By on May 7, 2014

2013 Mercedes-Benz G550

For 35 years, the Mercedes-Benz G-Class has seen tours of duty with United Nations peacekeepers, the Pope, various hardened soldiers from Germany to Canada, and a few celebrities now and again. In that time, the SUV has changed its overall appearance once, when the W463 began leaving the factory in Graz, Austria in 1990; the previous W461 is still available for military and civil service. However, the current Geländewagen will get its second major revision come 2017 while retaining the W463 chassis code.

Autocar reports the changes will be so extensive that Mercedes claims the new G-Class will effectively be a new SUV, though it will still retain its classic look according to SUV chief Andreas Zygan:

We have to be careful with our heritage. We offer something really special. Last year — the 34th — was the best ever for G-class sales. It’s amazing, and one of our idols.

Changes for the 2017 W463 include a wider track for greater stability on- and off-road, more aluminium to reduce around 440 pounds from the current model, and a new front three- or four-link suspension setup mated to a modern electro-mechanical steering system.

Under the bonnet will either be a 3-liter diesel producing over 300 horsepower or 3-liter gasoline engine pushing over 360 horses, all going through Mercedes’ nine-speed 9G-Tronic automatic as standard as a way to improve overall fuel economy. The two engines will debut a year earlier under the hood of the 2016 E-Class.

As for inside, more space will be offered alongside increases in comfort and quality, with a boost in technology for improved safety and assistance.

Finally, AMG variants — which account for half of all G-Class sales — are set to follow the newly revised SUV sometime down the road.

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15 Comments on “2017 Mercedes G-Class To Be Effectively “All-New” After Major Makeover...”


  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    So it will have ugly pointless swoopy curves, ridiculous looking headlamps, unwarranted oversized spoilers, especially the front chin one, and the lane departure system that would turn the wheel for you as you are trying to position yourself between two holes in the road. At least that’s what I imagine it will be based on the current “design” trend of MB. They should sell lotsa!

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Last year was our best sales year ever, we’d better change it!

    Seriously, the new engine options and lighter construction are a good idea, but I don’t see a point in changing anything else.

    The photo is so static, just looks like he’s about to dip his toe in some cold water. Slooooowly.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The people who buy these want to be known to be driving the latest model. For this model, the 2017 redesign will be good for another 20 years.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Aged, boutique Austrian gets a lift. Still prefer Denali/Suburban/Yukon’s quiet, insulated ride.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I drove one of these a few years back – an AMG edition, no less – and it was, hands down, the worst vehicle I’ve ever driven. All that power combined with a high center of gravity and antique suspension adds up to one scary drive. AND a six-figure sticker price. Put differently: can you imagine WANTING to end the test drive of an AMG Benz early? You will with this stupid thing.

    And, yes, I’m sure the thing is brilliant off road…as if you’re going to actually take a vehicle with a $110,000 base price off road. Yeah, right. If you want an off road vehicle, buy a Jeep Wrangler, take the $80,000 you’d save and buy a REAL Benz, like a E550.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      The $110k price isn’t keeping it offroad, for sure I’ve seen H1s offroad weeks after purchase, and my deuce at less than half the cost was offroad the day after I bought new in 03. Rather I believe its the vehicle itself.

      It’s not positioned as an offroader, AM General could ask the $50k price tag of a new civilian humvee in 1992 because it had technology otherwise unavailable, geared hubs, transmission at waist level to driver, TD engine, aluminum body, BTM system, etc etc, the price was high in 92 but it was reasonable for what you could get.

      I look at the G-wagon and there’s not much there I can’t build from some junkyard parts, the price is astronomic for the same if not less prowess than a wrangler, parts are insane for stuff that WILL break under intended use. There’s very little going for it if you are a serious offroader, its completely positioned as a street vehicle, no question about it. Honestly how many sells would MB lose if it went uniframe and 4 wheel IFS?

      I’m sure I’ve offended at least one enthusiast that takes their g wagon offroad, so I’ll stop there.

      • 0 avatar
        Numbers_Matching

        ‘I’m sure I’ve offended at least one enthusiast that takes their g wagon offroad, so I’ll stop there.’

        Not only that, you’ve prooven you don’t really know anything about the G-Wagen.

        Most military organizations around the world view it as the most capable multi-purpose high mobility vehicle in the world. Period. Including the U.S. Marine Corps. Ask me how I know….

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        I agree with you about on road. They are absolutely terrible to drive, but I would put a G-Wagen up against anything with 4 wheels off-road. (As long as the G is equipped with suitable tires, not 22″ rims and “sport” tires) You cannot piece something together that’s similar if you tried, unless you were using G-wagen parts.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        as to whether a $110k vehicle will go off road, it depends on how much of a stretch it is for the purchaser.

        As the proud owner of a $150k house that isn’t paid off, I wouldn’t be taking a $110k vehicle off road any time soon. And I’m doing better than at least 85% of the people out there, according to the Wikipedia article on income distribution in the USA.

        There aren’t going to be a lot of peoe who plunk down $110k and immediately take their house-sized purchase out to get a few dings and scratches. That would be wildly irresponsible for the vast majority of us, especially someone who stretches to buy a car they really like.

        I’d rather offroad a 2017 Wrangler Unlimited Diesel. In 2025.

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      LMAO, it is an atrocious vehicle. A few of my friends bought them and sold them after less than a year. However it does have its charm. I still think you should own one at least once in your life, even if it is for a little while. Other than badass looks, the full size Range Rover is better than it in every single way.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I hope they don’t kill the 6×6. That thing is f***ing AWESOME and if I win a few million in the Powerball I’m buying one, even if I have to move out west to actually drive the damn thing.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Even with a 9 speed, they will need to retain the two speed transfer case. Like the move to 6 cylinders over V8s. Range in the current one is worse than a joke, and the chassis is not set up for driving at speeds where a more powerful V8 would have much benefit. They should do a 4cyl diesel, to limit speeds to where they could get away with smaller brake discs, hence smaller rims and more sidewall. Can’t imagine them stealing many serious off/soft roaders away from Toyota and Jeep regardless, but at least rap stars could go up an urban curb without having to worry about their rims denting.

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    Cutting edge WWII tech introduced in 1979 only impresses the easily impressed. Those who are truly serious about not getting stuck go for Mogs and Pinzes.

    • 0 avatar

      I have to agree the factory locking diffs and coil suspension was only novel into the 90′s. By the 2000 you could buy a wrangler Rubicon with factory locking diffs coils and better approach and departure angles for 1/4 the price.


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