By on August 17, 2010

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32 Comments on “Chart Of The Day: America’s Top 25 Nameplates In July...”


  • avatar
    Syke

    Hmmn, that makes:

    5 Toyota
    5 GM
    4 Ford
    3 Honda
    2 Chrysler
    2 Nissan
    2 Hyundai
    2 Other

    Not a bad look at who’s selling what. Biggest surprise for me was the Jetta (I expected a bit lower, like about 27-30). Wonder how the new one’s going to rank next year?

  • avatar
    dhathewa

    Most interesting. People whine about gas prices, yet two of the three top sellers are trucks.

    • 0 avatar

      Yes, but notice how there are no traditional BOF SUVs on the list anymore (wither Ford Explorer). Now there are lots of CUVs. I think the bulk of the pick-up sales are going to businesses, not individuals.

    • 0 avatar

      Lots of these “business” users dual-use or are profigate (saw a Ford SVT Raptor as a pilot vehicle for a mobile home transport).

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      The Wrangler is still BOF IIRC, but yeah, for the most part the big traditional SUVs have become a niche item.

      Business sales will always make up a big chunk of truck sales, but from my experience the balance is still in favor of actual retail customer sales. There are a lot of small business owners and sole proprietorships that buy F-150s and Silverados though, so that blurs the lines a bit.

    • 0 avatar

      I was just trying to imply that there are far fewer people buying trucks and traditional SUVs solely for personal use.

      Also, I wasn’t sure if the Wrangler was BOF either. I figured someone would educate me.

    • 0 avatar
      dhathewa

      I hadn’t looked all the way down the list… BOF SUVs do seem to be off the radar.

      OTOH, Truck sales are sharply up over last year while and it’s hard to say this is on account of increased economic activity. And Prius sales are down, which suggests either people have found other alternatives in the super-high-fuel-economy sector (I can’t imagine what) or it’s additional evidence of lack of concern for fuel price and supply. The Corolla/Matrix is down a bit, too. As is the Civic. The Elantra is up but that maybe has more to do with cheap yet perceived to be reliable than with fuel economy.

      Maybe some former BOF SUV prospects moved into the Traverse (up) and Sienna (also up)?

    • 0 avatar

      I didn’t comment on Wrangler because it is a somewhat a special case. If it weren’t BOF, it would be difficult to add heavy accessories to it in the way Jeep owners expect. In particular everything having to do with new bumpers and swing-out carriers requires sturdy attachment points that can resist not just weights but moments too. Also, I think a larger percentage of Wrangler owners raise them than, say, Explorer owners. Wrangler is not just BOF, it has a solid front axle too.

      Also please note that Wrangler is way down the order. The new unibody Explorer is going to sail past it easily once it’s available in numbers.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    Geee, GM aren’t you glad you killed the Pontiac Vibe (Matrix)?

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    What’s startling is the lack of domestic CARS on the list. Ford has two, Chevrolet has two, and Chrysler none. Even if you classify CUVs as cars, it still wouldn’t help. If the only way domestics can get anywhere near the top of this list is with trucks, their problems are not yet over.

  • avatar
    jj99

    Wow. Two Hyundai vehicles outsell every Ford except for the F150. Except for large pickups, Asia rules. If you remove fleet sales, with the exception of large pickups, Detroit falls way down the charts. Good show Detroit.

    • 0 avatar
      HoldenSSVSE

      Errr, 11 of the top 25 are from “Detroit,” from three makers. Thirteen are from Asia from five makers. One is from Europe. I think Detroit did pretty good. Funny how you go, “well gee, take out the number one selling vehicle and the number three selling vehicle and Detroit isn’t doing well. They still have 9 of the 23 (since you took 1 and 3 out).

      Gee, if I take out number 2 and 4 from Toyota, they aren’t doing all that well. Now the Asian companies only have 11…see I can have fun with numbers too.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      Errrrrr. With the exceptiopn of the large pickups, Detroit does not have a single segment leader in this chart. Ouch.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      The Escape is outselling the closest competitor CR-V YTD for the small CUV crown, and the Focus is still YTD ahead of the Elantra, as is the Fusion YTD vs the Sonata.

      Detroit leads the way with large cars as well, with the Impala, Charger, and Taurus all outselling the Avalon and Genesis. The Traverse is the only large CUV to make the list, which with combined with the other Lambdas, and Ford’s healthy sales of the Edge, give Detroit a very strong presence in the midsize and large CUV segment.

      I’d like to see combined Caravan/Town & Country sales vs the Sienna as well, I don’t know how those would pan out.

      The Asian import brands only real area of dominance is in compact and midsize sedans, and the current Detroit offerings are making more and more inroads there every year. Compare the relative position of the Fusion and Malibu on the list now vs back in ’06.

      It’s also a bit silly to throw out fullsize trucks, when full size trucks make up two of the top three sellers in the US. Trucks are big business, and big money, and an area where the import brands have been able to make very little headway.

    • 0 avatar
      crc

      Nullo Modo – Yeah but how many of those Escapes are in the Boston metro area?

    • 0 avatar
      PartsUnknown

      crc – none. In fact, there are no Fords registered anywhere in Massachusetts. It is a Ford-free state. Just ask jj99, he knows.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      Nullo, your are right. I forgot to consider the nearly 40% of Ford sales that go to rental car lots, the government, and other fleet sales. That is a real success story.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      I seem to recall from the last post about fleet numbers that Ford’s percentage was closer to 30%, and of that, only about a third was rental fleet sales, so, about 10% of volume overall, which isn’t too bad.

      As far as the government, construction, and other fleet sales, I think I have a reason. One day Alan Mulally woke up and he noticed that Ford built all sorts of vehicles that might not look right sitting in the average suburban driveway. From E-150 cargo and 15 passenger vans, to Transit Connect cargo and Taxi Package vans, to Crown Victoria Police Interceptor and Taxi Package cars, to F-Series cab and chassis models and E-series cutaways. Looking at these vehicles, he must have also noticed that they fit the business needs of a whole range of industries perfectly, and seeing as the Japanese weren’t building anything to meet those needs, he decided take advantage of an entire network of dedicated business and fleet salespeople that had somehow sprung up inside of the dealers, and who were experts in matching the needs of business and fleet customers with vehicles that they could use to get their jobs done.

      Thus, Ford has found itself in the position of building a variety of vehicles designed from the ground up for business and fleet use, and at the same time found business and fleets that need such vehicles and are willing to pay for them. How on earth will Ford ever survive by continuing to sell purpose built vehicles at a profit to these fleet buyers?

    • 0 avatar
      Monty

      jj99 – Silvy is that you?

      So I assume that there are no other carmakers selling rentals? Only Ford? It must have been Fords in disguise at the Phoenix airport last year when I noticed the plethora of Hyundai vehicles at every single rental outlet? Not to mention the gazillion Camrys and Yarii I spotted? It’s funny, we couldn’t get a Ford Escape, but were offered our choice of a RAV4 or a Tuscon instead.

      Nullo – thanks for the reasoned and logical response. Locally, construction companies and other like organizations seem to buy a lot of domestic pickup trucks and large commercial vans; not a lot of import companies seem to be selling 15 passenger vans or super heavy duty pickups. Coincidence or is it something from “The Twilight Zone”?

  • avatar
    threeer

    @jj9…true, but then again, the Malibu outsold either Hyundai on the list (temper that with the understanding that fleet sales “might” have helped that along). Perhaps (not) surprising is the drop-off of both the Civic and the Accord.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      Malibu is a decent looking vehicle. I have never driven one. Next trip, I will make that my rental. In my opinion, it is the only decent looking car from Detroit that competes with the Camry and Accord.

    • 0 avatar
      rnc

      Are we looking at the same bloat/bland mobiles that the accord and camry have become?

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      Are you trying to tell me that people who drive Fusions have more fun?

    • 0 avatar
      PartsUnknown

      rnc – i hear this “bloat” word tossed around in reference to the Accord. What does that mean? An Accord LX sedan weighs 3,200 pounds soaking wet (and only about 65 pounds more than its predecessor). In 2010, 3,200 pounds is a welterweight.

      The Camry, I have no idea. And I’ll give you bland – neither car will set your pants on fire.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      PartsUnknown, a midwest person calles a vehicle “bland/boring” when it is reliable. For example, Toyota or Honda vehicles are “bland/boring” because, when they are between 5 and 10 years old, they don’t require exciting trips to the dealer for expensive repairs. You see, going to the Ford dealer to get the transmission repaired on your seven year old Ford is “exciting”.

  • avatar
    Jacob

    WOW. Based on this chart, Big 3s car sales are still doing pretty badly. Of the top 10 most sold cars, only 3 are Detroit brand names, at least one of which is hecho en Mexico (Fusion). The only heartening part is that Malibu seems to be closing in on Accord.

    • 0 avatar
      mad scientist

      Incentives are helping quite a bit with that effort.

      As for the Silverado, one dealer in my area is offering $9000 off MSRP on those. Not so good for profits.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Chrysler only has 2 entries: the Dodge Ram and the Jeep Wrangler – serious trouble there.

    EVs like the Volt or Leaf can ever make such a Top 25 list due to their poor ROI, but the treehuggers want to make it so via subsidies and negative incentives such as gasoline taxation and CAFE regulation.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Are you trying to tell me that people who drive Fusions have more fun?

    Driving them? Yes, based on every review I’ve read.

    • 0 avatar

      My experience with Fusion was mixed. It’s an enormous step forward after the “soap” shaped Taurus of old, but still it’s not an Accord. Its Fordesque girdth helps in some turns, but not in all. In the same time I was annoyed every time I had to park.

  • avatar
    John Horner

    Wow, Ford’s F-series stands out as the pickup truck which gained a bunch of sales. I would guess that the combination of a solid product, in-tact dealer network and the fact that some people don’t want to buy from “Government Motors” all worked in Ford’s favor.

    It is also interesting that only one minivan made the top-25 list, and it wasn’t the previously always best selling Dodge Caravan. My, how the once mighty Caravan has fallen. Not very long ago, Chrysler corp got the majority of all minivan sales and everyone else fought for what was left. No mas.

    Noteworthy too is that the Toyota Tundra and Nissan Titan are not in the hunt.

  • avatar
    ajla

    What is the “Dodge Ram”?

    It’s just “Ram” now. Like Cher.


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