By on November 7, 2013

2014_Toyota_FJ_Ult_002

With every mountain climbed, every river crossed, and every supermarket parking lot conquered since its showroom debut in 2006, the Toyota FJ Cruiser prepares to retire to the countryside in 2014.

The retromodern SUV — based upon the bones of the venerable Land Cruiser and the looks of the FJ40 — took one final bow at the 2013 SEMA Show with the introduction of the 2014 Trail Teams Ultimate Edition. The edition will comprise of 2,500 unites painted in a hue called Heritage Blue, offer a TRD off-road suspension ready to take on the Baja 500 paired with knobby BF Goodrich tires and a TRD heavy-duty skid plate, a roof rack to hold all of your precious cargo, and an assortment of high-tech systems to keep you from landing upon your roof on the trail.

The Trail Teams Ultimate Edition will enter showrooms in February of 2014 (final year FJs are in showrooms now), with production of the FJ drawing to a close before the beginning of the 2015 model year with 200,000 examples sold in the eight model years it has been with the world.

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74 Comments on “Toyota’s Retro FJ Cruiser to Become History in 2014...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    Wait, only 200k were sold?
    That’s seems lower than I would have thunk.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Your taste in vehicles isn’t universally shared.

      I see more Mini Coopers than FJ Cruisers, and that observation aligns with the sales numbers pretty well.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I didn’t say I fancied the vehicle, but I see these with regularity.

        I was thinking in regards to the H2, and H3. Both of which sold more than that figure worldwide individually. I was always under the impression the fj had more success.

    • 0 avatar
      Stephen7

      That’s because it isn’t true. The FJ Cruiser has sold more than 200k in the US alone, and while I’m sure they were the lion’s share of worldwide sales the article implies that this figure was worldwide.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    Good riddance. The FJ Cruiser was poorly executed (rare for Toyota) in comparison to the original FJ40 it was supposedly based upon. Maybe if it had been a bit more squared off (i.e., practical) instead of the weird rounded stuff (particularly that huge ‘c’ pillar).

    But, unlike GM, Toyota stubbornly holds onto a brand-new model even when it’s an obvious loser from the start. Even worse, in typical Toyota fashion, there were never any incentives on the FJ Cruiser. If you wanted one, there wasn’t much of a discount (if any). GM dropped the Aztek after only five years. That was the max Toyota should have kept the FJ Cruiser around, too.

    • 0 avatar
      tatracitroensaab

      Idk I would argue that it makes a lot of sense to keep poor-selling vehicles for a while — the development is a “sunk cost” so as long as it costs more than it costs to make then its no problem. This logic is why the flex is still around and why the ridge line is only just getting retired

    • 0 avatar
      gramon55

      I own an FJ Cruiser with over 100,000 miles. In spite of rock climbing, mudding, and a very rough treatment, it is very much like new. It is a tough and quite reliable off-roader. The vehicles that should be discontinued are all those pretend SUV’s that can’t take on a 30 degree ramp.
      The fact is that the majority of people like to BS themselves, buying lookalikes. I had a Suzuki Samurai and a Suzuki Sidekick. I loved them, so when the Grand Vitara came out, I bought one. Thinking that I was driving the real thing, I broke the suspension, ripped the air conditioned plate, and the car started sounding like a clanking old trash can. I switched to A wrangler. Eventually, I sold the Wrangler and later I bought the FJ cruiser.
      The Samurai, the Sidekick, The FJ cruiser, the Hummer, and the X-Terra are all great vehicles that have been sacrificed to the make believe lovers. HURRAY for Jeep. They continue making cars for people that like the real thing

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    From a distance, I’ve always admired this retro vehicle. Except for the dreadful fuel economy, they seem really nice.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      That’s key “from a distance.” I sat in one at the dealership while getting getting the oil changed in my gf’s Camry. The visibility is absolutely horrid, the rear seat is a veritable dungeon. The dash is full of chunky pseudo “manly” Tonka truck crap that just comes across as contrived and cheap.

      I’d much rather have an Xterra Pro-4x at the same price. It has a much more palatable interior and regular passenger doors and sightlines.

      The hardware was all there, including a manual transmission, but they got too caught up in the chasing the retro FJ vibe and gave up too much in ergonomics and function.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I agree on your FJ opinion. I thought oh a nice small 2-door esque SUV that’s capable. In the right colors it looks okay. But then you open the door and see Playskool sized buttons and knobs, and a sea of grey plastic. Then you close the door and look at the price tag.

        No go.

        And it has had VERY few updates for it’s life. Should have had a do-over or some other body style added 4 years ago.

      • 0 avatar

        Damn straight! I’ve always hated that dark interior, faux pipe/girder crap, and huge blind spots. If the new 4Runner came in a stick, then that’s be the better option… at least before they went angler-fish on the front end.* XTerra isn’t long for this world if I remember right.

        *Why there’s as many who have those horrid “scoops” on the front of their cars like an Aston One-77 is beyond me. Veloster, 4Runner, Forester XT– who’m I missing?

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Preach on brother. What happened to Toyota’s simple and functional (and handsome) designs for their SUVs? My 4runner has a simple chrome steel bumper and a modest chrome grill. The bottom of the bumper is compliant and scratch resistant dark plastic. It looks good, and it is very functional (read: durable). I’d argue they started to loose the plot with the later 3rd gen 4runners once they introduced that fake hood scoop on the upper trim levels, not sure if that fed a top mount intercooler on the overseas diesel models or what. Same story for interiors, mine looks basically like what you’d find in a Corolla of the same age. No attempts at being tough or macho, just a clean and simple layout made with high quality materials. Again, the Xterra has a perfectly honest and reasonable dash.

          I weep at the impending demise of the Xterra, maybe I’ll scoop one up in a year or two, 6spd stick with a rear locker and skid plate package please!

          • 0 avatar
            Tim_Turbo

            Yup. That is pretty much why I have kept a 99 Cherokee for a second vehicle. I use it to tow my snowmobile/wheeler, take fishing, haul my Mtn. Bike, take to the dump, go camping and haul the dogs around. It’s just simple, no frills “honest” transportation. Parts are cheap and plentiful. If something breaks it is usually an easy fix. And at just 150K miles it will last for quite awhile longer. Lucky for me it has not lived all its life in the salt belt and is really clean.
            The only odd thing is it is the only 4.0L Jeep I know of that does not leak any oil. Very, very strange!

    • 0 avatar
      PeteRR

      Black ones with the white roof have panicked me more than once as I mistook them for CHP cruisers.

    • 0 avatar
      gramon55

      You are right. The FJ gives me an average of 16 MPG. However, it is great, dependable, fun, aggressive, and only compares in off-road performance with the Rubicon or the Hummer 2 or 3.

  • avatar
    Mikein08

    Back in ’09, when I was looking for a competent BOF SUV that didn’t
    cost an arm and a leg, the FJ40 and Xterra were the only 2 vehicles
    to make the cut. I bought the Xterra because it was about $5k or so
    cheaper, and it doesn’t have that riduculous blind spot. It also has
    much better outside mirrors. Here’s hoping Nissan does not discontinue
    the Xterra. It’s a great vehicle in it’s niche.

    • 0 avatar

      When I shopped for them in 2010, Xterra and FJ were exactly the same price, if you take a minimal model with a rear locker. FJ’s MSRP was $30,700, Xterra’s $30,779. Frankly FJ was a better deal for my mission. I didn’t buy it because JK was more fun and fit the mid-life crisis vehicle profile better. Now I kinda wish I bought that FJ, although I cannot say anything bad about the Jeep.

  • avatar
    PenguinBoy

    Not surprising – unless someone is absolutely in love with the Toyota badge, I don’t see why anyone would choose one of these over a Wrangler Unlimited.

    • 0 avatar
      84Cressida

      Reliability….

      • 0 avatar
        360joules

        Disagree. The FJ40 I drove on an obstacle course at a Toyota-sponsored event was packed with so much electronic gimmickry that I would be sceptical as to the long term reliability of the bits and pieces. The engine and basic drivetrain would be solid but frequent soft-roading would kill all the other stuff. But maybe I’m biased by my 97 4Runner’s comparative simplicity.

      • 0 avatar
        Landcrusher

        Unfortunately, the FJ had a poor reputation for problems. Why buy a problem Toyota?

        • 0 avatar
          84Cressida

          That must be why it’s one of the topped ranked in reliability according to CR.

          Toyota reliability easily trumps anything slapped together by Chrysler. And the FJ has no more modern electronics than any other modern car.

          • 0 avatar
            Landcrusher

            My recollection from when I considered one was that It had several of the wrong colored dots. Perhaps it’s improved?

            Test drive was more comfortable than the jeep, but still more off roady than I wanted.

            A friend who is a nature guide and photographer wasn’t that happy with his.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          What sort of problems?

      • 0 avatar
        PenguinBoy

        “Reliability…”
        I agree that the perception of superior reliability is what causes some people to gravitate towards Toyota – but is Wrangler reliability really that bad? It seems to me to be a pretty basic vehicle with solid, well proven mechanical components. Is there a material difference in the reliability of a Wrangler and an FJ Cruiser?

        I remember looking at these at the local car show when they first came out, and was surprised at how poor the “perceived quality” was – at least for me. The way the doors closed made a poor impression on me (perhaps it was difficult to get this right with the half suicide door on the back), and the interior plastics looked cheap and cartoonish. The visibility also seemed very poor.

        Even if the reliability of the FJ Cruiser was better than the
        Wrangler (and I’m not sure that it is…), it wouldn’t be enough to make up for the FJ’s design flaws. Obviously I’m not the only one that feels that way, as it seems Jeep is doing a brisk business selling Wranglers while the FJ is being discontinued.

      • 0 avatar

        I seem to recall these having an issue where the front tub cracks off from the body/frame.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Reliability? OK

        Doesn’t change the fact that Consumer Reports gives the FJ Cruiser a 36 on a scale of 1 to 100, at one point it was on their 10 worst list.

        Lows: Visibility, ride, handling, noise, fuel economy, fit and finish, access.

        Yes, it’s reliable, A steaming pile of reliability so says Consumer Reports. But we know what haters they are.

        http://autos.msn.com/research/vip/ConsumerReportsSnapshot.aspx?year=2013&make=Toyota&model=FJ%20Cruiser#creport

        And don’t spin your reply that I missed the part about well above average reliability – it doesn’t change the fact that it is a poorly put together rough riding, thirsty, noisy, ill-handling “very reliable” vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “Doesn’t change the fact that Consumer Reports gives the FJ Cruiser a 36 on a scale of 1 to 100, at one point it was on their 10 worst list.”

          And the Wrangler got a 20. Which is the worst of anything they tested. The Jeep is also one of the most capable vehicles one can purchase. The Liberty got a 27. I don’t know what the Xterra gets, but my guess would be in the low 40s.

          In my opinion, the road test method CR uses for off-road vehicles is flawed.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            Ding!

            It’s madness to reply to a thread about “why would anyone choose an FJ over a Wrangler Unlimited”? by saying “CR says the FJ is *loud* and gets *bad fuel economy* and *handles bad*.

            I’ve RIDDEN in a Wrangler, and it’s got all of that in spades.

            (While I know someone with an FJ, I’ve never ridden in it, so cannot compare directly.

            I do know she loves the damned thing.)

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Consumer Reports has the average suburban American in mind that never ventures offroad or enjoys driving fast. While their reliability ratings carry much weight, their opinions on certain segments of cars do not. Of course an offroad biased SUV will guzzle gas and be noisy and ill handling. The Xterra gets dinged for the same stuff, as do Jeep Wranglers. CR also complained about the S2000 back in the day, the ride was not compliant enough for them.

    • 0 avatar

      Clearly most consumers agreed, but I am not sure JKU vs FJ was all that clear-cut. The biggest question was if you ever were going to use the rear seat (which I don’t). FJ has a real roof and rack, for one thing. It tows twice as much (a Pentastar JKU was even truncated to 2000 lbs). I find it more comfortable, and it’s definitely safer for my noggin, which I’m going to crack upon JK’s roll cage if anyone ever rear-ends me. So, advantages are there. Just not enough for the most.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    I personally really liked the exterior look, it was a great blend of modern and retro.

    I considered buying one, but I thought it was a low rent interior and it wasn’t the best kid hauler, so I passed. Also, the prices on used ones were insane, you were basically forced to buy new, and I rarely buy new cars.

    Still sad though to see it go, I miss vehicles like the Bronco and 2 door Blazer/Tahoe/Yukon, etc. All SUVs are blending into soccer mom jelly bean blobs riding on car platforms.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    The FJ Cruiser is cool because it has 3 windshield wipers.

  • avatar
    David

    I sold Toyota’s for awhile back in 2008, the FJ were slow sellers back then and the dealership had to put spiffs on the cars to get them off the lot.

    Another problem with the FJ was the sticker inside the gas tank lid reminding drivers they had to use premium.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Really? What engine was in there so special as to require premium? It’s not a vehicle which attracts a premium buyer. More like the granola hiker type buyer, or college-age wealthy girls.

      Furthermore, why no 2 door Lexus fancy variant? That would have sold.

    • 0 avatar
      luvmyv8

      Really? The FJ has the same engine as the ’04+ 4Runner and ’05 Tacoma, the 4.0L V6, the ’1GRFE’. A good engine, but nothing exotic. My ’12 4Runner with a slightly updated version of that engine just takes plain old 87 octane and still puts out 270hp.

  • avatar
    deanst

    The edition will comprise of 2,500 unites painted in a hue called Heritage Blue, offer a TRD off-road suspension ready to take on the Baja 500 paired with knobby BF Goodrich tires and a TRD heavy-duty skid plate, a roof rack to hold all of your precious cargo, and an assortment of high-tech systems to keep you from landing upon your roof on the trail.

    PLEASE, PLEASE GET AN EDITOR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      The TTAC robot needs spellcheck. Personally I would use the less-is-more approach with the generic news stories.

      EDIT: I was kicking the robot when it actually wasn’t at fault, my bad. Although I’m sure it deserved a kick, fancy robots with all of their numbers processing and new fangled hydraulic systems.

  • avatar
    Tim_Turbo

    With rare exceptions I’ve found the FJ Cruiser to be a good fit for people who want to appear like they might be called to lead an expedition at any second yet really possess no actual desire to venture off road. You could probably say that about a lot of SUV’s I guess, it just seems more obvious with the FJ.

  • avatar
    probert

    1/3 smaller and 1/3 taller would have made it more interesting.

  • avatar
    Peter Reynolds

    Wasn’t it based upon the bones of the Tacoma? Not the venerable Land Cruiser?

    • 0 avatar
      84Cressida

      Based on the 4Runner, which is based on the LC Prado.

      • 0 avatar

        IIRC it was even more convoluted, FJ appearing before the current “wide” Tacoma and using the Prado’s running gear directly. Tacoma came next and the new 4Runner a year after that.

        • 0 avatar
          84Cressida

          The current Tacoma came out as an ’05, FJ as ’07. 4Runner came out in 2003 and then redesigned in 2010. Both FJ and 4Runner (and Tundra) in 2010 got the updated 1GR-FE with dual VVTi. Of course, for some reason the Tacoma does not get the updated engine.

          • 0 avatar
            luvmyv8

            Strange but true. I test drove a ’12 V6 Tacoma and a ’12 4Runner and the 4Runner felt noticebly faster then the Taco. The Tacoma just didn’t feel all that spritely in my opinion. The 4Runner did. Plus the ‘Runner also has 4 wheel discs vs. the Tacoma’s rear drums, plus the Taco’s brakes felt mushy, the 4Runner stopped with confidence…. though it does nose dive in panic stops.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Toyota built could be why they sold any at all. Horrid/unsafe blind spots could be why they didn’t sell any more. Imagine the blog outrage if GM or Ford tried to sell an SUV with pizza-box sized blind spots.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    I would like to see an off-road capabilities comparison test between an FJ Cruiser and a first generation RAV4 AWD two door. I would not be surprised to see the RAV4 come out ahead.

    • 0 avatar

      I don’t think so. RAV4.1 didn’t have any kind of low gear, and sadly I received my fill driving a 4.3. As far as getting over obstacles, I suprised jeepers many times, and I posted a few striking pictures to RAV4world.com. But as soon as it hit sand or snow, it was curtains: TQ stall for auto, regular stall for manual. Another thing, driving RAV4 off road was immensely tiring, as I had to be extremely cautious not to put a wheel wrong. In JK, on the same trail, I only need to point it in the general direction and let it idle over everything. It’s night and day. I expect FJ being more like JK in that regard.

      A 4.1 would probably be awesome for high-speed runs on reasonably level trails, provided you know when to brake to avoid plowing into a wash. Unfortunately, you can’t do it well most places: too many bicyclists and other moving obstacles. And if we talk a marked course like Chili Challenge, F-150 Raptor will just crush 4.1 like a bug.

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        It looks like the issues were with the gearing and differentials, but you’re confirming that it could climb over stuff.

        The “proper” body-on-frame, live-(at least rear)-axle off-roaders are becoming so heavy and wide that I can imagine a small off-roader doing better, even if it is unibody and strut based, like the RAV4, as long as it is small enough and has enough ground clearance (which I would credit the original RAV4 as being, but not necessarily the later versions).

        • 0 avatar

          You do realize that supposedly-heavy BOF Wrangler is lighter than many CUVs, such as Pilot, Explorer, Pathfinder, etc.? A BOF vehicle in the format of RAV4.1 could be made the same weight.

          • 0 avatar
            racer-esq.

            Could but won’t be because a small BOF standalone platform cannot be justified.

            Obviously it would be great for the Suzuki Jimny to come over, but that is highly unlikely now that Suzuki is gone.

            Something like the original RAV4 seems more likely.

  • avatar
    Yeah_right

    Not sure what reliability problems they were accused of. I have an ’07 6-speed manual that has been bulletproof.

    If your quibble is that you don’t like the style, that’s your issue. Women I work with want to ride in it. Style enough for me.

    The blind spot is dangerous. The first time you pull up to an intersection that is at a 30-degree angle and realize you literaly cannot see what is coming from your right changes how you approach those intersections in the future.

  • avatar
    ash78

    I was always mixed on these things…seems like Toyota could have done a lot more to make this a viable Wrangler competitor, maybe even more niche than that for the extra profit (like Land Rover).

    My uncle bought one several years ago when he came into some money. It’s a gas hog, but he’s kitted it out for daily driving in rural Costa Rica (where you almost HAVE to have a proper SUV). I really wonder how it’s going to hold up against all the local Daihatsus and Suzukis.

  • avatar
    azmtbkr81

    Too bad, I was holding out hope Toyota would update the FJ instead of killing it. This really is a dark time for off-road enthusiasts, hopefully manufacturers will take a clue from the increasingly strong market for used old-school SUVs and the insane popularity of the Wrangler and develop new models.

    At this point I’m not sure who to blame for the complete abandonment of the offroad SUV market. I know that consumer tastes have shifted to CUVs and CAFE regulations are tough but I have to think that the market is under-served. Everywhere that I drive my full size Bronco I receive comments similar to “Wow, they don’t make them like that anymore…why is that?” I can’t seem to come up with a good answer.

  • avatar
    raincoconuts

    I bought my 2007 FJ 6 speed manual December 2006. Great truck, cross-shopped with Nissan X-terra(bloody awful!). Did not bother to drive a Wrangler-more plasticky than a pickle bucket and not as durable either.
    I’ve made several trips along the east coast and mid-west, it’s always been competent on road or off, that Prado platform is excellent. Sight lines are fine, it has some of the biggest front windows I’ve seen on any vehicle. I’ve sat in the rear, that’s not so bad either.
    The mileage is bad but that’s a given on any SUV. The interior is excellent quality,still not dated, very user friendly and it’s held up better than the one on the Porsche I own of the same vintage.
    Very reliable vehicle,trouble I’ve had-a bad sensor and a seat belt harness, both replaced under warranty.
    Sorry to hear that Toyota has decided to take it off the market.
    I plan to hold on to mine for a while.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “Sight lines are fine” Nope. Not at all.

      “I’ve sat in the rear, that’s not so bad either” Not so bad maybe if you spend your days underground in a coal mine. But compared to literally any other passenger car or truck sold on the market currently, it is much worse.

      I’m not saying it’s a bad rig overall, but to defend such a blatant deficiency is just crazy.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I’m not a big fan of this Toyota. It might be acceptable off road. It has lost of it off road ability in comparison to the 76 Series, which it’s chassis is based on.

    It might be okay to take to an off road park in a major city but it couldn’t be considered for any serious off roading holiday.

    Here in Australia wanna be people and hair dresser buy these along with Wranglers to drive the beach. They are treated like a bracelet or handbag, an accessory.

    The link is a review on the 76 Series wagon with the V8 diesel we get. Like a Wrangler the 76 Series is a pig to drive on the road but excels off road. But, the Wrangler like this FJ is limited for serious off road touring. They just don’t have the capability and endurance/power of the better Toyota variant the 76 Series V8 diesel.

    http://www.themotorreport.com.au/48703/2010-toyota-landcruiser-76-series-gxl-wagon-road-test-and-review

  • avatar
    StatisticalDolphin

    It’s intended to be a niche vehicle, not to appeal to the typical Consumer Reports subscriber.

    FWIW, rumors of the FJ’s demise after 2014 MY have been debunked in the enthusiasts discussion forum.

    FJC is the best vehicle for resale value. BOF SUVs dominate the list.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    From the perspective of someone who owned one of the first FJ Cruisers that made it to US shores. I modded it, wheeled, it, bought the 4×4 MT model… I was even in my late 20s when I bought it, meaning that I was kinda sorta in the target demographic.

    The truck had heinous blind spots. For an off road vehicle you couldn’t see in front, to the side, behind… it was like sitting inside a football helmet. The back seats were just horrid, passengers sat in a black box with tiny porthole windows and no leg room in an SUV that shared a platform with a 4Runner that gives generous space to back seat passengers.

    For an off road vehicle, and I’ve owned several Land Cruisers, the FJC was very frail. The rear diff grenaded, the paint was peeling off the roof, the vertical windshield exploded upon contact with the tiniest pebble, the interior was trashed at 50k miles due to substandard cloth and plastics… the most damning of all was the T/O bearing which grenades the manual transmission. Toyota knows of this, won’t fix the design of these transmissions which are in FJCs and Tacos… and will eventually brick the truck at 50-75k miles. Toyota claims that this is caused by owner neglect by water entering the transmission casing–something which I vehemently denied as I never took the vehicle on deep water crossings.

    An entry level, cheap SUV with no luxury amenities and all the off-road goodies is a great idea. It’s what most Jeep owners still can get if they so choose. The FJ Cruiser wasn’t this, it was a crappy concept and poor execution. If Toyota wants to keep selling an entry level SUV, they can decontent a proper 4-door 4Runner and keep all the SUV benefits of visibility, durability, passenger convenience without all the idiotic design-related pitfalls of the FJC.

    The only fans of these vehicles either have unlimited funds to keep fixing every damn thing that keeps breaking, or just never go off road.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    This vehicle always struck me as Toyota’s answer to Hummer chic. (and Honda Element too, to some degree)

    One thing I have noticed, at least were I live & drive, FJC drivers are some of the most aggressive ones out there.

  • avatar
    John

    Well, I own an FJ Cruiser. The vehicle has been good to me. I bought it in 2007 and it has never broken down on me in my 7 years of ownership. I am not a “mall crawler” or a “soccer dad”. My vehicle is lifted and heavily modified for off-roading. With that said, it was a niche vehicle. It will not appeal to all. I leave with this last little bit of information for the fan boys and trolls that posted all their hate in the comment area. If this vehicle sucks so much, why is it #1 in resale value for 2014 on the Kelly Blue Book website? Where is your truck ranked? Here is the link:

    http://www.kbb.com/new-cars/best-resale-value-awards/best-resale-top-10-cars/

    By the way, I would hardly classify the X-Terra an off-road vehicle. The aftermarket support says it all!

  • avatar
    oldcruiser

    The FJ is my life. I can’t say anything bad about it because Ive replaced most everything on it and I spent about $70K doing it. Now I spend all day on the FJ cruiser forum with one hand in my pants and typing with the other…..hoping someone will disagree with me. I usually spend all morning trying to think of a catchy title for a new thread, something to stir the pot and create controversy. Have I mentioned Im a cry baby if you dont agree with me?

  • avatar
    tonka cruiser

    i think there is a lot of misinformation in this thread. FJ60LandCruiser i’m sorry you had so many problems with your truck. i can tell you that your experience is very uncommon. the FJ has the highest resale value of any vehicle in the US, not my statement Edmonds. this would not be the case if it was such a crappy vehicle. it also has one of the best owner satisfactions ratings, according to consumer reports.

    i have had two FJ’s first was black 07. i now have 08 trail teams. between the 2 i have over 140,000 miles with no equipment failures. i wheel my truck very hard, here is a link to one of my videos ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5dGFtJDLmU&list=UUewwZi_WNn-vxEdImh0MOpw&feature=share ). the FJ was never meant to be a big seller, none of the land cruisers are. it is about image and press coverage.


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