By on July 12, 2021

Ford

Sorry, diesel fans. Just three years after introducing a Power Stroke diesel for the F-150, Ford is dropping the diesel option.

And doing so with haste.

If you want to grab one of the last ones available, you have until Friday to do it.

Part of the problem, says Autoblog, is that the turbocharged gas options make more power and cost less than the diesel’s $4,995 price. They offer better towing capacity, to boot.

There’s also a hybrid model that is slightly cheaper, has slightly better towing, and is on par in terms of fuel economy.

Of course, diesel engines offer something gas engines don’t — low-end grunt.

While the diesel no longer seems to be the best powertrain option on paper, some buyers will still miss it. For the rest, special order by Friday or forever hold your peace.

Or, you know, save your dough for the upcoming Lightning.

[Image: Ford]

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67 Comments on “Ford to Drop Diesel F-150 This Week...”


  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    I was surprised they brought it out in the first place. Straight out of the gate, the EB was comparable and cheaper. Not a profitable move for F.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    USG hates diesel, Ford wants to continue keeping the junta happy (not to mention the Powerstroke 6.0 debacle Ford wants you to forget). If you must have a Ford diesel, you’ll step up to the $90K (?) F-250 diesel but only hardcore users play in that sandbox as it stands.

    • 0 avatar
      96redse5sp

      The junta?!? What junta? How many F-150s do you think Ford sells in Burma/Myanmar. Or is this just another reference from Q-Anon?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The junta in D.C., given Biden’s health there is no way he’s in a position to effectively govern by himself.

        • 0 avatar
          96red

          Oh, OK, so you’re one of those… Given that Brainless will be re-sworn in as President on August 13 anyway, why does Biden’s health matter? And what does any of this have to do with the F-150 diesel? You’re really reaching – and just for the opportunity to show off your shiny tinfoil hat…

          • 0 avatar
            RHD

            Women crave attention, and get it with gaudy fake nails, nasty heels and overdone makeup, along with not knowing how to keep quiet.
            Men who crave attention do it by posting out-of-touch, disparaging, useless, lame and repetitive “political” nonsense on internet websites.
            Enjoy your attention. Now get the shovel and go clean up after your hounds.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Not a chance. The Q nonsense is a disinfo op, the Cheka did something similar in the 1920s:

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Trust

            Long before the Capo di Tutti i Capi in Depends the USG has hated diesel technology. Its more fuel efficient, it can run on alternative fuels, the engines last longer, and historically diesel fuel had a long shelf life although that seems to have changed. When you’re a government whose currency is based on petroleum trading, these factors are not in your best interest on a large scale so what is in your best interest is to limit the technology so only those who have an actual need are able to utilize it. So they attack it in 2007 with their favorite weapon -regulation- in order to drive the costs up, despite the fact the numbers never lined up with the need for that regulation. There is no conspiracy, nearly all major gov’t actions are implemented through the lens of what is best for gov’t and/or the major corps affected by the action.

            https://www.bellperformance.com/blog/bid/117614/diesel-storage-shelf-life-isn-t-what-it-used-to-be

            @RHD

            You’re going to need a bigger shovel for all of the daily excrement coming out of your mouth.

        • 0 avatar
          Zhahn Doe

          Oh lord, here we go. Smh.

        • 0 avatar
          Zhahn Doe

          Oh lord, here we go. Smh.

        • 0 avatar
          midnite_clyde

          Who’s monitoring these comments? 28 thought he was on Parler.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Nah, cell phone apps are for children and dolts.

            You’d better check to go see what you’re told is trending, since thinking is hard and all.

      • 0 avatar

        What difference does it make?

    • 0 avatar
      Ol Shel

      I love how Biden gets the blame when the free-market capitalists at Ford decide to drop a poor-selling option.

      Republicans are a sorry lot.Y’all used to be based in reality.

    • 0 avatar
      kjhkjlhkjhkljh kljhjkhjklhkjh

      Except the Junta like diesels … so your posting nonsense ?

  • avatar
    JMII

    How else are the locals going to impress us if they can’t roll coal? clearly not with some flower powered EV truck!

  • avatar
    eng_alvarado90

    Personally I thought the V6 diesel was gone along with the 13th gen F150 last year. I’ve only seen a handful of these in the wild and from the beginning it was the least interesting Diesel option out of the D3 half-ton trucks (at least on paper).

    I can see a Supercab 13th gen Diesel (or 14th gen 2021 MY only) having its own Rare Rides chapter in a few years

  • avatar
    dal20402

    The smaller diesel engines are, the more terrible they are, either because their emissions levels are completely unacceptable or because the Rube Goldberg devices you have to put on them to make their emissions somewhat acceptable are costly to install and maintain and reduce engine performance.

    This is a recognition that the diesel had far more costs than benefits for the vast majority of light-duty consumers.

    The faster diesel dies out for every application smaller than a Class 3 hotshot truck, the better.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Gasoline HD trucks these days are generally capable of handling all but the most extreme noncommercial applications, but they still have two big downfalls IMO:

      0. They like to rev to make their power and some people do not care for that power delivery. The Ford 6.7L gas is a little better in this regard but still not to the degree of a diesel.

      1. The fuel tanks are too small. Especially on the short box. Having frequent fuel stops when towing a larger trailer (you’ll probably be getting 9-10 MPG in that situation) is already a PITA but it is even worse when you need to use gasoline pumps versus diesel ones because they are usually much harder to maneuver into and out of. OEMs should be aiming for at least 45 gal on the short beds and at least 55 on the long box.

      I’d still get a gas truck personally though.

      • 0 avatar
        DC Bruce

        As someone who tows a 7600 lb. travel trailer, I think diesels have no use until you need to tow weights that require a CDL (over 10,000 lbs.). The truck in the photo is a GMC half ton with the 6.2 liter gas engine. At 420 hp and 460 lb-ft. of torque, it does fine towing my trailer and, on all but the most extreme hills (i.e. over 10 % grade) it does not rev over 3000 rpm to maintain 60 mph. It provides satisfactory engine braking; in 4 years and 60,000 miles of towing all over the U.S., I’ve never even gotten my service brakes hot enough to smell. And, I get from 11-14 mpg. With today’s 8 – 10 speed transmissions, the need for massive amounts of low end torque is just not there.

        When RAM introduced the “ecodiesel” in its half-ton, I didn’t think it made much sense, except for someone who planned on driving lots of miles, carrying (or towing) a fairly modest load.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “I think diesels have no use until you need to tow weights that require a CDL (over 10,000 lbs.).”

          In Florida the basic driver’s license is “GVWR up to 26,001 *or any RV*” and I believe the CDL exception for large RVs/travel trailers is present in most states.

          There are some caveats but I’d expect a properly-equipped 2021 gas HD truck could handle a 5th wheel up to a 15000GVWR, so pretty much all but bigger toy haulers and “full-time” units. However, the two items I listed in my initial comment will still be hangups for some shoppers.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          In BC you need either a commercial licence, or a heavy RV towing endorsement to tow more than 4,600 kg or 10,120 lbs. I’ve towed around 7,500 lbs a few times with my 2010 F150 which felt fine.
          I’ve read that the Colorado is dropping the V6 and diesel for a 2.7 litre turbo gasser(the one from the Silverado)

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        I have never towed truly heavy with my 6.2L F350, but based on its performance towing 7500-8000 lb, I’d have no reservations pulling double that amount, at least on relatively flat ground.

        The dislike of engine revs is always a weird one to me, the engine is designed to do it, and the sound is not objectionable to my ears. Turn the stereo up if you don’t like it.

        As for the fuel tank, 48 gallons in the Ford long bed seems about right. Even at 9 mpg, I’m ready for a stop by the time that bad boy gets close to empty.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “Turn the stereo up if you don’t like it.”

          That works fine for you and me, less fine for the 65YO couple with the Vanleigh Vilano.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            It makes one wonder how all those folks in 22,000 lb Class As with the old Ford V10 get by.

            Still, the kind of people who can justify dropping six figures on their rig hopefully tow it enough to make the diesel worth it anyways.

          • 0 avatar
            SoCalMikester

            doubt theyd be buying if they saw the website.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        An additional factor to point 1 is that the gas fuel tank is considered part of the EVAP system with all of the fed compliance headaches that implies so the aftermarket won’t touch it. Oversized diesel tanks are a swipe of the credit card away.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “ This is a recognition that the diesel had far more costs than benefits for the vast majority of light-duty consumers.”

      Ah yes like lower or equal fuel costs while returning much better fuel economy, a little bit of DEF every so often, oil changes.

      Yeah those diesels are crazy expensive. It’s not like manufacturers price them outrageously high with the direct expectation that nobody will buy them.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The diesel is priced high not because of some Ford conspiracy, but because with the emissions system it is very expensive to make. And poor sales show that it’s not worth the cost.

  • avatar

    “diesel engines offer something gas engines don’t — low-end grunt.”

    That is what electric motor is good for and being cleaner, simpler and more practical. Diesel is too dirty.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Beer rides in Prague were definitely cleaner than diesel cars. One thing I did not enjoy there was the constant smell of the diesel in the city.

    • 0 avatar
      285exp

      Electric motors are indeed great for torque, the stopping every 100 miles to recharge is a bit of an inconvenience though.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        “he stopping every 100 miles to recharge is a bit of an inconvenience though.”

        Then get one with 300 to 400 miles range.

        • 0 avatar
          285exp

          mcs, you seem to be knowledgeable about flux capacitors, dilithium crystals and cardinal grammeters, but not so much about towing. The new Ford Lightning is rated at 300 miles with the big battery. Now, this is the EPA rated range, unloaded, using the combined testing procedure, which is 50-50 highway and city testing. Range in city testing is usually better than highway range, because speeds are lower so less drag, and regenerative braking helps recoup significant energy lost in braking. Steady state highway driving is usually significantly lower because of the higher speeds and therefore drag, which increases by the square of speed, and usually less opportunity for regenerative braking. Towing boats, travel trailers and horse trailers will drastically reduce the range, not so much because of the weight, but because of the increased drag. Given that it’s bad for the battery to discharge below 20%, and that there limited places to recharge, especially in rural areas not near the interstate, making it necessary to be extremely conservative when pushing the limits on range, real life range could easily be less than 100 miles in a truck rated at 300. Then, notice how the EV makers always talk about the time to recharge to 80%? That’s because that last 20% can take nearly as much time as the first 80%, so unless you want to spend an hour recharging a big truck battery, you’ll need to leave with only an 80% charge, leaving you with even less effective range. Then try finding many charging stations where you can fit a truck with a big trailer behind it.

          Not every truck buyer uses it as a minivan with a bed, some of us actually use them for truck stuff, not just to haul some mulch from Lowes. I’m not being a Luddite to point out that the limitations of current EV technology and infrastructure make EV trucks a very poor choice for many buyers. Snarky comments about just getting a truck with 300 mile range aren’t informative or useful.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “ Then get one with 300 to 400 miles range.”

          There isn’t one. We are decades away from having a EV that actually has that amount of range. With the garbage F-150 Mach E, your range towing will be 75-100 miles at best. Probably 50-100 when towing the max 10k pounds Ford claims that abysmal pile of garbage can pull.

          As soon as EVs can pull 300+ miles towing, that will mean they have an unloaded range of about 1k miles. Then they will be considering when purchasing a new vehicle. Until the , they are nothing more than fashion accessories and compliance vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Worry about yourself. Buyers will work around its limitations (suddenly everyone tows/payloads?), even if it’s their only vehicle (that tows [heavy] and or long distances). Others will avoid buying it, not a major catastrophe.

            Doesn’t everybody have a dually show truck anyway? That’s hard to believe..

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Yes, no one ever takes a road trip without towing a 10klb trailer.

            For normal people who don’t tow a house behind them everywhere they go, there is a 400-mile EV available today, the Tesla Model S, and a pretty broad selection of 300-mile cars.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “normal people”
            “the Tesla Model S”

            tinyurl.com/yrxxwcjf

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            OK, fine. It’s twice the price of the average new car (as long as you skip the fraudulent “Full Self-Driving.”)

            But you can get 300 miles now for not that much more than the price of the average new car, in the 3/Y and the long-range Mach E, among others. And you can get 250 miles for less than the price of the average new car.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I think they’ll get there.
            I don’t think they are “there” yet though.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Yes, no one ever takes a road trip without towing a 10klb trailer.”(dal20402)

            I live in the resource heartland of my province. Logging, mining, and ranching. I rarely ever see anyone in those industries use a 1/2 ton for towing. They use commercial tractors larger than a one ton pickup.

            The weekend warriors tow boats, campers and toys but rarely more than 160km. I could 1/2 that distance and not be off by much.

            It’s a poor excuse to say it needs to be able to go several hundred miles doing heavy work. Over 1/2 of pickups sold are personal light duty use vehicles. Any minivan or midsized CUV/SUV could do the same job.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I assume the Jayco and Arctic Wolf trailers I saw in Florida pre-pandemic with Canadian tags were driven here.

            It isn’t a case of “everyone” needs it but it isn’t just like two guys either and if EVs are going to eventually to be the *only* option then they need to accommodate the existing market.

          • 0 avatar
            285exp

            Those are some fine strawmen y’all are thrashing there. Nobody says every truck owner tows or plows snow or goes places where they can’t get recharged, but you act like nobody does those things either, or they’re so few it doesn’t matter. A lot of people would disagree with you. Saying you should simply buy one with long enough range or just go on down to the next charging station if the one you get to is full doesn’t help much when you can’t .

            This discussion is about trucks, not sedans, nobody tows a big load with a Model S, and they wouldn’t get anywhere near 400 mile range if they did.

            Diesel half ton trucks just don’t make sense for most, if you need all that power and torque, you probably need a 3/4 ton truck anyway. Even without reliability issues, the premium for the Diesel engine is so high that it would take a very long time to recoup it through fuel savings, and these new light duty diesels aren’t the reliable, bulletproof engines of old. EV trucks dont work well for heavy duty operations, and without some serious improvements in price, power density, and recharging infrastructure, won’t. This isn’t hating on them, it’s just the truth.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @ajla – I stated 50% or so are pleasure vehicles. You see work trucks with Canadian plates in Florida? I also pointed out the distance typical drivers travel. Yes, some will tow to Florida or Arizona. That’s the minority. Most will be driving HD diesels.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “I stated 50% or so are pleasure vehicles.”

            At the volumes trucks sell at that means there are a lot of vehicles that aren’t.

            I disagree with this part of your comment here: “It’s a poor excuse to say it needs to be able to go several hundred miles doing heavy work.”.
            Many people do not need to drive their trucks a long distance but some people do. I think certain commenters on here do overstate the population of that second group but a lot of others want to handwave them away entirely.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @ajla – virtually every couple I know has a pickup as a 2nd vehicle. I have a good idea as to what kind of duty cycles they see. Most do not travel too far. Pre-covid I drove my truck on long trips (over 500 km/300miles) 2-3 times per year. Anyone I know who’s towed a long distance for vacations don’t do it often due to the fuel consumption. The “snow-birds” you mention will tow south for the winter and come back within 6 months and repeat that year in year out.
            I know people who work in remote locations where a 500 km range would not work. I also know that on big job sites like mines, bridges, industrial complexes where an EV pickup would be perfect.
            EV’S like diesel or gas engines have pros and cons.

      • 0 avatar
        wolfwagen

        You forgot about the at least half-hour wait while charging too

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          then go to a station without a wait. You can check on the in vehicle app. The stations are getting bigger. Some of them up to 70+ ports now. Charging times are shorter at the 250 or 350 kW stations.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Here’s a photo of Tesla’s prefab stations. It takes just a few days to add multiple chargers.

            https://www.teslarati.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/tesla-supercharger-prefab.jpeg

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “ Diesel is too dirty.”

      No, actually, diesel is amazingly clean. It’s been a very long time since we had a dirty diesel on sale in the US.

  • avatar
    EX35

    All 6cyl 1/2 ton truck diesels available in the U.S. seem to suck. After taking a look at the GM forums, I will never own a duramax 3.0. The amount of issues in such few miles reported by new owners is amazing. Yet, the 6.6 in the 3/4 is legendary for reliability. I’ve heard the same for the diesel in the F150. Garbage.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    Well, this engine was never really meant for the F150. Ford freaked out when the saw the Ram 1500 Eco Diesel relative success so they had to get an engine in quickly. So they went to the UK and got one from Range Rover. That engine was meant to be used in luxury SUVs not hauling 8000 lbs in a pick up truck. No one hauls 8,000 in a Jaguar SUV or Range Rover. I remember when it came out in 2018, TFL truck did the Ike towing test and the F150 went into limp mode. Ford tried excuses…pre-production model…blah, blah.
    TFL brought it back a few months later and the truck did ok but it struggled. Probably a good engine, just not meant for a pick up truck, plus two expensive. I know it says V6 Power stroke on the side…it has nothing in common with its bigger brother.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    new diesel maintenance costs are now sky high

    though the engines are still supposed to last longer, they probably offer no savings when you factor in the high maintenance and higher fuel costs too

    Mercedes Sprinters are now available w/ gas engines for that reason – something you never saw in class b rv’s

    EB engines could have probs as they age – because turbos often do

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    “Part of the problem, says Autoblog, is that the turbocharged gas options make more power and cost less than the diesel’s $4,995 price. They offer better towing capacity, to boot.”

    That sentence reads like it was copied directly from a dishonest Ford press release.

    Of course they offer better towing capacity. When you manipulate the towing and capability numbers simply to drive sales numbers that is the result. Nobody actually believes the absolute garbage 5.4L could tow more than the 5.0L trucks but that’s how Ford decided to drive sales of the awful Ecobust trucks.

    What they won’t tell you is that not only was the diesel far more efficient than the Ecobust or Ecobust hybrid versions, but when doing actual work the fuel economy would still be impressive versus the Ecobust where the MPGs are abysmal.

    It’s a shame Ford hates the Diesel engine in the F150. It was one of two engines that are reliable and actually worth buying. The other is the 5.0L. The rest of the engines including the awful hybrid and laughably bad EV are just garbage. But we know Ford makes awful business decisions and intentionally pricing the diesel high and then wondering why nobody bought it is a self fulfilling prophecy. And now Ford can go around and say “See? Nobody bought it so we got rid of it.”

    • 0 avatar
      EX35

      What? The power stroke v6 was far from reliable after reading forum posts from new owners.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      You’re just making stuff up about reliability records. From all accounts the first-generation 3.5TT engine is incredibly durable, and at least from the forums it seems that it has fewer issues than the 5.0. The 2.7TT has also done very well. The second-gen 3.5TT is too new to draw good conclusions but it’s not raising any red flags yet. Meanwhile, the diesel is having issues left and right.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        I knew a mechanic who worked for a large mining company. The EB 3.5 has been durable and has had less issues than the 5.0. The first one’s had the condensation issue but was an easy fix. Everything I’ve heard aligns with durability reports I’ve read.

        The Ford Lion diesel was destined to fail in the F150 because the EB 3.5 was built to provide diesel-like power characteristics.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          Ah yes all the Ford apologists are here. Hilarious.

          No shock that you would consider needed turbos at 100k miles, misfiring, massive carbon build up on top of extremely poor fuel economy reliable I guess they are bullet proof.

          Meanwhile here in the real world, it’s unsurprising that Ford techs recommend the amazingly reliable 5.0L over the high strung EgoBust engines. I wonder why that is

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    No surprise here. I’ve seen exactly *two* Power Stroke-equipped F-150s since they first came out, and that’s here in truck-loving Texas. It might have been successful if EcoBoost weren’t a thing.

    I find light truck diesels intriguing, but really, I’d never buy one. I do sometimes wish my Tacoma was a turbo diesel (for the fuel economy).

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    I’ve got a bad feeling about this.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    So a publicly traded global corporation in a free-market late-stage capitalistic society that answers to shareholders made a business decision in a single country to improve profits by axing a poor selling engine at the end of the 2021 model year production run. The same corporation had to jump through burning hoops of regulatory fire during the Trump Administration to get the engine “certified.”

    Somehow, Biden, who apparently actually isn’t even in charge, is to blame for consumers not wanting to pay $5000 for the privilege of the said engine when it offers almost no advantage over other choices beyond, for a small subset of buyers, the fuel it uses.

    Check please!

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Perfect assessment. This engine would have sold well in an era of “hard on fuel” V8’s. The EB 3.5 has similar torque characteristics to that of a diesel, costs less, and tows/hauls more.

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