By on April 20, 2018

2018 Ford F-150 , Image: Ford

Ford was all but gloating… okay, it was gloating when it unveiled the coveted “30 mpg highway” figure for the upcoming 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel V6 earlier this week. A full-size pickup with a 30 mpg rating? That sets it apart from all others, including the 27 mpg (highway) Ram 1500 EcoDiesel.

What the automaker didn’t mention was how much green you’ll need to shell out for a Power Stroke-powered F-150. Well, the beans are now spilled, but the product positioning seems a little odd.

Speaking to The Drive, an unnamed Ford spokesman described the markup for the 250 horsepower, 440 lb-ft engine, and where it sits in the trim lineup.

“On the F-150 Lariat, with its standard 2.7-liter EcoBoost engine, the walk to the 3.0-liter Power Stroke is $4,000, or $2,400 more than the 3.5-liter EcoBoost option,” the spokesman said. “On the F-150 King Ranch and Platinum, with the standard 5.0-liter V-8 engine, the walk to the 3.0-liter Power Stroke is $3,000, or $2,400 more than the 3.5-liter EcoBoost option.”

Lariat. That’s not the trim you think of when envisioning a prospective work truck with a diesel under the hood, though it’s the lowest trim deemed acceptable by the posh horsey set. The base XL starts out at $27,705 before delivery, and an extra $995 replaces the entry level 3.3-liter V6 with Ford’s excellent 2.7-liter EcoBoost V6. That engine boasts 400 lb-ft of torque, as does the optional 5.0-liter V8 found in both XL and XLT trims. The 3.5-liter EcoBoost pushes twist to 470 lb-ft, and is also optional on lower trims.

The 2.7-liter is standard kit on the Lariat trim, which starts at $7,715 more than an XLT. Paying an extra four grand on top of that for 40 extra foot-pounds of torque and four extra miles per gallon on the highway (and 3 mpg combined) seems like a decision you’d have to make over the course of an evening with your spouse and a calculator. There’s no regular cab bodystyle in the Lariat, either, not that many construction workers or fleet managers seek out that trim’s creature comforts.

While the new diesel promises superior fuel economy, Ford clearly isn’t pushing overall economy with this option. Diesel fuel currently runs about 15 cents a gallon more than gasoline, so you’d need to cover plenty of highway miles in a year for this upgrade to make financial sense — and if operational costs were truly that pressing, you wouldn’t be in the market for a Lariat, anyway.

[Image: Ford Motor Company]

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89 Comments on “Now, About Ford’s Upcoming F-150 Diesel…...”


  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Four thousand dollars?!? On top of a Lariat?!? I recognize that the PS 3.0 isn’t cheap to build, but it doesn’t sound like they’re that interested in selling a lot of them. I don’t see a lot of EcoDiesel RAMs, but I seem to see more of them all the time.

    I wouldn’t mind a SuperCrew XLT that got low 20s around town and 30 on the highway, but they don’t want to build it. Screw them.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      dukeisduke,
      Yet people are spending north of $60 000 for a PICKUP.

      So, why would you not spend the additional money?

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I know this is from that dreaded “other” site but it is relevant…

        https://jalopnik.com/84-month-auto-loans-are-becoming-more-common-because-yo-1825414883

        Which is also why Chevy thinks they need a more EXTREME Buffalo Butt Off Road package (or whatever it will be called) for the Colorado.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The 30mpg might be a little high, or the US methods to measure FE is lax.

    On average I would assume this vehicle in Australia would return around 10-11 litres per 100km, anything better than that the vehicle would be a nuisance on the highway by travelling too slow.

    I do hope the interior of the F150 is improved from the Chinese like, poorly put together Tupperware in the aluminium F150 I had in the UAE.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      A US 30 MPG rating translates to 50+ MPG in UNECE markets. But think about why F-150s are found in every corner of the world, Tupperware included.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        DenverMike,
        Please stop with your trolling, it’s becoming rather boring.

        Really mate, quit the sh!t, go troll on some dating site.

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          the US highway mpg testing is pretty accurate these days, in fact with diesels in particular it’s not uncommon for people to get higher than EPA number when driving at speed limit.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            TwoBelugas,
            It’s the same here in Australia. All you need to do is look at any diesel powered vehicle review and look at the FE from the motoring journo’s.

            I think it has a lot to do with driving technique.

            My diesel is supposed to return 9.1 litres per 100km according to the sticker. I’m currently sitting on 8.6 after 60 thousand km.

            Where we differ is the reported FE is combined. So, this F-150 will not get anywhere near 30mpg (US) in Australia, it would realistically be around 23-24mpg.

          • 0 avatar
            brn

            EPA fuel economy ratings are probably the least “lax” ratings in the world. You don’t need to drive the speed limit to exceed them. You just need to not drive like an idiot.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s too easy to cut through the horse sh… The Prius gets about 65 mpg in Europe and a magical 69 mpg Australia, which reviewers couldn’t come close to achieving.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            caradvice.com.au/423354/2016-toyota-prius-review/

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            DiM again,
            Read this
            “Fuel economy was pretty good, seeing as low as 4.5L/100km on some daily commutes”.

            4.5L/100km equates to 52.2 US mpg.

            https://www.motoring.com.au/toyota-prius-c-2018-review-111246/

            You again blew it.

            Keep on trying troll.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          “DenverMike,

          blah blah blah blah blah blah blah”

          Do you two girls want to get a room?

          Al, just shut the f up. Drinking and posting is never a good idea.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – Thanks, check your article, 3.9L/100km is its official “Fuel Consumption”.

            4.5L was the best observed, “4.8L/100km AS TESTED”.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            jalop1991,
            You are correct, sorry mate. I don’t drink and post. I only drink around others socially. Then I get sh!tfaced.

      • 0 avatar
        dima

        In Switzerland, I see some RAMs and almost no F-150. Same for France and Germany. Here we do not like Ford, the interior quality just not there,

      • 0 avatar
        Ce he sin

        In possibly surprising news, the F 150 is sold in North America, parts of the middle east, a few islands in the Caribbean and Iceland. The rest of the world swears by the Hilux.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Yet in spite of being sold only in those limited markets it remains the best selling vehicle on the planet.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Art,
            By default through stringent Big 3 protection.

            I would hazard to guess if the Chicken Tax didn’t exist the Hilux would be the dominant global pickup.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAF0 – What? How? Are you actually suggesting Toyota would sell the Hilux along side the Tacoma?

            If anything the Chicken tax “protects” Toyota from itself, I guess.

            ???

            You make no sense. The Chicken tax may “protect” certain automakers (sales), but the Big 3 have the least to gain from the Chicken tax.

            In fact the Big 3 are hampered the most, trying to import their global trucks to the US.

            Use your brain mate!

            And while you’re at it, provide a list of global trucks that could truly “compete” with Big 3, fullsize pickups, steal sales, etc…

            In alphabetical order please……………………..!

  • avatar
    ajla

    So like with the GM 6.2L V8, you can only get the diesel F-150 if you go for the Steakhose and Leather editions.

    At least Ram will sell you a Tradesman Ecodiesel (for now anyway).

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      ajla,
      For some reason in Australia diesel is the preferred option on 85% of all pickups sold, even the 25% of pickups used as work trucks. 85% of pickups sold are also 4×4.

      I do believe people are prepared to pay the premium for diesel power in larger vehicles, especially work trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      This is just to have that magical 30MPG number for bragging rights. Ford has invested far too much in the EcoThirsty’s to let a diesel undo a decade of “tiny gas turbo is better” propaganda.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I expect that once they are up to speed you’ll be able to get the diesel in an XL and probably with a regular cab too, though it may require a FIN to order it. But to start they are going to force you into the higher trims to maximize their profit.

  • avatar
    ernest

    “Lariat. That’s not the trim you think of when envisioning a prospective work truck with a diesel under the hood, though it’s the lowest trim deemed acceptable by the posh horsey set.”

    So…. what trim level were you thinking? Take a bare bones XL Supercab 4X4 (no one buys a Reg Cab, and 4X4 is minimum up here), and you’ve got a $40K+ stripped down pickup. That’s what killed the base pickups- there’s no such thing as a cheap one. And what killed Regular and Supercabs- for that kind of money, it’d better be able to do more than one thing.

    $4000 for the PSD isn’t that bad- it’s over $9000 on the big Fords.

    • 0 avatar
      JDG1980

      “Take a bare bones XL Supercab 4X4 (no one buys a Reg Cab, and 4X4 is minimum up here), and you’ve got a $40K+ stripped down pickup.”

      Not according to Ford’s website – the MSRP for a base model XL Supercab 4×4 is $35,220. And of course there are almost always substantial discounts available.

      And that’s for *individual* buyers. Fleets pay much less – my county government pays less than $24K for a stripped-down F-150 SuperCab 4×4.

  • avatar
    cartime

    Is there a precedent to define this as odd? Wouldn’t it be odd if they offered a diesel pickup as a base engine and the gas was an upgrade. Particularly when said diesel engine has attractive fuel economy, torque, and HP.

    What’s odd is how large the pickup market is and how ignorant media can be to it.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Yes there is precedent. Ram.

      They will offer you the EcoDiesel in the very base level Tradesman. It’s still outrageously priced but at least you won’t see such a drastic MPG drop if you go with the 4X4 over the 4X2.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    At this price I see zero reason for anyone to get the diesel.

    Unlike with the big HD engines, this one doesn’t have any qualitative or quantitative advantage over the 3.5 EcoBoost except fuel economy. And with the higher price of diesel the economy advantage still exists, but becomes very small. Urea and maintenance costs could well eat it altogether. Even in the best case it would take years to make up the purchase price difference.

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      “At this price I see zero reason for anyone to get the diesel.”

      It might be important down the road when they have to deal with CAFE and gas truck prices increase to make diesels more on parity cost wise.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      The diesel mpg advantage is most relevant when towing. This vehicle is clearly targeted toward the crowd that tows their toys to the lake house every weekend. They wouldn’t be caught dead in a lower level trim.

    • 0 avatar
      Rocket

      Opting for the 5.0 can’t be cost-justified, either. Some people simply prefer the drivability of a diesel or NA V8. Besides, you can bet some of that will come back in resale.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      Hmm…

      In some parts of the country diesel is cheaper than gas. Lower price + Fuel economy is a real winner. It could pay off in about a year… moreso if your towing a lot because thats where diesel fuel economy really shines. My F350 gets about 14 MPG towing my race hauler. My ram gasser would get about 8-10 MPG towing my race hauler. empty, my F350 got about 16 MPG and the Ram got about 18. Plus I sold my last ford to a guy who puts up 6 figures a year delivering medical supplies between rochester and albany daily… payoff for him could be in months, not years!

      Diesels are EASY to tune, so for $100 this thing will put down 25% better numbers. You can’t do that with gas engines anymore like you could in the 90s.

      reliability. There’s a lot of reliability concerns over ecoboosts for frequent tow-ers. The diesels can handle the abuse a lot longer.

      Torque and Horsepower. Everyone LOVES to point out the peak HP and Torque figures aren’t “that much better” than the gassers, but they fail to read the entire power curves. The diesels produce a lot more power in the lower RPMs where the users use them most, leading to a significant real-world power increase, despite the lack of high revving power that no one ever really sees. again, look at the power curves, not just a peak power number. Even a dinky little cruze diesel (I think its 1.6L) outperforms the Direct Injected 3.6L Chevy motor put in the bigger cars and camaro in RPMs up to around 3000, and who goes over 3000 RPMs in normal driving? That motor has about half the peak power though, but higher power through all normal driving situations.

      Resale – I can pay $2500 and get most of that back when I sell it. that means your really only factoring in time-value of money, not a real cost increase.

      Maintenance – This is up in the air. Many people love diesels because they argue its lower maintenance costs. Others argue diesels have a higher maintenance cost. This depends on a lot of factors, but I see it as fairly negligable. I doubt a dealer will charge more to change the oil on a diesel… they don’t right now (I have a powerstroke 1 ton and I pay the same as someone with the v10). Might it cost a few dollars more? maybe… others will argue they are more durable so long term costs are less… but critical components cost more… but once again most people won’t own it out of warranty! haha.

      Cool factor. What practical reason does anyone need a ferrari? A porsche panamera? A lamborghini? A bentley? We like to pretend like all our decisions are about practicality, but more often than not they aren’t. If they were, we’d all be driving around in brown, manual, base model wagons and mopeds.

      But they aren’t for everyone… but theres a lot of good reasons to buy a diesel.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Based on what I have seen from the the Super Duty PS diesel, I would be keen to take a pass on this for a couple of years. I am not aware of much issue with the Ecoboost motors, but the PS diesel have been fairly problematic from the 6.0 on. Too costly to keep them running as compared to the dollars required for the gas engine.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Even the most reliable diesels can’t touch the reliability of the average gas engines. Although the failure may be “DEF emissions” related.

      But I wouldn’t judge Ford diesels by 6.0 disaster, thanks in part to Navistar. Ford went work on the 6.0 and by ’05 had the least warranty complaints of any pickup. So the later 6.0 Super dutys are becoming prized possessions.

      • 0 avatar
        brn

        To effectively repeat what DenverMike said. Don’t judge modern powerstrokes on the junk from Navistar. Once Ford dumped them (big controversy) and did their own thing, it got a lot better. Ford knows how to make a diesel.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          The 6.0 issues were mostly Ford’s doing, not Navistars.

          The 6.0 when used in Navistar applications was far more reliable. But Ford insisted on pushing the engine (via tuning) to horsepowers that it wasn’t designed for. Gotta win that war on paper!

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The 6.0 was installed as designed/built by Navistar and it was basic mechanicals that were failing, oil pump, high pressure oil distribution, etc.

            Navistar truck 6.0s had almost as much problems, although they’re detuned (same a Ford cab-chassis’ 6.0s), but they’re the same engine.

            Here’s the difference. Salaried/commercial drivers don’t care when their trucks break, they just jump in another. Fleet operators have better things to do than go on forums, rant and cry all day.

            But remember it was a tiny percentage of trucks that had problems, and you almost never hear from happy customers. Ford sold lots of Power Strokes in this era, and too many had problems.

            The later 6.0s (or upgraded to “later”) are trading for big dollars now, for their reliability/durability, big power, great fuel economy and of course they’re “pre-emissions”.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            youtube.com/watch?v=E4Xy4WDqgjQ

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            EBFlex,
            The 3.2 Ford diesel in my pickup should go more than 1/2 a million miles before any major overhaul.

            I do believe Ford does produce some good diesels.

            In all honesty the new 2 litre diesel in the Ranger will more than likely move the F-150 along nicely. I don’t now why Ford just doesn’t offer a diesel like this in the XL work trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “…I don’t know why Ford doesn’t offer this engine in the…”

            @BAFO – For one, your old diesel is “pre emissions”. Your fuel consumption will go up dramatically if you upgrade to a new diesel, as well as increased maintenance/repair costs, not to mention longevity.

            As new blends of “emissions friendly” diesel fuel comes about, you’ll lose the lubricity that made half million mile diesels possible.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Um DenverMike,
            1. What is pre emissions? My 3.2 is used in the US under as you term the harshest emissions standards in the world.

            2. The two litre Ford diesel I quoted used in the Ranger is actually Ford’s newest diesel. So, that to me indicates its ……. sort of …… like “now”, “current”, “new”, “bestest”, far more advanced than any current US diesel in use, leave the 3 litre Lion looking very old and tarnished.

            Man, rather than troll, fncktard, start responding to the conmments.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s real simple. Do you add DEF/Adblue to your truck? If no, it’s “pre emissions”.

            I respond to all your questions/comments directed to me, honestly and professionally, even if you insult. I realize you have a problem.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            DenverMike,
            I’ll respond to fnckwit comments with little or no basis as I see fit.

            You produce many aspersions based on your paradigms, like this pre emissions crap.

            You also deflected the jist of my comment. You did not respond to what I wrote, you came out with a fncking trolling bullsh!t response I’d expect from a child. Are you mentally fncked up or something. Do you blow in your pants thinking how good you are at trolling.

            Well, mate, you are a definite tockley, a sick fnck of an exuse for a human. TTAC moderators should ask you to produce proof, other than your comments are the be all end all.

            I will not correspond any longer with you as you just troll and don’t seek the truth.

            You just troll.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – Once again, thank you for your response!

            It’s been about a decade since you could buy a new “pre emissions” diesel in the US, and I realize Australia trails behind the US (and Europe too!) when it comes to emissions, so when you brag about the awesome diesel MPG of your BT Mazda pickup, there’s a reason why it gets such great mpg, besides your exaggerations.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Must be that Trifecta tune at work

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Chances are better than average the F-150 would sell a fair amount in any market it’s allowed to sell freely along side the Hilux, global Ranger, etc, especially now with the diesel.

            Imagine the increased productivity, hauling, and who can hate the increased power, comfort, passenger carrying and legroom?

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      6.0 and 6.4 were navistar motors. I haven’t heard any issues on the 6.7, and frankly the 6.4 was pretty solid too with the only major complaint being cab-off-service requirements.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        When the cab needs to come off, you’re needing head gaskets or worse. The lifting off the cab is a relatively minor annoyance or cost at that point. It pays something like “3 hours”, but can be done in one hr, as trucks are designed for easy cab removal.

        The cab removal is necessary for major work on Duramax trucks too. Except cabs don’t “need” to be removed for Ford or GM, but it makes the job many times easier/efficient therefor faster.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          Only 3 hours?

          I priced around and it was a minimum of $2k for the cab off at every shop I called. Thats about a 10-15 hour job, although if they can do it in 3 hours wouldn’t surprise me.

          I think the 6.4 is the real bargain in the diesel market. the trucks sell for about $10k less than comparible trucks all because you “might” someday need an extra $2000 repair.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            If it takes them that long to lift off the cab, they shouldn’t be working on your truck. Clearly they’re not used it, so what does that tell you?

            The 6.4 is throwaway engine. Good for maybe 150K between rebuilds, with not much reusable. That’s why those trucks are so cheap. First time DEF emissions on that one.

            A little research before you buy goes a long ways. The later 6.0s are gaining a fan base (going up in value) for a reason.

          • 0 avatar
            arach

            @DenverMike

            I laugh at how much the diesel market “overvalues” the good ones and “undervalues” the bad ones.

            Seriously I’ll take a 6.4 any day. 10 grand will buy you a new engine or two.

            Why pay $10k price premium to save a possible few grand expense?

            Plus I had well over 200k on my 6.4.

  • avatar
    Bill Wade

    I just want to know where diesel is only $.15 more than gas.

    • 0 avatar
      Pricha33

      Come to southern Ontario where diesel is currently about .40 a gallon cheaper than regular unleaded.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      Much US diesel gets exported to Europe. As Europe moves away from diesel and European diesels reduce imports to the US, we’ll see the price of diesel decline. Back in my day, it was quite a bit less than gas.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      In Houston today its ranging .18+ cents at my area stations….

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      Diesels’ cheaper here in Ohio than midgrade (what the Hemi and such need).

      We did a huge analysis of it over on the ja-darkside-lopnik. We discovered that diesel is cheaper than even regular at times in Central US, but quite a bit more expensive in California and the east coast. Didn’t get much feedback on the south.

      In comparing the ecodiesel and the hemi, at least in the midwest, diesel was always cheaper than the midgrade which the hemi requires, and was at times equal to or lower than regular.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    Three guys I work with drive one-ton Diesels daily. One Ford; one Chevy; and one Dodge Cummins. They all argue about the merits of each until I ask why they drive those behemoths every day just so that they can tow a holiday trailer a few hundred miles; park for two weeks; then tow it back. One guy, at least, has an old Corolla GT-S that he occasionally drives but it seems more to be a bragging thing with their trucks. I don’t get it at all.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      It’s all about STS – short tallywhacker syndrome.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      We all know those guys. Gotta have a diesel for towing, but put most of their miles on commuting. It’s really a status thing.

      • 0 avatar
        Tele Vision

        They like to make fun of my F-150 SCab but collectively love my Gen I CTS-V – both of which, combined, cost less to buy and own than just one of their massively-capable trucks that are used as Miatas for 350 days of the year. They’ve all ‘chipped’ their trucks now, too. Sad, really. Just sad.

  • avatar
    jeano

    Other sites report the magical 30mpg is only obtainable in 4×2 trim, 4wd trucks are rated at 25mpg
    How does this compare to RAM and the upcoming Chev offering?

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Ford really screwed the pooch on this. FAR too expensive, wrong positioning in the lineup, and if you want 4WD, the MPG drops by a staggering 5MPG.

    The Ram 4X2 and 4X4 doesn’t drop at all. No penalty for getting four wheel drive.

  • avatar
    BoogerROTN

    I just purchased a Ram 1500 Big Horn 4×4 w/the 3.0 on Thursday. Whereas the MSRP was a tick below $52K, I ended up paying $33K; about $12K in rebates and the dealer discount was $7K. I did play the fool on this one and buy the 7-year extended warranty ($1800), but it’ll give me some piece of mind concerning the drivetrain.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      Congrats. Heck of a price… if I could buy one of those for 33k I’d do it in a heartbeat.

      • 0 avatar
        BoogerROTN

        My dealer still has nine Big Horn 3.0’s left at between $33-35K (no funny business w/the dealer discount or Chrysler Financial rebate either). Here’s another one for $32,995:

        https://www.lithiadodgespokane.com/new/Ram/2017-Ram-1500-spokane-wa-bafec96a0a0e0ae70c244e03320a4304.htm

        You could always call the dealer and fly up or ship. Note: The snow is gone, supposed to be 81F by Friday.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          Are you serious?

          this is “too good to be true”. that one you sent me is my wife’s DREAM truck. Its the right color and all the right options. I’d pay that amount right now but my “BS Meter” is going pretty hard… but I totally want to believe you.

          • 0 avatar
            BoogerROTN

            You can believe…$33K was the price I paid. I was absolutely sure the rebates were going to be things like Farm Bureau, Active Duty Military, Mercury Astronauts, etc. But it was all legit…

            BTW: Spent the better part of four hours waxing it yesterday with Collinite 845.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            I’d hop on that. Dream vehicles with a discount like that don’t happen often. Spokane’s a nice little city anyway.

            The cathedral there is an unexpected gem of architecture. You can stop by and show a little gratitude for a 33% discount on a diesel pickup–something I didn’t think was possible.

      • 0 avatar
        jthorner

        $29,528 for that truck in Gilroy, CA … and they have lots to choose from. Here is one in red:

        https://www.southcountychryslerdodgejeepramfiat.com/new/Ram/2017-Ram-1500-013923570a0e0aea6df6503854e72424.htm

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      Dang, you just got me thinking lol.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    “A full-size pickup with a 30 mpg rating? That sets it apart from all others, including the 27 mpg (highway) Ram 1500 EcoDiesel.”

    On 2WD models.

    The RAM 1500, with 8 speed (not 6 speed as you claimed last time) has no highway mileage penalty for the EcoDiesel. The Ford? 2 MPG less than the RAM 1500 on 4×4 models.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      SC5door,
      I believe when you get FE figures as close as the Ram EcoDiesel and the F150 Lion diesel, with two extremely similar engines in design, output and FE there will be little or no difference in actual FE during ownership.

      I have the 3.2 Mazda diesel pickup, which is in reality a Ranger. A couple of guys at work drive Rangers one is using lots more fuel than me, the other similar as myself. So, I think the big FE push is mainly for the manufacturers boasting as a marketing ploy.

      Another issue in Australia when diesel became popular in the 80s was the way in which people drove diesels. They “flogged” them as if they were driving a gasoline engine and not use the lower rpm torque. The injector business did well.

      In the US with the diesel being relatively unpopular I do see people driving diesels like gas engines and the FE will be poorer than it should be.

  • avatar
    jfb43

    I drove a Tata pickup while deployed in Afghaniland. It had a tiny diesel and was pretty gutless. But what made it usable was the manual transmission. The speed limits were low around the FOB, but I could shift through all the gears without hitting the accelerator and make the engine’s torque pull it to around 25-30 MPH. Diesels need manuals to be as efficient as possible. I could drive around in that truck for weeks without filling up.

  • avatar
    arach

    I’m going to buy one of these.

    My wife only wants to drive a Diesel. that is requirement number 1. We don’t even need a truck, but I’m stuck owning a 1 ton truck just for a diesel engine.

    SOOOO…. the Diesel F150 is SO MUCH MORE PRACTICAL than a Diesel F250 or F350. It gets WAY better fuel economy, and you get a lot more options for the price.

    total winner.

    Thought about buying an ecodiesel, but this one will beat that out I believe.

    Too many people on here are looking at the diesel as an engine upgrade. Move to the midwest and you’ll know a diesel isn’t an engine upgrade, its a requirement for life… haha. We also often have cheaper diesel.

    car choices aren’t practical… but if having a DIESEL ENGINE is a priority for you for whatever stupid reason it is, this is great news for the environment and for my wallet.

    #BringOntheHate

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      No hate, but I am genuinely curious why a diesel engine is Priority Almighty. Does she even want a truck?

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        Because she’s a stereotypical woman who wants to say “Its a diesel”

        seriously (insert eyeroll here). I bought a 5.4L gasser and she hates it and keeps griping about when we’re going to get a “real truck” again.

        Her car hit 120k, so this is a great way to give her a “real truck” without having to buy a 3/4 – 1 ton.

        I can’t hate on her too much, because I like to blow money on sports cars. we all have our things.

    • 0 avatar
      jthorner

      It is probably all about bragging rights.

  • avatar
    Grenade

    Pontiac 6000 turbo

  • avatar
    jthorner

    Many of the people buying brand new diesel powered pickup trucks would be better off financially had they purchased a gasoline powered version.

    People are weird, and they love bragging rights. They will spend thousands more up front to be able to brag about their truck’s fuel economy at the next party. Here in California at least diesel fuel runs about 15% more than regular gasoline. So ya gotta get more than a 15% fuel economy improvement just to break even at the pump, never mind the high up front costs, expensive long term maintenance and unknown durability of new designs.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I agree, but they are probably better off in a 3.0L 150 Diesel than a 6.7L 3/4 Ton if all they are looking for is bragging rights…

      Not all these buyers will be “upgrade”. the “downgrade” buyers are actually an improvement financially and for the environment.

      (Side note, according to the EPA, the Diesels are better for the environment than the V8 gassers)

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