By on July 21, 2014

Chevrolet SS

Those who were waiting for the Chevrolet SS to have a manual transmission to go with its Australian power, they can now breathe: The order guide confirms the 2015 model will that, as well as the Magnetic Ride suspension.

Jalopnik reports one of their commentariat had looked through General Motors’ online Fleet Order guide when they came upon the revelations. In addition, more of the commentariat pointed out a number of new colors 2015 SS owners could drool over, including Regal Peacock Green and Alchemy Purple; Dodge and SRT may have to dust off a few oldies to keep up.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

96 Comments on “2015 Chevrolet SS Order Guide Confirms Manual Transmission, Magnetic Ride...”


  • avatar

    It looks too plain.

    And it’s pretty ridiculous that this car has an engine in it that you should be getting in a $70,000 XTS-V.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Bingo. Looks like a rental.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      Not everyone wants a blinged-out car with gangsta windows.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Oh come on now there’s space between those two and you know it. This car doesn’t look special or expensive.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Is it suppose to? Did a caprice or impala RWD family car of yesteryear look special in comparison to other family cars?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m sorry, but this is SS. SS is supposed to be special and different, and you’re paying more for that brand history.

            It is supposed to.

          • 0 avatar
            th009

            I don’t think I’m the only person around who has debadged a performance model to give it a lower profile.

            For me, the Q-ship approach works quite well, even if I’m not in the market for an SS (or any other car) at the moment.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            True, but this “Impala SS” is very different to today’s family cars, and it is not meant to function as a traditional family car.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Corey, if you look at your brand history, you’ll find that in its glory days, the SS nomenclature was used on all manner of otherwise innocuous machinery – Chevelles, Malibus, Novas, Impalas, you name it. None of these SS models looked much different than the “stock” versions. That was the charm of it.

            Here’s a good example:
            http://www.barrett-jackson.com/Archive/Event/Item/1970-CHEVROLET-CHEVELLE-MALIBU-SS-2-DOOR-163096

            Check out how much that baby sold for. Not everyone wants a flashy performance car.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I genuinely thought the SS’s always looked different, or had some special parts attached.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Corey –

            Most of the SS models were fairly subtle, particularly the Impalas and Malibus, which the current SS is the spiritual successor to. Here’s a good selection:

            http://www.netcarshow.com/chevrolet/1966-impala_super_sport/800×600/wallpaper_01.htm

            http://www.boldride.com/ride/1967/chevrolet-chevelle-malibu-ss-396375-coupe

            An enthusiast’s eye can pick out the performance bits (tires, wheels, hood vents, etc) but overall, the SS package was pretty subtle on most models. The Camaros and later-model Chevelles and Malibus with the SS package were a bit more flamboyant.

            Chrysler, on the other hand, went all in for wilder colors and styling touches for its muscle cars, and still does.

            So, yeah, both the current SS and Charger SRT are good examples of “heritage”.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            SS was little more than a trim package in a lot of cases. You could get a Nova SS with the 250 cid stovebolt in ’73-76. Ditto with the early Impala SS models.

            That said, this could use a little more performance cues in the styling. And I don’t see why not. They did it with the G8 GXP just a few years ago.

          • 0 avatar

            Personally, I like it when it’s subtle.

      • 0 avatar

        If I’m rolling fire…I expect the car to look TERRIFYING.

        PERIOD.

        • 0 avatar
          brenschluss

          I’d rather leave people wondering why they couldn’t keep up with that Malibu than tell everyone that I’ll probably be doing something illegal at the next stoplight.

          Around police and terrified drivers, I’ll take plain over aggro every single day.

          • 0 avatar
            darkwing

            Well, sure, but that only works if you aren’t obsessed with your own inadequacy. In that case, you NEED to be SURE that EVERYONE notices your MONSTER car or at least MAKE up a NARRATIVE in your OWN HEAD so you can PRETEND they DO.

          • 0 avatar

            DARKWING

            “Well, sure, but that only works if you aren’t obsessed with your own inadequacy. In that case, you NEED to be SURE that EVERYONE notices your MONSTER car or at least MAKE up a NARRATIVE in your OWN HEAD so you can PRETEND they DO.”

            So basically: the man driving at 50MPH in the middle lane, in a PRIUS or Nissan Leaf, or Nissan Versa has no inadequacies and the hugest genitals in the state?

            Something very odd about that line of thinking.

          • 0 avatar
            darkwing

            What’s very odd is your obsession with male genitalia. We were just talking about sleepers versus ostentatiousness, bro.

        • 0 avatar
          arun

          If you are rolling fire, you probably just had curry for dinner…

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          @BTSR

          But you are basically a 13yo with a lot of cash. Some of us value sublty. If I had any use for this sort of thing, the SS woullkd be top of my list.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        I’m with you 009. This is the car for me. I have wrung out the caprice version (which has LESS horsepower) and it is outstanding. I just hammered the crap out of it and the engine, brakes, suspension, all were golden. You can be a blacksmith, you dont have to be a surgeon. This is a well-built car.

        The back seat has plenty of leg room for adults. Visibility is excellent. The interior is roomy. The seats are supportive and comfortable. This is a car you can live with and drive every day like an ordinary sedan, but when no one is looking, you can have a blast.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      And that’s the charm of it. Plain Jane and fast as hell. Posers beware.

      I like it.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      First impression… Looks purposeful and sophisticated, and a bit like a BMW crossed slightly with a Merc’. But, that is just from a designer’s quick visceral point of view absorbing all the design elements that result in a certain mien that I’m sure GM designers were shooting for and hit the mark… with me.

      A designer will look at this car with different eyes then the general public, we are far more analytical on product design and have to understand why it works or doesn’t, what could be adjusted/tweaked, and true, even for us(designers) there is some subjectivity, we all bring something a bit different to any subject, but it isn’t colored by make/model/OEM prejudices, it is just about the design presented.

      All production designs for bread & butter vehicles involve a lot of compromises and considerations. They are a lot harder to design then a new Pick-up or van, or even a sporty like a C7 Corvette or new ‘ND’ Miata. Have a little appreciation for the painfully wrought efforts of designers, these Guys & Gals are up against a lot entities and engineering parameters.

      But, no matter how good a design is, it is subjective to whoever. That person may be very sophisticated in regards to design or very unsophisticated, and in between those poles we have varied subjective opinion.

      I love the look of Pacers, VW bugs and Karmann Ghia’s, Corvairs, Porsche 356’s, Cistalia’s and Gen-7 Impala/Buick wagons, most people don’t get them and some hate them. But don’t say you hate something or like a design without expressing why. If you can’t do that, it is just more baseless irritating blog noise. You don’t have to express your opinion using design vernacular, but try, using what ever expressive tools you have.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        Great input.

        I have a personal design detail that I think defines the basic proportions of a car and makes it attractive or stubby in my eyes.

        If the imaginary line that follows the A-pillar down to the ground (when looking at the profile of the car) intersects the front wheel anywhere from the middle towards the rear of the front wheel a car’s proportions are generally more pleasing to the eye (obviously this doesn’t work on something like a Wrangler).

        I feel that hoods are far too stubby in proportion to the rest of the car these days and I think alot of style could be gained if that metric were used (or if they started putting FWD engines behind the front axle (like the wacky French did and Audi does on some cars) instead of in front of.

        Cars always seem to look more elegant if the hood isn’t wider than it is long.

        Just my 2 cents, thanks for reading.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    I want Magnetic Ride in a Spark.

  • avatar
    Mr Imperial

    This car is outgunned powerwise, by the Charger, Challenger, Mustang (but more than the Taurus SHO). And to me, it seems like GM is repeating the same questionnable marketing plan used for the failed 2004-2005 Pontiac GTO. History repeating itself?

    I just don’t get the business reason for this car, maybe if GM knocked 10K off the MSRP. It’s the answer to a question no one asked, IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      I don’t think Challenger and Mustang (or Camaro) are realistically competing for the same buyer as the SS.

      Charger maybe, but with the SS’s Q-ship approach vs Charger’s extroverted styling, I think most buyers will find the choice quite easy one way or another.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Ok, just because something is boring, and the designers didn’t try and/or missed the mark – does not make it Q-Ship. I feel you’re applying this term improperly.

        • 0 avatar
          th009

          I’ll respectfully disagree with you on this point. IMHO the SS was intentionally designed with toned-down styling rather than the far more polarizing design of the Charger. Whether or not any given buyer prefers one or the other depends on individual preferences, of course.

      • 0 avatar
        Car Ramrod

        Have to agree with th009 here, at least to a point. There are plenty of us who have clients who see our cars and ride in them from time to time. I’d like my performance sedan with a side of extroverted styling but I don’t think it plays well with older, conservative clients. There’s probably enough people like me to make a business case for a car like this, but I don’t find this execution particularly attractive, nor does the ‘SS’ badge mean anything to me as I’m in my 30s.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          You are approximately 25 years younger than the target buyer for this vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            Car Ramrod

            I get that. I also get that I’ll probably be buying BMWs until they, too give up on offering manual transmission cars that can tote clients or 3 kids when needed. Kind of a shame that I was back in school during the G8 GXP’s lifespan– that car was the best of both worlds.

            If these cars sold well enough, there might be non-hideous aftermarket parts available to (tastefully) spice things up, but that’s never going to happen.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            There are, but shipping bumpers and hoods from Australia can be hard on the wallet.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      How was the GTO a fail? They sold pretty much up to projections all 3 years.

      • 0 avatar
        Mr Imperial

        Had the GTO sold in amounts to justify its existence, it would have lasted longer than it did, as does any car for that matter. I don’t believe that it met sales goals, unless that claim can be proved.

        • 0 avatar
          PonchoIndian

          It didn’t last longer because production of that body style wasn’t being made anymore. The GTO essentially changed into the G8, and they never made a 2 door version in AUS.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          The GTO was killed because it was no longer meeting US regulatory standards, the Monaro body style was being killed down under, and it was going to cost a going bankrupt GM too much money to address.

          The G8 release was delayed a good 12 to 18 months in the United States, and by then it was too little, too late.

    • 0 avatar
      LD

      The business case is that GM has an obligation not to close its Holden unit in Australia for the next 1-2? years. This car is to fill in the production gaps at that assembly line. Its also priced the way it is because of the high cost of Australian production and the high value of the Aussie dollar. When the Holden unit closes down, most likely, this car will disappear.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      The SS is SLIGHTLY outgunned by the SRT Charger. The manual transmission should cure that problem.

    • 0 avatar
      johnny_5.0

      The Charger is the only realistic comparison here. While I prefer the styling of the SRT8 Charger, if someone offered me a choice of either car for free I’d pick a manual SS without hesitation. The Charger goes like stink in a straight line and is a spacious and comfy cruiser. The SS does _everything_ well. There’s just no getting around the 400lb weight difference. If trapping at 110mph+ isn’t fast enough for you, the aftermarket for the LS3 is huge compared to the 6.4. There’s no magic fix for the Charger weighing over 4,300 pounds.

      I wish GM made a 4 door Camaro for Camaro money too, but let’s not pretend that nobody would prefer the SS to the Charger. Anyone whose definition of driving “fun” extends being straight line speed or values driving dynamics would have to think long and hard if the Chargers looks were worth it (and it does look bitchin’!).

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatic

      GM is just using it as a place holder until production ends in Australia. Low sales and high price are fine with GM, their cost are high for this production scheme and they are just testing the waters. Once GM down under folds, they either bring production to NA with an updated car at a better price point or they kill it because its not selling. Which seems typical GM think to me.

      That said I like the car. The ones I see on the road look nicer than those in photos or at the autoshow. Since neither Mopar nor Ford offer a well balanced four door RWD with a MT I have to either spend more money than I want (SS), settle for a two door (Mustang, though its too nose heavy), get a car with useless back seat room (ATS) or get an automatic (Charger) when I need to replace the LS.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    It’s just so boring looking. I can’t get past the boring. And rental look. And Malibu styling.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      RenCen hates the compliance car and it shows by the rental car styling. This is demonstrated by the fact they could have left the Commodore styling completely intact and literally swap the badges (or just sell it completely as-is with the Holden livery). They actually spent money to make it look ridiculous, so it fits in with the rest of the lineup even though it is the exact opposite and it should stick out.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      With all due respect, your feeling about its styling is a bit ironic coming from a guy who owns an Infiniti M, the queen of bland.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Compared to this here SS, my car is excessively swoopy and overstyled. I don’t think the M is bland at all – it was polarizing, which is part of why it didn’t sell well.

        • 0 avatar
          Nick_515

          Corey, the SS does NOT look like a rental. I have seen a few in person. I won’t say they are captivating, but the car has true presence. If this car was ever offered with a V6, I would seriously lust after it.

          EDIT: Agree with Poncho – M is not a bad looking car, but it was never relevant enough to be called “polarizing” in my opinion. I am sure it is a terrific automobile.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “If this car was ever offered with a V6, I would seriously lust after it.”

            So if they took away the performance part of this performance car, and offered it with a more common, more lame V6 – then you’d want it.

            Sir, your Malibu awaits you already.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Ah, but GM does not offer a V6 Malibu anymore. They do offer this in a six:
            http://www.gmfleet.com/police/chevy-caprice-ppv-patrol-car.html

          • 0 avatar
            Nick_515

            Corey – that’s correct, I like the way it looks that much. As PC & richards ad goes, there IS a difference – it’s not a Malibu, though it does look similar. And it would have to be v6 and stick. v8 sounds excessive to me – I can’t imagine ever needing more than 300hp. I’ll happily pull over for BTSR.

          • 0 avatar
            turboprius

            If the SS had a V6, an “Enhance Your Drive: Scan Now” sticker would be on the driver’s window.

            The V8 and abundance of tech features and room give it a special charm. Yet for 45 grand, a sunroof and a spare tire are optional. For that price, those items should be STANDARD.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            TurboPrius

            When you can spend 45K on a BMW or Mercedes with vinyl seats, no sunroof and no cd player, why would you expect a Sunroof and spare tire to be standard on a 45K SS?

          • 0 avatar
            Dan

            “The V8 and abundance of tech features and room give it a special charm. Yet for 45 grand, a sunroof and a spare tire are optional. For that price, those items should be STANDARD.”

            There is no surer way to take a car off my shopping list than a standard sunroof.

          • 0 avatar
            pragmatic

            V6 with the MT is how I’d want it, but that is a market of one (me). Which is why I have the LS.

          • 0 avatar
            snakebit

            Nick,

            We’re on the same page, if not paragraph, about going pre-owned, that’s an excellent way of affording a car you want very much, but can’t swing as a new one. As far as criticizing a manufacturer for pulling production of a model you couldn’t afford to begin with, that’s an exercise in frustration,why do that to yourself, other than hoping you can afford it as a pre-owned ride? I’m glad you like the trim of the new SS, let’s hope you have lots of company so that it stays in production as long as Holden still keeps the assembly line going.

            As an aside, I was out in Colorado Springs two weeks ago at an autocross at Pikes Peak International Raceway, and noticed the Bondurant school uses about six or eight red Pontiac G8’s or GXP’s (I couldn’t tell-the actual track was closed to the public-I just peeked through the fence), as well as even more Camaros for its students. Thinking of the pre-owned-I know- post-thrashed market, I wonder when these cars will come up for sale.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          The Infiniti M indeed polarized buyers – reactions ranged from “boring” to “did I just fall asleep looking at that car?”

          Fine vehicle, though…and goes to show that sometimes a plain wrapper hides all kinds of good stuff.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Can we stop using the appliance silver in news heads, use mystic green, that’s a color that attracts!

  • avatar
    snakebit

    This car is for the dolts who were asleep when the prettier Pontiac G8 and GXP was offered, and then whined when the whole Pontiac brand was killed, and the G8 went bye bye. So, now that those of you who whined, ‘I want what the public safety dudes just got, I don’t want it just in two-tone black and white, I want it from GM, and you know what-I want a stick while you’re at it” just got very close to that, should be in the order line, tight-lipped, and checkbook in hand.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      Some of us may not have been in a position to own a G8 in 2008, snakebit. But I might buy this in two-three years, pre-owned. Though some of the B&B have previously expressed content with the G8 interior, I prefer the SS interior. The G8 exterior looks beautiful to me, and I never fail to notice them.

      • 0 avatar
        Car Ramrod

        This. Pretty safe bet that a few year old G8 or SS will be cheaper to maintain than a 4-7 year old BMW M3 or M5, and the value proposition is similar.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          On True Delta the G8 long term data (now 5 to 6 years old) is showing the cars are basically as reliable as a boat anchor.

          The issues on failed LCAs and bad AFM lifters were confined to 9.1 production cars, and most of those failures raised their ugly heads well within the warranty period.

          In this case, GM did issue new part numbers. ;-)

        • 0 avatar
          jeano

          My 5 year old M3 has needed fuel,tires and a new battery
          Guess I must be doing something wrong

        • 0 avatar
          tekdemon

          They’re probably more reliable but this is one of the few cars where you might actually have a tougher time getting parts a few years down the line than the BMW buyer would.

  • avatar

    If I’m coughing up $50k for a performance car, I’d prefer it acts and somewhat looks like a performance car. The car and chassis is great, but GM’s styling department missed the mark – again. Decades of styling failures by GM.

    It doesn’t need to go for over-the-top-Camaro-styling, but something more would be nice. Some bold pretty colors for 2015 will help differentiate the car a bit.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Funny you’d say that, because if you knew anything about the heritage of the classic SS cars, you’d know they were by and large performance versions of very plain models – Chevelles, Novas, Malibus, and Impalas, mainly – and it took a pretty sharp eye to spot one without keying on the SS badging. They were designed to be subtle. Why? Because being subtle is a good thing in street racing.

      And today, pretty much genuine numbers-matching SS fetches SICK money at auction time. But let’s remember…GM failed at styling. LOL.

      And if 0-60 times of 4.5 seconds and a sub-13 second quarter – in a SEDAN that will fit five people and luggage – don’t fit your bill of performance, I don’t know what to tell you, friend.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        Your first two paragraphs basically apply to the “retired to dead” age group. Mecum’s and such? So Jr has the taken over the dry-walling business and you can go spend 300k on the bad-ass 69 Chevelle 3996 SS? Once you’re dead, the resale will plummet. Most people won’t buy one if they’ve never seen one. 50k for a Chebbie? Just not my cup of tea, pal.

  • avatar
    mars3941

    If you get one with a stick you will pay dearly at trade in time. These type American cars without an automatic are dogs on the used car market. A stick can add up to a 600 to 1000 dollar deduct on it’s value plus few if any one would want it. Styling wise it’s nothing special, if fact I like the Impala better.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Here’s a radical idea for stick shift buyers. Keep it so long the difference in resale doesn’t matter (especially since a full size 4 door car with a stick AND A V8 is basically a unicorn in the US market.) Or realize that the good old G8 GXP hasn’t been hurt in resale value by the stick shift.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        Exactly.

        I paid less for my car to get the stick (though in the $50K range it’s not exactly a huge difference). I’ll probably keep it 10+ years so at that point I won’t really care so much about resale. And just maybe there will be some kid at that point who will want one with a stick. If not, I’ll still have had 10 years of happy driving with a stick.

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        If anything maybe this will relax GXP prices finally.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      This likely won’t be the case with this car. Specialty and performance cars are typically more sought after with manual transmissions and often trade at a premium. A good example would be the G8 GXP with a manual transmission.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        There’s plenty limited edition sports/sporty cars that didn’t/don’t even offer an auto trans. There’s still a waiting list and price gouging to buy them new. Enthusiasts suddenly demand an auto trans when buying used? Or do true enthusiasts of these only buy new? You’d think there would be more enthusiasts waiting for used examples, than new.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      These are oddball cars, the typical rules do not apply to them. Just ask a used G8 buyer.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Sell it privately. It may take longer but folks who want a stick will PAY for the privilege. This is a performance car, not a Camry.

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      If you are trading it in you are crazy and going to pay dearly anyway. I think selling it is the answer as people will be specifically looking for these used and the stick could add value depending on how many they make.

  • avatar
    mjz

    That front end is the absolute worst interpretation of the Chevy split grill design of any of the the current Chevy models. It looks forced, probably because it was never meant to be a Chevy in the first place. The G8 was much more attractively done.

  • avatar
    Mikein08

    You think this car looks boring? Great! Cops pay less attention to it
    that way. Gives you more chances to have fun.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      If my eyeball-searing red sports car is a target for cops, I can drive it conservatively where cops frequent and populated areas. I do that anyways, even in bland rentals.

      And I’ll gladly take a speeding ticket (after some arguing that goes unheard) that was meant for a bland silver car speeding past me on the right. It’s happened to me on a few occasions. Price you pay…

      Obviously GM can and has made lots of Hot and fast looking sporty cars and sedans, but chooses to neuter them from the start, every single time. They’d hate to sell too many of them and ding their precious CAFE profile.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        …last I checked, all manufacturers have to comply with CAFE, so maybe the reason why BMW sells so few M5s is to save its CAFE average.

        But I don’t see you whining about that…because BMW isn’t GM.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          New Rule: No whining about CAFE during Challenger week.

          Sorry, but given how many performance cars are being introduced to the market, the whole “automakers are hamstrung by the government/CAFE/Obama” meme is absolutely ridiculous.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Chevy’s on track to sell 3300 of these in 2014.

    I the take rate on a stick is as high as 25%, we’re talking about 825 cars. Does it really matter?

  • avatar

    Please, GM Canada, tell me you’re going to bring this to Canada in 2015.

    It’s actually slightly tempting to buy a US model and bring it up here, but that does involve a significant amount of hoop-jumping.

    I couldn’t care less about the resale value effect of the manual – I don’t choose the number of pedals based on what future owners will want, although I do agree that this car is one where the resale value will probably benefit by having a manual.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    This is a really great Chevy! Too bad they didn’t have anything like this circa 1988. Hop in the WABAC machine imagine this as a 1988 Pontiac Bonneville. Things might be different if GM had unleashed something like this in 1988. More an example of what could’ve been, instead of what happened. It’ll do well in flyover country and appeals to high-dollar blue collar on the east coast.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    Sleeper…I like it.

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    Too bad this drivetrain is not in the new Impala…IMHO THAT would hearken back to the “SS was not so different” days. Oh yes, and in a perfect world, I could have this set up in a TWO DOOR body style!! :-)

  • avatar
    pacificpom2

    It is a shame that the Commodore got a pumped up & out Malibu styling makeover. That would be a result of head office dictating that (1) the car has to appeal to a different (universal, non offensive) set of tastes to suit it’s new market, (2) not a great deal of money to redesign anyway, (3) why spend money on a dead end product anyway.

    Unfortunately even in its home market it looks like a big Malibu, not a home grown car. So when they made the decision to sell the Malibu along side the Commodore and make the Commodore look like a Malibu. Well the sales of each vehicle make the point.

    The Australian sense of what is stylish and tasteful is definitely differently to American taste and sense of style. Australians prefer the sleeper look rather than the “look at me” brigade.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      I must have an Australian sense of style – to the extent Australians have a sense of style – which, from my observation, consists of conspicuously pretending they don’t.

      Anyway, give me a roomy plain-wrap sedan that has guts and handles predictably and I am happy. I used to have a 1996 Buick Regal with a sweet V-6. Sure, it was a sled. Not bragging about it. But it was cheap and it was pretty fast and the handling was not floaty. The engine was smooth and powerful and reliable as hell. I had a blast with it and drove it hard every day for 165k until my @#$%! niece totaled it.

      Pretty much invisible to cops. Don’t want attention from anyone. Big trunk. 3 adult passengers no problem. Decent mileage. Cheap to run.

      Yeah, I wish there was a bigger market for hot plain wrap “domestic” sedans. I don’t care for the Euro mobiles. The SS is at the top of the auto lust list for me, and I would love the Aussie one and not whatever they come up with after they shut that plant down.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States