By on October 14, 2014

rentalcars

 

Courtesy of the New York Times and Polk, a chart showing the top rental cars in 2013, as a percentage of overall sales.

A big question mark overall is “what percentage of Impala sales (not just to fleets) are of the W-Body, fleet only, ‘Impala Limited'”? GM won’t break out their numbers from the Epsilon II-based model that replaced it, but either way, at least half of the Impala’s volume (roughly 156,000 units were sold in 2013) went to rental fleets. The Impala and the Dodge Charger, two heavy hitters in the ever-shrinking full-size car segment, are well represented, along with the Chrysler minivans, the now defunct Dodge Avenger and GM’s full-size SUVs. Mazda also appears to be dumping volume into daily rental, with the Mazda2 and Mazda5 making an appearance.

Ranking ahead of the Impala was the Toyota Yaris. Even though nearly 60 percent of Yarisis (Yari?) go to rental fleets, Toyota just spent what must have been a huge sum of money flying journalists and their guest of choice to a week-long drive event in Hawaii to preview the new Yaris, as well as the Sienna and refreshed 2015 Camry. TTAC was not invited, but perhaps we can do two rental reviews, for less than the cost of one night’s stay on the Big Island.

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93 Comments on “Chart Of The Day: America’s Top Rental Cars...”


  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    I had no idea the Yukon/Suburban had such a high rate of cars going to rental fleets. I assumed their fleet sales were more government than anything, but I guess that’s what the Tahoe is for.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      The chart is a bit deceptive on the Yukon XL. The XL Denali is a different line item with about a 4% rental rate. Overall the Yukon XL is right around the Suburban.

      Same thing on the Yukon. It was 44% rental but the Yukon Denali was just 7%. Total Yukon (non XL) wouldn’t be on this chart.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I’ll make a prediction: within ten years, the “GMC” badge will disappear entirely, and the division will be called “Denali.”

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I think they should keep both :). I wouldn’t mind a car that said DENALI on the front, letting everyone know mine is better than the plain GMC version parked next to it. That’s very American.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          GMC should be a trim level from Chevy, kind of like SS. The fact that it is another “brand” is utterly ridiculous.

          • 0 avatar

            GMC is a separate brand because it gives Buick/Cadillac dealers a line of trucks to sell. Making it part of Chevy would leave those dealers with no trucks, and they want to be able to offer a full line of trucks.

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          dal20402: I’ll make a prediction: within ten years, the “GMC” badge will disappear entirely, and the division will be called “Denali.”

          – Won’t happen. “Denali” is a real name that means something while “GMC” is a three letter code, and we know how automakers feel about three letter codes v. real names. The better question is will they add a number to the “GMC”?

    • 0 avatar
      Occam

      My wife coaches a high school forensics team and regularly rents Suburbans/Yukon XLs to drive kids to tournaments.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        It’s a perfect rental candidate. It’s the type of ride that most people only need once in a blue moon. It’s like a full-size van: if you only need it a couple of times a year, why would you buy one?

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Retail demand for the full-size mainstream segment has really tanked. When retail demand falls apart, volume often gets shifted to rental.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        Uhh..that will change quite a bit in 2014 with all new models across the board in GM Full Size SUV.

        In addition, it will be delivered at one plant fully utilized in 3 shifts at transaction prices and volumes similar to mid-size luxury (BMW 5 Series) prices. I think they’ll be okay.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          You have it on good authority that everyone is going start buying full-size mainstream SUVs again?

          This segment cratered and did not recover. There are more fuel efficient alternatives that can do the job.

          • 0 avatar
            Truckducken

            Pch, our august poster would have you know that what’s good for GM is good for America.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            Never said it was going back to old volumes. My point was that the full size BOF SUV market is the US today is about the same size as the mid size luxury market and transacts at the same prices. When you have 75% of said market you are doing okay. Even you can see YOY volume increases in GM SUVs with new model availability ramping up in April or so.

            GM used to have 3 plants making them. They now have one working around the clock.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Was that supposed to be a response to my post, or just an attempt at GM PR?

            Let’s go back and follow this chain:

            -Original poster was surprised by the high fleet percentages

            -I point out that fleet percentages often increase when retail demand becomes soft

            -You then “correct” me by claiming that this would no longer be the case

            If the retail percentage of the mix is going to inevitably increase (as you assure me that it will), then I can only conclude one of two things:

            1. GM will be cutting production (retail percentage goes up based upon a lower base of sales)
            2. GM will be retailing more units

            That’s how the math works, unless you have some other form of arithmetic that you’d like to share with the audience.

            You then assure me that “GM will be OK.” I never touched on GM’s alleged “OK” factor, but whether fleet was going to remain relatively high.

            So does GM have a meaningful plan for retailing more cars or is it cutting production? Apparently, you have some handle on the future, so feel free to provide some details.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            No PCH.

            Original poster was confused by misleading (bad) data from Polk. That is where the data came from.

            You know the source…automotive-fleet.com

            You can do the math.

            Will GM be cutting production? They already have…that was my point about going from 3 to 1 factories since 2008.

            GM will be retailing more units? Yes, that was my point about the new models available by Q2 this year.

            You made a statement:

            ‘Retail demand for the full-size mainstream segment has really tanked’

            My point was that retail demand is now up in 2014 with the new models. Looking at 2013CY data is looking at the old model.

            My statement to you was that sales volume was up a ton this year in this segment due to the new model. Feel free to ignore facts around current volume, market share and average transaction price as you realize these vehicle are produced in one plant working 3 shifts.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The data was fine. The original poster was not confused; he obviously got the point.

            In 2005, GM retailed 364k units of Suburbans, Tahoes and Yukons, with fleet of 8%.

            In 2012, GM retailed just under 110k units, with fleet of 37%.

            In 2013, GM retailed just under 110k units, with fleet of 44%.

            Retail has clearly fallen apart between 2005 and 2013.

            There was no sign of improvement in retail between 2012 and 2013. In a rising market, retail in this segment was flat, which means that its market share declined.

            Fleet is obviously both (a) high and (b) higher than it once was. Without customers to buy them at retail, more end up in fleet.

            So again, unless you have a crystal ball that points to more retail or additional production cuts, we’re still looking at a high fleet, flat retail market. Not exactly flying high (although it does make sense to build them, given the platform amortization opportunity.)

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Fleet managers look for vehicles with low cost of ownership combined with high revenue.

    I see this chart as a good thing.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Five months ago, Hertz tried to rent me a 2013 Nissan Altima in Providence. The first one started but the keyless ignition wouldn’t let me put it in gear. The second Altima did the same thing. They finally gave me a Taurus with conventional keyed ignition, after a tech failed to get the Altimas to shift into gear. The tech told me the Altimas were electronics nightmares.

  • avatar
    SayMyName

    So much for GM preserving the Impala’s perceived value by keeping the new model away from the rental counters, if that picture of the line at National is any indication.

    • 0 avatar

      But as stated above, it’s not known how many of the above fleet sales were the new model and how many were the old W-body.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Lately when I rent (always from National) I see a couple of Epsilon Impalas at the front of the line as reserved “premium” rentals and then a ginormous line of pretty much nothing but W-Impalas, Altimas, and the occasional Sonata for the plebs like me.

      I’ll take the Altima. As unrefined as it is, the W-Impala is even less refined, and at least with the Altima I can get 35 mpg even if I abuse it.

      • 0 avatar
        JCraig

        I found this to be the case at Enterprise as well. The old Impala is the full size and the new one is premium. Lucky for me even though they are different classes of rental the guy at the counter let me have the new Impala at no extra charge.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        I had an Altima rental for 2 weeks this summer – I was actually very impressed with it – the handling, the CVT, the mpg when carrying 3 and their luggage all over the northeast.

        And the keyless go worked every single time for me. YMMV

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      It does make sense that the new Impala is doing very poorly, i.e., lots of rental sales, otherwise GM would report the figures.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        If we don’t know the sales figures, on the new Impala, how do you know its doing poorly?

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          It’s an inference.

          GM chooses to not let us know. The inference being that GM’s refusal to tell the NYTimes the numbers means the new model is not doing as well as expected. Naturally they’d crow about it if the numbers were good, especially w/ all the bad recall news that dominates GM’s buzz.

          Despite some glowing reviews, the new Impala has received some poor ones as well. They also appear about as rare as hen’s teeth, except in that National rental lot picture in the NYTimes article linked in the story.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Umm, you know that the Impala includes both Epsilon and the W-Body sold to fleet only. No distinction is made, and GM sells plenty of W-body Impalas to rentals, governments, and livery.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        Umm, I read the NYTimes story. Maybe you should also.

        The story makes clear that GM chooses not to break out the figures, meaning it chooses not to let the Times know how the new model is doing.

        That’s a distinction with a difference.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Combining data for shared nameplates is not unusual. It should have been clear that the Corolla wasn’t a failure when its figures were combined with those of the Matrix, for example.

          The new Impala is probably not a star performer, but the nameplate sharing isn’t the reason to believe that. They combine those because big numbers always look better than small numbers, no matter what.

          But what we can see is that overall volumes are down, and it’s likely that much of the volume is going to the same fleet customers who were buying them before the new car was introduced. While the new car supposedly commands decent prices, there probably isn’t much volume there, otherwise there would have been growth in the top line number. The new model is higher priced and subject to less fleet discounting, which is going to reduce demand among rental fleets that need cheaper wheels.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I see very few if any NON W bodied Impalas at the rental counter. The new improved version is most likely 2x the cost to the fleet companies to put in service, so why would they when the old version is durable, large etc.

    As for the suburban and Yukon XL oddly enough I think this is great news for the average consumer. I love my suburban, but can’t stomach the idea of 55k for a stripper version or 70k for a LTZ or Denali. They make for great CPO units with 30k on the Odo.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      At National, the “Impala Classic” is a full-size, the non-W bodied Impala is a premium. I suspect this is probably the case at a lot of rental companies, where the Classic is effectively a cheap “upgrade” option to give to customers who rented a midsize.

  • avatar
    Robbie

    The lack of invitation strongly suggests that the truth about the new Yaris is that it is yet another rental fleet queen, and that Toyota does not want that to be printed.

    • 0 avatar
      Daniel Latini

      TTAC wasn’t invited to the Hawaii trip, but we’ll be at a regional one this week to test all three vehicles. Stay tuned!

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Also need to look at no. of rental fleet sales in addition to percentage.

      Last year, more Camrys went to rental lots than the Malibu or Avenger, leading the mainstream, midsize sedan segment.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      With the “new” Yaris being showcased, Toyota may have dumped the backlog of the old model into rental fleets rather than discount them and blunt sales of the new.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Yaris sales have been fleet-heavy for a few years.

        The competitors are doing better in this segment. It’s really as simple as that.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Yup. The Yaris is utterly uncompetitive in the segment, the Prius C and Corolla are both better choices and only marginally more expensive. Given lease deals on both, the value prop on the Yaris is very thin.

          • 0 avatar
            suspekt

            Yet it is a great used car buy.
            Simple and reliable.
            Much better option then a CVT equipped Nissan.

            God bless the 4 speed.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Even though the Yaris comes in 3rd, their total sales numbers are dismal, Toyota needs to fix this, even though they most likely won’t because of the low profit margin, but still it’s a black eye to the brand, which always had a good, competitive entry level car.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Tercel had some brand equity in its day. It was a mistake to dump the name.

      • 0 avatar
        Occam

        Tercel fit well with the “royalty” and “crown” theme: Corona (crown in latin), Corolla (small crown in latin), Camry (kanmuri is crown in Japanese), the flagship “Crown,” the castle Avalon, and older models like the Tiara. Even Scion (heir to the crown) fits.

        Tercel fit… Yaris doesn’t. Per Toyota, Yaris “stems from a goddess in Greek mythology, named CHARIS, who was a symbol of beauty and elegance. We put that together with the German expression of agreement, YA.”

        It’s silly, incongruous, and threw away a long-lived name in the interest of silly marketing. New names for revamped models is generally reserved for cars that have so damaged their reputation (Kia Sephia-Spectra-Forte, Chevrolet Chevette-Cavalier-Cobalt-Cruze, Ford Tempo-Contour-Fusion) that it’s not worth salvaging.

        • 0 avatar
          whynot

          Well don’t forget the Tercel was replaced by the Echo, not Yaris.

          Toyota hasn’t had a good, competitive entry level car in almost 15 years.

        • 0 avatar
          bosozoku

          >Yaris “stems from a goddess in Greek mythology, named CHARIS, who was a symbol of beauty and elegance. We put that together with the German expression of agreement, YA.”

          Who approves this stuff? Even the JDM names Belta and Vitz each sound better than Yaris. Toyota need to kill off the name and replace it with something catchy and fun like Honda did with the Fit.

          • 0 avatar
            James2

            “Who approves this stuff? Even the JDM names Belta and Vitz each sound better than Yaris. Toyota need to kill off the name and replace it with something catchy and fun like Honda did with the Fit.”

            No. Toyota should switch to alphanumerics. Then, it’ll be thought of as a luxury brand.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Disregarding the fact that the German expression of agreement is “ja,” pronounced “yah” (think Fargo), pretty much any name used by a global automaker like Toyota has to be both memorable and inoffensive in every market. Nobody in Spain wants a Mitsubishi Pajero…

        • 0 avatar
          jjster6

          Cheap shot on the Cruze. It has been well reviewed and has sold very well. Even TTAC was impressed by the way the interior held up in heavily used rental car (wish I had the link to article handy).

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            His point is that Forte, Cruze, and Fusion are names that replaced models with names not worth continuing.

        • 0 avatar

          Fusion really replaced the Taurus, which wasn’t dead, just not doing anything exciting. Still your point stands. At the time, Ford wanted all their cars (Save Crown Vic and Mustang) to start with a “F”

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “Fusion really replaced the Taurus”

            This is an important note when discussing the market shrinkage of “large” sedans. D segment cars have grown to have as much or more room than many E segment sedans, so they’re basically eating their lunch at a lower price point. The demand is still very much there for large sedans, it’s just that the traditional large models are being squeezed out by model bloat.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        If and only if Toyota gets serious about the segment and produces an Accent- and Fit-beater, it should bring back the “Tercel” name. That would get a lot of attention.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      Wasn’t “Yaris” Igor’s brother in “Young Frankenstein”?

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The Yaris is an irredeemable, un-fixable POS.

      Circa-2001 Kia would be embarrassed to be associated with that lump of vague, melty plastic.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        I’d rather take my chances with like…a 1999 Kia Sephia or something.

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          Shi..yeah, who wouldn’t?

          Beautiful greenhouse on ’em.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The Sephia may be the most generic looking car ever. If you took the badging off and asked someone who made that car, no one would have a clue. I wondered why “Sephia” wasn’t all capitialized like “SEPHIA”, because it’s an acronym. StyleElegantPowerfulHi-techIdealAuto: Sephia.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            I would think it was a Proton or a Perodua or something. Something made from Mitsubishi parts for “developing countries”.

      • 0 avatar
        suspekt

        Wrong

        It is a great used car buy.
        Simple and reliable.
        Much better option then a CVT equipped Nissan.

        God bless the 4 speed. It’s the perfect commuter beater… And I must say, the original Yaris was a fun little runabout.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I laughed at the Yukon XL being so much more popular in rental than the Suburban given that they are largely the same vehicle. I’ll bet it is a case of rental fleet managers hearing customers say: “Oh Honey, we’re getting a GMC, not just a Chevy!”

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    “Captiva.” Perfect name to sum up how you feel driving it.

  • avatar
    Bunter1

    I always keep this stuff in mind with the “popularity” of the Chrysler mini-vans.

    Fun chart.

    Cheerio,
    Dennis

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Hmmm… we had a nice, almost-new 2014 red Camry rental in Florida three weeks ago.

    They were giving us a hamster-wagon, but must’ve thought we’d be better off with a sedan, so we got a nice, free upgrade.

    • 0 avatar
      Sammy B

      That seems to happen a lot. They always want to keep the tiniest cars on the lot so when some schmo walks up needing an emergency rental, they have that subcompact ready to go at midsize prices. A friend at work would ALWAYS book the subcompact and swore that 9/10 times he would arrive and they would give him one of the many bigger cars so they could always keep those tiny ones in stock.

      Such a weird business

      • 0 avatar
        fincar1

        It’s possible that they’re hoping to get repeat business by doing that.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        The last time I rented a car, they kept telling me that they didn’t have the size (“Focus or similar”) that I reserved, and they kept trying to get me into something bigger. I wanted the C-segment car for the fuel efficiency, so I refused. Confused, the guy at the counter told me to walk out to their lot and pick a car that would work for me, and lo & behold, there was the Focus I reserved, which I promptly took.

        Weird business indeed.

  • avatar
    Richard Chen

    We ought to have a mashup graph of this data + Timothy Cain’s sales data. For example:

    2013 US Yaris sales: 21,342 x 56% = 11,952 fleet sales

  • avatar
    bills79jeep

    I’ve been curious for a while how Chevy believes the rental tier and showroom tier vehicle strategy is working. It’s a good idea on its face: Don’t dilute your offerings by throwing masses of base models out on rental lots. However, how many people put their butt in a rental Chevy (maybe their first ever drive in a Chevy product) and think, “Wow, what a piece of crap. No wonder I never cross-shop at the local dealership.”

    Case in point – I had a rental Captiva with some co-workers last year, and, unsurprisingly, no one else had any idea that it wasn’t actually available for sale or that it was basically the same as a Saturn VUE. For them, it was a Chevy CUV, plain and simple. Odd part was, they kind of liked it. Also makes me wonder how many people drive one as a rental and then go to a showroom asking for it. I guess they just get steered to the Equinox.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      My local Chevy dealer has two 2014 Captivas for sale. One with 15K on the clock for $18,996 and one with 18K on the clock for $20,977. They’ll get a subprime, payment buyer to take them off their hands I’m sure.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      The last two Malibus I rented were terrible, and yes, that sours me on the brand. However, if you have what you think is a great car, it also makes sense to put some out into rental fleets so people can be exposed to them who normally would not be. They even put those scan codes on the windows so you can “learn more” about the car. I remember when the Mustang was redone in c. 2006, at least 1 in 3 cars in Yellowstone were new (rental) Mustangs.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I would like to see this chart right next to a chart for livery sales. The MKS and 300 would be up high on those, along with the Escalade.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      How many of the MkT’s 364 sales in September do you think were to retail customers? It’s gotta be all livery, rental, corporate cars, and funeral home, right?

      I think the only people that buy the MkT new are Ford employees/retirees in the Detroit area that for some reason don’t want a Flex or Explorer.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        It ate my comment.

        I said:
        It’s basically a hearse now.
        All they have to do is add casket rails.
        The funeral coachbuilders must be gutted!

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “It ate my comment.”

          WordPress did?

          If it is wordpress, the same happens to me time and again, regardless of browser (Safari, Opera, Firefox, Chrome or IE11).

          But today is MS-update day so I have six W8.1 PCs with FireFox to upgrade today, one at a time, and I am really short on time to explain how to get around the wordpress glitches.

          Try opening up two browsers logged on to ttac, then resubmit your text copy from Notepad, Wordpad, or Note, using the other browser when wordpress eats your comment.

          Works for me.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            WordPress doesn’t eat comments, it just swishes them around in its maw and spits them out later. That’s why we’re seeing more duplicate comments lately.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Whether wordpress regurgitates comments after they have passed through its digestive tract does not diminish that a lot of very thoughtful contributors, commentors one and all, some also being pillars of the automotive community, are more than irked by this sophomoric operation.

            It is sad to see ttac, the best there ever was at one time, to have sunk to the level of being totally at the mercy of a second rate wordprocessor.

          • 0 avatar

            What do you think has kept out the ads for fake viagra and Louis Vuitton bags since the start of the site? Just take a deep breath and be patient. I could be doing a million other things besides manually approving each reader comment, but I’m doing just that, and placing a higher value on YOUR comments than what my writers have submitted. Get some perspective.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Thank you, Derek!

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The new corporate grille did not translate well. My 2010 looks coherant, although psychotic, compared to the 2015s.

          I looked at the Ford fleet guide for the MkT, and there is a Hearse Package, Limo Package, and Livery Package. If only I could find a landau package.

  • avatar

    I’m *definitely* sure that a large number of those fleet sales are due to ye olde W-Body. And I’m surprised the Taurus didn’t end up on this list. It’s definitely a fleet queen…

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Interesting because the big 3 rental companies where I live in Upstate, NY Alamo, National and Enterprise never seem to have an Epsilon II Impala available due to really small numbers ordered. In contrast there are bucket loads of W-body Impalas, Camry’s, Malibu’s, Avengers and Altima’s always available.

  • avatar
    James2

    I must have hit Enterprise at the wrong time last time I had to rent a car. They had nothing but CUV/SUVs… and one Lincoln Town Car. (This was a couple years ago.)

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Have I already told the story of when my old man the farmer and his brother the contractor, who have driven almost nothing but tractors, trucks, pickups and minivans since their high school years, took their wives to Vermont to see the trees and ended up with a Grand Marquis as their rental?

      Sure, the two of them are accustomed to driving 20-foot-long vehicles. But not when they’re sitting a foot off the ground in a reclining position!

  • avatar
    baconpope

    Although the chart is interesting, it does not really give an accurate picture. When I last worked for a car rental company, we paid near full retail for large SUV’s through their fleet programs. Knowing that we could sell them for full retail price when off rent. They were great revenue generators on rent and at sale. Conversely, we purchased nearly a third of all Camrys, Altimas, etc. through wholly owned dealerships as “retail sales” and at a price far below dealer invoice. These cars had to make all of their money on rent because they would be released as dealer demos or wholesaled through auctions. The vehicles on this chart are the ones the manufacturers want you as a consumer to see as “fleet vehicles”–generally thought of as tough if inelegant.

  • avatar
    Bill

    This is purely an anecdotal observation on my part but I have been seeing a lot of Suburbans and Yukons around here with black paint, tinted windows, and livery plates. It seems they are the choice in the chauffer business to replace the old Panther platform Town Cars, at least in Denver anyways.

  • avatar

    Amazing to see that if you want the hot ‘in demand’ CUV category you end up with a Captiva foisted on your unhappy soul. Essentially a 2008 Saturn Vue, which was not half bad in its day, this is now an underpowered dinosaur. You would think that with these kind of numbers GM has paid for all the $ they invested in this turd.

  • avatar
    Power6

    Nice to see some data since according to the loudest TTAC commentariat the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord are the most common rental cars. Usually this is mixed in with great nuggets of wisdom like “AWD doesn’t help in snow”

    Wonder if they even had Honda numbers since they do no “official” fleet sales maybe it is the biggest fleet seller.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Remember that this data shows the percentage of a model’s sales that ended up in rental fleets. The Altima or Camry probably have much higher raw numbers going to fleet, but not a percentage of overall sales. Many of these cars, like the 2013 Avenger/200, Yaris, Mazda2, are cars people don’t want. Many others are vehicles, like the Econoline, Suburban, Yukon, Savanna, are much too large for the average consumer.

      According to the linked article, the most common rental car for the last two years is the Chevrolet Impala.

  • avatar
    zamoti

    This could be, quite possibly, the most boring article on this site to date.
    Is there REALLY that little going on to the point where this is necessary? I’m shocked that there were any comments on this; I guess we’re all getting accustomed to the latest crop of boring posts. Maybe Hooniverse has something good today…


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