By on July 2, 2014

2015-Hyundai-Genesis-main

Speed cameras are the bane of any driver’s existence, especially if they’re more trouble than they’re worth for the municipality who experiments with them for a contract period of several years. Future Hyundai Genesis owners in Korea, however, may have a new tool at their disposal that should make dealing with the long lens of the law much easier on the wallet.

Drive.com.au reports the new generation of the Korean premium sedan will use GPS and braking technology to help would-be Alex Roys down to the limit in time to wave hello at the camera. Hyundai representative explained to reporters at the Genesis Sedan’s unveiling in Seoul how the system would work:

It knows there is a speed camera there, it knows where the speed camera is and it will adopt the correct speed. It will beep 800 metres before a camera and show the legal speed, and it will beep at you if your speed is over that.

The system will work best at fixed and average speed cameras, but not against mobile units. Meanwhile, the same self-braking tech used in the preemptive camera evasion will also bring the sedan to a halt to prevent a collision should such an event arise.

Alas, the system won’t be available to U.S. drivers anytime soon, while Korean drivers may have to wait a bit until after the Genesis makes its local debut in October of this year.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

8 Comments on “2015 Hyundai Genesis Sedan To Receive Speed-Camera Warning System...”


  • avatar
    Signal11

    In Korea, speeding is almost exclusively enforced by speeding cameras and all GPS units (OEM, 3rd party, smartphone apps or otherwise) already do this anyway. Well, except for the automatically slowing down part.

    Premium GPS units already do seamless, over the air updating via DMB-TV channels for mobile locations.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Most highway drivers in Korea have a hard time doing the 100kph that’s allowed, so this isn’t really a big problem.

    I was pretty much always speeding on the highway (Lanos powah!), and I never got a speeding ticket, ever. Very rare to even see popo on the highway. They put up cop car lights on little posts at the side of the road and turn them on – I was never sure what that was supposed to accomplish.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I read about a study once that indicated blue lights reduce criminal activity. Maybe they read it in Korea.

    • 0 avatar
      Signal11

      Are you kidding? I generally cruise at roughly 140 KPH on my weekly 2.5 hour commutes and hit 160+ on the long straight stretches and there are still guys passing me.

      And it’s 110 KPH on the freeways and the speed cameras don’t even register you unless you’re doing 120 KPH+. It’s only 100 on the freeways inside Gyeonggido or near major cities.

  • avatar
    otter

    After six years in Chicago watching people drive at stupid speeds and in insane, dangerous ways because they seem to believe that it is their God-given right to drive as fast as possible at all times in all places, I’d be happy to see speed cameras every quarter-mile on every street in the city.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    Considering the traffic in Korea, perhaps drivers won’t need to worry much about being trapped by a speed camera. I can’t recall when a car I was in traveled faster than walking speed on the highways in Korea.

    • 0 avatar
      Signal11

      I wonder where you guys lived and how long you were there, because outside of the major built up areas, Koreans can drive at absolutely reckless speeds on major roads and rural highways.

      My last place in Seoul was in a villa overlooking the north riverside highway. It’s like a supercar convention out there every night past 1AM, tearing ass down the highway at full throttle. I’ve had taxi drivers and hired drivers bring me back home at silly speeds. Not to mention that it’s super easy to go 15KPH over on some the larger bridges even in the middle of the day.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States