By on April 23, 2014

Subaru Impreza WRX STi Hatchback

For those who want a Subaru WRX or WRX STi, but prefer the utility of the previous hatchback over the current sedan offerings, they should start breathing again, as Subaru will not be bringing such a beast to the United States after all.

Motor Trend reports that last month, WRX project manager Masuo Takatsu informed Motoring.com.au that Subaru “received strong interest from the US” for a hatchback variant, citing the 50 percent uptake by the U.S. market for the previous hatch. The statement came as a surprise to Subaru of America, who weren’t expecting anything more than the sedans:

We do not know about, nor do we have, any plans for a WRX hatch. Takatsu San is the product general manager of the WRX, but this is not something he has discussed with us.

One exchange between Subaru of America and Subaru of Japan later gave the final word: No WRX hatch will be forthcoming to the U.S. market, citing cost issues against producing both sedan and hatchback models.

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67 Comments on “Subaru: No WRX Hatch For U.S. Market...”


  • avatar
    Timothy

    I just don’t understand how there can be cost issues when an estimated 50% of the previous generation sales were hatches.

    No hatch = looking for an alternative for a lot of people… maybe not 50% but I’m betting a significant number will be looking at alternatives.

    Weird.

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      Is there any alternative besides a Golf R?

      I’m assuming these folks have no interest in anything FWD, CUV or lacking a fifth door.

      • 0 avatar
        npaladin2000

        The current Mazda3 platform is AWD capable, and the last Mazdaspeed3 already had issues getting its power to the pavement with only FWD. So they could go AWD with the next Mazdaspeed3, and now they’ve got even more reason to.

    • 0 avatar

      Quite. I had no problem continuing a decade+ of Subaru loyalty had they made a hatch.
      Now I have a Focus ST.
      I have a feeling that sedan buyers, given no choice, would accept a WRX hatch but not the other way around.
      Smooth move, Subaru.

      • 0 avatar
        Timothy

        How do you like your ST?

        FWIW I absolutely looked at the WRX Hatch when I bought my ST, but the content to dollar ration was so heavily skewed in the ST’s favor that it was a no brainer.

        I do wish I had AWD though… lol.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Did you get winter tires/wheels?

          • 0 avatar
            Timothy

            Oh god yes. With this Boston winter? I would have been dead without them.

            Goodyear Ultra Ice & Snow on 17″ rims. Honestly I had 0 issues this winter aside from idiots in giant SUV’s on 20″ low-pro’s getting in my way.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I did a month of winter driving with summer tires on an MKV GTI (I moved back to MI from AZ in February a few years ago). It was awful. Luckily it wasn’t as bad as this winter. It still was bad enough that I decided that I would always have winter tires in the winter.

          • 0 avatar
            Synchromesh

            I’ve driven fwd cars with all-season tires in Boston winters for over 15 years and it worked just fine. Especially after I bought a car with ABS on it. So winter tires are not a necessity in that area unless you live in total boonies.

            And yes, I hate giant SUVs with a passion. Boston roads were full of them. Luckily, SF is not! A lot less SUVs and a lot more sports cars – just the way I like it.

            As for Subaru – I own a current ’12 hatch and I will not be buying a newer car until these idiots make a hatchback.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Synchro-

            I think all seasons would be fine, but the ST comes with some aggressive summer rubber. Also, dropping for super wide 18s to most likely much more narrow 17s will help too. There are a number of all season tires that I would recommend in the winter, but my wife and I both spend too much time on the road for us to use all seasons year round in the Midwest.

          • 0 avatar
            Timothy

            This was for Synchro… the reply button gets pushed off the end of the page.

            No way you can drive the ST on the stock tires. They come standard with Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric 2. They are high performance summer tire that start to function poorly at temps below 50 degrees.

            Even during the worst of this years snow I was able to continue on my daily activities, snow at times be plowed out from in front of the car by the ST’s gaping maw.

        • 0 avatar

          @ Timothy

          I’m only 5 days into ST ownership, but it’s a wonderful machine.

          Agreed, the price vs content ratio against the wrx hatch is a no brainer. Luckily, the car happens to be great fun, as well.
          A bit sore to lose AWD, but hey change is good.

          The dealership experience was interesting.
          Subie dealers would only let me sit in their WRXs (2014 and 15 models) as they had no demos available. I guess people buy these things sight unseen.
          The Ford guy tossed me the keys to a Focus ST sent me out alone, asking me to come back before closing time. If I needed more gas they would reimburse me, just keep the receipt.
          Made me feel good giving them my money.

          Anyways it’s my first American car, so it’s also a personal experiment on the Japanese vs. Domestic reliability stereotype.

          • 0 avatar
            Timothy

            Well congrats on the purchase… you are going to really enjoy it (especially when the Recaro’s break in a little bit).

            Just took mine from Boston to northern VT to visit the fam for easter and it’s a real joy to get out of a car after 280 miles without a sore back.

    • 0 avatar
      Power6

      Not apologizing for Subaru, but basically they made mods to the Chassis to make the WRX/STI stiffer. Previously the WRX and STI used the exact same chassis as the regular Impreza, aleit with flared fenders.

      So Subarus explantion was they they could only afford to do that to one of the Impreza chassis to make it into a WRX.

      It does seem odd though, where the hatch was so popular, but maybe at 50/50 they deciced on sedan becuase the backlash against the STI hatch and loss of the giant spoiler bit them last time so they went the other way this time.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Saab!!!!

    (get it)

    • 0 avatar
      gtrslngr

      Subaru has already ” Got It ” ! Assuming you mean ” IT ” to be all those former SAABistas customers desperate for a new ride .

      Subaru thru both a bit of luck as well as brilliant and extremely responsive marketing , reacting swiftly to a need across a varied terrain of customers/demographics [ pun intended ] along with meaningful and insightful ads [ rather than the current trend of ludicrous claims/lies/smoke & mirrors ads appealing to the redneck and conspicuous consumer type ] every other manufacture completely ignored [ take not GM ... s-w-i-f-t ] Subaru having become the SAAB of the 2010’s

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        You didn’t get it – you didn’t get it at all – somehow I’m not surprised.

        Hint – it had nothing to do with “Saab”

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Some Saabs *are* Subarus though… maybe he’s putting it all together!

          “Subaru manufactured a badge engineered version of the second generation Impreza hatchback as the “Saab 9-2X” between 2004 and 2005. Retailed only in the North American market for the 2005 and 2006 model years, the car earned the nickname “Saabaru”.[16] The car’s name is written as “92X” on its badge, but as “9-2X” in advertising and other texts. At the time the 9-2X was conceived, Saab Automobile had been a fully owned subsidiary of General Motors (GM), and GM held a 20 percent stake of Subaru’s parent company, Fuji Heavy Industries.”

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subaru_Impreza_%28second_generation%29

  • avatar
    gtrslngr

    ….. and this decision on behalf of Subaru in light of the overall American car buyers allergies to both wagons and hatchbacks .. preferring SUV/CUVs over the previous .. not to mention the same trend now expanding worldwide ….

    … surprises …… WHO ?

    As well as ….. WHY ?

    Get a clue .

    Americans overall DO NOT BUY hatchbacks and wagons . Despite all the rhetoric on car site like this . With again the same buying trend now expanding Worldwide . Because …. they [ UK EU & Asia ] .. want to be more like us [ US ] .At least when it comes to body style choices

    As to Timothy’s comment . Guaranteed . Hatchback or no . Subaru will sell as many WRX/STis as they can produce . All bets being a Forester WRX/STi is in the works and soon to be announced .

    • 0 avatar
      npaladin2000

      And yet 50% of the WRXes that Subaru sold were hatches or wagons, well above the “usual” American trend. Subaru will only sell as many as before if all of those buyers were simply buying a hatch because that’s all they could get, rather than preference. If a significant number of those sales were a preference for the hatch/wagon variant, then Subaru will likely lose those sales.

      • 0 avatar
        gtrslngr

        ” Were ” being the key word !

        That was .. THEN …. this is … NOW . Just in case that moment of reality has somehow passed you by .

        This is 2014 you know !!!!

        See …. buying trends and in fact the very world around you changes . Sometimes on a daily basis . Unlike those attempting in vain to remain at Stasis

        So wake up ! Welcome to the almost mid 2010’s . And do try to realize/come to grips with the fact that yours and my tastes/opinions DO NOT determine the World around us : despite the fact that the VaporWare world might try to convince the likes of yourself that we / you do

        • 0 avatar
          npaladin2000

          Yeah, and “were” was the way-back days of…2010 through 2013. Face facts, WRX buyers are the exception to the “Americans don’t buy hatchbacks” statement. Which is a myth anyway, since when you put them on stilts we buy them by the SUV-load.

          You seem to think your tastes DO determine the world around us. I’m merely arguing the sales history of the WRX and you’re taking rather massive exception to…facts.

        • 0 avatar
          Synchromesh

          You should visit San Francisco Bay Area. There are tons and tons of hatchbacks of all sorts here. In SF itself sedans seem to be a minority almost.

          And the previous gen of WRX was made 2008-2014 (and I emphasize the last number here).

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      I predicted an Outlander EVO so the Forester STi would be perfect to compete with that.

    • 0 avatar
      tooloud10

      Gosh, Americans generally don’t buy a lot of almost $40k faux rally cars with borderline cheap interiors AT ALL. That’s exactly the point–Subaru probably shouldn’t be using the same measuring stick to judge the STi that they use for the rest of the lineup. Surely they learned this while preparing the BRZ?

      Anyway, I fit the STi’s target demographic perfectly, but no hatch completely rules it out as an option for me.

      Sedans are like cars that someone went out of their way to manufacture to be less useful than their hatchback counterparts. Based on info that Subaru obviously knows, this is exactly the kind of hatch that’s successful in America. They’re just playing dumb while they finish an STi version of an existing vehicle in the lineup to make up for the lost hatch–cheaper than making another bodystyle of the Impreza.

      Open your eyes…lots of things are changing quickly in the car world. If you’d told me just ten years ago that I would soon prefer the offerings from Ford over anything from Honda/Toyota, I’d have laughed in your face.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    I’m just not sure I understand this. All of the WRX’s potential competition comes in hatch form, since it absolutely gets cross-shopped with the Mazdaspeed 3, Focus ST, and regular GTI, as well as the R.

    I was temporarily shopping for a WRX in the past, and I would only consider hatch variants. I’m not saying that they won’t move the metal, but it’ll take longer when your primary audience uses this as an only vehicle and they get rid of the model with the most utility.

    • 0 avatar
      omer333

      Riiiiight. Because the average WRX/STI/GTI/Speed3/ST customer or owner needs room for two-three child seats, a jogging stroller (with room for one or two kids) diaper bags, toys, and a Costco trip while roaring around some back roads at full ‘hoon.

      Oh, forgot to include surfboard/kayak/fixed-gear mountain bike on the roof.

      • 0 avatar
        gtrslngr

        +1

        Seriously . The outdoor types / family /shopaholic crowd most likely wouldn’t even give a second look at a WRX/STi . They all gravitate to the Forester / Outback and most likely always will . Even if as rumored Subaru does bring out a Forester WRX/STi variant . Though that one ? Well . In light of current trends [ like the GLA-45 already selling out for months in advance despite not even being on the showroom floor yet here in the US ] Hmmmn . That one just might fly !

        Now a coupe WRX/STi ? Thats an idea .. what with all the WRC references etc …. that just might be worthy of consideration … as well as more to the liking of the WRX/STi demographic

      • 0 avatar
        sitting@home

        Last Sunday morning I took my stick-shift WRX wagon to the hardware store and loaded up with 12 bags of redwood tree bark.

        Last Sunday afternoon I took my stick-shift WRX wagon through a twisty-windy mountain road (Highway 9 from Santa Cruz to San Jose) racing against some motorbikes at times and leaving a Mustang and more than one macho-man pickup in the dust.

        That car is approaching ten years old and Subaru are doing their darnest to ensure I don’t buy another car from them by not selling one that fills all of my wants and needs in a single vehicle. I was prepared to look past awkward styling and dubious cabin quality to get the type of car I wanted last time, but if Subaru insist I must have a trunk or a CVT then they won’t get my money this time.

        • 0 avatar
          omer333

          Ever notice no one complains that no one complains that the GTI or GLI are sold with automatics?

          Are you married or in a committed relationship? Does that signifigant other know how to drive a manual transmission car or want to learn?

          That was the problem when I had my Si sedan, wife doesn’t know how to drive a manual transmission car and really didn’t want to learn. I also realized I did not have the patience to teach her.

          • 0 avatar
            sproc

            +1000 on the spouse issue. Ten years of trying to teach stick have been nothing but fail. She refuses to even move my RSX around in the driveway.

            As to your GTI/GLI comment, comparing their DSG to any CVT I’ve ever driven is like comparing fresh king salmon to a Fillet-O-Fish.

          • 0 avatar
            FormerFF

            I drove a stick shift for 12 years. I tried to teach my wife how to drive it, and she was doing quite well until she stalled it going up a hill and couldn’t get going. After that she refused to drive it. She drove her car and I drove mine, it wasn’t that much of an issue.

            My current car is an automatic. I have a teenage daughter that needs to learn to drive, and also I wanted a plug in hybrid which only comes in an automatic. My wife has driven it twice. She’s welcome to drive it anytime I’m home, but she still drives her car and I still drive mine.

          • 0 avatar
            Pinzgauer

            I decided my happiness was more important than my wife being able to drive my car, so that’s why my Mustang and daily driver Wrangler Unlimited are both stick shift. Unfortunately that meant parking my Boss at the train station today while the Jeep gets a new gas tank, but atleast I will enjoy my drive home :)

          • 0 avatar
            theirishscion

            My missus is actually polishing up her manual transmission skills specifically so she can have fun driving my (2014 5-door, bought early just so as to avoid this exact bloody problem) STI. I don’t mind FHI choosing to sell anything they like with any transmission they like (I’d actually be very interested to drive a version of my car with a dual-clutch flappy-paddle setup like Mitsubishi have) just so long as it doesn’t dilute the chassis, engine, or the rest of the powertrain. The more options the better.

            But I will want my next commuter/fun car in a 5-door. And since I _have_ put my money where my mouth is recently, hopefully that’ll be taken into consideration going forward. Don’t make me buy something tasteless like a GTI when the time comes Subaru! [/me dons flameproof undies and ducks behind the blast-wall]

        • 0 avatar
          05lgt

          Subaru has lost the script I was following. Since they’ll no longer make a single car that does it all, I’ll buy a boring eco-utility vehicle (Prius V) and an MX-5. I’m completely done with Subaru now.

      • 0 avatar
        Timothy

        This particular ST owner needed the hatch not because of Satan’s spawn (aka children) but a 130lbs Great Dane… she fits well in the hatch, not so much in a small sedan.

        And Ski’s on the roof.

      • 0 avatar
        tooloud10

        In some cases (including my own), yes. That’s exactly the kind of stuff I move around in my car. I might be about ten years older than the rest of the STi shoppers, but we all have stuff to move around, whether it be diaper bags and strollers or band equipment and a mountain bike.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      The WRX and STI were outsold by the BRZ/FR-S twins in the US last year. Does the volume really exist to justify development cost for both a hatch and sedan version of both the WRX and STI for 30k units a year? We don’t know the exact numbers that drove their decision… and we never will. But, we do know that the mission of the Impreza and the WRX/STI has been diverging more and more over the past 15 years. Recall that the 2002 Impreza 2.5RS and WRX were only separated by engine, some driveline bits, and some interior bits. Today, buyers of the Impreza want space and fuel efficiency. Buyers of the WRX want speed, handling, looks, and a little better fuel efficiency than before. Slapping a turbo on the current Impreza sedan and hatch would have been a sport compact disaster. Trying to make a cheap, cheerful, efficient Impreza off what we see as the current WRX would have been costly and difficult. They had to be separated. When they became different cars, the ability to offer all those variations went away. The HTCVT had already been developed for the Forester XT, so the WRX will buy some customers to make up for the “hatch only” lost sales by offering an automatic transmission. The Forester XT also offers a turbo engine in tall wagon form that fits the booming CUV segment.

      You can also look at it this way. How many sport compact sedan options are out there? If they did hatch instead of sedan, they are directly competing against the GTI, MS3 (assuming it comes), Focus ST, etc. The Focus ST has loads of cash on the hood. The GTI has a very loyal following. For someone wanting a sport compact sedan, it is the WRX or a Jetta GLI now that Mitsu is killing off the Evo variants. You’ve got to step up to an A4 2.0T/328i/IS etc if you want a sporty AWD sedan and you’re looking at $40k. Subaru has the segment to themselves.

      • 0 avatar
        gtrslngr

        Quentin my good man . You GET it !

        Two thumbs up ! And thanks . Its nice not being the only voice of reason here sometimes

      • 0 avatar
        omer333

        You forgot Civic Si Sedan. It may not have the POWAR of the ‘Rex or AWD, but you don’t have to worry abour blowing a gasket and it’s cheaper to buy and insure.

        • 0 avatar
          Quentin

          True, missed the Si. Judging by the disdain for Civic-like engine in the twins from my time on nasioc, I’d wager that the Si is a non-starter for most people in the market for a WRX.

          • 0 avatar
            Timothy

            Asking the question because I simply don’t know the answer… the BRZ FRS were new last year and the new WRX didn’t come out until the second half of this year right?

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            Year:: WRX/WRX STI sales
            CY11:: 13805
            CY12:: 13624
            CY13:: 17969

            Year:: BRZ : FR-S
            CY12:: 4144 : 11417 (on sale in July’12)
            CY13:: 8587 : 18327

            I was under the impression WRX sales were higher! Yikes! The twins sold nearly 50% more than the WRX did in CY13. They outsold the WRX in CY12 with only 7 months on the market. I’m sure we’ll see the twins taper off for CY14 as that is the norm with a sports coupe, but the WRX numbers say quite a lot. It is a low volume car. That makes 7 major variants (hatch, sedan, wrx, wrx sti, 6MT, CVT) hard to justify.

          • 0 avatar
            Timothy

            Thanks for the info. Wonder how many more gets they will get w/ that infernal CVT offering… either way. Le sigh.

          • 0 avatar
            Power6

            You’re comparing the end of a cycle and the old WRX/STI are currently very lame ducks, against the first couple years of a new sports coupe. To be honest I had a 2009 WRX and I am not sure why one would buy this old design 5 years on as a 2014 but they do, and in steady numbers!

            The 2015 WRX/STI sales will crush 3rd year BRZ/FRS sales.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            Power6 – you are missing the point. I’m not comparing the twins sales, specifically, to the WRX. I’m using the twins as a benchmark. The twins are a low volume niche that offers 2 transmissions, 1 engine, and 1 body style. At around 25k sales a year, people (especially people here) like to say that it is failing to meet sales expectations. To me, that highlights why the WRX had no choice but go one body style. It will never be pushing 50k+ units a year in the US where you could possibly justify all sorts of variations. In order to keep the WRX and STI versions around, something had to give. Unfortunately, it was the hatch. They expanded their target market by offering an automatic on the new one, which I think was a great idea to get some volume back to the WRX line. I have no doubt the ’15 WRX will outsell the twins in CY14. It is a darn good car at a good price and it is practical enough for a dad of two. People are getting comfortable with the idea of a high performance CVT, as well. I think that will help push the WRX to nearly 30k units for CY14.

          • 0 avatar
            npaladin2000

            Quentin, you’re skewing the numbers by rolling in the FR-S, which is a niche model for Toyota, but that’s apples and oranges. Numbers for a Toyota “niche” model would be near mainstream numbers for a niche brand like Subaru. It doesn’t matter that they’re built on the same line, the FR-S is sold by Toyota/Scion dealers, and there’s a lot more of them than Subaru dealers.

  • avatar
    Scott_314

    Count me as one of those who say they want a hatch but has never bought one… so Subaru is probably making the right call.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      I love hatches. In my lifetime I’ve had a Datsun 240Z, a Mazda RX – 7, a VW GTI, and a first gen Focus ZX-3. The only other cars I’ve owned until now were a Fiat Spyder, and Opel Manta (trunkback coupe), and a Ford Aerostar minivan (tow vehicle).

      Like I said, I love hatches, however my wife does not, which is why my current car is a sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      theirishscion

      Hmm. For the counter-argument, I like hatches and have never bought myself anything _but_ a hatch. (I’ve had SUVs and CUVs and pickups and motorcycles as well, but never a sedan)

      Which is of limited value as a single data point in this discussion I know, but perhaps of a little more pertinence because I just (Dec ’13) bought myself a 2014 5-door STI, one of the last batch made, specifically because while I wanted the STI, I _didn’t_ want the 4-door. I actually pushed the purchase up 6+ months from when I had originally planned to avoid being stuck without the 5-door option.

      Now, can I guarantee that in a few years I wouldn’t be prepared to consider a 4-door? I don’t know that I can guarantee it, but I am confident that I’m a great deal less likely to go that route. And I am (demographically speaking) an attractive customer for Subaru (as are a surprising number of STI buyers, from what I’ve gathered) so I guess they ignore our opinion at their own risk, whatever that risk may turn out to be.

  • avatar
    doublechili

    I like hatches and have owned a Saab 9-3 Viggen and found it pretty cool to have a very fast car that could also carry furniture in a pinch.

    That said, while no MT would be a dealbreaker for me, sedan vs. hatch is not that big a deal. My wife has an SUV, so we have that for when we need to carry stuff. I suppose that’s probably pretty similar for many married couples, but I can understand a single person wanting a hatch.

  • avatar
    Redshift

    When we went shopping for a car for my wife, she required a manual transmission, AWD, a hatch back, and wanted a turbo. So, we bought her a 2012 WRX because it was a hatch, not despite it. Small list that met those requirements.
    So, Subaru have just eliminated themselves from future consideration when it comes time to replace it.

  • avatar
    SilverCoupe

    We will probably replace my wife’s manual ’02 WRX wagon with a couple year old one when we trade it in, in order to get the hatch.

    She uses her current car to take her garden implements to her rental garden plot across town (as the yard behind our urban house does not afford her enough garden space).

    I don’t mind this in her decade old WRX, but getting the back dirty in the shiny black STI she is interested in does seem a bit wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      I am pretty sure Subaru sells a full complement of cargo liners, floor mats, and seat covers to protect the inside. There is also always Weathertech, which work very good. If she can do it without folding the seats down then you can keep the interior pretty clean.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    I know a lot of guys that have WRX’s and not one of them drives the sedan. I don’t know anyone who even thinks about buying a WRX in sedan. Same goes for automatic for that matter, but I do not fault them for offering one, I think they would get more sales by having it available, as long as they don’t try to drop the manual completely like Mitsu did with the EVO MR. But the hatch is a different story. This was a stupid move on Subaru’s part and they will lose sales because of it. Next year or two then we will see the return of the hatch, you will see.

    And for all those guys who are saying you can’t buy a stick shift because your wife refuses to drive it, that’s a sad sorry excuse. You should be able to get what you want otherwise that is a very one-sided marriage. My wife will only drive a stick, she is the one making fun of me for getting a DSG GTI. My daughter whined and whined about getting a car with an automatic, so that is what we chose for her. And now she keeps telling me she wishes she had gotten a stick shift, and she teases her BF for not knowing how to drive a stick. I am very proud of her!

    • 0 avatar
      Redshift

      +1. I don’t get this whole “wife can’t drive it…” thing either. Seems to be a sad excuse. Why do people seem to insist that women can’t or won’t drive manuals transmissions? It’s like the people who seem convinced that you can’t put snow tries on AWD cars. (Why else does everybody insist on comparing AWD with all seasons to FWD with snows.)

      All of the cars my wife has owned or will agree to own are manuals. The only automatic in our current fleet is one of my vehicles.

      Of course, out fleet is full of “money where your mouth is, internet” type cars.

      • 0 avatar
        omer333

        You have a brown, diesel wagon, with a manual transmission?

        • 0 avatar
          Redshift

          Funny, we were explaining that to a friend of ours the other note. Afraid not.
          But, do currently have a WRX hatch, a Mazda RX8, a MazdaSpeed Protege, a Chevy Avalanche and a couple RX7s..

      • 0 avatar
        omer333

        You have a Honda Accord Sport with a manual transmission?

      • 0 avatar
        doublechili

        We’re a 2 vehicle family. My wife can’t (won’t) drive a MT, so she just doesn’t drive my car. But I can drive hers (I’m a bad passenger). In fact, as I think about it, I’ve had my car 7 years (longest ever) and other than the odd valet or guy at the shop, no one’s ever driven it but me. Mine, mine, mine, mine, mine.

        Among the many benefits, my seat and mirrors are always where I want them.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Living here in the heart of Subaru Country, Commierado, I see more hatchback WRX and STi variants than sedans.

    It was the last hard core sports car that could be still used as a family, grocery, and stuff hauler on the weekends. I should know, because I own one.

    Subaru are dumbasses for not bringing the hatch over to the US.

    The sedan is just a cramped Civic with 4WD and a crazy turbo engine. No one wants that.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Yeah, yeah, yeah. Same old complaint of the huge horde of six speed hatch/wagon purchasers. I’d never consider anything but the sedan myself.

    And the two WRXs and the STI that my dealer had as an original allocation were sold in two days. They made deals with two of the buyers to keep them in the showroom because of snow and the pure summer tires the cars come with (more snow tomorrow, you need 10C or 50 F to safely drive pure summer tires), so I got to sit in them at least. They’re waiting for more, and so am I.

    Compared to my 08 LGT, the interior is total crap, the cloth seats not particularly well-shaped, the rears are awful – it’s like trying to sit on a balloon. No blinkers in side mirrors, no puddle lights, a headliner from the chocolate box tray material, etc., etc. In fact identical to the cheapo Impreza sitting alongside, despite magazine protestations to the contrary.

    So it had better drive really, really well. Subaru should make a bespoke interior for the car and add some sound deadening. Up the price so there is some pride of ownership, but they’re deaf on that too. An extra two grand wouldn’t stop purchasers. But their other cars are just as bad interiorwise.

    I never buy first year anyway, so we’ll see how quality/reliability and sales are over the next year or two.

    • 0 avatar
      Power6

      You’re spoiled by they LGT…Subaru has said that 05-09 Legacy was too expensive to produce, they went too upmarket, couldn’t unload them. Even the subsequent Legacy got cheaper and they sell more of them so there you go. Subaru is not interested in going upmarket.

      Wait for whatever FA motor Subaru is cooking up to replace the old EJ for this new STI, they say 16 or 17 it should happen, it should be the best STI ever.

  • avatar
    Power6

    Subaru of America is very careful about not spoiling current sales by the promise of future product.

    There were “no plans” in 2008 to have a Sedan STI and along came 2011…there is no talk about when the old EJ motor goes away in the new STI even though it is pretty much inevitable. So even if this is coming, and some guy in the know in Japan says something, SOA is all over it with respect to selling current product.

    The case is pretty good though, they say about half of WRX sales are hatchback. We’ll see how many of those will settle for the sedan or hold out for another hatch.

  • avatar
    LALoser

    I just purchased a new ’15 WRX today. Tried the STI, but for me, not worth the extra coin.


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