrible strategy. But Mitsu should focus on performance, not EVs. Build two models, some kind of fake SUV (err “CUV”) and a near roaster or hatch such a what Eclipse was back in the day. Give both monster horsepower and optional stick, and chase niche buyers with high margin unique product.

    • 0 avatar
      natrat

      Yea ok, like they did well with the evo. Writing is on the wall- cuvs and people buy those with economy as a consideration. This will be the only plug in cuv, it’s selling well in the rest of the world and surely it will find more buyers here than the high performance offerings, but that’s not saying much.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I don’t know much about the brand to make a specific argument, but in my limited knowledge Evo is similar in mission to the Subaru WRX. I’ll buy the Subaru all day long over the Mitsu anything, so for Mitsu to succeed they need create a more unique product and differentiate themselves. Back in the day Subaru produced the SVX. They were seldom sold but the concept of being different was there. Build something along those lines, or maybe a sleek hatch. Turbo only, sport mode trans only with stick option, no base models, price it in the mid 30s to start. Now duplicate the same product as a four door CUV.

        CUV != economy due to drag coefficient alone, people buy them because they like them, just like they enjoy 600cal doughnuts for breakfast and wonder why they are so fat. Going EV might help in the economy regard but then again you’re buying an high tech EV from a company barely in business in the US. I’m more likely to buy an ICE from you than something similar to what Tesla is cooking up.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @u mad scientist
    Hopefully this will work better, the link for economic freedom.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/84/2014_World_Map_of_the_Index_of_Economic_Freedom

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    That front end… ugghhh…

    All that is missing from the fluid-pressure-squooshing-out-baby-alien motif is a slime coating.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States