By on June 26, 2014

2015 Ram ProMaster City 01

Pulling up to the intersection of Flower Shop Lane, Contractor Boulevard and Utility Road is the Fiat Doblò-based 2015 Ram ProMaster City, the second van to emerge from Ram’s relationship with Fiat Professional.

The unibody van can be had in either Wagon or Tradesman Cargo base trim with SLT trim as an upgrade to both bases, and boasts a total of eight configurations involving security panels and rear and side windows. Cargo volume comes to 131.7 cubic feet with a width of 60.4 inches above the wheel wells, 48.4 inches in between. Height is 51.8 inches, with a step-in height of 21.5 inches, and payload capacity is 1,883 pounds.

Up front, the Tigershark 2.4-liter I4 with MultiAir2 technology puts 178 horsepower and 174 lb-ft of torque to the front wheels via its nine-speed automatic transmission. The transmission has a final-drive ratio of 3.73:1, good for improved fuel economy over the Ford Transit Connect, Nissan NV200 and Chevrolet City Express, as well as a nil-to-30 mph time of 3.7 seconds. ESC — one of 34 safety features on-board, including brake/park interlock and rearview camera — keeps it all together while making deliveries, and the van’s Uconnect helps maintain contact between provider and customer during service calls.

The ProMaster City variants will drive off the container ships to all 2,300 Ram dealerships later this year from the TOFAS plant in Bursa, Turkey, with upfitting to be handled at the Chrysler Group Transformation Center in Baltimore, Md., and Mopar contributing to the customization. No price has been given thus far.

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71 Comments on “2015 Ram ProMaster City Revealed...”


  • avatar
    GranMarkeez

    Let me guess. They’re shipping them to Baltimore to rip the seats out a la Transit Connect. Say it isn’t so!

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s the same deal as the Transits, before they got caught. They’ll rip out the seat, etc, until the Federales shut them down. They have a good 3 years before the Fed get around to them though. Thankfully they’re too busy busting Pot dispensaries and counterfeit DVDs at swapmeets.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Wouldn’t it make more sense to just make the rear seat standard and removable? It would make the van a better value proposition and eliminate the Fed’s beef with the chicken tax. Ford made the rear seat an option on the Transit just because they have so little respect for their customers. Surely, the cost of removing the seats and disposing of them makes up for the percentage of customers that pay for their seats a second time.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          It wouldn’t suprise me if the seats being removed ended right back on the boat to Turkey to be used for this purpose again and again.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            I’ve read that the majority of the removed Transit seats are destroyed.

            http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB125357990638429655?mg=reno64-wsj&url=http%3A%2F%2Fonline.wsj.com%2Farticle%2FSB125357990638429655.html

            >>BALTIMORE — Several times a month, Transit Connect vans from a Ford Motor Co. factory in Turkey roll off a ship here shiny and new, rear side windows gleaming, back seats firmly bolted to the floor.

            Their first stop in America is a low-slung, brick warehouse where those same windows, never squeegeed at a gas station, and seats, never touched by human backsides, are promptly ripped out.

            The fabric is shredded, the steel parts are broken down, and everything is sent off along with the glass to be recycled.<<

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            OTOH, that doesn’t really surprise me either.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          There isn’t one specific issue that contributes to Ford’s chicken tax problem. It’s a combination of factors, including the short amount of time that it takes to convert them into cargo vans in port and how they’re marketed primarily as cargo vehicles.

        • 0 avatar
          eggsalad

          The “Rear Seat” that comes in the Transit Connect cargo (and gets ripped out at the port) is NOT the same seat that comes in the “van” version. It is a simple hard plastic bench that you wouldn’t want to sit in for 10 minutes – just enough to satisfy the feds.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      There’s still a matter of painting and gluing the panels on. But it should be the job of the dealer’s body shop to convert them. Not a big deal for them. And it’d be completely above the board, straight passenger vans delivered/sold to the dealer. What happens after that was per the buyer’s instructions.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    Kill it with fire.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    This vehicle has a 1,883 lb cargo capacity.

    1,635 lb is the best one can get in a Ram regular cab truck.

    A big manly V8 hemi powered pickup gets out worked by a girly Eurovan with a masculine 4 cylinder engine called the Tigershark…….

    I wonder what @bigtrucksreview is going to say about this ;)

    cue the sound of crickets chirping.

    • 0 avatar
      Compaq Deskpro

      Springs are springs and tires are tires, there isn’t much to it. I’m guessing that a Ram with 1600 lbs in the bed won’t collapse if you add another 200.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      One can’t win the Trollprah™ Book Club, Lou.

      We pull a 24′ pontoon boat with a (318ci, 290k mile, 1997MY) SWB Ram 1500.

      When presented with real work– this little Italian thing would simply sneer while nervously offering some dismissive hipster half-truth about being too-qualified.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        Different horses for different courses.

        I doubt this Promaster will do much business in the leisure segment, but they could do quite well for fleet/urban delivery and small business. The people who depend on this type of van to pay their mortgages consider it “real work.”

        • 0 avatar
          Silence

          It’s not real work unless you can also slap a gun rack in the rear winder, put loud redneck exhausts on it, and drive it full throddle to NASCAR events.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Those issues had not occurred to me Silence. However, I think think you have raised excellent points. Those issues would have to be addressed before I would seriously consider purchasing what otherwise appears to be a quite competitive vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Regular cab longbed V6 RAM 1500 truck has 1910lbs payload.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @ajla – nope. Double cab has a higher payload than the reg cab according to Ram’s web site. Oddly enough if you go with the more capable V8 you loose cargo capacity.
        Goes to show that Ram is marketing their V8 trucks as muscle cars with a sun deck.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          @Lou_BC:

          This is a screenshot I just took of the RAM website. 8-ft bed. Regular cab. 1910lbs payload.

          http://postimg.org/image/o2vl8qg8p/

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @ajla – I took a second look at their site and still don’t see that cargo capacity.

            Sorry, my bad, I was looking at the 6.4 length box.

            BTW – how many reg cab long box trucks do you see?

            The most common configuration is the crewcab.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @Lou_BC – The V8′s added capabilities matter not, to “payload”. It reduces payload by how ever much it weighs more than the base V6. The double-cab also reduces payload, vs the regular cab. In fact, there’s nothing you can add to a vehicle to increase “payload”. Dropping weight is the only way.

          • 0 avatar
            hybridkiller

            “…there’s nothing you can add to a vehicle to increase “payload”.”

            Nothing except heavier springs and rear axle, which in most cases is what makes the difference between a 2500/250-3/4 ton truck and 3500/350-1 ton truck.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “Nothing except heavier springs and rear axle…”

            Then it wouldn’t be the same vehicle. Sure you can beef up a your truck to haul more, with HD parts, but does that legally give you more “payload”?

            Did you also upgrade to heavier duty brakes, cooling, steering, trans, driveshaft, spines, bearings, U-joints, ball joints, A-arms, bushings, tie rods, parking brake, etc?

            If you did, you’re psycho. You could have stepped up to a bigger class of truck for a few hundred dollars more.

          • 0 avatar
            hybridkiller

            Nice try, but the discussion – your remarks included – were about OEM equipped production vehicles. Nobody said anything about aftermarket upgrading.
            And even assuming that you somehow decided to go off on that tangent, your statement, “In fact, there’s nothing you can add to a vehicle to increase “payload”. Dropping weight is the only way.”, is still wrong – regardless of how you try to spin it.
            I used to have a G3500 van with the optional (factory) 9800# GVWR – guess what the difference was between that and the 8600# 3500? The springs (and shocks). The rest of the van – including brakes, cooling, AND rear axle – the same.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            We were already talking about the “maximum” payload for a specific truck. The Ram 1500. You can’t go beyond that, not even with a bigger, more capable engine. You interjected with a “heavier” this or “heavier” that.

    • 0 avatar
      hybridkiller

      I’m still trying to get past the fact that my little Golf makes 62 lb/ft more torque than the 2.4L gasser in this thing. Wonder what mpg looks like with a full load – I’m thinking not good.

      • 0 avatar
        hybridkiller

        “We were already talking about the “maximum” payload for a specific truck. The Ram 1500. You can’t go beyond that, not even with a bigger, more capable engine. You interjected with a “heavier” this or “heavier” that.”

        I interjected nothing – I was responding to your (still) incorrect assertion, in which you referred to “a vehicle” (as in “any vehicle”) – plz don’t make me C&P it a third time.
        You can try and walk it back to your heart’s content, but your statement-in-question was pretty unambiguous.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    @Z71_Silvy – this little van in 120 lb off the best you can get in a crew cab Silverado.

    I don’t blame you for wanting to kill it with fire.

    On the subject of fire, GM for a short time had a heater for windshield fluid.
    It was recalled due to catching on fire.

  • avatar
    wmba

    ” The ProMaster City variants will drive off the container ships to all 2,300 Ram dealerships later this year from the TOFAS plant in Bursa, Turkey, with upfitting to be handled at the Chrysler Group Transformation Center in Baltimore, Md., and Mopar contributing to the customization.”

    So which is it? Do they drive off the container ships to the dealers, and THEN go back to Baltimore POE, or what, exactly?

    Since the 2.4l Tigershark engine is made in Dundee, MI, and the transmission is also US made, does that mean engines are also fitted in Baltimore? Would make sense economically to not ship these items clear to Turkey.

    But then, they couldn’t be driven off an auto-carrier ship without an engine. Maybe that’s why the press release mentions container ships. Two of these per container and roll ‘em out!

    Now even run-of-the mill press releases reek of hyperbole, obfuscating the main message with extraneous PR fluff.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “Now even run-of-the mill press releases reek of hyperbole, obfuscating the main message with extraneous PR fluff.”

      This! Wretched rah-rah speak. Here’s my fave:

      “ESC — one of 34 safety features on-board, including brake/park interlock and rearview camera — keeps it all together while making deliveries”

      “keeps it all together”?! If I want late-’60s hippie cliches I’ll get a Mod Squad dvd.

      Worst thing is that I’m intensely interested in this little van and it’s competition. So I’ll get my info elsewhere.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It makes perfect sense to ship the engines and transmissions to Turkey. The boats are going back empty otherwise.

      • 0 avatar
        Toad

        Boats that haul autos are not set up to haul cargo like engines; they back haul US made vehicles and machinery to other ports. Engines and transmissions go into shipping containers that are in turn hauled by container ships (surprise!). No boats are going back empty.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      I’m not a fleet buyer, so I’m asking; is 0-30 a used metric? or did it just result in a pretty number for the release?

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      What would make the most sense would be to ship them as knockdown kits to the US, then finish the assembly work and drivetrain installation here. That would allow Americans to get their own unique specs while avoiding the chicken tax, thus killing two birds with one stone.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Pch101 – and that would kill any profits to be made with this little van.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          The auto industry has a long history of using knockdown kits to avoid tariffs. It’s not a new idea, and it isn’t limited to the US.

          Daimler does this currently with the Sprinter, which sells in the US for far less than it does in Germany.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    How I wish Toyota would jump into the NA market for these Floral Delivery Units. They’ve got to have some whacking good competitors in their global stable.

    • 0 avatar
      Johannes Dutch

      Sure, the Toyota ProAce would be a whacking good competitor.

      The Toyota ProAce a.k.a. the Peugeot Expert a.k.a. the Citroën Jumpy a.k.a. the Fiat Scudo….another “Pro”-van with a link to Fiat.

    • 0 avatar

      FWIW Kenmore I’ve driven these (commercial and passenger versions) and the French versions. It is surprising how car-like they are and for city driving and highway travelling they excel. Easy to get in and out, load, short dimensions, clever cubbies and packaging throughout, excellent visibility and just more room than the similar Asian options in the US (Cube and Soul, xb may be larger, but looks like a damn tank). Of course on a mountain road it’ll do less well than a more focused car, but at normal even higher speeds the well mannered behavior is admirable. Now if you think you’re Senna you might have a problem.

      One of these or a Transit are definitely on my shirt list. Shame Dodge, I mean, Ram hit it so hard with the ugly stick. The original design is challenging enough, but relatively coherent, this version? Maybe the passenger version will be better.

      One of these or a Tr

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Hmmm…..possibly a high mpg pickup, as well on day???

    http://www.businessvans.co.uk/the-versatile-fiat-doblo-work-up-in-a-class-of-its-own/

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Does Chrysler sell a passenger-van version of any of the ProMasters in North America yet?

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Yes, there is a window van version with 3 rows of benches available.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        There’s some confusion here. The ProMaster is the full-size and the ProMaster City is the mid-size. Similarly the Transit Connect is the mid-size and the regular Transit is the full-size.

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      Hmmmm…

      Kia Soul meets Club Wagon?

    • 0 avatar
      Banger

      Re: Passenger seats…

      Not in the full-size ProMaster, they don’t. This smaller van might get a passenger version, for all I know, but when I got to test a Ram 1500 ProMaster a couple months back, it was made clear in the press materials about the van that it was NOT available with passenger seats because, in so many words, “That’s what upfitters are for.” I thought it was pretty shortsighted.

  • avatar
    jmo

    I kinda like the styling.

  • avatar
    Victor

    If anyone wants an Opel in NA, this is cheaper than those Insignias with Buick badges.

    • 0 avatar

      I know what you’re saying, but with that extended wheelbase evident in the pics it’s an Opel made into its own by Fiat with the kind of re-engineering we’ve discussed elsewhere. Curious Victor, have you driven the Doblò? What were your impressions?

      • 0 avatar
        Victor

        This is the Opel Combo in EU. The Ram’s smiling fascia even looks suspiciously like the Adam, which could mean a thing or two. Maybe Opel is to drop the Combo for a NV200 derivative and Ram got its share in production capacity, alongside a new frontend and dash.

        Yes I’ve driven it, once, but the Mk1 that Fiat still shoves down our brazilian throats. It was a test drive of the Adventure Xingu on a Carrefour parking lot, a pretty limited thing. But it felt more solid than I expected, and it did not feel Ducato-like as I also expected. Nice shifter. Ugly as the necessity, though. Both inside and out.

        I’ve been lusting after this kind of MPV since the Berlingo first came out, with that awesome canvas top – which I obviously learned years later that it is prone to infiltration and rust like no other. It always made more sense than the Scenic or the Idea.

        Still the best taxicab for the airport run. It puzzles me somewhat that either Ford or Ram are not touting this and the Transitwhatever as perfect taxicabs in the US.

  • avatar
    dtremit

    What is the deal with that weird grill? I was about to blame Fiat for it, but the Dobló has a much nicer, more conventional fascia/grill.


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