By on July 31, 2014

Alfa_Romeo_GTA_-_002

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne is open to forming new alliance with other automakers as far as cost-savings are concerned, but he maintains that Alfa Romeo is not for sale.

Automotive News Europe reports Marchionne said as much during a conference call regarding Fiat’s Q2 2014 earnings, reaffirming the parent company’s commitment to Alfa Romeo and proclaiming his company is not “in the business of brand-trading.”

Said commitment includes a €5 billion ($6.7 billion USD) investment to help the premium brand become a sought-after global brand of eight new models — underpinned by the upcoming Giorgio RWD/AWD platform — with annual sales of 400,000 by 2018, up from 74,000 in 2013.

As for alliances, Marchionne is open to the idea, though nothing is on the table as of this writing.

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38 Comments on “Marchionne: Alfa Romeo Still Not For Sale...”


  • avatar
    mjz

    Everyone scoffed when Marchionne said Maserati sales would hit 50,000 in 2015, but they are running right on track to hit that goal. There is no reason to believe they won’t have the same success with the Alfa Romeo brand, which will be less expensive and have a more extensive lineup of models. They would be foolish to sell off the Alfa brand given the potential it has. Now Lancia on the other hand, is a brand they should consider selling off.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      Resuscitating Alfa Romeo is a whole lot tougher job than Maserati. For years it has been saddled with outdated low-end cars, it has no short-term product pipeline (no, the 4C doesn’t count) and next to no distribution network. Taking sales from somewhere around 50-60K in 2015-2016 to 400K two years later is a very tall order. €5B isn’t much to rebuild a brand — and that’s assuming that this time Marchionne actually follows through on the plan.

      Marchionne would have much more credibility if he set more realistic goals.

  • avatar
    juicy sushi

    So, as this plan is essentially vapourware, Alfa Romeo continues to slumber, and fade in the minds of consumers…

  • avatar
    thegamper

    A dealer network is already in place with Fiat/chrysler. I’m sure lots of those stores would be eager to sell Alfa Romeos. Product is a more pressing problem. I am curious to see if Alfa would steal sales from Bmw, Mercedes, Cadillac, Audi or if it would become sort of a niche curiosity more likened to Saab and Volvo. With most of the premium brands chasing the same formula, I could see Alfa sealing customers from all of the above just to have something different. I think that is the primary factor driving increased Maserati sales. I think alfa has a great deal of potential, would love to own one someday

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    What if there was like… a sweet luxury convertible which would wear the Chrysler name, but be developed by Maserati? It could be yellow or purple, I think. It could really change how the world thinks about Chrysler and Maserati.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Cadillac could really turn some heads with a model built by Pininfarina too.

    • 0 avatar
      freshforged

      Already tried that once back in the 80s. Not ever again.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I was wearing my sarcasm trilby, freshforged!

        • 0 avatar

          My friend’s father had a Chrysler TC by Maserati. He actually thought the thing was *valuable*. I think my cousin’s grandparents may have also had two of them. When I was five, my aunt picked my cousin and I up from school, but got the TC got stuck in the snow.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Between TC and the E-body Reatta/Allante, I might think the TC is closer to being a K-car than the R/A are being to standard E-bodies, and in terms of parts/maint the better of the two to own long term. Reatta is probably the overall best of the three due to the legendary motor, but they have alot of unobtainium bits as well, whereas the TC probably does not (or at least not as much outside of the roof, chrome trim bits, wheels, and the grille). Push comes to shove, you can lose the chrome bits and replace the wheels. Tougher to replace the Reatta’s headlight motors, touchscreens/digital dash, and any body panel. Ditto on Allante.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Seems to me like the TC is easiest to obtain at cheap entry prices, in nice condition. Some special versions of the Reatta and most of the Allantes have Silver Arrow Syndrome (TM).

            Also, it’s funny. You see ratty Reattas, but rarely a ratty TC or Allante. I wonder if this is because the 3800 lends itself to actual longer-term use, where the whatever engine in the TC and early Northstars don’t.

            In my parents hometown there’s an Allante in silver over red with hardtop present for sale – it’s been there quite a while.

          • 0 avatar

            Funny you all mention the Reatta because I was just told by my grandmother that the two convertibles in question were Reattas…not TC’s. That means either I or my cousin was sitting on the parcel shelf in the back, instead of a proper car seat. But we survived…

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            >Also, it’s funny. You see ratty Reattas, but rarely a ratty TC or Allante. I wonder if this is because the 3800 lends itself to actual longer-term use, where the whatever engine in the TC and early Northstars don’t.

            I’d venture to guess this was because the entry price for a Reatta was less than the other two cars. They sold about as many Reattas as Allantes, but in half the amount of time, and definitely sold a lot more of them than TCs.

            The right ones can fetch decent money. Late run convertibles with low mileage can sell for 20k as I saw at an RM auction a few years ago. My father has a ’91 ‘vert with low mileage and has been offered 14k at a car show without it being for sale, so there’s some interest in those things

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That makes sense. I didn’t think about it being more accessible overall. Though IIRC it was still priced too high for what it was.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    That car in the picture is UGLY. with a face like Predator and wheels that mimic a biohazard symbol, I can’t see why it doesn’t sell. If Sergio can make a Dart, Cherokee, and 200 out of an Alfa, all to my eyes attractive vehicles, why can’t he make an attractive Alfa out of an Alfa?

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Perchance the reason it is not for sale is that no one would buy it?

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    What Alfa needs is a partnership with a Japanese maker. An Alfa body and interior with Honda guts would be just about perfect.

    • 0 avatar

      Be careful what you wish for. *mind flashes back to the Rover 800*

    • 0 avatar
      Ostrich67

      It’s been done.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfa_Romeo_Arna

      “However, such fears were quickly allayed upon the Arna’s release when it became obvious that the Arna exhibited the worst qualities of each of its parents.”

      Just like the Rover/Honda partnership!

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Well of course, it had a boring Nissan body and abysmal Alfa build quality.

        It was the exact opposite of what it needed to be.

      • 0 avatar
        Eyeflyistheeye

        I think that phrase may have been one of my Wikipedia contributions under numerous different names since I did work a bit on the Arna article. Not sure though, but I have a soft spot for the Arna because of my partial Italian and Japanese heritage, and how two cultures that have significantly advanced the art of the automobile came up with something even the Soviet Union would find dreadful.

  • avatar
    bobman

    I can’t believe some of the comments here regarding Alfa achieving its sales goals. The one that is the most ridiculous is lack of distribution. It will be distributed throughout FCA’s global network. Back in 2003 Alfa sold over 200k cars with its very limited distribution, mostly in Europe. Why on earth would 450k be a stretch considering a global network many times greater in size. As Jeep has done, Alfa will achieve sales heights never before seen. Then it will be time to bring back Lancia. Go for it Sergio.

  • avatar
    Morea

    Mandalorian: “An Alfa body and interior with Honda guts would be just about perfect.”

    No, because it wouldn’t be an Alfa, it would be a nicer looking Honda.

    Marchionne has already said Alfas would have Italian engines. Then again, he changes product plans more often than he changes sweaters.

    • 0 avatar
      GusTurbo

      Ah yes, Sergio “Wop Engine” Marchionne. To be fair, it COULD be an Italian-American engine.

      • 0 avatar
        bobman

        That wop remark was in reference to its use in the movie The Graduate. The car Dustin Hoffman drove around in was referred to as the wop car. Sergio has mentioned that movie quite a few times. It had inspired him to bring it back. I wouldn’t be surprised to see Dustin Hoffman somehow involved in an ad for the Alfa Romeo return. I think all the controversy that surrounded the remark was a little over the top, I don’t think he thought it would offend anyone.

  • avatar
    Jacob

    I agree that Fiat should keep Alfa if it really wants to have a high end brand. The brand that Fiat should really jinx is Lancia. Lancia is basically one of those “premium but not truly luxury” car brands. There isn’t much space between FIAT and barely alive Alfa to fit the Lancia in.

    • 0 avatar
      bobman

      I think, the decision to make the Chrysler brand more mainstream was an acknowledgement that it couldn’t compete with the high end foreign brands. Alfa Romeo will take on that role for FCA. It’s a good strategy, although they will need to maintain a little more conservative performance in order to get a wider appeal. This would leave a nice (wild side) niche for Lancia to fill.
      Still a lot of excellent brands in FCA’s portfolio. I’m looking forward to seeing a Giorgio based Barracuda.


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