Stellantis Cancels Ram 1500 Classic in Canada, America Next?

Matthew Guy
by Matthew Guy

The burly Ram brand has officially announced what alert Canadian gearheads have known for a spell – the old-school Ram 1500 Classic pickup truck has been cancelled in that country.

Why have alert Canucks been wise to this development prior to Friday’s announcement? For starters, mention of the truck for a 2024 model year has never been part of the brand’s build-and-price tool in that country, despite dealers in the area having the things parked cheek-to-jowl on their lots. Meanwhile, both sides of the border sat up and took notice when the full-fat Ram 1500 earned a Warlock trim for 2024, a name formerly reserved for the Classic.


Per a short statement, the company said inventory in the Canadian market will sell through the 2024 calendar year, so presumably what ya see is what ya get in showrooms north of the border (unless someone’s willing to do a dealer trade; given the level of inventory on lots around here, that may be an option like it was in the pre-pandemic years). Notably, the same statement went on to say Ram 1500 Classic production will continue for the United States and Mexico.


Selling both the ‘old’ and ‘new’ trucks side-by-each wasn’t a wholly fresh idea when the current-gen Ram 1500 popped up about five years ago. After all, Ford did something similar with the F-150 way back in 2004 when that model was extensively redesigned. What is unique about the situation at Ram is how long the arrangement has lasted – to the point where the ‘new’ truck has received numerous minor changes and even a mild refresh on the front fascia of some trims.


Readers with a clue will have long identified that the Ram 1500 Classic is powered by either the 3.6-liter Pentastar or 5.7L Hemi, the latter of which isn’t long for this world. Continuing to offer the Classic with just the V6 would limit the truck’s towing prowess to less than 8,000 pounds. We feel the chances of Ram engineering the new straight-six turbo for use in a truck which first appeared over fifteen long years ago hovers somewhere between slim and none.


Our advice if you want a Ram 1500 Classic? Hop on that train before Stellantis makes a last call for the thing in America, too.


[Image: Ram]


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Matthew Guy
Matthew Guy

Matthew buys, sells, fixes, & races cars. As a human index of auto & auction knowledge, he is fond of making money and offering loud opinions.

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  • Irvingklaws Irvingklaws on Apr 30, 2024

    I still prefer the looks of this generation to the new truck. If I were to buy new, it would be one of these.

  • Nathan Nathan on May 03, 2024

    The Ram is the most boring looking of the full size trucks, kind of like a Tundra.

    If they cancel the Ram Classic, I hope a full resign makes the Ram at least look interesting.

  • 3-On-The-Tree I don’t think Toyotas going down.
  • ToolGuy Random thoughts (bulleted list because it should work on this page):• Carlos Tavares is a very smart individual.• I get the sense that the western hemisphere portion of Stellantis was even more messed up than he originally believed (I have no data), which is why the plan (old plan, original plan) has taken longer than expected (longer than I expected).• All the OEMs who have taken a serious look at what is happening with EVs in China have had to take a step back and reassess (oversimplification: they were thinking mostly business-as-usual with some tweaks here and there, and now realize they have bigger issues, much bigger, really big).• You (dear TTAC reader) aren't ready to hear this yet, but the EV thing is a tsunami (the thing has already done the thing, just hasn't reached you yet). I hesitate to even tell you, but it is the truth.
  • ToolGuy ¶ I have kicked around doing an engine rebuild at some point (I never have on an automobile); right now my interest level in that is pretty low, say 2/5.¶ It could be interesting to do an engine swap at some point (also haven't done that), call that 2/5 as well.¶ Building a kit car would be interesting but a big commitment, let's say 1/5 realistically.¶ Frame-up restoration, very little interest, 1/5.¶ I have repainted a vehicle (down to bare metal) and that was interesting/engaging (didn't have the right facilities, but made it work, sort of lol).¶ Taking a vehicle which I like where the ICE has given out and converting it to EV sounds engaging and appealing. Would not do it anytime soon, maybe 3 to 5 years out. Current interest level 4/5.¶ Building my own car (from scratch) would have some significant hurdles. Unless I started my own car company, which might involve other hurdles. 😉
  • Rover Sig "Value" is what people perceive as its worth. What is the worth or value of an EV somebody creates out of a used car? People value different things, but for a vehicle, people generally ascribe worth in terms of reliability, maintainability, safety, appearance and style, utility (payload, range, etc.), convenience, operating cost, projected life, support network, etc. "Value for money" means how much worth would people think it had compared to competing vehicles on the market, in other words, would it be a good deal to buy one, compared to other vehicles one could get? Consider what price you would have to ask for it, including the parts and labor you put into it, because that would affect the “for the money” part of the “value for money” calculation. An indicator of whether people think an EV-built-in-a-used-car would provide "value for money" is the current level of demand for used cars turned into EVs. Are there a lot of people looking for these on the market? Or would building one just be a hobby? Repairing an existing EV, bringing it back into spec, might create better value for the money. Although demand for EVs is reportedly down recently.
  • ToolGuy Those of you who aren't listening to the TTAC Podcast, you really don't know what you are missing.
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