By on March 23, 2016

2017 Chrysler 300S with Sport Appearance Packages

Chrysler’s venerable 300 has seen its fair share of wardrobe changes since debuting for the 2005 model year, and it’s now come back from the closet with more.

Not wanting to be absent from all the action happening at the New York Auto Show, Chrysler dutifully showed up to display the interior and exterior Sport Appearance Packages that will come standard on the V8-powered 2017 300S.

Dressing up a model that’s already been refreshed once since its second generation bowed five years ago can be a challenge, but the 300 is the torchbearer for the brand’s scant lineup and needs to stay visible.

2017 Chrysler 300S with Sport Appearance Packages

The exterior package sports a facelifted fascia with larger air intakes, body-colored front lip and two rows of LED foglights, while 20-inch wheels, sportier side sills and a decklid spoiler round out the changes further aft.

Perforated leather and suede front seats and “Piano Black” painted trim can be expected with the interior sport package, and can be matched to a new “industrial-looking” Ceramic Gray exterior paint (surely pleasing the small group of people who demand a slightly meaner full-size, mid-range American sedan).

Both packages are optional on the base 300S, which carries a 300-horsepower version of the 3.6-liter Pentastar V6, eight-speed automatic transmission, available sport-tuned suspension and optional all-wheel drive.

2017 Chrysler 300S with Sport Appearance Packages

Sales of the 2017 300S begin in August.

Sadly for Chrysler, the 300’s sales have fallen for the past three years, following a post-recession uptick that only amounted to half of its pre-recession numbers.

With Fiat Chrysler Automobiles focusing its attention on the red-hot Jeep and Ram divisions, Chrysler has been left with only the 300 and new Pacifica minivan to represent the storied brand (the 200 has been given the axe, though it’s currently in a weird purgatory).

In fact, if you crank up the stereo system in any of its cars, the tune playing just might be Queen’s “Keep Yourself Alive.”

[Images: FCS US LLC] [Source: GoodCarBadCar]

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116 Comments on “2017 Chrysler 300S – Murdered Out Modern Muscle Fights Malaise...”


  • avatar
    frozenman

    A ‘Murdered Out’ 300S fits the clientele profiling for this car perfectly :)

    • 0 avatar

      Is that a Black joke?

      Or a Mafia joke…as in the Black 300 used to whack Phil Leotardo?

      Or the one driven by the fixer in BILLIONS on showtime?

      I’d like to see special Federal agents in a movie driving blacked out 300 Hellcats .

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        I want MIB to drive blacked out 300 Hellcats. And chase a flying saucer down.

      • 0 avatar
        kmars2009

        Come on now, let’s be real. The LX cars are loved by everyone…white, red, yellow, beige, and black. However, I rarely see white, unless they’re the senior variety. (Just an observation, not a judgement)
        Personally, they look okay, but I prefer German cars.

        • 0 avatar
          nrd515

          The vast majority of the 300’s I see are driven by white, middle aged men and women. I see a few driven by black people, but not many here in Toledo, it’s an older white person’s car. A lot are base cars, but there are a lot of hemi powered ones. Chargers have a much more diverse ownership spread.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This car really, really needs the 6.4 as an option. With either existing engine its appearance is writing checks its powertrain can’t cash.

    • 0 avatar

      Dubai had plenty of 300’s and a slew of SRT models.

      Australia only gets 300 SRT and not Dodges because of the fact Dodge doesn’t do Right-hand-drive.

      I was one of the few people in my entire city that I saw with a 300 SRT because the vast majority of buyers of SRT products were opting for the Challenger and Charger .

      Take rate on the V-8 with all wheel drive, for example, was so low that it was below 15% .

      I did kind of get annoyed by the fact that so many 300s here or sold to limo companies .

    • 0 avatar
      Roadranger

      Yeah, we get the 6.4 in the 300 SRT here in Australia. Big Brembos too. I’ve only ever seen 1 on the road though.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      There are 3 products that I think are quite good, especially at their price point, from FCA, and the 300 is one of them (the others being the JGC and Durango).

      The 300 really does offer up a very quiet, very plush, very solid and roomy riding experience. The base V6 Pentastar is excellent matched with the ZF-Clone 8 speed transmission.

      The 300 is more plush and solid than any Cadillac currently built, and as a bonus, these can be purchased loaded inexpensively (in the metro Detroit area, a mid trimmed model, which is nicely equipped, can be purchased new for less than 28k plus TTL).

      However, FCA needs to do a major refresh of the exterior and interior, because this vehicle is really long in the tooth.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        Downside: the 300 has the worst steering of any new car I have ever driven. No centering, resistance, or feel. No initial response at all to the wheel, then a sudden jerk far beyond what you intended, then a wallowy wobble from the soft suspension as you try to correct with zero feedback to guide you. Absolutely appalling and unacceptable at any price. Chrysler needs to send someone out to drive a Fusion, stat.

        • 0 avatar

          You compare a front wheel drive car with a 4-cylinder to a real wheel drive car with V-8 engines optional ?

          Never go FULL retard…

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I agree with HotPotato. If I were looking to drive something quickly on a back road, and be satisfied with its feel and precision, I’d take the Fusion, hands down. Hustling the 300 down a back road is like asking a NFL lineman to do a tango – he’ll do it but it won’t be pretty. Carving up back roads was never the 300’s strong suit. But point it down a boulevard or the Interstate, and it’s about as good as anything on the road. Not surprising given all the old-school Benz in the 300’s bones – it drives a lot like the old S-class Benz my family had once upon a time.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I don’t disagree with you.

            But, there is a difference between “Absolutely appalling and unacceptable at any price” and “Carving up back roads was never the 300’s strong suit”,

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          HotPotato,

          ” the 300 has the worst steering of any new car I have ever driven”

          Don’t they come with either EHPS or HPS, depending on engine, like the WK2 Grand Cherokees?

          So, which type did you drive?

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          B.S. hotpotato.

          The 300 steering feel is absolutely fine for its class. It has good on center feel, no dead spots, and tracks true and straight (assuming the vehicle is free of accidents with proper wheel balance and decent tires).

          There’s not the progressive, sporting resistance that a hydraulic, non-EPS sports coupe is going to provide (who even makes those anymore even in sports cars?).

          I’ve driven 300s more than any other rental over a 6 year period.

          They’re my go-to rental, and the best freeway, long-distance cruiser of choice for me (short of an E Class, which shares suspension & chassis DNA with the 300, by the way, or an Audi A6).

          A Ford Fusion is a decent car, but it’s nowhere near as roomy (especially in the rear) or powerful (4 bangers in the Fusion are asthmatic) or plush as the 300.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I’m surprised to read that criticism. I’ve always felt all the nonSRT LX cars had a good steering and suspension setup for their class.

          Honestly, the steering on the Charger was a big reason why I went for it over the Genesis or Impala. Granted, I think the Charger is built to be a bit sharper than the 300, but it isn’t a world of difference.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I’ve always found LX cars to be very sensitive to the tires installed. Good tires (like you’ll find on 300S or Charger R/T) and they feel decent, if a bit dead like you’d expect from 4300 lb cars. Bad tires, like you often get on rental-spec Chargers, and they can be very vague and a bit scary. Not quite as bad as HotPotato describes, but at the worse end of the 2016 spectrum.

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          Say what you will about the 300. The fact remains that in a third gear sweeper or higher it is the first American sedan in my lifetime that takes a set and handles that situation with aplomb. It remains the only rwd sedan at its price point that has that particular mission statement. Not for me but I respect the hell out of it.

          The steering feel sucks, but the weight is extreme and you can blame the previous gen fwd cars for donating that front suspension geometry. I can’t have any criticism for what happens at the rear of those cars.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          I have a 2016 300S and I have never experienced anything like that. Perhaps you drove a 2014 or older model with the old Electrohydraulic system. The adjustable sensitivity full EPS in the ’15+ models is actually quite good in comparison to other full size cars I have driven.

        • 0 avatar
          PeriSoft

          “the 300 has the worst steering of any new car I have ever driven”

          Time to drive a G-Wagen!

      • 0 avatar
        seanx37

        Don’t forget the absurd lease deals on them here in Detroit. Especially if you can get the Chrysler discount. My brother is leasing 2 of them(his wife works at the Jeep plant). For less than $400 a month for both. They are comfortable. If you can one of these for less than the lease rates for a Civic, why not?

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “The 300 is more plush and solid than any Cadillac currently built…”

        Not even remotely true. Check one out versus an XTS (the closest competitor) and you’ll see where the corners were cut almost immediately…

        1) worse fit and finish outside
        2) far cheaper materials inside, including fake wood and cheaper leather
        3) less solid structure
        4) less solid door, hood and trunk closing

        Not saying the 300 isn’t a great car, and it’s a hell of a buy at its price point, but put it up against something costing $20,000 more and the difference in quality is obvious.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Let me tell you something, Mike – I’m intimately familiar with every Cadillac save the ELR.

          The ATS is way cheaper inside, with way worse fit/finish and materials (plastics, leather and metals) than the 300.

          The CTS is better than the ATS, but still has incredibly cheap details (like the door pulls, as just one example which are worse in a significant way than an Accord’s).

          The XTS is not much better than a LaCrosse (no surprise, since it is a LaCrosse), which isn’t good.

          Drive each Cadillac at a high rate of speed over railroad tracks, or another deep perpendicular rut or series of ruts in a roadway, and then do the same with a 2014+ MY 300.

          The 300 has far superior flex resistance and higher torsional rigidity than any of the Cadillacs.

          The ATS does have good torsional rigidity (one of its few redeeming attributes), but the build quality of the car is just bad, and the interior assembly is just bad, too, so that torsional rigidity doesn’t save the day.

          The 300 really does handle serious road imperfections, even at higher speeds, in a similar way as a Mercedes E Class (which should not surprise).

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I’ve driven the old-gen and new-gen 300s, and I’ve driven a XTS. The interesting thing is that the 300 drives like a $55,000 car but isn’t built like one, while the XTS has the opposite problem.

            But in terms of perceived quality, quality of materials, and fit and finish, I’d say just about any Cadillac (yes, even the ATS) has it all over the 300. I’d rate the 300’s interior quality as being about on a par with something like an Accord. Well, if you wondered how Chrysler delivers so much car for the money, there’s the answer.

            We’re gonna disagree on this one. Not surprising, eh?

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            ” worse fit and finish outside
            2) far cheaper materials inside, including fake wood and cheaper leather”

            There is no fake wood in the 300’s interior. It doesn’t even look or feel fake, it’s actual wood. The leather in the high end models with luxury interior is nice too. The 300 with the luxury interior really does put Cadillac to shame. Low end models aren’t all that special, the S seats are nice and have quality details though.

        • 0 avatar

          “1) worse fit and finish outside
          2) far cheaper materials inside, including fake wood and cheaper leather
          3) less solid structure
          4) less solid door, hood and trunk closing”

          I do think the Cadillac CTS and XTS have better interiors than anything else America makes – including Tesla.

          Unfortunately : CUE ruins the Cadillacs for me while Uconnect makes Chryslers shine.

          If only I could get a 300 SRT with the XTS interior/ interior space.

        • 0 avatar
          nickoo

          Wrong. The 300 has real open pore expensive wood trim. Get the higher luxury trim package of the 300c

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        +1

        And I got 29 mpg on my recent 800 mile rental journey.

        My favorite sedan period. (price considered)

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I don’t think the refresh did enough to distinguish itself as the new car it actually was. Too similar to the previous one, as it fell right into the retro trap.

    • 0 avatar
      tekdemon

      The real problem with this car isn’t the powertrain but the very outdated and overweight platform, if it weren’t 500 pounds heavier than a modern luxury car this size.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        The 268 bhp motor that is the Pentastar has enough grunt at both the low and top end to move the 300 with authority.

        The 300 coupled with the Pentastar is never going to leave anyone but people with irrational expectations and unsafe tendencies wanting for power at just about any speed on the highway or in the city.

        I’ve driven a 300 rental at very high speeds over a long distance of straight-as-arrow blacktop through White Plains, Arizona on a jaunt out of Vegas and Henderson, NV, all the way down to Kingman, AZ, and parts even further. It was effortless.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Actually the Pentastar puts out 292 hp.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            It was 286 or 268 when I did that jaunt in a 2013 (with a 5 speed transmission) one.

            But yes, they now have the base Pentastar puts out 292, and does it well.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I’ve never driven a 300 with the Pentastar, but I have driven a 200 with that engine. It was definitely entertaining.

          • 0 avatar

            The smartest thing Chrysler did was making the new Pentastar cars and Cherokee with AWD. The Sebring with the V6 had WICKED Torque Steer. AWD with a V6 helps sell the car – although the 9-speed isn’t as good as the 8-speed.

            The big problem with the 200 is that it’s a class-too-small. I could never choose a 200 – wherein a new Sonata 2.0t would work for me perfectly.

            The 300 is too small, but it was “huge” and “deep” when it was released against the Ford 500, Cadillac STS/ DTS/ CTS and the smaller Taurus of 2005-2006.

            In order to stay competitive, the 300 needs to grow to compete with the Genesis…which I never thought I’d say it…is an overall better car when the HEMI engines aren’t a factor.

            NO ONE in ANY MAKE has a car that can even hope to compete with the Charger/ 300 SRT models…or HELLCAT.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            At some point, is someone planning to tell BTSR that the Chrysler and Dodge brands are dying?

            Has he not yet figured out that Chrysler cannot continue with just 2 makes, the 300 and Pacifica? Has he not figured out that Dodge will soon be down to the Charger/Challenger and Journey?

            The Hellcat will be remembered as the last Hoorahs for 2 brands that just didn’t get it. Give our best to Plymouth and AMC when you get there!

          • 0 avatar

            SORRY VOGO

            I CAN’T HEAR YOU OVER THIS SUPERCHARGER!!!

            I’ll adapt…when the lights go out at MOPAR (if they do ) I’ll just get the fastest, most powerful, WHATEVER there is available at that time.

            TESLA P200D RIDICULOUS?

            Hyunda Genesis GT-R?

            I ain’t worried….

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            What saves you is your sense of humor. Kudos

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “NO ONE in ANY MAKE has a car that can even hope to compete with the Charger/ 300 SRT models…or HELLCAT.”

            Mercedes, Porsche, and BMW would like a word.

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    how many more decades is FCA
    gonna get out of this architecture? IT’S OBVIOUS THEY DON’T HAVE THE MONEY TO REPLACE IT

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      This.

      The longevity of the architecture is a testament that it was a good design, but holy long in the tooth Batman, they appear to be going after the GM W-Body way past its life record.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      I wonder which is the oldest design. This along with all the other Mercedes designs or the GM Enclave/Traverse brotherhood.
      I think the GM builds are trying to get by even longer.

      Both companies had no money for serious R&D, and I think the pent V6 was the only really good engine to come out after the bankruptcies…but not sure.
      Think all the new smaller engines were all taken from Italy.

      Everything else is just changing dressing.

      Thinkin….

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        GM has no R&D budget issues – not sure where you conclude they have no R&D resources like FCA.

        Theta is retiring out. Lambda is retiring out. All the money they’re pouring into Cadillac, Alpha platform, new Colorado/Canyon, new 1.5 powerplant, newer 1.6, Voltec system expanding into other products, etc. etc. etc.

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          Are you kidding?
          Are you trying to tell me that during the government bailout…they had no R&D budget issues?????

          OK…then maybe I missed something in economics class.

          And I never said their issues were equal…just that they had issues.
          Money issues.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            You do realize that even with the drama of the ignition recall GM had record profits, and gave our record bonuses???

            It has been discussed by the B&B at length that not only is FCA in in way worse shape than GM, they are probably in worse shape now then they were in 2005.

            As far as GM R&D budget circa 2007 versus 2016, it is even apples and oranges, it is apples and boneless skinless chicken breasts.

            GM R&D has included (for right or wrong)

            GMT K2XX
            GMT 700
            GMT 960
            Alpha
            Delta D2XX/DU2X
            Epsilon E2XX/P2XX/C1XX
            Gamma G2SC
            C7 Corvette
            Zeta VF

            Seven platforms, with 10 variants. New vehicles on new platforms, have included or will include in the next 24 months, for right or wrong:

            * Colorado
            * Canyon
            * ATS
            * CT6
            * Bolt
            * Encore
            * Trax
            * Alpha based Camaro
            * Volt mk2
            * City Express (partnership)
            * New Cruze and Cruze hatchback
            * New Sonic (not the 2017 refresh, the next gen)
            * E2XX Impala
            * E2XX LaCrosse
            * New Acadia
            * Envision
            * Cascadia
            * XT5
            * ELR
            * C7 Corvette

            This list does not include R&D for China or Europe, nor powertrain development. The list of vehicles above is new within the last 30 months or coming in the next 24. I also didn’t even include the launch of the GMT K2XX vehicles (Silverado, Sierra, Tahoe, Suburban, Yukon, Yukon XL, Escalade) or the niche Chevy SS.

            In comparison to FCA specifically, the Charger/Challenger/300 are based on a platform born in 2005 that was already based on on older Mercedes platform. The Dart is dead, with no replacement. The Chrysler 200 can’t be given away, literally. They are still selling the Dodge Journey. They can’t give away the Fiat 500. They’re selling about 50 Alphas a month. The Ram is now the oldest pickup from a design cycle standpoint in the market. The biggest thing in their pipeline since the GC and Cherokee is the upcoming update to the Wrangler.

            If gasoline spikes to $4 or $5 a gallon again – FCA is dead, dead, deadski.

            GM does not have a R&D issue. The launch history and the pending updates over the next 24 months simply don’t support the position.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            APaGttH

            Not saying GM HAS a R&D issue.
            Just that THEY HAD one.
            You can name all the platforms you want. If you are telling me that during the period during and right after the bailout they had the green light to do the R&D they wanted…you are crazy.

            And I am not comparing both Fiat?Chrysler to GM…just that they BOTH had bankruptcies…that means they could not pay their creditors.
            They went to the consumers and taxpayers for money to pay their bills and get out of contracts (which I liked).
            That also means money problems.
            The two are welded at the hip.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Personally, I’m *very* conservative when it comes to what I buy so for me the age of the platform and components were a selling point.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        How’d that work out? x.x;;

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I’ve been from one extreme to the other. I’ve been the early adopter (’89 Ford Probe in ’88) and I’ve been tried and true (Grand Prix in ’05 in part because W-body was well sorted out by that point) and somewhere between (02 Chevy Avalanche which was toward the end of the GMT800 lifespan, but the Avalanche itself was new to the world).

        My life experience has taught me to shy away from first model year vehicles and platforms regardless of maker (I’ve owned products from 4 continents). They all have a degree of — kinks.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      All the more shocking that they had to recall the latest Chargers due to jack-point issues.

    • 0 avatar
      seanx37

      They don’t have the money to replace ANYTHING

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I say it does another decade and then goes fleet (assuming there is a Chrysler next decade).

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      The Lx cars have been steadily upgraded over the years to the point where they share next to nothing with the originals. They have all the latest technology that you’d expect in this class including semi-autonomous features like lane keep assistance, stop and go cruise control and automatic collision mitigation too. Completely replacing a platform just for the sake of it is a waste of resources and unnecessary, just ask Subaru.

      The comments here remind me of how many people here don’t actually try out the cars they comment on and just parrot vague perceptions. People who actually reviewed the 2015+ models nearly universally liked them.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        This is the same argument one could make of Lambda. They have all the latest technology, interior features and body panels are different, etc. etc. etc.

        The chassis hard points are still the same on the LX cars, the fundamentals are the same and they are simply no longer competitive in the space.

        American buyers have completely abandoned RWD 4-door sedans. The taxi of choice is now the Camry hybrid and Prius it appears in the real world. Police departments have moved to SUV Fords, LX cars, SUV GM products, and a handful a month of the PPV specialty vehicle.

        Buyers for the 300 and Charger are very specific demographics, and the Charger in particular is a subprime sweetheart.

        I get your point, and I certainly am not arguing that a 2005 Chrysler 300 is the same as a 2015 Chrysler, but the LX platform is past its useful life, and not competitive in the marketplace. The public is voting with their wallets, and FCA has no budget to R&D a viable replacement – and they’ve come out and basically said that.

        What is Chrysler going to have after the Pacifica in a couple of years??? This is a company in huge trouble, with a minimum of 3 brands that are running out of justification for their existence – Dodge, Chrysler and Alfa (which has no reason to be in the first place). Sergio’s insistence on the billions he is pumping into Alfa is literally killing FCA. RAM as a stand alone brand doesn’t make a lot of sense at this point given all the other problems.

        Worst of all, it isn’t even really clear how you fix this.

        “Performance” brands like Dodge and Pontiac are just a dead concept. I’m an enthusiast and it hurts me to write that, but that’s what it is. Dodge has simply no reason to exist as a stand alone brand.

        Ram as its own brand just doesn’t make a lot of sense either, beyond making it something to delicious to sell to someone else down the road.

        Fiat dealers are literally fighting for their survival, the products aren’t selling and the B segment competition (sans the Yaris) is getting better, and better, and better. If you’re choice was the Scion iA or the 500, what are you picking? It’s no contest. If you’re sensitive to price are you going with a 500 or a Versa? Again, it just isn’t any contest. If you have some extra cash and you want the Euro cool factor are you going Fiat or Mini? Without a broader portfolio, this is a failed experiment.

        Chrysler is going to lose the 200. What it desperately needed was another $500 million to do another major update, and it likely would have been somewhat competitive. Their selling of the 200 to every fleet manager in the country also killed the market. The 300 is dated and has declining sales that no Bluetooth 12″ touch screen collision avoidance spoiler on the rear new grille is going to save. That leaves the Pacifica. If anything, Chrysler as the near luxury brand is ironically the one that likely should go away, and you circle the wagons around Dodge as a full line maker, and pull Ram back into the Dodge family.

        That leaves – Jeep. The only thing of any value in the FCA portfolio. But even Jeep is a grim state of affairs, I can still buy the awful Compass and Patriot, and the Renegade just didn’t deliver on the hype, only being marginally better than the 500 CUV it is based on.

        FCA is in huge trouble.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          I’m domestic-adverse; the 300 is the only domestic I’d consider based only looks, bones and value.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Nice post.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          The LX cars still own the large non-luxury car market. No maker sells more cars in this space, so “not competitive” really isn’t true. Again, professionals who reviewed and compared them still feel the cars are very competitive relative to competing models.

          Yes large sedans (cars in general) are in a decline versus SUVs/CUVs, so there will be some changes to go along with that shift. That’s been talked about publicly.

          As for the rest, you’re on the outside looking in from a long distance, so you really have no idea.

  • avatar
    FromaBuick6

    That spoiler looks really stupid. Makes the whole car scream “I finally got my disability settlement, so I traded in my Stratus R/T!”

    • 0 avatar

      That spoiler was my favorite part of the car.

      Functional or not…that car was FAST and gorgeous.

      If only they’d built a 300 HELLCAT, I wouldn’t have this Dodge Charger HELLCAT.

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        I guess I’m most surprised that it took this long for Chrysler to introduce an appearance package. Why wait to the end of the run when sales are dropping?

        Way to add hellcat in there even though it didn’t matter to the story. I think you were behind on your quota for this week.

  • avatar
    twotone

    I’ve been trying to find a new 300, V8, RWD, Platinum edition for the past six months. Not a single one in the entire state of Colorado. Make them available and people (e.g. me) will buy them.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    I’m really surprised these cars are even relevant anymore. Who buys these things?

  • avatar
    RHD

    The trunk looks like a Cirrus or a Neon, and the lower front grille just screams “Camry!”
    The rest of it is pretty unique.
    I just remember seeing an episode of COPS when the 300 was new, and a couple of ladies of the night rode in the back seat, using it to go from appointment to appointment.

  • avatar
    bricoler1946

    BTSR has 3 of them, one to drive whilst the other 2 are in the shop waiting for p[arts!

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Today, a car that’s aspirational only in subsidized housing and trailer parks is quintessentially Murican. No wonder its sales are steadily declining.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Out of every 25 300 models I see, on average one is being driven by someone respectable. They’re always old, and usually they’ve put a landau on it.

      That’s because the 300 is more of a Cadillac than anything they sell currently, as DW points out.

      Pity bout the trim and build quality.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    I’m confused, has the 200 actually been axed? I thought the plant was only temporarily closed to clear inventory backlog?

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Not officially, but … It’s close to being outsourced to another vertically integrated manufacturer such as Magna (or like) to build in the future (whether as 200 or under different name, and on different platform).

      The Sterling Heights Assembly Plant was supposed to be shut down for 6 weeks to allow dealers to dump a glut of the 200s now accumulated en masse on their lots, and that furlough is now in week 8 and keeps getting extended.

      Switching over to Fiat platforms has been a disaster for the Dart and 200, though the (IMO awful) Jeep Cherokee is selling well despite also sitting on a Fiat platform (CUVs are just that hot right now).

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I don’t think it was as much the Fiat platform as the unbelievably stupid marketing they did with both cars. Put the 2.4 and a six speed automatic in the Dart, and get the handling suspension, and it’s actually a very satisfying driver, as compacts go. It’s certainly worlds better to drive than a Corolla. But the original engine choices, as I recall, were a smaller naturally aspirated four and that weird small-displacement turbo. Those turned buyers off early and I don’t think the car ever really recovered.

        And far as I can tell, Chrysler didn’t just sell lots of the 200s to fleets – it apparently sold ALL of them to fleets. So the first-year sales figures looked spectacular on paper, but a year later, they’re all showing up on used lots with low miles and insanely low asking prices. And that 200 came right on the heels of the last fleet-queen 200. Bottom line – no one’s with a IQ higher than Forrest Gump is going to buy one new. How do you sell a brand new one when there’s a used one with maybe 15,000 miles for ten grand less a couple of hundred feet away? That’s great for the used car department, not so great for the nameplate. FCA really blew it with this car and how it was marketed. They should have settled for a lower initial sales volume and allowed the redesign to gain some real traction with consumers before they started pumping them straight from the factory to Hertz.

        Clearly the 200 isn’t on a par with an Accord, but I don’t think it’s bad enough to have the sales problems it has. I can think of a few midsizes I’d pass on in favor of a Pentastar-powered 200 (I’m looking at you, Camry).

        Maybe FCA was trying to show some gaudy sales numbers to find itself a merger partner?

        • 0 avatar
          threeer

          Not ALL…my FIL actually bought a 200 last year and absolutely loves it. Granted, he has no need to use the rear seat, so one of the biggest complaints lodged against the car is inconsequential to him. And yes, his IQ is much higher than Forest Gump’s…

  • avatar
    rcx141

    I’ve had a 2008 one and a 2012 one (V6). Both excellent cars, and it seems like they get better looking with every generation.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Geez, you folks are a rough crowd.

  • avatar
    jberger

    I’m with BTSR.
    The car platform might be old, but it is a very solid ride when compared to any of it’s competition.
    The V-6 has plenty of power with the 8 Speed, so the base engine package doesn’t feel anemic, it performs well. It’s big, comfortable and quiet on the road. Shame about the lack of visibility but that’s a problem with most of it’s competition too.
    Chrysler is doing a great job on the interior these days too.

  • avatar
    montecarl

    Wonder if is gonna be a next Gen 300 ?

  • avatar
    Dan

    After the 2015 update, when most of what third owners did to make their cars worse became factory standard, I figured that this platform had reached peak hoodrat. Apparently I figured wrong.

    What a waste. The 2011-14 was a classy looking car if you can find one that hasn’t had a date with RimTyme yet.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I also preferred the look of the 11-14, but in a world where Jaguars come with factory blackout packages and most Lexuses look like bath-salt induced nightmares I don’t think this 300 is all that bad.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Actually, I’ll be a heretic and represent for the 2005-10 models. Brilliant design, even with all the bad stuff that came with, like the cheap interior.

    • 0 avatar
      PentastarPride

      I never did really care for the LX platform like I did the LH, but I agree on the 2011-14. It was the only LX I’ve ever cared for from either generation. Charger, Magnum, first-gen 300? Never liked them.

      The interior and exterior was really nicely done and was a whole world of difference from the K-Martish first gen. The ’15-’17 models are still nice, but I just don’t like the front-end restyle.

      Sadly, sure enough, these are steadily ending up in the hands of the chrome crowd. The first gen is slowly starting to disappear due to a lack of maintenance; typical owners (usually 3rd, 4th, 7th) choose rims, Bentley grilles and subwoofers over oil changes.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    This thing is the next Panther, its incredibly dated, in with the hoodie low-lifes, and it aint getting prettier with each face-lift.

    They’re probably fine second-hand buys if you can get Grandmas Brougham special.

  • avatar
    bryanska

    People say they’re dated but that’s only because they’re familiar. Everything about these cars continues to be current; no options are missing. UConnect gets better every generation and the ride of any model 300 needn’t apologize. In short, it’s missing nothing and if you like the design, you should have no reservations. Reliability is perfectly reasonable and there are no glaring weak spots.

  • avatar
    Acd

    I’ll take one with smaller wheels, more chrome and less suede inside. I’m a fan of the Chrysler 300 but the “S” trim doesn’t do it for me.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    just about everything blingie from the pre-crash era is just played out. everyone that wanted to look str8 ‘hood already went through that phase.

  • avatar
    nguyenvuminh

    I think Chrysler should put in a 8.2 liter and get the Hellcat version for this thing right away. That should help drive Chrysler into oblivion quicker and put FCA out of its misery faster.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I know Giles is hailed as a genius but I still really don’t like the styling of this thing, it needs a lot of help.

  • avatar
    Noble713

    There is very little in Chrysler’s stable that has been consistently appealing over the past decade, but the 300 is one such car.

    These are surprisingly popular (as far as imported American cars go) with the VIP-style crowd here in Japan. If you want a muscle-y alternative to a Toyota Crown, it’s the best option. The design has great road presence.

    Still too big and heavy for the driving conditions here, IMO…

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    I really want to like the 300, but the back is just too much of a throwback to ’70s and ’80s “formal rooflines” for me to see anything but grandpa or gangster in the profile.

    They should make a wagon version. Nobody would buy it, but it would probably look awesome.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Like we used to say at the axle plant back in the 90s.
    “God in his infinite wisdom, made all animals rear drive.”

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    That Ceramic Gray is a terrific color.

    I have never ridden in, or driven a 300…rented a couple of Dodge Magnums, and they didn’t leave much of an impression either way.

    My issue with any FCA car is my perception that their clientele is more “urban” than I am. Chryslers seem to age poorly and end up in ghettotastic neighborhoods. There’s an older 300 running around Mt. Airy Ohio with that flip-flop “mystic” paint on it that looks green, gold, purple, etc, as you walk around it, with big wheels, and THAT’s the kind of thing I associate with FCA cars.

    With that said, the wsealthiest woman I know also drives a late model 300 in a nice low-key maroon color, but she never keeps them long, I assume she is doing 3 year leases, and unloads them before they can start looking old.

  • avatar
    06V66speed

    Dubs, foo.


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