By on March 8, 2019

2018 Ford F-150 Platinum 4X4 SuperCrew

3.0-liter twin-turbocharged diesel V6 (250 horsepower @ 3,250 rpm; 440 lb-ft @ 1,750 rpm)

Ten-speed automatic, four-wheel drive

20 city / 22 highway / 25 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

11.8 city, 9.3 highway, 10.7 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $58,210 (U.S) / $69,129 (Canada)

As Tested: $70,375 (U.S.) / $75,649 (Canada)

Prices include $1,395 destination charge in the United States and $1,900 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

Part of the appeal of pickup trucks is that they can be many things to many people.

Tow machine to haul your boat? Check. Home-improvement aid? Sure, throw those 2x4s in the back. Guarantee that your friends will call you when they need help moving, even if they never call you any other time? Sure. Cowboy Cadillac? If you like cruising the streets of Texas in comfort, pardner.

Ford’s F-150 is already at least perceived as doing all those things well – Ford doesn’t sell approximately a zillionity billion for no reason – and adding a diesel powertrain to the mix doesn’t hurt.

That powertrain is a 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged V6 that pumps out 250 horsepower and 440 lb-ft of torque. A ten-speed automatic transmission and 3.55 electronically locking rear differential gets all that to the ground.

As is typical with diesels, peak torque is available low in the rev range (at 1,750 rpm, in this case), and while the truck ain’t light (over 5,300 pounds), there’s enough torque on tap to keep up with the flow of urban and suburban driving.

Speaking of urban driving, the truck’s size (156.8-inch wheelbase, 243.7-inch overall length, 6.5-foot bed) makes that a challenge, as an unfortunate encounter with a parking bollard showed. That same size also makes the interior feel huge, though – I felt like I’ve been in smaller hotel rooms.

2018 Ford F150 SuperCrew 4x4

Needless to say, headroom and legroom weren’t an issue. The center console is wide enough as to put your passenger some distance away. Whether that’s a good or bad thing for your personal relationships is up to you.

The cabin looks a little too familiar by now – Ford’s design has aged gracefully, but it’s still aging. I appreciated the easy-to-reach knobs and dials, and the squared-off A/C vents and upper center stack look appropriately purposeful, but Ford interiors have used this look for a while now. It felt a bit long in the tooth. There was also a bit more hard plastic than I’d like, especially given the sky-high price (stay tuned for sticker shock), but other parts of the cabin were classed up by upscale materials. For example, red leather that matched the seat colors was tastefully draped across the upper portions of the dash.

On-road, the F-150 is predictably truckish in ride and handling, especially with an unladen bed, but Ford reins in the worst excesses well enough. You’ll get some bounce, and you’re not getting great handling or steering feel, but it’s perfectly acceptable for commuting or cruising. Highway slogs are pleasant enough, at least until the pavement turns sour.

A relative asked me to help him move during my time with the truck, and I was actually excited at the thought – I’d finally be able to use a test truck for one of its intended purposes. No dice. In the end, I was only asked to move furniture from a garage to the inside of a house, without leaving the property. No need for truckin’. That said, my test unit was ready to go. Options included a bed extender, spray-in bedliner, and a tailgate step (this one is part of a package). If I needed to tow, a trailer-tow package made it possible, and the FX4 off-road package was tacked on in case of off-pavement excursions.

At $58,210 to start, this F-150 Platinum was already spinning the cash register. That’s because it carries such content as: fog lamps, lighting for the pickup bed, auto stop/start, remote liftgate release, LED headlamps and taillamps, blind-spot information system, curve control, trailer-brake controller, remote start, push-button start, heated and cooled front seats, second-row heated seats, 8-inch touch screen for infotainment, Sync, satellite radio, navigation, power-adjustable pedals, and power tilt/telescope steering wheel.

2018 Ford F150 SuperCrew 4x4

Add the diesel ($3,000), package 701A (includes 360-degree camera, park assist, technology package, adaptive cruise control, and tailgate step, $2,540), the electronically locking ($470), twin-panel moonroof ($1,245), trailer-tow package ($995), power-folding mirrors ($250), wheel-well liner ($180), a soft tonneau cover ($525), and the spray-in bedliner ($495) and you get a $68,980 truck. Tack on the $1,395 destination fee and now the price tag reads $70,375.

Yup, folks – a $70,000 pick-em-up truck. One that I dinged while entering a car wash. A big ‘ole honking diesel truck with the ability to tow 11,000 pounds while coddling occupants in comfort.

You get what you pay for. That sticker price is dear, but the F-150 doesn’t lack for content. It’s a combination between long-haul tower, freeway cruiser, and cowboy Cadillac.

Speaking of long-hauls and cruising, fuel economy checks in at 20 mpg city, 25 mpg highway, and 22 mpg combined.

Yeah, this is a truck for all people – provided those people have fat bank accounts. Versatility isn’t cheap these days.

[Images © 2019 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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51 Comments on “2018 Ford F-150 Platinum 4X4 SuperCrew – Power Cruising...”


  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    You literally cannot look at an Alberta road for 5-sec and not see one of these. My neighbour gets two new ones every year for him and his wife. Great looking trucks, wish I could afford one!

  • avatar
    JimZ

    single turbo, not twin.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    2019 Ford F-150 XLT Super Crew 4X4 with the 3.5 Ecoboost V6= $46,615

    So, this truck has $24K worth of crap you don’t need, got it

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      That’s my thought as well. Once options are stacked up to the point that they make up 50% of the basic vehicle’s price… that’s not very good value. In a few years, that XLT and this Platinum will be worth just a fraction apart (although the diesel option generally retains its value well). I also wonder: what’s the proportion in F150 sales XL/XLT/Lariat/Platinum? Seeing as its the top selling vehicle in America, are there that many people buying $70k trucks?

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Anything above Lariat is still a pretty low percentage of sales. If the F150 is anything like the Super Duty, it’s possible to get almost any option on a Lariat.

        The King Ranch/Platinum/Limited have a couple unique features, but it’s mostly having more things standard, better leather, and bigger wheels.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        What I think happens is that “truck guys” due to high resale values and high trade in values get in a spiral of “trading up.”

        Example: let’s say your first truck is a sub $40K XLT, drive it 5-6 years pay it off, dealer offers you $20K-ish in trade. You trade and buy a $50K Lariat trim truck and less your trade in your loan actually ends up smaller. Lather rinse repeat a few times and you’re driving a $60K plus Platinum with a fairly tiny loan by comparison.

        Just my 2 cents. YMMV.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Looking at Cars.com for a 20 mile radius shows that XLTs are the most common with 91/192, XL 45/192, Lariat 25/192, Limited 3/192, Platinum 11/192, Raptor 10/192 and King Ranch 3/192 though I suspect that some of those higher trims are out the door before they hit the ground.

        So roughly 50% XLT 25% XL and 25% others combined though I’m certain they move a lot of XLs that are ordered pushing its percentage up and those higher trims down.

        There are only 6 diesels BTW though again I bet those are more likely to be sold before they hit the ground.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Eh, this is just the traditional domestic sales model. Back in the day, you bought a Chevrolet, and depending on how many options you ladled on to it, you might get a name change from Biscayne to Impala or Caprice, but it was still the same car underneath the gingerbread.

      • 0 avatar
        IHateCars

        No one pays full pop for these. There’s at least two opportunities throughout the year where Ford knocks anywhere from $8-$12 K off the MSRP. In fact I recently priced out a leftover ‘18 Platinum 5.0L with most options to $62 K CAD before tax with 2.99% financing over 5 years….essentially the same truck as the ‘19. And come August, you be able to get better on a ‘19 with employee pricing plus Costco member discount.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      Probably best deal is the F150 crew cab XL 4×2 with the STX package. It comes with the 2.7T engine, a tow package, 20 inch fancy wheels and Sync 3 with the big 8 inch screen. All for about $35,000 in my area.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        It’s comedy when going from an XLT to a Lariat is a $5,000 bump. Lariat to King Ranch? Another $5,000. King Ranch to Platinum? Same, another $5,000 and so on.

        Still about 30% F-150 sales are Lariat and above. It seems insane but they must represent value for many F-150 buyers, especially when cross shopping a 7-series BMW (that can’t pull your boat, RV, horse etc.), nor can you write off the BMW as business expense when you’re a plumber.

        If it wasn’t for a huge percentage of fleet sales, the average F-150 might be a Lariat.

        • 0 avatar
          naveenkaratekid

          I would probably get a maxed out Lariat trim supercrew cab with the 2.7 TT V6. But I am torn between this trim or a maxed out King Ranch trim with the 5.0L V8, radar cruise, and the massaging seats.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      You can’t get radar cruise below Lariat. And then, only on some Lariats. optioned up to darned near Platinum price and bling points.

      All the Big3 are doing this: Purposely decontenting mass market models, in order to keep up the illusion that “floor mats” is some great luxury that should require $25K, pimp rims, leather seats and an AARP membership, in order to obtain. While all it really does, is keeping Toyota’s 15 year old halfton in the game. Increasingly giving Toyota an otherwise harder to obtain foot in the door.

      On the Ranger, where Ford has to compete for conquest sales against the Taco, those cheap to add, popular electronics are available across trim lines. But with the F series, the name of the game is to continue to milk uncritical loyalists, for as long as they keep coming back for more.

  • avatar
    DedBull

    Does the diesel engine package override the auto stop/start feature?

  • avatar
    ajla

    Yea, this price is mostly just press fleet wankery. This is well into the price range of the Raptor or mack-daddy Limited.

    I still think the diesel would make more sense if it was available at lower trim levels too. As it is now, it’s restricted enough that it’s really only around for serious compression ignition cultists and “up to xx MPG” marketing.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Unless you actually spend a lot of time saddled up with a trailer, with how impressive the unloaded MPG can be on the 2.7 and 3.5L Ecoboosts, I’d be hardpressed to even consider the diesel.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        And if you really spend that much time with a heavy trailer, you’re better off in a Super Duty anyways.

        I don’t think a diesel engine really makes sense in a 1/2 ton pickup with how well the gas engines perform.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I personally wouldn’t go for any diesel if I wasn’t towing over 14000lbs (and depending on the Ford 7.3L rating that might go up even more). However, there are some people that absolutely love diesels and will happily pay for it (both now and later).

          Still, the 3.0TD has got to have a low take rate. I really believe an ~430hp 6.2L option, even at the same $4k upcharge, would get more takers. But I guess the CAFE hit isn’t worth it.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            As much as it pains me to admit, I’m not sure that’s true. The Ford 6.2L is just not a performance engine like the GM 6.2L is, even in the old Raptor tune. It’s simple and reliable with good power, but the average buyer who wants a fast Ford truck is going to be happier with the 3.5TT or the 5.0L I think.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Take a look at the numbers I posted above for my area, ~3% of the f150s in stock or in transit are diesels so I bet the overall diesel take rate is less than 5%.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “The Ford 6.2L is just not a performance engine”

            It could be. They just haven’t tried yet. But they probably never will.

      • 0 avatar
        Jerome10

        This is exactly my thoughts as well. 2.7L EcoBoost would probably be sufficient. If you need diesel, wouldn’t you get a Super Duty?

        But I’m not a truck guy so I might not know what I’m talking about.

        There is a small part of me that cynically thinks these new diesels in the half-tons is just marketing. People that want the “cool” diesel but have no desire or need for the terrible ride or even more ridiculous size of the heavy duty’s.??

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      This diesel wouldn’t make sense if it were free. All of the traditional diesel advantages – low end torque, relaxed towing, good fuel economy – are already present in the gas base engines. You’re paying a $3,000 upcharge for what amounts to future emissions headaches, giving up all of your top end power, and taking a couple hundred pounds off your payload sticker to replace with dead iron sitting on top of your front axle for good measure.

      If the diesel were the base engine I’d pay that 3,000 dollars in a heartbeat to upgrade to the turbo gas motor instead.

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        The diesel is a great Jaguar derived engine bit it does come at a steep price. Also, with all the urea and SCR and all the other stuff added, I am not sure of its reliability. I am sure after the warranty is up a lot of people from non-emissions control states will take them straight to a tuner and eliminate all that stuff. They do the same with the 3.0 Ram engine. The gas 2.7 and 3.5 turbo engines are great as well, but the diesel after the 10,000 miles break in should be able to get 30 mpg in the 4×2 extra cab trucks

  • avatar
    LectroByte

    Nice review. I’m a little curious how an electronic LSD works, I’d have thought with that much torque, a mechanical one might be preferred. A shot of the interior showing the seats and rear legroom might have been a good addition to the review, too, since this truck is about the luxury of it all.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      The review is wrong.

      It is not an electronic LSD, but an electronic locker (not the same).

      • 0 avatar
        Tim Healey

        GAH I ducked up. I meant to write electronically locking. I will fix and thanks for correcting me.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          “On-road, the F-150 is predictably truckish in ride and handling, especially with an unladen bed, but Ford reigns in the worst excesses well enough.“

          That should probably be “reins!” Unless this truck truly excels in too much steak, not enough sizzle, which I don’t think is what was meant. This is right up there with the Ram, and makes the new GMs look horrible.

          Grammar snob — guilty as charged!

          • 0 avatar
            Fordson

            This is an increasingly common usage error among a demographic – people who write for a living – that should know enough not to commit it.

            I am going to be ageist here and say that under a certain age, people are not going to understand the etymology of the term – that it refers to pulling on the reins of one or a team of draft or riding animals, to get them to slow down.

            These young’uns think it has something to do with commanding – i.e. reigning over – something to make it do what you want it to do.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Right your are jack. But since you mentioned it, Ford does in fact have some sort of “electronic LSD” on the FX4 equipped Expedition. Does anyone know what exactly that means? Is it simply brake-based traction control that had existed for decades now? Or does it have a true mechanical element to it?

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    For less money you can get the Ram Laramie Longhorn which is an astoundingly better truck.

    Why would anyone waste $70K on a diesel Ford?

  • avatar
    Carrera

    The diesel is a great Jaguar derived engine bit it does come at a steep price. Also, with all the urea and SCR and all the other stuff added, I am not sure of its reliability. I am sure after the warranty is up a lot of people from non-emissions control states will take them straight to a tuner and eliminate all that stuff. They do the same with the 3.0 Ram engine. The gas 2.7 and 3.5 turbo engines are great as well, but the diesel after the 10,000 miles break in should be able to get 30 mpg in the 4×2 extra cab trucks

  • avatar
    Carrera

    I was looking around in January and I’ve noticed that a lot of local Ford dealership had F150 crew cab diesel Lariats on their lots. They were all 2018 of course and they were priced anywhere from $46,000-55,000.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Here in Indiana there’s about a 60 cent / gal price bump for ULSD vs 87 octane gas. I assume that’s why the UPS trucks that come to my neighborhood have switched from Cummins ISB diesels to GM 6.0 gassers.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      I believe that the migration of UPS local delivery trucks from diesel to gas had a great deal to do with the issues of the required increased emissions controls and associated electronics/SCR/DEF headaches for post-2012 diesel engines. This was probably a rather large increase in overhead costs for their fleet. It’s bad publicity when UPS delivery vehicles go into “limp-mode” at 6:00PM on December 24 due to low DEF/malfunctioning emissions systems.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Is that still true? Early systems on big rigs were problematic for sure with an easily measurable uptick in downtime but a lot of time has gone by since then. I thought I read somewhere that those downtime metrics were quickly improving but I don’t recall where. Regardless, diesel adds costs upfront and around here, the fuel costs more as well. Just as people like to say hybrids take too long to pay back, the same can be said for diesels for most uses. As pointed out above, the gas engines are very capable and unless you want diesel just because (fine if that’s your thing) the vast majority will be served well by the gas engines.

        Just came back from a 400 mile jaunt into the mountains and I made it a point to check the big rigs on the thruway…the lack of visible particulates was really nice to (not)see. Nothing comes free of course but some things are worth the price.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I drove up I95 to Alexandria this weekend. I saw some pretty crazy fuel prices, and was quite happy that my car allowed me to drive from Virginia Beach to Alexandria and back to Fredericksburg for cheap Top Tier gas from Costco on half a tank. I saw quite a few signs with diesel priced a dollar more than 87 octane. I also saw one place that was charging a $1.20 uptick for 93 octane over 87 octane, but that was an exception. Diesel was probably an average of $0.85 more at all the stations we passed.

  • avatar
    MeaMaximaCulpa

    Ford seriously needs to up the infotainment game. Both they and Chevy have acres of plastic around a small infotainment screen, I get it on a 25k work truck but when spending 50k it really looks dated. RAM still the only ones with air springs in all four corners on a pickup? As a lot of these are used basically as large family sedans without any off-road or sporting ambitions air ride suspension seems like a no brainier at the price point. Air sprung cab would also be nice in these luxury barges for the 21 century and why not air ride seats, they could sell it as “what the big boys have”.

  • avatar
    MeaMaximaCulpa

    The amount Ford spent on the current F150 surely could have included a somewhat flexible frame architecture. At this time the RAM seems like the car like truck to beat.

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    The lowest model that has the Diesel is the $50K CDN Lariat and it’s a $7500 option. Makes no sense to me since really, Diesel = work and towing, so having available in a base work truck would make a lot of sense.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      It’s the same in the US – you have to buy a Lariat to get the diesel. I wish they would offer it in the XLT. The only one I have seen so far was in a King Ranch. I was driving alongside on it, and rolled down my window to listen. Yeah, it’s pretty quiet.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Tim,

    Good review, thank you. One question – when the military-grade aluminum struck the bollard, did the bollard twist up like a pretzel? Shear off cleanly at the base? Or did it sense that intimidating grille and bend out of the way preemptively?

    Asking for a friend…

  • avatar
    naveenkaratekid

    The F150 is my runner up favorite vehicle. I test drove the SXT trim with the 2.7 Twin Turbo EcoBoost V6. I was impressed by how much pull it has given the fact that it has 400 lb ft of torque, and the 10 speed auto. I am torn between choosing the 2.7 TT V6 or the 5.0 V8. I wouldn’t bother getting the diesel V6 because it’s a very expensive option. My only disappointment in the F150 is that you cannot get the 2.7 TT V6 on the top end trims, like the King Ranch, Platinum, or the Limited. So I either have to choose massaging front seats, or the smooth 2.7 TT V6.


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