By on March 6, 2012

The newest Porsche Boxster is here, with lots more aluminum, some new engines and styling cues derived from the 991-chassis Porsche 911 that has just launched in North America.

The base engine, a 2.7L flat-six, makes 265 horsepower, while the 3.4L in the Boxster S makes 315. A 6-speed manual and 7-speed PDK gearbox are both available. A Sport Chrono Package with Dynamic Transmission Mounts and a Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV) mechanical differential are also available, at an exorbitant markup no doubt. The 2013 Boxster will be on sale this summer, and Jack Baruth will not be testing one.

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28 Comments on “Geneva 2012: 2013 Porsche Boxster, Now With 991 Percent More Brand Identity...”


  • avatar
    carguy

    I have never quite understood the hate heaped on the Boxter/Cayman. They are probably the finest example of sport car value for money that Porsche offers and yet they are ridiculed by some. Maybe some folks need to spend $150K before they feel that their car is truly special.

    • 0 avatar
      pfingst

      I’m with you – I like the Cayman a lot. I guess some people just like to run down any Porsche that isn’t a 911.

    • 0 avatar
      Franz K

      Well…… if you must know . It has something to do with the fact that the Boxster/Cayman has gotten the unfortunate and undeserved ‘ Chick Mobile ‘ reputation , along with the realities of their engines letting lose in a big way in 35,000 miles or less .

      Handling and driving pleasure are the Boxster/Cayman’s forte . Reliability and durability are not . Tuck that simple fact in with the price ( which for all the hype is not Cheap ) and you’ve got the makings of a lousy reputation

      Any questions ?

      • 0 avatar
        chuckrs

        Any questions? Here’s one. You do realize that starting with the 2009 MY, no Porsche – 911 or CayBoxster – has had an IMS? If you want a ’09 or later one, the IMS brouhaha may drag the resale value down enough to make them affordable.

      • 0 avatar

        The IMS problem might be history. TrueDelta has about 200 1999-2005 Boxsters in the Car Reliability Survey. Not a single IMS failure has been reported since the beginning of 2011.

        To be fair, some of these cars have had kits fitted to prevent an IMS failure. But far from all of them. It’s possible that the IMS has already failed in those engines where it was going to fail.

        One caveat: on average these cars are driven about 5,500 miles a year. So their reliability scores aren’t necessarily commensurate with car models typically used as daily drivers.

        http://truedelta.com/Porsche-Boxster/engine-problems-239

      • 0 avatar
        Franz K

        AHEM ! Gentlemen . As a Porschophile might I recommend you aim your browsers over to the slew of Boxster/Cayman blogs – discussions – message boards etc . Methinks if you do you just might read that barely any Boxster/Cayman of ANY year or set up has an engine thats made it intact past 50K miles .

        Its a major thorn in Porsches side . Inexcusable in my opinion – but never the less the facts as they really are . Forget about the TrueDelta etc rubbish and talk to the people that own them .

      • 0 avatar

        Where do you think our survey responses come from?

        The forums you refer to have thousands of active participants. And even people who aren’t active are likely to post an IMS failure if they have one. A failure rate of 5 percent over the life of the car can still seem like “all of them.” At this point the failure rate appears to be very low.

        Of course, that the failures occur at all and that Porsche doesn’t always step up are pretty bad. But a failure rate of virtually 100 percent? This just isn’t accurate.

        RMS leaks are more common, but less catastrophic.

        This thread is a fairly good one:

        http://forums.pelicanparts.com/off-topic-discussions/656743-ims-failure.html

    • 0 avatar
      Acd

      The used car market doesn’t appreciate them either–just look at how cheap you can buy an early 2000’s Boxster. Then do a Google search for “Porsche Boxster IMS Engine Failure” and you’ll see why they are so cheap.

      • 0 avatar
        ccd2

        The IMS problem is history starting in MY2009 for both the Cayman and the Boxster. A redesign of the engine eliminated it. Hard to know how this will improve reliability of the engine at this point because Porsches tend to clock so few annual miles.

  • avatar
    Darkhorse

    I thought they were going to make this with a 4 cylinder option to bring it a bit down market. What happened? Not nearly as attractive as the original 1997 model.

  • avatar
    thirty-three

    The design reminds me of the MR2. I’m not sure if that’s good or bad.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Considering that last MR2 was designed to look like a Porsche, it’s kind of funny.

      • 0 avatar
        morf

        Got your facts wrong there. The MR Spyder was on the market in Japan before Porsche even revealed a concept version of the Boxster. The Boxster is a much more refined look, but that might be becaues they wanted to distinguish it from the MR2.

  • avatar
    number9ine

    Don’t you mean “981 percent?”

    I love the styling. Where the 991 looks big compared to its predecessor, the Boxster looks grown-up.

    If I have the money in the next few years, this will be in my garage. I love my 997 C2S but I miss my Boxster. Hopefully I can have both!

  • avatar
    ccd1

    At one point Porsche was going to produce a baby Boxster/Cayman and the Boxster/Cayman was going to be moved upmarket to make room for it. Those plans have been shelved for the time being. Porsche is introducing a new model, the Macan, which is a baby Cayenne. From a volume standpoint, this is a smart move. The Boxster/Cayman was never sold particularly well. No reason why a smaller version would sell any better, given the way Porsche prices its cars.

    The Cayman has always tread upon the bottom of the 911 line. The main reason to choose a Carrera over a Cayman S is that you simply don’t fit in the Cayman or just have to have the 911 mystique. Like the new Boxster, the new Cayman will be bigger and more people will fit into the new car. Now all that separates a Cayman from a Carrera is the 911 mystique for which you will pay roughly $20,000.

    • 0 avatar
      SunnyvaleCA

      ‘all that separates a Cayman from a Carrera”

      The new 911 adds: More powerful engines, more gagues in the instrument cluster, taller high gears (better top speed and better fuel efficiency), and a newly designed manual transmission with an extra cog. I still doubt those benefits overcome the Boxter/Cayman benefits: mid-engine feel and the convenience of a hatchback for carrying stuff.

      • 0 avatar
        ccd2

        I was being very literal here. The 911 Carrera starts at a little over $80,000 and has about 340 hp. The Cayman S starts at a little over $60,000 and currently has 320 hp (unless you have the R which is 330hp). The Cayman is also a couple of hundred pounds lighter than the Carrera. The Cayman is very competitive against the Carrera in terms of performance, handling, fuel efficiency, etc. But the current gen Cayman is a tight fit for a lot of people, including myself. That will be less true with the next gen Cayman.

        As for more powerful engines and better top speed, you would be talking about the other varieties of 911 which start with the Carrera S at close to $100,000 and up.

  • avatar
    robc123

    I have always liked the look of the cayman, the boxster less (but if I get a second car, I want a convertible).

    When I was shopping around I looked at the forums to see if there was anything I should know about in terms of reliability but it seems pretty sorted out post 2008 model yrs.

    Was it true delta that rated Porsche boxster at the top for reliability?

  • avatar
    seanx37

    Shouldn’t the base model(which costs around $60000!) have more power than a Toyota Camry v6?

    • 0 avatar
      DeeTee

      Nope. The Boxster is not about horsepower – it’s about how it drives. Wouldn’t matter if the Camry had 600hp – it’s still a Camry. The Boxster is a Porsche sports car. It’s not all about punching holes in the horizon.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      Not necessarily more than a Camry, just more. 315 should be the base with the S pushing 375 or thereabouts.

      I don’t buy the argument that it shouldn’t have more power. You can increase power and still have an engaging drive. IMO Porsche dumbs it down so it won’t kick the 911 in the nuts.

      • 0 avatar
        ccd2

        You are missing the point that drives most people nuts about Porsches in general. The Cayman starts around $52,000 and you have nothing inside the car. Want bi-xeon lights? Extra. Self dimming mirrors? Extra. The Convenience Package, which IMHO contains things which should be standard at this price point, is an extra couple of thousand dollars. Want more horsepower? That would be an extra $10,000 for something that costs Porsche nothing to do. PDK? Over $3,000. The cars are expensive to begin with and then Porsche nickels and dimes you to death. Consider that Porsche didn’t even package up the the commonly optioned items until MY2011.

      • 0 avatar
        DeeTee

        Sure Porsche mess with the specs to keep a horsepower pecking order for buyers who need to feel good that more of their money (which buys more horsepower) means they got a “better” car. But I don’t buy cars based on a number on the brochure. And I don’t buy that more hp necessarily means a better car. The Miata is a great drive and it has about 12.73 hp (from memory). A friend’s 1977 911 Turbo had about 3.9 thousand million hp (again, from memory) and that thing was about as much fun as falling down a stairway (but much more dangerous).

        I agree that the Boxster/Cayman is not as powerful as it could be if Porsche let their engineers determine the cars specifications, but what manufacturer doesn’t play this game?

        BUT – my point is that the car has plenty of horsepower and is a fantastic drive and we shouldn’t get too spun up about a number on a brochure. Most of the time we can’t actually use the full hp of the car anyhow. Try this: find your favorite empty back road and drive your car as hard as you can and count how many seconds you spend consecutively at full throttle. On a twisty road (where the most fun can be had) the answer is between none and “very few”. Even a mere 265 hp (and how do they measure that, BTW?) is enough to reach the limits of the chassis and the driver pretty quickly.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        @DeeTee

        Everything you said is valid but the car should have more power (as should the Miata :-)).

        @ccd2
        I’m with you brotha. But, in Porsche’s defense people are buying the cars nonetheless. In these situations the best thing to do is vote with your wallet. If Porsche started losing sales they’d be forced to do something.

        If I were in their position and people were still buying expensive options packages I just might push the boundaries a bit more to see how much more I could get.

      • 0 avatar
        ccd2

        Call me crazy, but I think Porsche is pretty good at pushing the price “envelope”! lol!

  • avatar
    ccd1

    Look forward to a TTAC review of this car. Several sources have released “First Drives” which are favorable of course. My take is that the new Boxster is an improvement but not much of one. Horsepower and torque receive nominal increases, weight loss is 70-80 lbs, fuel efficiency increases by 15%. Most important changes are a larger cabin which will fit larger people and the cabin electronics received a substantial update. Expect the changes to the Cayman to largely mirror those to the Boxster

  • avatar
    danwat1234

    It’ll be interesting to see what the real world MPG will be. The electrical recuperation technology is cool. If only the alternator could turn into a motor to help the engine along too, powered by the lead acid battery or a supercapacitor.


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