Scrapyard Find: 2010 Peugeot Bipper, Royal Mail Edition

Murilee Martin
by Murilee Martin

Last week, I joined fellow car writer Andrew Ganz on a four-day trip to Northern England, with one of Great Britain's two Ewe Pullet-style self-service junkyards as our primary destination. This was the U-Pull-It in York, and today's Junkyard Scrapyard Find is one of the more interesting products of the Société Européene de Véhicules Légers during the 2000s.

Sevel S.P.A. began life in 1978 as a joint venture between Fiat and the PSA Group and is now part of the mighty Amsterdam-based Stellantis Empire. This van is a third-generation Fiat Fiorino, which PSA Peugeot Citroën sold with Citroën Nemo and Peugeot Bipper badging. Thanks to FCA, it was sold as the Ram V700 in Chile.

U-Pull-It is owned by Dallas-based Copart and runs two self-service yards in the United Kingdom. The York facility is much closer to Heathrow Airport (to which there are cheap nonstop flights from Denver) than the one in Edinburgh, so we rented a Mercedes-Benz A-Class saloon and drove the four hours north to York (stopping at a breaker's yard near Nottingham to grab some Euro-market XJ Cherokee taillights, as one does).

The inventory at U-Pull-It York is well-organized and the employees are friendly (if somewhat difficult to understand). The Peugeot, Renault and Vauxhall sections are the biggest, which made for a fascinating scrapyard day for a couple of American car aficionados. Sure, it was 33°F and very damp out, but English winter weather make you tough.

Out front, they sell late-model runners for cheap. How about a Renault Modus with good title for just £695?

This van's original owner was Her Majesty's government, though the Royal Mail was fully privatised a few years after its purchase.

This engine is a 1.4-liter HDi turbodiesel, developed by a partnership that included, Mazda, Ford and the PSA Group. It was rated at 67 horsepower and 118 pound-feet.

Curb weight is well under 3,000 pounds, but even so it must have been difficult to get a tall van full of mail going fast enough to hit the 70 mph limiter.

Fortunately for its drivers, this van was equipped with a five-speed manual transmission. Imagine the United States Postal Service requiring its carriers to work a manual transmission in 2010! Even most examples of the Jeep DJ Mail Dispatcher were slushbox-equipped when purchased by Uncle Sam.

For such a small van, the cabin seems spacious and comfortable.

There's a sliding door on the left (sidewalk) side and plenty of space in the cargo compartment.

In back, a pair of asymmetric rear doors. A seriously useful delivery van with great fuel economy and French seats. What more could a mailman ask for?

It's extremely unlikely that FCA ever considered bringing the Fiorino cargo van over to the United States, but the Bipper Tepee (aka Fiorino Qubo) passenger version might have found a cult following among outdoorsy American families. Just kidding— most car shoppers over here would have eaten a potato bug rather than be seen anywhere near a Bipper Tepee. By the way, I now own this Bipper emblem, along with dozens of others from my whirlwind English scrapyard trip.

Did rust doom it? We can't know, though U-Pull-It's photos of this van show the gauges with the ignition on and a final mileage of just 127,848 miles.

After a productive day of photographing discarded examples of everything from a Mitsubishi i to one of the very last MGs ever built in Britain (you'll see all of them soon enough, here and at the other publications that employ me), we enjoyed a spicy Indian meal and then headed over to Brew York's Taproom for a selection of their excellent stouts and porters. They'll sell four third-pints for the price of a pint, which I recommend.

It's the new low-emission van designed for the city. Seen in all the tightest spaces and all the best places.

Equally at home on the Great Wall of China or the Moon.

The FDM ads for this van family appear to be the most fun. Comacité. Maniabilité.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

2010 Peugeot Bipper Royal Mail cargo van in English junkyard.

[Images: The Author]

Become a TTAC insider. Get the latest news, features, TTAC takes, and everything else that gets to the truth about cars first by  subscribing to our newsletter.

Murilee Martin
Murilee Martin

Murilee Martin is the pen name of Phil Greden, a writer who has lived in Minnesota, California, Georgia and (now) Colorado. He has toiled at copywriting, technical writing, junkmail writing, fiction writing and now automotive writing. He has owned many terrible vehicles and some good ones. He spends a great deal of time in self-service junkyards. These days, he writes for publications including Autoweek, Autoblog, Hagerty, The Truth About Cars and Capital One.

More by Murilee Martin

Comments
Join the conversation
3 of 40 comments
  • John Clyne John Clyne on Jan 23, 2024

    In my case it was when I was out either hurt or sick that others would use my assigned vehicle. Some people in life are either just addicted or don’t care. I went to my immediate supervisor the first time it happened. He did nothing. I warned him because he failed to follow up I will be going over his head the next time it happens. Sure enough the same person smoked in my vehicle & when asked denied right to my face. (Where I came from that would warrant a face pummeling). I went to my manager & he initially didn’t follow up. I asked him again & he claimed he forgot. He watered it down to say that the smoker was allowed to smoke in his assigned vehicle but not others? The third time it was vaped in by another coworker & I reported it to my new first line supervisor. He was stumped because he told him no smoking or vaping in John’s truck.

    I told my supervisor the next time it happens I’m going straight to HR. Well, it happened a forth time by an apprentice. My boss begged me not to report it to HR? How many times do I have to be treated like a door mat? I took all day cleaning the cab from ceiling to floor. It gets into the heat registers & it’s considered a class 2 carcinogen by the EPA.

    I just got over cancer that is prevalent amongst smokers. Go figure?

    • Jeff Jeff on Jan 24, 2024

      You did everything you could. Smoking in the fleet cars I used would not entitle you to use them. You would lose your access to the vehicles and be written up.


  • 3SpeedAutomatic 3SpeedAutomatic on Jan 24, 2024

    IIUC, you can get the passenger version of these vans with double sliding doors. The second seat is designed for there occupants which would be a bit of a pinch. These would be great fighting the narrow streets of Europe.

  • Ras815 Their naming scheme is almost as idiotic as having a totally separate Polestar brand for EVs that look exactly like...de-badged Volvos. But you can tell it came from the same idiocy.
  • Dukeisduke "The EX naming convention is used for the automaker’s new and upcoming EVs, the EX30 and EX90."Only upcoming when they can figure out the software.
  • SCE to AUX I've always said that consumer/business pressures will reign in government decrees, as they have in the past in places like California. That state has moved the goalposts many times for "ZEV" mandates.But the problem is the depth of politicization of the EPA. Mfrs need continuity and long-term commitment to requirements, not living on a 4-year political cycle of who's in the White House and Congress. Your President - whomever that is - isn't going to be around forever.Ironically, backing off the gas means handing a greater lead to Tesla, Rivian, and Lucid, (and possibly H/K/G). The whiners have begun heavy investments whose ROI will be extended by years, and their EV sales will reduce even further.It's like the coach granting his players less practice time because they're tired, while the other team stays fit - that's how you lose the game.
  • Dukeisduke The administration is slowly dribbling out details of the change - it's like they don't want to piss off environmentalists, the auto manufacturers, or the UAW. John McElroy covered this very well in today's installment of Autoline Daily: AD #3751 - 2024 U.S. EV Sales Could Grow 43%; China Price War Spreads To ICE; U.S Vehicles Biggest Ever, Also Lowest CO2 - AutolineAlso, even though vehicles in the US have gotten larger, heavier, and more powerful (thanks to the shift away from sedans to trucks and SUVs), according to a year-end report by the EPA, in 2023, average fuel economy was at its highest ever, and CO2 emissions of new vehicles were at their lowest ever ( The 2023 EPA Automotive Trends Report: Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Fuel Economy, and Technology since 1975, Executive Summary (EPA-420-S-23-002, December 2023 ).
  • Golden2husky How about real names instead of alphabet/numeric soup?
Next