By on April 1, 2014

2014-Chevrolet-CruzeRS-010-medium
Last weekend, Chevrolet issued a stop-sale 2013-2014 Chevrolet Cruze equipped with the 1.4L turbo-four with no initial reason for the action. A stop-sale is an order given by a manufacturer to dealers to cease the sales of a specific model of car to repair a problem. It can be anything from minor quality issues, up to major mechanical maladies. While not an uncommon event, this comes on the heels of a tidal wave of expanded recalls and investigations centered around the maligned Delta-Platform cars. TTAC was able to obtain a copy of the stop-sale notice for the B&B, which pinpoints the failure to the front-passenger half-shaft not meeting GM specifications, with the half-shafts possibly fracturing as the result. 

It is notable that this is the second time the Cruze was recalled for this exact issue last September. In GM’s letter to the NHTSA on September 23, 2013, GM noted the response time from the initial reports in July of 2013 to the initial stop-sale and recall in September of 2013 after receiving field report of the half-shafts breaking. GM found that poor quality control from the parts supplier lead to micro fractures inside the shaft. It’s unknown at this time why GM has again initiated this recall, but GM plans to release a full chronology in two weeks.

Below is a full text copy of the current stop-sale notice to dealers, and a partial copy of the recall letter which details the failure; the portion of the document left it is merely repair instructions for the technician.

GM CUSTOMER CARE AND AFTERSALES
DCS3173
URGENT – DISTRIBUTE IMMEDIATELY

Date: March 28, 2014

Subject: 14079 – Safety Recall — Stop Delivery Until Safety Recall Has Been Performed On Vehicle
Front Axle Right Half Shaft Fracture

To: All Chevrolet Dealers

Attention: General Manager, Service Advisor, Service Manager, Parts and Service Director, Parts Manager, New Vehicle Sales Manager

General Motors is announcing Safety Recall 14079 today. Please see the attached bulletin for details.

Vehicles involved in this recall were placed on stop delivery March 27, 2014. Once the service procedure contained in the bulletin has been performed on the vehicle, the vehicle is released from stop delivery and the vehicle can be delivered to the customer.

Customer Letter Mailing
The customer letter mailing date has not yet been determined.

Global Connect (GWM)
The “Investigate Vehicle History” (IVH) screen will be updated week of March 24, 2014. A list of involved vehicles in dealer inventory is attached to this message. Please hold all warranty transactions until the VIN appears in IVH.

Campaign Initiation Detail Report (CIDR)
The CIDR will be available in the near future.

END OF MESSAGE
GM CUSTOMER CARE AND AFTERSALES

And, finally, the recall report. Full text with photos detailing how to diagnose whether or not your Cruze has the defective half-shaft is here.

PRODUCT SAFETY RECALL

SUBJECT: Front Axle Right Half Shaft Fracture

MODELS: 2013-2014 Chevrolet Cruze Equipped with 1.4L Turbo Engine (LUV)

CONDITION

General Motors has decided that a defect which relates to motor vehicle safety exists in some 2013-2014 model year Chevrolet Cruze vehicles, equipped with a 1.4L turbo engine (LUV). The interconnecting tubular bar on the front right axle half shaft on some of these vehicles may not meet GM specification and could fracture and separate. If this occurs while driving the vehicle, steering and braking control would be maintained; however, the vehicle would lose power to the wheels and would coast to a stop. If a vehicle with a fractured half shaft is parked on an incline without the parking brake applied, the vehicle could move unexpectedly, resulting in a possible crash or injury to pedestrians.

CORRECTION

Dealers are to inspect and, if necessary, replace the half shaft.

[...]

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111 Comments on “General Motors Puts Stop-Sale & Recall On Chevrolet Cruze Due To Axle Failure [W/ Full Text]...”


  • avatar
    cpthaddock

    At this point, if General Motors were to be named after a movie it would have to be Total Recall.

    • 0 avatar

      :-/

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      +1

    • 0 avatar
      IndianaDriver

      Total Recall is funny, but I feel for the people putting these cars together. They take pride in assembling them with what they are given. I’m really beginning to wonder who is vetting these suppliers.

      • 0 avatar
        Stumpaster

        I guess we won’t know unless someone IDs the supplier. Jack?

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I know a higher up at the Sterling Heights, Michigan Fiatsler assembly plant, who is a highly skilled machinist in a problem spotting & fixing role (trouble shooter), and he informed me just today that many of the problematic parts finding their way into ChryCo, GM & Ford vehicles have a disproportionately high place of origin: China.

          He went so far as to proclaim that he’d wager a hefty sum of his paycheck that managing these parts could be sourced from higher quality suppliers stateside because of the “ton of bad components, out of spec components, and otherwise faulty components that are batch shipped from Chinese suppliers,” which either have to be tossed out, or reworked by assembly plant machinists such as himself, which is apparently a very time consuming, labor intensive & difficult process (aka it would be cheaper to just pay more to begin with by ordering better quality parts from non-Chinese suppliers as it would ensure less reworking, trouble shooting, re-inspection, and warranty claims).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The elephant in the room.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            28 – I think you’re right. You used an apt metaphor b/c mentioning China as a source of component QC problems almost seems taboo in even the circle of auto execs.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I haven’t personally purchased a sensor or electronic automotive component since last March, but I noticed it was stamped “Made in Japan” (it was a Saturn transmission sensor).

            The taboo subject may actually explain a good deal of the problems newer cars have been experiencing.

          • 0 avatar
            threeer

            But wait…with over $300 billion in excess trade with China alone last year everything made in China HAS to be great, right? I pray every night that the tide shifts and folks begin to realize that you truly get what you pay for and that “cheap” often comes at a very, very steep price. Paying a bit more up front saves a ton later on…

          • 0 avatar

            > many of the problematic parts finding their way into ChryCo, GM & Ford vehicles have a disproportionately high place of origin: China.

            Making stuff anywhere carries the same caveats. Iphones made in china are some of the highest grade products out there. Expensive auto parts made in Italy is often hardly better than mediocre.

            There’s a higher correlation of crummy parts with “made in china” because that’s where the lowest bids in every dimension go. It hardly needs to be repeated that correlation doesn’t imply causation.

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            From what I’ve seen, you may choose a Chinese supplier, but you have to keep a very tight rein on them (to the point of having several American on-site quality personnel) so that they follow spec, adhere to quality, etc. or they WILL slip. It seems the rapid expansion of Chinese manufacturing has resulted in a workforce unfamiliar with quality; then there is the spectre of embedded corruption.

          • 0 avatar
            LALoser

            Shaker: Yes, it takes a lot of oversight when dealing with Chinese manufacturing/fabrication. When I set-up a fabrication facility there we had to station our own people to inspect temper, tolerance and finish of metal. Then proper sequence of packing and shipping. It requires a style of oversight that most Americans and so on are not comfortable with.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Someday, hopefully before it is too late, America will wake up and take stock of all the costs associated with outsourcing and realize that the low price on the tag is just the beginning. There is no “comparative advantage” when one side only has low prices to offer.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Today’s automotive world lowlight sponsored by Bag’O’BrokenGlass Toy Company -

            GM avoided defective switch redesign in 2005 to save a dollar each

            WASHINGTON Wed Apr 2, 2014 9:38am EDT
            REUTERS

            http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/02/us-gm-recall-delphi-idUSBREA3105R20140402

          • 0 avatar

            > http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/02/us-gm-recall-delphi-idUSBREA3105R20140402

            This is a good example of why people who’ve never made anything more complex than a wood bowl in shop class shouldn’t get their car-making info from the news. It’s the blind leading the blind.

            > It requires a style of oversight that most Americans and so on are not comfortable with.

            That must be why everything sold here from the $$$$ to the $ is made there.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I always thought selling the Cruze in developing international markets before the States was a form of quality assurance; identifying the teething problems and fixing them before wide release.

    Boy, was I wrong!

  • avatar
    Johnny Canada

    Sounds like a heat-treatment issue from the supplier. We’ll never know if this was a preemptive move as the Feds comb through the files. Regardless, Mary and Company pulled the trigger and got out in front of this one.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Almost ALL of the problems cropping up stem from suppliers. GM, like all other car “makers”, is pretty much in the car assembly business, dependent on suppliers for a large portion of the mechanicals that go into a car. It’s not just failed individual components, but sub-assemblies being put together by suppliers to make assembly faster/easier. That makes it difficult to identify a particular part before the assembly is installed in the car. Squeezing suppliers for the lowest possible unit price doesn’t help ensure quality.

      • 0 avatar
        Johnny Canada

        True. I actually accept that there will be problems considering how complicated and price-sensitive components have become. What is unacceptable however, is an internal cover-up attempting to hide a problem. Looks like GM made the right move in this instance.

      • 0 avatar

        > GM, like all other car “makers”, is pretty much in the car assembly business, dependent on suppliers for a large portion of the mechanicals that go into a car.

        OTOH, what we observe on the ignition issue are suppliers who ship parts that fail tests as long as someone at GM is apathetic enough to sign off. That lack of personal responsibility is somewhat expected at places with high turnover, but GM is known for lifers who don’t give a damn unless it’s pawn blame off on someone else.

        It’s a cultural issue that needs to be fixed from the top.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          “It’s a cultural issue that needs to be fixed from the top.”

          Wasn’t bk supposed to fix this? Oh wait, that was just to hose anyone whom GM owned money to, not actually fix the company the way that reorganization bk is supposed to do.

          • 0 avatar

            > Wasn’t bk supposed to fix this? Oh wait, that was just to hose anyone whom GM owned money to, not actually fix the company the way that reorganization bk is supposed to do.

            A plurality of your precious successful corps have identical systemic issues. GM’s bk is largely a coincidence of japanese socialist innovations like their company union.

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            There was a time when auto companies were essentially vertically integrated.

            Ford famously made its own steel and glass. Auto cos. dis-integrated largely because of unions. GM got rid of Frigidaire because it had to pay UAW rates well above those of other appliance makers.

            Is there anything unions can’t (un)do?

            “….Frigidaire initially lost money but by 1926 had contributed $15 million to GM’s net earnings. The cost to build a refrigerator had dropped from $750 in 1921 to $96 in 1933.

            Frigidaire expanded its business to include air conditioning, electric ranges and self-cleaning ovens. For those who could not pay cash, General Motors Acceptance Corp. provided financing.

            For World War II, Frigidaire changed its assembly lines to build .50-caliber machine guns and B-29 propeller assemblies.

            After the war, Frigidaire expanded its home appliance business to feed America’s consumer craze. New products included clothes washers and dryers, dishwashers and food-waste disposers.

            In 1953, Frigidaire began building air-conditioning compressors for GM automobiles.

            Frigidaire firsts
            1915: Cabinet refrigerator
            1929: Home food freezer
            1931: Freon refrigerant
            1937: Electric range
            1938: Window air conditioner
            1947: Agitator clothes washer
            1952: Automatic refrigerator-freezer defroster
            1965: Ice-making freezer

            By the mid-1960s, the Frigidaire manufacturing complex in Dayton had grown to the size of 125 football fields — just as the company had sold its 50 millionth appliance.

            But the 1970s economic malaise took its toll. GM had to divest some of its holdings to free up cash. Appliances had stayed a maddeningly low-margin business, especially when UAW wages were factored into the bottom line. In 1975, GM split off the automotive air-conditioning unit into Delco Air Conditioning. In 1978, Frigidaire’s appliance business lost $40 million on $450 million in sales.

            In January 1979, GM announced it had sold Frigidaire to giant White Consolidated Industries of Cleveland for about $120 million. That purchase completed a White trifecta of also buying American Motors’ ailing Kelvinator and the remnants of Ford’s Philco units at huge markdowns from book value….”
            http://www.autonews.com/article/20080914/OEM/309149836/frigidaire-kept-gms-bottom-line-cool

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            @thornmark:

            You’re correct about FoMoCo’s vertical integration, i.e., Iron Mountain and the Rouge complex.

            However, your allegory with GM and Frigidaire isn’t an example of vertical integration, more of an example of diversification.

            Frigidaire didn’t start out as the air conditioning division of GM, it was acquired during the Durant leadership-era. They weren’t a raw material resource or other automotive supplier until much later in the relationship.

            The rest of what you posted is correct, but what was driving the dis-integration was the fact that all of these items produced by these companies, from completed cars to washing machines rapidly became commodity products and with other economic factors, became less profitable for the parent companies to sell.

            The auto companies then decided to focus on their “core competency” and stick to autos, not TVs or washing machines.

            The unions were only tangentially involved in this, as all of these moves are management decisions, as they should have been.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            More blame the unions for everything bs from the consistent thornmark. Appliances being made here are too expensive compared to Mexico and China. Union labor costs probably hastened the move, but it would have happened anyway since nobody in America is willing to work for the slave wages that those other countries pay their citizens. Again, the race to the bottom. A company can get away with charging more if the product and reputation can justify it. Maytag is a great example. Consumers had to pay more in the 70s for Maytag products, but they knew the long term durability and quality made it worthwhile. The company however, made the conscious business decision to rape its reputation by not only outsourcing assembly to two bit countries, but also by cheapening the quality of the components. A once great American brand ruined by American corporate short term mentality. Toyota started doing the same thing as well. When will people wake up? If you outsource all your jobs, where will the money come to buy these products? Not everybody is suited to be part of the “service” economy. A well balanced economy must have a wide variety of employment opportunities. We are rapidly losing that….

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            @goldenhusky: If the pundits are to be believed, then high-tech manufacturing is what we’re supposed to be doing. There’s a lot of that going on in the US already, but all we need is for the economy to take a poop again or another nation to perform their version of Quantitative Easing and away go the jobs.

            Look at Canada right now, the auto manufacturers are taking jobs and plants out of there and pushing them to either the US South or Mexico.

  • avatar
    srogers

    Where’s Dr. Olds to tell us how it’s due to the driver incompetence?

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Jeesh, kind of validates my apprehension about buying one of these when I was car shopping. The Eco 6spd manual that I drove was a fantastic car, drove very “German.” Head and shoulders a more refined driving experience than the 2012 Civic I ended up buying. What held me back was the fact that a small turbocharged 1.4 liter I-4 was pulling around over 3000lbs of weight. It’s recalls like this that just reinforce the buying behavior of many consumers such as myself. Ditto the Focus and the slew of issues that are not cropping up such a sagging headliners and wheel bearings. Not to mention the Dodge Dart, which has more issues than the Chevy and Ford put together it seems.

    • 0 avatar
      lukemo2

      A quick internet search found this recall on the 2012 Honda Civic.

      06/12/2012 – TORRANCE, Calif. — Honda will voluntarily recall approximately 50,000 model-year 2012 Civic vehicles in the United States to inspect and, if necessary, replace the left driveshaft. The left (driver’s side) driveshaft in certain vehicles may not have been properly assembled, potentially allowing it to separate from the outer CV joint while in operation. If separation occurs, the engine will no longer propel the vehicle in any gear, and the vehicle may roll away if the parking brake has not been set when the gear selector has been placed in the Park position, increasing the risk of a crash or personal injury. No crashes or injuries have been reported related to this issue.

      Would this have swayed you from buying the honda?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Yes, although I’m not a huge fan of the whole segment. Verano would probably be my only choice.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          28 cars, the Verano is quite a bit pricier. Put yourself in my shoes: I was looking for a new-ish compact that would do 30+ mpg in mixed driving, for not too much money (No more than $15k). I looked at everything under the sun, from a low mile 2010 $10k Cobalt XFE to $11k ex-rental Sentras, to $15k brand new Corolla LEs. The Cruze Eco I drove was brand new and the ‘best price’ dealer I tried it at had it priced at $18,999 (which is decent considering MSRP). There were some used 2011 Ecos for $16k-ish with low miles, but in the end the 11k mile 2012 Civic hit all the right notes for me. Much roomier interior than the other compacts (knee room and general sensation of airiness), nice un-intrusive low dash, fantastic shifter and progressive clutch. The biggest minus is the lack of sound insulation, followed by the slightly wallowy handling. My family’s positive experience with our last 4 Hondas (82 civic Wagon, 85 civic Sedan, 90 civic Wagon, 07 Fit) played no small part in my decision.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Honestly gtemnykh I’m pretty cheap so in your shoes I’m not buying a new car, I’m buying something nice and giving up some mixed fuel economy for it. Playing devil’s advocate 15K out the door for 30/mpg mixed is a tall order. Vibe? Yaris? Mazda 2/3? (all used)

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Well for my $15k I wanted something as new/reliable as possible, something that would need zero tinkering on my part or hunting forums for DIY fixes (I’m too proud and cheap to take cars to a mechanic unless it’s my brother). So that took anything entry-luxury out of the equation. My MPG requirement I could have slacked on a bit I suppose, so I could be looking at 2-3 year old midsizers and CUVs. After buying the Civic I still had an itch to scratch, I missed having a spacious cargo area and some semblance of off road ability and camping-friendliness so I ended up buying my 96 4Runner once I relocated and got a better paying job. 4Runner needs occasional fixing/tinkering, but I actually enjoy that as long as I can solve it myself and it’s not too expensive (brakes, greasing u joints, etc). If I were to do it all over again I might be tempted to say damn the torpedoes and buy a Trail Edition 4Runner (an eye watering $30k used) or a low mile Xterra Pro-4x ($23-25k). MPG would take a huge hit and it’d cost more up front, but I’d have one less vehicle to maintain, insure, and park.

            yaris, not really highway friendly. I was doing monthly drives out to Indiana from NY at the time of the Civic purchase, and currently make 2 hour weekend trips on the highway.

            Mazda-> rust, enough said.

            Vibe/Matrix? Never even considered them, mpg is lackluster with the 2.4, visibility is god awful. First gen cars are quite good IMO but even the newest first gen cars were a bit too used/old at that point.

            Believe it or not I was considering W body Impalas briefly, that 3.6 DI motor is something else. But they do not hold their value at all and the stretched timing chain stories I’ve heard on the Lambda 3.6 spooked me a bit. Not sure what a 10 year old Impala would be worth down the line or how it’d hold up. I knew I’d be taking a financial bath if I bought one of those. The way the car goes over bumps definitely exposes its 1980s roots, for better or for worse, the Civic felt like a spaceship in comparison. The few 3.5L OHV cars I drove already felt worn in how doors closed, and the suspension felt loosened up. And that was on 2 year old cars (ex rentals perhaps).

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      In defense of the Cruze, that taxed 1.4T and the axle problem are not related. My friend’s former Cruze 1.4T was a very nice driving car, as you mention.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Oh I didn’t mean to imply that small engine + heavy car = broken axle, I was speaking more generally about the idea of a heavily boosted small displacement 4 and its longevity when hauling around a lot of weight.

        I wasn’t aware of the Civic axle recall, that will be something to look into. But I bought the Civic with confidence because it was a tried and true engine and chassis, nothing ground breaking. 5spd manual, no fancy touch screens on the inside. Naturally aspirated, port injected. Despite the lack of high tech MPG enhancing tricks, I can reliably achieve 38-40 mpg in my commute during the summer with some mindful driving (suburban with some highway mixed in). I wanted an efficient commuter that I can drive for 5-7 years with zero hassle and then sell for a fair amount of money when the time comes. Or else keep driving it for another 5 years with little drama and still have it be worth decent money when I get rid of it as a 10+ year old car. Will the same hold true for a Focus/Cruze/Dart? Maybe, but no one can say for sure yet.

        Edmunds’ experience with their Dart makes me think no:
        http://www.edmunds.com/dodge/dart/2013/long-term-road-test/2013-dodge-dart-limping-to-the-bay.html

        A quick gander at the internet shows 413,000 Cruzes recalled for potential engine fires, another 293,000 for potential brake failures (with 27 reported accidents that may have been related), and a 2100 car recall for improperly fastened steering wheels(!).

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Honda recalls about everyone they sell since the 1980′s.

      http://www.forbes.com/sites/jimgorzelany/2014/03/26/automakers-with-the-lowest-and-highest-recall-rates/

    • 0 avatar
      alsorl

      Its all about perception. You perceive civic equals no issues. Then perceive Ford and Chrysler equal many issues. But in turn the perceived better car the “Civic” can break down, get new brakes shoes and rotors every 50k. But the perception is still the Honda is better. Any new auto maker can have issues. Just look at the perfect auto maker Toyoda. They forgot how to design a fuel pedal. Yet the perception is Toyoda can still do no wrong.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Do we know the country of origin of these questionable parts?

    • 0 avatar
      gtrslngr

      Where a good 90% of the CRUZE comes from no doubt . That being S.Korea . The CRUZE being mostly manufactured in S. Korea and then … Assembled … in the US .

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        On mine the auto trans was from Korea but I’m not sure how much else. The engine is from Austria, the metal stampings USA, and I’d guess the balance is the typical roster of worldwide suppliers in Mexico, China, etc.

  • avatar
    gtrslngr

    Oh Ryuko and all my other detractors from yesterdays CRUZE discussion !!!

    Any questions now .. gentlemen ?

    And just to add in further insult to injury when it comes to GMs current foibles ;

    News Flash !!!! For the very first time in automotive History … the Dodge RAM is out selling the Chevy Silverado and its GMC counterpart .

    I’m telling you . If any of my other predictions about GM I made recently on another site where GM had me removed come true in the next 30 days I may just lose it from laughing my fool head off .

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Just the silverado*

      But no less that’s amazing, the new silverado is a massive disappointment and massively overpriced, truck buyers simply won’t pay the rediculous amounts GM is asking and further proves my previous ideas on why the fullsize SUV market has been in decline.

      So to GM~
      No extremely feminized trucks with plastic pretty boy front ends.
      No square wheel wells
      Get rid of the luxury car interior, regardless what the media says, truck buyers don’t look for high quality plastics, if that’s a such thing.
      And lower the price 25% to make it competitive.

      I’m looking for a pickup truck not a Mercedes.

    • 0 avatar

      > News Flash !!!! For the very first time in automotive History … the Dodge RAM is out selling the Chevy Silverado and its GMC counterpart .

      Slamming GM dependability to promote Chrysler. The irony overfloweth.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    So question, on many AWD and maybe FWD? Vehicles the front passenger side does the most pulling from a stop.

    Are the two half shafts different parts? If not(which to me would make sense for them to be the same) are they only upgrading the side with the most force being sent through, or is it in fact different?

    • 0 avatar
      Volt 230

      I believe that in the Corolla, the passenger one does most of the puling from a stop and it is shorter than the driver’s side.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Halfshafts are almost always different, because a transversely-mounted engine and transaxle (mounted in tandem) push the transaxle output splines way off-center.

      The halfshafts may be the same on some AWD cars with longitudinal engines.

      Evidently the RH shaft on these cars suffers from a metallurgy flaw or something wrong in the secondary operations of manufacturing (heat treating, machining, assembly) that are unique to it alone.

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      equal lengths are best.

      But, most people don’t have equal length fwd except Subaru who mounts the engine and transmission in the longitudinal fashion. Thus symmetric all wheel drive.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        Many modern cars compensate for this with an intermediate shaft on the longer side, the half shafts end up being the same length.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          That’s what I was thinking, it’s seems easier to have a single part number for both sides.

          • 0 avatar
            Wheeljack

            But it costs a lot to add that intermediate shaft, a bearing and some sort of a bracket to hold the whole affair up. That’s the unfortunate reality of why most vehicles don’t have equal length halfshafts.

            Ironically, the US spec 1978-80 Ford Fiestas had equal length halfshafts with very robust Rzeppa style CV joints. The only weakness was the boots themselves, but I cleaned and repacked many a crud-encrusted joint on those with no sign of wear despite the torn boot.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            @Wheeljack:

            I learned to drive on a 78 Fiesta, but didn’t know that it had equal length halfshafts. That car had a lot of torque steer, but I suppose that was more due to suspension and steering geometry than the halfshafts.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Equal length halfshafts used to be added to performance variants of cars. A good 80s example would be Chrysler products. Most of the turbo cars got the pillow block (if that’s the right term) and short horizontal shaft to create equal length driveshafts. Basic models got the unequal length. It was supposed to reduce torque steer.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    The hits just keep on coming. Can you recall Cadillac names as well?

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    Now I know why I was told by the Chevy dealer when these came out – you have to buy them before you drive them!

  • avatar
    mikedt

    What the hell is going on at GM?!? Are they trying to drive their stock price down in anticipation of a buy-back? No company could unintentionally make this many errors.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Looks like the RAM pickup outsold the Silverado by a couple hundred units last month. Not a good month for GM, at all.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Well there goes one of my potential test drives while new car shopping. I was going to do some test drives next week during my Spring Break.

    I was going to try an RS manual trans 1.4 turbo to keep my my Enthusiast Street Cred, YO!

  • avatar
    seth1065

    They will need Norm to save them , thank The Lord this recall was not on his Buick or hell would have broken loose

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I’m sure he is digging up links of other manufacturers that have had recalls to prove that his beloved GMs are, in fact, even more reliable than anything else on the road.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Toyota and Honda still lead in recalls/sales ratio over GM weighing sales into the mix. Hyundai is about the worst new car maker but not sure if this includes Kia.

        http://www.forbes.com/sites/jimgorzelany/2014/03/26/automakers-with-the-lowest-and-highest-recall-rates/

  • avatar
    86er

    Guess GM is getting all the recalls over with at once. Question is if it’s the right approach or has the appearance of a tidal wave of reliability/durability woes?

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I’d guess the appearance of a tidal wave would be short-lived. What really hurts is having relatives, co-workers, acquaintances, and others telling of their personal experience with a car that wouldn’t run when they want it to.

      With the half shaft, the car is running when brought in for inspection and running when picked up, making it a short-lived minor blip in peoples’ minds. Having the problem checked/repaired BEFORE it’s experienced by the owner can have a positive effect.

  • avatar
    86er

    P.S. The hell’s a half-shaft?

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      A half-shaft is a drive axle.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      @86er, less excited than a FULL-shaft.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      It cost me $900 to replace both in my old Altima, so I’d say a half-shaft is about $450.

      • 0 avatar

        Mother of god. It seems like I bought a half-shaft for Galant for $150 only a couple of years ago, dust boots and all, NOS.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        WTF were they made out of Gold?

        Rockauto has a 2010 Altima CV shafts with the highest price being ~$130 (used)
        On the other hand, a NEW halfshaft for an 03 H2 is Max $85 dollars, And from experience it took me an hour to remove it when I was doing a UCA a few months back.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Lorenzo might have had OEM Nissan parts installed at a dealer, or atleast they charged him that much. I recently replaced the axles in a 1992 Accord with new (NOT reman junk) axles that cost something like $80 per side, very reasonable. The reman crap they sell at Advanced Auto or Autozone is to be avoided like the plague.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            They WERE OEM parts, but weren’t just the half shafts, but the complete assemblies along with some brake and suspension work that I didn’t break out of the total bill. It was just a few years ago on what was then a 15 year old car. The 1995 Altima front end wasn’t designed to allow a car thief to jump a curb at speed with impunity.

  • avatar

    Does it really matter?
    Who in the right mind would buy any GM car now?

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      I never understand the idea of a recall being a bad thing. The problems to me are known problems that aren’t recalled. Think of the ignition switch issue where they delayed any action for many years.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Norm of course

  • avatar
    omer333

    After seeing what’s happening with GM right now, I’m really glad I bought a Dart over the weekend instead of going with a Verano or Cruze.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Not to impune your choice by any means (because I don’t know what you like) but this to me is shades of the bizzaro world.

      I’m really glad I brought the [Chrysler product] over the [GM product].

      Wow this [Dodge/RAM product] is worlds better than the [Chevy/GMC product] I test drove last week.

      • 0 avatar
        omer333

        No worries.

        Before I bought my Dart I test drove the Dart in the three different engine combinations that are available, along with an Accord Sport, Buick Verano, Buick Regal, Dodge Journey, Dodge Charger (V6), Mazda3 (2.0/MT), and Mazda6 (AT/MT). I had looked at a Focus, but the back seat was too small for kid seats. I had contemplated a Cruze, but never drove one.

        My sentiment was that the current issues with GM makes their products very undesirable compared to what else is out there.

        Oh and cash on the hood helps when making a decision in a car purchase.

      • 0 avatar
        jpolicke

        Certainly aren’t words many people expected to hear- or say. However, I get the impression that FCA under Marchionne has made a serious commitment to improving and maintaining quality. People ridiculed Jeep for the delays in launching the Cherokee, but FCA decided to hold it back until the transmission issues were resolved. Contrast with GM basically saying “Meh, the switch is good enough.”

    • 0 avatar
      bk_moto

      That’s a little bit like saying “I’m sure glad I got shot by a Beretta instead of a Glock.”

  • avatar
    Ralph ShpoilShport

    GM is an embarrassment. Even given a new debt free lease on life can’t help them.
    “GM found that poor quality control from the parts supplier lead to micro fractures inside the shaft.” Don’t take responsibility (it is their name on the car), and throw another supplier under the bus.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Better than the “silent” Toyota recalls of the 80′s and 90′s!

  • avatar
    Atum

    Toyota was just put on probation. Will GM be as well?

    Just saying.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    One of three things IMO, (1) the half shaft is the same across all drive trains and it was discovered it could not handle the turbo motor well, (2) the half shaft on the turbo is different than the NA models and it was discovered to not be up to spec, (3) Half shaft is the same across all, is not up to spec, and will be recalled on all models of Cruze in the near future.


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