By on July 11, 2017

GM Real People Not Actors Silverado ad screenshot - Image: Chevrolet YouTubeWith the July 10 launch of a new Chevrolet Silverado commercial, General Motors is once again using its Real People, Not Actors campaign in an attempt to tarnish the Ford F-150’s good name.

This methodology doesn’t appear to have had an impact in the marketplace in the past. Yet two years after General Motors displayed conversations between Howie Long and GM engineer Eric Stanczak discussing repair costs on the Ford F-150’s aluminum bed and one year after Chevrolet punctured a Ford F-150’s aluminum bed with 825 pounds of concrete blocks, General Motors is turning to admitted Ford F-150 owners as a means of casting aspersions on America’s top-selling full-size truck.

After earlier rounds, Ford gained ground in America’s full-size pickup truck market in 2016. Indeed, Ford is continuing to gain ground in that same market in 2017. Ford is selling more trucks than its rivals. Ford is selling more trucks with less incentivization. Ford is selling more trucks with less incentivization at higher average transaction prices.

So, GM sends the Chevrolet Silverado back to the same ol’ well.

To be fair, not all Real People, Not Actors commercials are equally bad. From the ghastly Emoji Cruze ad to the Malibu at the Glass House to the painful hipster variant, plenty have been awful. But more recently, GM seemed to have found its way, running a Chevrolet Equinox campaign in which people don’t manage to slap Chevrolet with a backhand compliment, in which competitors are only digged with subtlety at the end of the commercial.

Regardless of how in-the-know car enthusiasts feel about the ads, GM believes they work. In fact, GM is operating under the assumption that the ads work, in part, because the viewer knows what to expect. “For the foreseeable future, we don’t have a change in mind.”

Attacking the core element of America’s best-selling vehicle lineup, however, is an entirely different matter. It’s like going after Tom Brady for deflategate. He still won the Super Bowl, and he’s still gonna win another Super Bowl.

Sure, maybe there are vast swathes of America that don’t like Tom Brady, that wouldn’t buy a Tom Brady if Tom Brady could be bought. But you’re still attempting to win a losing argument against the guy who will beat you.

The latest Chevrolet attack on the Ford F-150 involves a camouflaged Silverado, F-150 owners who apparently didn’t buy Ford’s bed ladder system, who were seemingly unaware when they purchased their aluminum F-150s that they could have purchased a truck with the same kind of steel bed that’s been part of the truck world since 900 B.C., and who pretend to know what an automatic locking rear differential does.

These F-150 owners were evidently easy to sway. Consumers who don’t appear in General Motors’ ads? Not quite so easy.

Through the first six months of 2017, GM has seen its total share of America’s full-size pickup truck market, including the Sierra, fall to 32.3 percent from 35.5 percent in the first half of last year. Not only is the entire Ford F-Series line outselling the GM full-size twins, F-Series volume is greater than the entire GM truck lineup, midsize pickups included.

Meanwhile, over a three-month period spanning March, April, and May, the Chevrolet Silverado wasn’t even America’s second-best-selling truck. FCA’s Ram P/U stole the silver medal position.

Maybe the Ram 1500 is the pickup Chevrolet should be attacking. Rotary shifters? Ecodiesel? RamBoxes and those narrow beds?

Puh-leeze. Real people might not like that at all.

[Image: Chevrolet/YouTube]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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81 Comments on “Chevrolet’s Real People Commercials Are Once Again Pitting Silverado Against F-150...”


  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    If one of the big truck players really wanted to go for GM’s jugular, why not make an attack ad simply stating the fact that every single one of Chevy/GMC’s crew cab half ton trucks are Hencho en Mexico? And/or put some focus on domestic parts content. Bet that would ruffle some feathers. Better yet, Toyota should make a Tundra ad calling out the GM twins (and Ram while they’re at it) for their foreign provenance.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      Because that would be incorrect. Crew Cabs are being made in Flint as well.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Must be a recent development? Every single full crewcab I’ve seen listed in the past few years have had a ‘3’ VIN.

        EDIT: looking at a random sampling of new/used ’14-’17 GM crew cabs on cars.com, I could not find a single US-VIN.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          By crew cab I mean the fullsize “supercrew” equivalent one. My understanding is that the “extended cab” of your is now a “doublecab” with the rear doors being regular front-hinged doors, but of a smaller size. I was able to find a few new Sierra 1500s with the doublecab with a “1” VIN.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            Doublecabs are made in Ft Wayne.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Here’s a VIN “1” Crew Cab Silverado 1500.

            carlblackchevybuickgmc.com/VehicleDetails/new-2017-
            Chevrolet-Silverado_1500-Crew_Cab_Standard_Box_
            2_Wheel_Drive_LT-Orlando-FL/2989571803

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          It is recent. Production for US crew cabs started in Flint this year. I think Jack’s was built in Flint.

          http://media.gm.com/media/us/en/gm/company_info/facilities/assembly/flint.html

          However, at this point, a vast majority of 1500 Crew Cabs are Mexican.

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            Negative, Ghost Rider. I’m all about that south of the border truckin’

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            You’re killin me Jack! You of all people, with a blog dedicated to fancy niche clothes made in USA (as well as Kirkland socks, those I can relate to).

            I thought it was very emblematic when I went down with my grandfather in law to the USW Local 1123 in downtown Canton Ohio earlier this year for a free asbestos chest screening for him and there was a shiny Silverado LTZ Crewcab in the lot, undoubtedly made in Mexico. Equally emblematic was that we drove down there in his leased CRV, made right in Ohio at the East Liberty plant.

          • 0 avatar
            NoID

            Meh, “Made in USA” isn’t a good enough delineator anymore. Personally, I focus on whatever maximizes contribution to GDP and/or GNP, with preference given to GDP as it is recognized as the best measure of the national economy.

            As such:

            Made in the USA by USA-owned company > Made in USA by foreign company > Made in foreign land by USA-owned company > Made in foreign land by foreign-owned company.

            When it comes to foreign goods, I skew toward NAFTA product and to product made in Asian countries that are not China.

            I’ve clearly put too much thought into this.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I think poking that hornet’s nest is a very bad idea.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Toyota builds trucks in Mexico, not the competitor to the Silverado, but its still kinda stupid for them to attack GM for building trucks in Mexico when they also do the same.

      Ford builds cars in Mexico, so, still a conflict there. This week, Ford says the F-150 is all USA baby, then next week, Real People, Not Actors would be “surprised to learn” that of the two supposedly American cars they see before them, the Malibu is built in the US while the Fusion next to it is built in Mexico.

      I think Ram builds some trucks in Mexico, either way I’m sure FCA has a manufacturing presence there, as does Nissan, even if its pickups are built in Mississippi.

      So, no player in the truck market that I’m aware of is without some form of Mexican manufacturing background, even if its not their trucks being built there. So pointing fingers would just invite criticism of their own plants located below the Rio Grande.

      Beaides, GM is the company that pitched the Aveo as AN AMERICAN REVOLUTION, remember? Lol

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Yeah I’m not a fan of them starting to make Tacomas in Mexico. I get that there is a decent demand for them down there (I saw a lot of new Pre-Runner spec previous gen Tacos down there 2 years ago), but I personally have a real mental block about buying something like that. I’ve all but written off this gen Tacoma as a wheezy porker anyways so having to sift through US vs Mexican VINs on them is just the nail in the coffin on them.

        The Tundra however is IMO a real star in terms of being assembled entirely in the US (and designed in the US), with a over-70% domestic content. Buy OEM parts to do a brake job on a Tundra and on a Chevy. Tundra parts are darn near exclusively US made. The Chevy is a mix of Chinese, Malaysian, and Mexican. No thanks. The rate at which stupid stuff like wheel bearings and other parts are succumbing to corrosion, things like window-switch blocks are crapping out from poor electrical connections, etc on newer GM trucks with this high third-world content is disconcerting.

        • 0 avatar
          dukeisduke

          They’ve made Tacomas in Mexico for some time. The 2nd-gen Tacoma had production initially split between NUMMI and Mexico. After NUMMI closed, US
          production moved to San Antonio, where my ’13 DCLB (DoubleCab long bed) was built, again split with Mexico. According to Wikipedia, DCSBs are now built in Tijuana, and all other Tacomas are built in San Antonio.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Good info dukeisduke, man the doublecab-crewcab is the most interesting configuration to me as well. Too bad!

        • 0 avatar
          dukeisduke

          And I wouldn’t buy a third-gen Taco anyway. I’ve driven one, and I wasn’t impressed by the wimpy 3.5l Atkinson-cycle V6. They dropped the excellent 4.0 just to pick up a lousy 1 mpg on the highway.

          Plus a lot of owners complain about weird vibration problems with the 3rd-gen, but Toyota has blown off their complaints.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Regardless, some shaming needs to be done. I know some GM pickup diehards that would puke in their helmets if they found out where their beloved pickups were hechoed.

            I know it’s NOT gonna be me that tells them! But no one cares where the Focus, VWs and others are made. GM (and Ram) trucks are the most profitable vehicles made in Mexico, by far. Exponentially.

            It’s a stinkin’ insult to pickup buyers/owners and Americans in general.

            It’s unclear how GM has mostly kept it secret this long, while a Mexican Camaro or Mustang would be front-page news.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        This whole thread wants to make me puke. Listen to yourselves. What nonsense.

        Who really gives a flying fnck. Did you not read that 75% of people who purchase vehicles don’t care where their vehicle is made.

        Don’t worry sooner or later when the US has it’s 20% tax on steel you can pay more for ‘Murican made vehicles.

        At the end of the day if the vehicle is reliable and you like it, does it really matter if a vehicle is made in Germany, Mexico, Korea or even the US?

        If you make a purchase and are happy with it, then so be it. If you are one of those brand fans who only wants a particular brand and the vehicle is not made in the country of your desire, then switch brands.

        You guys represent the margin and not the masses.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          “At the end of the day if the vehicle is reliable and you like it, does it really matter if a vehicle is made in Germany, Mexico, Korea or even the US?”

          That’s exactly the problem Al, in my circle of friends who work on these things in the rust-belt, it seems that the newer GM trucks that are chock-full of bottom-bidder third world parts, component failures of said parts is increasing (electrical/interior stuff as well as wheel bearings and such that are exposed to corrosion).

          And some of us in the minority do care about things like supporting local manufacturing and stable and decently paid employment of fellow Americans.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            gtemnykh,
            If the part in the vehicles were of a higher standard the vehicle would cost more.

            The US already manufacturers better quality vehicles than what come from Detroit.

            The reality is Ford, GM and Chrysler are and have always been cheap consumer goods. They are not about to change.

            Whilst the Big 3 remain cheap vehicles the US will always be competing with the bottom end of the market.

            Daily driving appliances from pickups, SUVs, midsize cars and econoboxes will always be the hardest market to remain in.

            Even pickups need support to remain as much US and NAFTA made as possible.

            The Europeans have the prestige market sown up, the Asians have good quality smaller cars and global light trucks and 4x4s sown up.

            This leaves the US with cheap, consumer large SUVs, pickups, etc.

            The US (Big 3) will have a problem competing against Nissan Patrols and Landcruisers if the quality needed to improve.

            If the chicken tax was dropped or even if the cost of US pickups rose enough due to quality improvements would allow global pickups to enter into the US market.

            This has been my argument all along. The US vehicle market is a lot more fragile than many think.

            So, it needs to maintain cheap, large vehicle production …………. because no one else makes cheap large vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “If the part in the vehicles were of a higher standard the vehicle would cost more.”

            The Toyota Tundra seems to fly in the face of your argument. Made in USA components, much less prone to these silly issues and premature failures that plague GM trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            “This leaves the US with cheap, consumer large SUVs, pickups, etc.

            The US (Big 3) will have a problem competing against Nissan Patrols and Landcruisers if the quality needed to improve.”

            If fullsized trucks sold routinely at the price point Land Cruisers sold for then they would probably be comparable…Though purely anecdotally my truck has proven to be vastly more reliable than my Land Cruiser was. Of course my 300,000 mile first gen Saturn could make the same claim. Come to think of it so could the plethora of sub 300 dollar Fiats and Alfa Romeos I owned over the years. But I digress.

            If you are a builder of vehicles that serves North America as your primary market, trucks are where you want to be. The F-Series is, by the numbers, the best selling vehicle IN THE WORLD…even though it primarily only sells in North America. Furthermore they are profitable to build. Again, if you are an automaker and you primarily sell vehicles in the US especially, which is a market it is possible to be very profitable in, you can argue that you are a fool to not be in the pickup game and if you divert resources away from those lines for niche products you are a bigger fool.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          “Don’t worry sooner or later when the US has it’s 20% tax on steel you can pay more for ‘Murican made vehicles.”

          Why…My Truck is Aluminum LOL!!!!

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @BAFO – The price of all pickups, all autos, is set by what consumers are willing to pay, nothing else. Many are sold at a loss, regardless of what it costs to build.

          When you think about it, all vehicles are sold “at a loss” initially, until all costs, tooling, development, etc, are recouped. Hopefully sooner than later. For some, never.

          It’s a gamble to some degree, like anything else. When you’re expecting low volume and a slow “return”, any small tax can kill the deal. Many global cars can’t handle the 2.5% duty on imports cars to the US. So who’s gonna cry for them??

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      If there is one thing, besides boxing gloves and gear, I would trust Mexicans to take extra care when assembling, it is a truck.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    That automatic locking rear diff is actually a really nice feature. Some people find they can skip the expense of 4 wheel drive.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I like GM’s auto-4wd feature, and yes the G80 spin-locker is definitely nice, although I personally prefer a manually selectable one that Nissan and Ford offer on their half-tons. The G80 would be nice in regular wet-road circumstances I suppose.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The G80 is bad, it is especially bad in the rain when you hit it hard, the RR tire starts to spin hard, it tries to lock up and instead shatters. Or if you drop off the curb as you try to exit a parking lot quickly and again it spins then shatters. To be fair it isn’t all the G80’s fault the rear end they are using in the 1/2 tons of recent is just junk. There is a reason that Dorman offers complete assemblies.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          “Dorman offers complete assemblies”

          *shudder*

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Ooops, I meant Cardone is now offering GM axle assemblies. However perusing the Dorman new product offering flyers does give you a good idea of things that are failing with a high frequency.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    It’s a Malibu! /Mahk

  • avatar
    sirwired

    I read an article a few weeks back about what it was like to be one of those “Real People” It was fascinating. Basically, the guy signed up for like you might sign up for any focus group. They brought the group to the LA convention center and they started to do the thing with the doors. He said it was fascinating that everybody (including the author) started, on cue, talking in the weird, stilted, marketing-ese you see in the ads.

    He didn’t make the cut for the final ad, and I think he mentioned they ran several groups through, presumably to pick the most-believable.

  • avatar

    Now that the trucks are truly competitive, time for a branding campaign.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBvR74VUF6o

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      LOL! My ’90 Chevy Cheyenne came standard with the “Like a Rock” cassette tape in the glove box extolling the virtues/features of the truck on side “A” (with “Like a Rock” playing as background music). Side “B” was “Like a Rock” instrumental music.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    “It’s the poop emoji, cause it’s a piece of sh*t.”

    -Mahk

  • avatar
    TW5

    Are we really supposed to buy into the arguments presented in this article? Ford has been running aggressive campaigns against several other vehicles. Thinking about a Cherokee? Here’s why you’re wrong, and you should buy an Escape. Thinking about a Camaro? Wrong! You should be thinking about the #1 selling “sports car” for decades, the Ford Mustang. Maybe the rebukes leveed against the competition’s products are more veiled and diplomatic than Chevy’s F-150 ads, but we’re splitting hairs.

    Plus, if you want to trace the modern advertising rancor to its source, it originated with Ford, when they claimed Ford was not bailed out by the US government. Those advertisements were a violation of public trust, built upon an irrelevant technical nuance between loans from TARP and loans from the Department of Energy. Ford was pressured to pull the ads by regulators and consumer advocacy groups alike. This advertising campaign was followed by an mpg scandal in which Ford attempted to present the C-Max and Fusion Hybrid as direct competitors to vehicles with better fuel economy performance. They had to execute another strategic withdrawal from that situation as well.

    The merit or lack of merit in Chevrolet’s current advertising campaign will depend upon Chevrolet’s product decisions in the future. If GM switches to aluminum bodies, but they retain a steel bed floor, we can conclude that their criticism of Ford is genuine. If GM puts an aluminum bed floor in their next generation Silverado, and they do nothing to mitigate the possibility of punctures or other damage, we can conclude GM are politically-motivated hypocrites who allow amoral marketing mavens and game-theory experts to convince executives that polluting the supply of public information is a viable business strategy.

    • 0 avatar
      BrianL

      But this is TTAC where universal shaming of GM is a requirement.

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      “GM are politically-motivated hypocrites who allow amoral marketing mavens and game-theory experts to convince executives that polluting the supply of public information is a viable business strategy”

      We call this sort of organization a “corporation”.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      TW5, Ford accepted DOE loans and actually manufactured millions of Ecoboost engines and aluminum pickup trucks. High enough volume to measurably reduce fuel consumption. Ford also appears to be paying back their loans. In contrast, the federal government invested in GM, got the irrelevant low-volume Volt, and lost billions of dollars. The federal government investment in FCA gave us the under-powered overweight Dart and other cars with lots of Fiat DNA.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Ugh.

  • avatar
    redapple

    As my obvious background would suggest, I am a strong Made in USA guy. But, it’s getting to the point where you cant fight city hall.

    Even the HELLCAT engine is Made in Mexico.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    GM really dropped the ball by chopping development budgets for recent generation trucks. The most profitable vehicles responsible for 75+% of company profits need to be the very best in the business, and Ford and even Ram are by most measures clearly superior. I wonder how much truck money GM management diverted to develop the ELR, Volt, and Bolt, which lost/lose money on every sale.

    • 0 avatar

      Cutting is all Barra knows. This is why GM products fail against the competition.

      GM – what a national disgrace.

    • 0 avatar
      Carilloskis

      I test drove a 2014 Sierra All terrain SLT when they first came out, no rear seat AC vents that My F150 had no ventilated seats at the time where available if you got z71 or the All Terrain packaged trucks . In this add campaign the only benefits that they claim are the G80 auto locker, steel bed and corner step. The worst in class 4×4 approach angle makes the GM twins a non starter for me until they come out with a ZR2 version with the 6.2l and the high country trim. They don’t show these supposed F-150 owners getting out of their trucks how do we know they don’t drive base models from the 90’s . You see one lady say she has a 2016 but don’t see her for the rest of the commercial. The step bumper clearly flexes when the guy steps in the foot hold putting 200lbs or more of weight on the corner of the bumper is probably not good. I had the G80 in my last truck much prefer the e-locker in my current truck. As far was the beds go get a bed liner if you have anything other than a tacoma or Ridgeline and your problems are solved it will prevent corrosion from scratches in the steel bed and punctures in the aluminum. The tech in the truck are comparable big touch screens with car play and android but info centers in the dash. the F150 at higher trims has massaging seats and all f150s have a centered searing wheel not that offset GM BS. The cheapness and cost cutting of the GM trucks are why i will not buy another one for the foreseeable future.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I’m not going to be swayed by any advertisement. I was in a Silverado LTZ2 a few weeks back and it was a disappointment. Ford and Ram trucks at comparable price points are clearly superior.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Looks like Mt. Charleston in the background, I wonder if they did this on the small twisty track outside of Las Vegas Speedway?

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    I think someone made the point a while ago, but it bears repeating. GM’s trucks need a decent mainline engine. The 5.3 V-8 is not more than satisfactory and is hobbled an overly gentle throttle tip-in. It “drives” slower than it actually is. By contrast, the 3.5 Ecoboost and its smaller 2.7 liter little brother, with their fat torque curves, let drivers feel the powah in a big way. The 5.7 liter hemi in the Ram also feels more muscular than the GM 5.3. So, GM, you screwed up by having a wimpy engine. That’s why people aren’t buying your trucks.

    Sure, the 6.2 liter “Corvette” engine is awesome, but its very limited production and limited availability in the Silverado and Sierra trucks. I had to fly to Denver to get my truck with that engine.

    When I ultimately got the GMC truck in the photo, it was the result of a lot of test driving. Having no allegiance to any brand, I just went out and looked for something that could pull my Airstream.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I agree. The 5.3L should be in the Canyorado (and the ATS) but otherwise have an entry-level V8 role in the trucks/SUVs (kind of like the Mopar 4.7L or GM’s old 4.8L).

      If GM really feels it’s necessary to protect the 6.2L prestige for Escalade/Denali/High Country trims then a ~400hp 5.7L – 6.0L as the volume V8 would be a welcome upgrade.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        This x a lot.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        The issue with too many levels of similar engines, especially V8s, is that production, engineering research and design costs increase in order to capture a very small incremental sales base. The cost to actually build a 4.8L over a 5.3L GM V8 is invariably very similar, and the fuel economy isn’t noticeably better. Might as well work on making one engine fit both customers.

        This was the conundrum of the 4.7L Powertech Ram engine. It didn’t offer much if any fuel economy benefit over the Hemi, even if cylinder deactivation were to be added, and it’s OHC construction was costlier to produce, for an engine that because of it’s smaller displacement had to be sold at a lower cost. Seeya later.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Well, if I was running the show over there I would just make the 6.2L available on every trim of the BOF offerings as a ~$2000 option over the 5.3L, but I know how important #branding is to GM.

          And when is Ram going to finally do a 6.4L 1500?

  • avatar
    ajla

    1. 6.2L
    2. ZR2
    3. 4.3L

    These are the only three reasons I would buy a GM truck.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Silverado is a great truck.
    Ram 1500 is a great truck.
    F-150 is a great truck.

    You can’t go wrong buying one of these trucks.

    Chevrolet has horrible advertising. Stop this trash advertising and start promoting your product.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      +1. I hate this advertising campaign. Like I stated on the other thread about who you hold a grudge against. The Brits inability to produce a quality car is on par to GM’s inability to produce (or hire out) a quality ad campaign.

      GM advertising has been bad for decades.

  • avatar
    hamish42

    I respect an automobile ad which tells me the good things about the product and why I should buy it.

    I disrespect an automobile ad which tries to get me to buy a product by trashing other people’s products.

    Tell me what you’ve got that’s good. That’s all I want to listen to.

  • avatar
    gaudette

    Haters gonna hate.

  • avatar
    WrittenDescription

    Chevy’s Real People come off as hopelessly uninformed, which makes their oohing and aahing over the Chevy laughable. I’ve got a 2014 F-150 and it’s been flawless, as was the 2004 F-150 I previously owned. The old truck passed along to another family member (who still drives it). If my next truck is a Chevy, it won’t be because a bunch of Real People who appear to known nothing about the vehicles being compared were impressed with the Chevy.

  • avatar
    phila_DLJ

    “Not only is the entire Ford F-Series line outselling the GM full-size twins, F-Series volume is greater than the entire GM truck lineup, midsize pickups included.”

    Hmmm…this statement is false, at least according to the two manufacturers:

    Ford’s public June sales report (http://ford.to/2tIN4Vr) lists 429,860 2017 YTD F-Series sales.

    GM’s public June sales report (http://bit.ly/2vcHY1r) indicates 448,707 combined 2017 YTD Silverado/Sierra/Colorado/Canyon sales.

    The numbers indicate a non-trivial 18,847-truck GM advantage. Even if you add Ford’s 6,705 “Heavy Trucks” (presumably the F-650 and F-750), it doesn’t close the gap (and if you add those, you have to add GM’s 4,262 “Commercial Trucks”, which includes their LCF).

    In point of fact, GM is selling more trucks than Ford, not t’other way round.

    But yeah, the Real People ads ARE some of the most unpleasant automotive advertising I’ve ever seen.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      According to GM’s June sales report, GM has sold 427,282 Sierras, Silverados, Canyons, and Colorados so far this year, not 448,707.

      262,940 Silverado
      99,153 Sierra
      50,301 Colorado
      14,888 Canyons

      Your Ford number is correct: 429,860.

      In point of fact, Ford is selling more trucks than GM, not t’other way round.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Timothy,
        I do believe, because the way in which pickup sales are tallied, any related SUV platform should be included.

        This would definitely place GM at the top.

        Or, it should be broken down into Classes.

        The current model for tallying pickup sales is complete nonsense. As the life of a midsizer or a mainstream light 1/2 ton has more in common than a cheap light 1/2 ton to a F450 or 3500.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          Following this logic, why not throw in vans. Your average van is more likely to be worked than a pickup since no one really buys a full sized van for personal use and it is certainly more likely to be used as a truck than a full sized BOF SUV. The were at one time related to the truck although in recent years they have diverged.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @BAFO – If you’re implying Ford has created an All-American *Aluminum Monster* with the F-series, you’d be CORRECT! (FINALLY!!!)

          Not just for the sake of simplicity, all F-series are now a single “platform” (as with GM and Ram fullsize pickups) and yes aluminum pickups are outselling all GM pickups across two brands and two completely different platforms.

          And yes (as stupid as it sounds!) lumping all fullsize SUVs *sales* with the pickups they share a platform with, would put GM a bit ahead of Ford, in the sales contest.

          But then it would serve no purpose except to ease some of GM’s pain (and yours!).

          It would be like *counting* Ford Transit Connect sales together with Focus sales, just because they share a single platform. They’re different species of vehicles, but again, what would be the point???

      • 0 avatar
        phila_DLJ

        By Jove, in point of fact, you ARE correct! I included 2016 rather than 2017 Silverado sales. Sorry about that!

      • 0 avatar

        That may explain why Ford surpassed GM in overall market share last March. Soon GM won’t even be number in the US.

        GM is done.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I finally saw this ad on TV the other night. Lame, like all the rest of their “reality” ads.

  • avatar

    GM trucks are rubbish too.

    What a disgrace!!!!

  • avatar
    gkhize

    I seem to recall a story here on TTAC that GM would be moving to aluminum body panels on their trucks in the future. If that’s in fact true, aren’t they being a little disingenuous slamming the Ford?

    I also agree with earlier comments; tell me why I should buy your product, not what’s wrong with someone else’s. Seems to me you’re hiding something when you do that.

    Also, that new Equinox commercial bugs me because it shows a totally tricked out new vehicle so the people they put in it think it’s the greatest thing since sliced bread and better than their vehicle. GM neglects to point out that the Equinox they are sitting in probably costs $10K more than the ‘real people’s’ cars, so of course it seems better.


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