By on November 10, 2010

Hyundai’s Sonata overhaul has been well-received by critics and customers, and the next-gen Elantra looks set to move the magic to the C-segment. But what of the Accent? If there’s a vehicle left in Hyundai’s lineup that recalls the bad old days of Hyundai’s bargain-basement past, it’s the current sub-$10k base price Accent. Of course, that’s all about to change, as a new Accent is hitting the roads in Korea… and like most of Hyundai’s new product, it looks like a huge step up from its predecessor. TTAC’s man in Korea, Walter Foreman, was kind enough to send in this mega-dump of over 80 images of the new Accent, noting

The car is 172 inches in length with a 101.2 inch wheelbase and a height of 57.3 inches. No news on the claimed curb weight yet.
The 1.4 liter engine is rated at 108 hp and 37.8 mpg with the 5-speed auto and 42.3 with the 6-speed manual [all mpg numbers on Korean test cycle].
The 1.6 liter engine is rated at 140 hp and 39.3 mpg with the 6-speed auto and 42.8 with the 6-speed manual.
The juggernaut rolls on…
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65 Comments on “From Korea With Love: The 2012 Hyundai Accent In Detail...”


  • avatar
    jaje

    42mpg combined?  Cost < $14k (speculation)?  That is quite damning to the larger and much more expensive Hybrids (we are talking a $10k delta).  I wonder if they’ll make a hatchback version of the Accent / Elantra to improve utility.  Hyundai has come a long, long way.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The best thing about the current Accent is the SE hatch, but reportedly, Hyundai likely will not offer the new Accent or Elantra in a hatch version (Elantra will still likely get a wagon) since they see the Veloster filling that role.

  • avatar
    stryker1

    Priced as shown must be appraoching 20k.
    Visually it invokes the Sonata, and the front also reminds me of the fiesta.
    Really wonder if people are going to be willing to pay this much for the high end tiny-cars that everyone seems to be betting on.
     

    • 0 avatar
      ash78

      Chalk me up as a skeptic, as well, but remember the “high-end small car” business model has been the norm in most of Europe and Asia for quite a while.
       
      Forget the tired cliches about “Americans are fat” or “Americans hate small cars.” We’re simply one of the most value-oriented societies and it’s hard to sell a small car for a price where a midsize or large vehicle would be more rational. Most parts of the US simply have too few size restrictions to justify the extra 3-4 mpg and slightly better tossability that comes from a smaller car.
       
      Now, if gas were $9/gallon and most of us lived in big cities…

    • 0 avatar

      Pricing in Korea ranges from 11.5 million Korean won (about $10,350 US dollars) for the 1.4 5-speed manual to 17.5 million Korean won (about $15,700 US dollars) for the 1.6 GDI with 6-speed auto and every available option.

      I’m not sure what it will sell for in the States, but I imagine that it’ll be around $15,500 fully loaded (but perhaps without the GPS and rearward camera). The current model tops out at $14,915.

  • avatar
    jj99

    At the glass house in Dearborn executives are having a cow.  This vehicle is 40% cheaper than Fiesta/Focus.  And, Consumer Reports is currently reporting Ford ranks in 10th place in vehicle reliability.  Not good.  Hyundai is in 12th place, right behind Ford, but its vehicles are much cheaper than equivalent Ford products. Note Ford reliability is worse than every Toyota and Honda brand. Ford expects people to pay massive for a Ford vehicle in the same segment that is not a quality leader?  No wonder Ford is complaining about the Korea free trade agreement.  Ford knows it can not compete with Hyundai, so they want some protection so you and I can not get the best vehicle for the money … Hyundai.

    • 0 avatar

      You greatly exaggerate both Hyundai’s price advantage and the differences in reliability.

      The reality: The Sonata is priced just a few hundred dollars below the Fusion. The 2010 Elantra lists for only about $1,400 less than a 2012 Focus. The gap will shrink with the redesigned Elantra. And the new Accent will likely be priced within $1,000 of the Fiesta when both are similarly equipped. The Focus is an Elantra competitor.

      The price difference is under 10 percent. Nowhere near 40 percent. Check them all out here:

      http://www.truedelta.com/prices.php

      Of course, when there’s an agenda, the actual numbers aren’t relevant.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      In the Boston area, I see base model Accents advertised below 10K ( manual transmission ).  I also see Fiesta advertised for 14K. That is a 40% gap. I assume the gap remains.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      So you say, one can buy a Hyundai cheap in Boston? Great… cause after about six Boston winters your gonn’a need another one.

    • 0 avatar
      jaje

      jj99 – You are comparing the pricing of the outgoing (thankfully) 2011 Accent which doesn’t make sense.  The new Accent will grow in price as it grows in refinement and options.  Because of Hyundai’s investment in the 2012 Accent any previous model price gap to the 2012 Fiesta will get much smaller.  Frankly, if you compare the outgoing 2011 Accent to a 2011 Fiesta – it is night in day in quality, etc. and tells you why Hyundai sells them at $10k and Ford can sell its Fiesta at $15k – $18k.
      That aside, the new Accent looks to be a huge step up in price and quality making it more of a competitor to the Fiesta and will likely make the Accents price much closer to it too.  It seems Ford, Hyundai have been making some big inroads in completely overhauling their offerings (GM to some extent too).  If I was anyone that should be worried – it is Honda and Toyota as Hyundia’s quality, styling, performance, reliability and fuel efficiency are getting better and better.

    • 0 avatar
      SV

      Wow jj, I’ve noted your dislike of Ford in the past but now you’re starting to sound just like our esteemed Z71_silvy. That’s not a compliment.

      Ford’s ranking in CR (whose flaws in reliability methodology have been very well documented here) is closer to Lexus’s than it is to Hyundai’s at the moment; even if they’re not quite at Toyota/Honda level yet, they’re close, and if you exclude Ford’s older truck offerings which drag the overall score down, the car lineup is at least on reliability parity with Honda and Toyota:

      -the Fusion outranks the Camry or Accord by a good margin (along with everything else in its class)

      -the Focus is close behind the Corolla, and they both get the half-red circle anyway which is all most people will ever care about. I’ll grant you that the Civic is still pretty far ahead, but they’re all above average by a good margin.

      -the Taurus outranks the Avalon, Maxima and Azera.

      -the Edge and Explorer are both listed as too new to be rated, but the Edge has done very well in the past and the Explorer’s D4 platform is well proven.

      The non-hybrid Escape is Ford’s only non-BOF vehicle with a less-than-stellar record, and it’s a very old design that’s due to be replaced soon. Even then it’s still recommended.

      As for that 40% lower price figure, it’s utter bull. Yes, you can get a stripped-out, no-frills Accent 3-door for under 10-grand* (*see dealer for details), whereas Fiestas don’t venture below $14k, but that’s comparing apples to oranges. Assuming the new Accent, which is a much more refined and sophisticated car, will be priced the same as the current model is ridiculous. Like MK said, the new Accent and the Fiesta will probably be within a grand of each other; I would expect a base, stripped-out next-gen Accent to go for $12k or $13k, which is in the Fiesta’s ballpark.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      At the glass house in Dearborn executives are having a cow.
      Actually you’re right. They are having a cow. Ford and Fiat are opposing the Korean Free Trade act. I guess they don’t want duty free Korean imports competing with their duty free Mexican imports.
      http://thehill.com/blogs/on-the-money/801-economy/127651-ford-slams-south-korea-trade-deal-as-obama-officials-renew-talks

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      SV, you are cherry picking data.  Here is the reliability rankings from Consumer Reports ( first 13 ):

      1) Scion ( Toyota )
      2) Porsche
      3) Acura ( Honda )
      4) Honda
      5) Infinit ( Nissan )
      6) Toyota
      7) Subaru
      8) Volvo
      9) Lexus
      10) Ford
      11) Hyundai
      12) Mazda
      13) Kia

      Bottom line is Ford is in the Hyundai league.  Toyota and Honda run the table. 

    • 0 avatar
      SV

      I’m citing the data as I see it; you’re fudging the facts to fit your opinions.
       
      Ford’s mean reliability rating is 17% above average; Hyundai’s is 12% above average; Lexus’s is 20% above average. Therefore, Ford’s reliability score is closer to Lexus’s than it is to Hyundai’s. Period. The end. That’s how it is.
       
      I’ll take your “cherry picking data” fallacy and raise you anecdotal evidence, false dichotomy, and whatever illogic makes you think the outdated, rental-car fodder current Accent will be priced the same as the vastly more refined and sophisticated next-gen Accent. Wishful thinking perhaps? That also applies to your sweeping generalization that Fords are “massively priced”.

      Toyota offers fewer trucks than Ford does and Honda offers none at all, so the flat “reliability by manufacturer” doesn’t tell the whole story. Ford’s mainline car offerings rank similarly to (Focus) or better than (Fusion, Taurus) their Honda and Toyota rivals; the only real use of overall brand reliability is to measure overall trends or for use in fanboy pissing matches, which is not dissimilar to what’s happening here. Individual buyers will be better served by comparing the reliability of the specific models they’re considering.
       
      Toyota and Honda are, overall, still ahead of Ford. For now. Hyundai and Ford are both improving, however, and it remains to be seen where they’ll be in a few more years.
       
      This is all, of course, assuming that Consumer Reports is infallible. They’re a good source of information but, as detailed elsewhere on this site, they’re far from perfect.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      SV, I just listed Consumer Report brand reliability in this month’s edition.  Ford ranks below every Toyota and Honda brand.  Fact.

      More facts.  Motor trend recently tested Camry against Fusion, and Camry was #1.

      Did I forget to mention that Motor Trend recently ranked Avalon ahead of Taurus?  Taurus only scored 17MPG in their test, while Avalon came in at 22MPG.  Big difference.  And, Avalon was much faster.

      Ford is no different than 5 years ago.  I am an unfortunate owner of a 3 year old Ford that I did not purchase the extended warranty on.  I have already handed over 1500 in repairs on this high quality and reliable Ford product. 

    • 0 avatar
      SV

      I am aware of where your data comes from; I used Consumer Report’s website, which has the same information. If anything, it is more in-depth as you can also see complete reliability information for individual models.

      Yes, Ford is below Toyota and Honda. I pointed out that this fact is partly due to Ford’s various older, soon-to-be-replaced offerings, which drag the overall score down. Those models which don’t do as well also don’t have Toyota or Honda equivalents in many cases so if you want a really good direct comparison of brands, it might be best to ignore them. Ford does better in that situation.

      I don’t really care what Motor Trend says. Their reviews are almost totally subjective; whether or not the Camry is “better” than the Fusion is as much a matter of personal opinion as anything else. I think the Fusion is more enjoyable to drive than the Camry, gets similar gas mileage and rides almost as comfortably. Throw in vastly superior reliability according to Consumer Reports, and it’s a no-brainer for me – it looks like about 200,000 other people will feel that way this year, as well.

      The Taurus could perhaps do with better MPG figures. And? The Fiesta and Fusion score quite well in this respect relative to their peers. The current Focus is middling in that respect but the new one looks quite promising, sporting as it does direct-injection and a dual-clutch transmission. Ford’s truck and SUV offerings also sport similar fuel economy to their Japanese competitors.

      The fact also remains that Ford’s reliability is better than Hyundai. Their mean score is five percent higher, and as MK states, the difference in price between Hyundai and Ford isn’t nearly as massive as you say – there’s the anecdotal evidence and wishful thinking fallacies at play.

      Your experience with Ford is unfortunate but also revealing: it seriously tilts your viewpoints and exposes your bias for what it is. I’ve never owned a Ford or a Hyundai, therefore my opinions are not colored by prior experience. I find them both compelling brands with an intriguing lineup that looks to have a lot to offer. What angers me is when people summarily dismiss an entire company out of hand despite evidence that things aren’t quite so black and white (false dichotomy).

      A $1500 repair is a lot for a 3-year-old car, but I’d bet my life savings there are 3-year-old Toyotas and Hondas that have needed similar repairs. Your one experience is not indicative of the state of the entire brand.

    • 0 avatar
      Patrickj

      @SV
      Ford’s mean reliability rating is 17% above average; Hyundai’s is 12% above average; Lexus’s is 20% above average. Therefore, Ford’s reliability score is closer to Lexus’s than it is to Hyundai’s. Period. The end. That’s how it is.

      I assure you that these reliability scores, whoever they are from (unclear), are not accurate to within 1%.  Therefore, it is not reasonable to say that Ford’s is closer to Lexus than it is to Hyundai.  Your statement assigns a precision to a survey completed by large numbers of bored, distracted, and biased humans that simply isn’t there.
      All the scores say is that Ford’s score is located between the other two.

    • 0 avatar
      SV

      Pardon me, I should have said “that’s how it is – according to Consumer Reports”. Ford’s Consumer Reports score is closer to Lexus than it is to Hyundai, but yes there’s a margin of error there. The fact remains though that jj is skewering Ford and cheerleading Hyundai when the data he cites actually shows them to be roughly equal in quality. Both brands are around the same area of reliability as Lexus according to CR, which honestly is pretty good.
       
      This whole argument is of course assuming that CR is a faultless source of data when it is not, but since jj thinks that’s the case I used their numbers to prove my points.

    • 0 avatar
      jaje

      Wow – this sub-thread really took off.  Relying on your own personal experiences and that of magazines will give you certain information but it is not fact when so much subjective input is included in everything.  CR – is just a suggestion and only good for arguing moot points via Inteweb tubes.  Now I’ve got to get back to my field runners game on the iPad.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Did they forget a piece of glass at the rear? The condemned “black plastic triangle” rears its ugly head once again! You’d think with all the goodies the car contains – and it does look quite attractive – why the sacrifice in visibility? Or is the visibility good from the inside? If so, I’d like to hear the reasoning behind the triangle trend. Sorry, but I care about seemingly trivial stuff like that. I’ll have lots of cars to check out at the Cincinnati Auto Show this coming February!

    This does appear to be a very nice effort. Toyota and Honda better grow an eye or two in the backs of their heads, Satchel Paige’s advice notwithstanding.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      For now, Toyota and Honda are safe because their vehicles score tops in Consumer Reports vehicle reliability.  Hyundai is average reliability.  But, if Hyundai climbs the reliability rankings, people will defect to Hyundaui/Kia from Toyota and Honda because Hyundai/Kia carry lower price tags.  The Detroit nameplates are no threat to the Asians.  Detroit reliability is below top Asian brands, but they sport stickers higher than the gold standard Toyota and Honda.  However, Detroit is making every attempt to paint the media with stories claiming their reliability can’t be beat by Toyota or Honda ( From a ford ad ). 

    • 0 avatar
      stryker1

      Ford and Hyundai could also steal some business from Toyota/Honda if it turns out that there are people willing to drive premium small cars and pay for them. There’s no version of the Fit that comes with leather seats, a back up camera, etc…
      Same for the yaris. Up until now, the thinking has been that small cars are only desired by people who can’t afford bigger cars. That’s going to take some disproving, but if wrong, Toyota/honda will probably have to respond with more primo’d versions of Fit/Yaris next year.

    • 0 avatar

      Also noticed the triangle, and also not a fan. These happen when the body engineers insist on one thing, and the designers another. Any window there would be too small to count, regardless. I just don’t care for the fake.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I’d like to know how much of a price difference there is between the 1.4 liter engine and the 1.6? I only ask because the larger engine offers better power and better fuel efficiency so you wouldn’t be taking a hit on mileage by moving up to the slightly larger engine. Also, since the MPG ratings given are from the Korean test cycle how accurately might they translate to the EPA test cycle?

    • 0 avatar

      My guess is that only the 1.6 will be offered in the US… but I won’t speculate on possible EPA numbers. Foreman did include a note on the Korean test though:
      Korean fuel economy is measured on a combined loop and is generally quite accurate. My KDM sonata is rated at 30.5 mpg (combined) and I get 23 in the city and 37 on the highway. That averages out to exactly 30!

    • 0 avatar

      @Ed: I just checked my email that I sent you. In it I see that I typed, “That averages out to exactly 13″, which you then posted as “31″. LOL Both of us were wrong. I typed 13 because that is my car’s rating in km/l (I forgot to convert it to imperial). You thought that I just made a typo 13 for 31.

      I’m no mathematologist, but even I know that 23+37 averages to THIRTY. LOL

    • 0 avatar

      Whoops! Fixed.

    • 0 avatar

      In Korea, yearly car tax is calcuated on engine displacement, so that could be one reason to offer the 1.4 liter engine. I too don’t think that the 1.4 will be offered in the States.

      The price difference between the two engines in Korea is about 1.6 million Korean won (about $1,450 US), however that price difference includes a 6-speed manual for the 1.6 (versus a 5-speed for the 1.4) and electronic climate control (versus manual a/c).

    • 0 avatar
      jaje

      The DI 1.6 Elantra motor has been for sale in other pats of the world and is delivering mid-high 30′s combined mpg (US converted).  It looks very promising that it’ll give us near hybrid mileage without the cost, complication and battery worries.

  • avatar

    Looks like a strong competitor to the Honda Fit.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Should we call it the Sonata junior?

  • avatar
    Roundel

    Its good for a brand to have some cohesion. The Koreans certainly know how to do this right with the direction of the Kia brand…. but all I see with Hyundai and its Sonata, Elantra and Accent is:
    A Sonata… left to dry on the line
    An Elantra: Sonata left to tumble dry a bit too long
    An Accent: Sonata left to tumble dry for a day.

    Now this may stem from the fact that I think the Sonata is a chunky messy design that screams “im fresh” from mountain tops, but ultimately is trying to hard.
    So in turn making your bread and butter sedans in all sizes look… exactly the same to scale is a risky move.
    I’m not a hater.. promise.

  • avatar
    stryker1

    I also wonder where this leaves the Elantra. Doesn’t the current model make around 140hp?
    Seeing all the leather and electronic gadgets in these pics, I can’t imagine they would be excluded from the accent’s big brother. So what becomes the difference besides size?

  • avatar
    Advance_92

    It would be interesting if the 1.6 remains tuned for 140hp in North America.

  • avatar
    jj99

    After reviewing all the pictures, I think this car looks better than any vehicle it competes with.  A lot better.  Hyundai stylists have been right on the mark. 

  • avatar
    Crosley

    It’s a good looking car, I actually prefer the styling of this car to offerings from Toyota and Honda.  Hyundai actually has a reliability rating ABOVE all the Big 3.
     
    IMO, the best approach for Hyundai would be to keep the price down rather than trying to sell a “premium” economy car.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      Agree.  That is where the market is.  Low low priced small cars.  If there was a market for high priced premium small cars, the Asian automakers would be all over them.  I find it hard to imagine how their analysts would miss this.  I think Detroit knows this, but can’t afford to build low low priced small cars, so they are throwing a hail mary by building high priced small cars.   I expect this will fail.

    • 0 avatar

      The car shown in the pictures in the Korean domestic version. I suspect that it will not make it to the US with all the features and options shown here.

    • 0 avatar
      Robbie

      Isn’t the relatively low price of second hand cars the problem with all inexpensive cars in this segment?

  • avatar
    Sammy Hagar

    It would be interesting to see the new versions of the Sonata, Elantra & Accent side-by-side and lined up in a row, just to compare styling and size. Looking at press photos of the Elantra & now the Accent, it seems like they are growing in size ala Honda & Toyota. But then again, who cares if they’re growing and can still get those sort of MPG numbers?

  • avatar
    Bytor

    Looks like another home run for Hyundai. If they use the 140HP GDI engine as the base here in North America it should be lead against the class competition (Yaris, Fit, Fiesta).
     
    And it would probably smoke a CR-Z while getting the same or better MPG for much less money.
     

  • avatar
    JMII

    As an ex-Honda fan I’d be all over this on LOOKS alone. Any chance of the 2.0T finding its way to this ride via some “sport” package? Wonder what a 3 door hatch version would look like.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    Ehrm, that is just a Ford (european last generation) Focus with a BMW rear-end isn’t it? It is nice to see that Ford has built up enough a decent enough reputation to be copied again by cheaper car makers.  As far as quality pricing and economy goes, I don’t care as long as Ford still build the best driver cars (next to a bunch of older Hondas) you can get among the FWD crowd.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Care to rethink that?

      These are the Hyundai HED-2 and HED-3 concepts from 2006.

      http://www.supercarnews.net/hyundai/picture/2006-hyundai-hed-2-genus-concept-scn-net-057-16657/

      http://www.supercarnews.net/hyundai/picture/2006-hyundai-hed-3-arnejs-concept-scn-net-6682-19643/

      Once could say that the shape of the headlights on the new Fiesta is eerily like those on the HED-2 concept.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Beautiful.
     
    The former Accent may be an ugly duckling, but TrueDelta’s limited data on the 07-09 models indicates that they are not terrible cars.

  • avatar
    cmoibenlepro

    Very nice

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    It’s really a bargain, the front half of a Ford, the rear half of a BMW, and the reliability and engaging driving experience of an older Toyota.
    edit: it’s more a Lexus rear than a BMW rear…

  • avatar
    william442

    When South Korea allows free trade with the US, I might look at their cars. The reporter at CNBC said this AM that we can sell one car in Korea for every six they sell here.

  • avatar
    SV

    Pretty impressive. I’m glad to see they changed the front end from the initial pictures we saw (I think they might have been Chinese-market models, I’m not sure).
    The interior looks good for the class, but I’m not a fan of the center stack of either this car or the new Elantra’s; they both remind me of a cheap late-90s jukebox. Overall it doesn’t have the flair (or materials quality – dash looks hard plastic) of the Fiesta, but the controls will likely be less cryptically European, and that’s important. I’ll be interested to see if the US Elantra gets the push-button start and in-dash nav seen in these pictures.
    IIRC the new Elantra is also supposed to get the GDI 1.6, so Hyundai might call the 1.4 good enough and just offer that in the Accent. If they do offer the 1.6, though, that’ll be great; hopefully it’ll make other subcompacts step up their game – the one thing I don’t like about my current favorite subcompact, the Fiesta, is its middling acceleration figures; a GDI conversion for an extra 10-20hp would fix that nicely.
    The wheelbase is surprisingly long for this class of car, which bodes well for rear seat room.
    It’s safe to say that Hyundai has a success on its hands here; even at a significantly higher price it has a lot to offer versus the competition. Personally, I prefer the hatchback bodystyle and likely superior driving dynamics of the Fiesta, but this new Accent probably has more mainstream appeal.

  • avatar
    jj99

    mcs, that is how the game works.  If you are a car company that is not offering the best products at a given price, blame the other country and get the government to protect your cars from the better product. 

  • avatar
    akitadog

    BUTTERFACE…Just like its big sister, the Sonata.
    Why can the lines in profile and in the rear look so good, but the front look so ugly/overwrought/Geiger-like?
    Kudos to Hyundai for finally having its own design language, but it can’t just be new, it needs to be attractive. That’s not the case here.

  • avatar
    don1967

    The mini-Sonata look translates better to the new Elantra, but still this is not a bad effort.  My only question is where’s the hatchback? Tiny sedans are just plain wrong IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      Bytor

      I agree. Hatchback needed and for the Elantra as well.  I don’t know why they don’t just have a liftback(like Scion TC), that looks like a trunk but is actually a hatch, it should cover the bases well.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The new Elantra will still likely get a wagon version (again, likely a rebadged Euro model), but the hatch role is supposed to be filled by the Veloster.

  • avatar
    MarcKyle64

    I prefer to drive a hatchback for the convenience of folding down the back seat and loading cargo.  My 2010 Accent meets my needs very well, but if Hyundai stops offering a hatch, I’m taking my business elsewhere in 2020!

  • avatar

    Between the new Accent and the upcoming Elantra, I can’t fathom why anyone would want the likes of a Daewoo Cruze. Better style (more accurately, the Hyundais HAVE style – the Snooze is desperately lacking in that regard) with more power and features… what’s not to like?

    And they’re all Korean cars. Really, who wants to drive a Korean car that was assembled by the UAW?

  • avatar
    mvlbr

    That’s a really nice car but I can only imagine that we will be getting a watered down version just to keep the price down.

  • avatar
    Almost Jake

    Initially, I was lovin the styling of the new Sonata, but my opinion quickly changed. The Accent has the same overdone, busy styling that the Sonata has and will look dated before its time.
    Just my two cents.
    Almost Jake

  • avatar
    Bimmer

    I wonder how much they will water it down for North America? Will we still get rear disk brakes, rear view camera, park distance control, folding mirrors, heated seats, climate control? Don’t really care about Start/Stop engine, keyless go and navigation.

  • avatar
    davealanbrown

    Why does the US get the ugly Accent?  The Bejing Auto Show premeired a really attractive front end on that Accent.  The US version looks like it has a bad facelift.  It’s stubby.  Also, it’s the front end shown for the Russian market.  Is that where the US rates today?  I thought about replacing my 2006 Sonata GLS with the new Accent.  It was good looking and promised good gas mileage.  But I want the pretty one! 

  • avatar
    Mike

    Didn’t read all of the comments on here, so not sure how many have read the most recent review of the 2012 Accent on this same site. I stumbled across this older review when I did a Google search on 2012 Accent reviews. Here is a link to the updated review. http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/06/review-2012-hyundai-accent-gls-sedan/#comment-1755497.

    We are in the market for a new compact car and we have been really impressed with the new Accent from what we have read. Up until now we have been looking at the Ford Fiesta, Honda Fit, Mazda M3, Toyota Corolla, and Kia Soul. We were finally able to find a GLS Sedan at our local dealership today and we weren’t disappointed. After test driving both the new Accent and Elantra today we have decided the Accent will be our next vehicle.


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