By on March 19, 2010

Black box data in New York and Japan shows that crashing Prius drivers had their feet on the wrong pedals and wrongly blamed their cars.

In Harrison, NY, the NHTSA declared that the cause of the Prius incident was driver error.Computer data from a Toyota Prius that crashed in suburban New York City show that at the time of the accident the throttle was open and the driver was not applying the brakes,” U.S. safety officials said to Associated Press.

NHTSA said information from the car’s computer systems indicates there was no application of the brakes and the throttle was fully open. The NHTSA “did not elaborate,” says AP, but the conclusions are clear: Someone’s foot was on the gas instead on the brakes.

The local Journal News learned that the disclosure did not please Harrison’s acting police chief Capt. Anthony Marraccini, who felt that the Feds are treading on his turf: “It’s disturbing to me that any information was released without the consultation of the Harrison Police Department,” Marraccini said. “We have done everything to protect the integrity of the investigation and Toyota.”

He said his probe was not over and driver error had not been established. He also complained that Toyota wouldn’t give him the tools to read the black box of the Prius.

“You can’t open it, you can’t read it, you can’t do anything with it,” Marraccini said, referring to the recorder.

Meanwhile in Japan, police of the Chiba prefecture, northeast of Tokyo, recommends that criminal charges are brought against a driver who claimed a brake failure had caused his Toyota Prius to crash into another car in the town of Matsudo. Two people aboard that car were slightly injured in the accident.

Again, data from the event recorder in the Prius showed that the brakes were working properly, Japanese police said today.

According to today’s Nikkei, “the accident in Matsudo led the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism to instruct Toyota to conduct checks on the Prius’ brake system. Later, Toyota announced a recall to address a glitch in the Prius’ antilock brake system, which causes a momentary lag in brake function when driving slowly on bumpy or slippery roads.”

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39 Comments on “The Empire Strikes Back: NHTSA Says Harrison Crash Was Driver Error, Japanese Police Recommends Charges Against Prius Driver...”


  • avatar
    Robert.Walter


    He said his probe was not over and driver error had not been established. He also complained that Toyota wouldn’t give him the tools to read the black box of the Prius.

    “You can’t open it, you can’t read it, you can’t do anything with it,” Marraccini said, referring to the recorder.

    Someone should tell him to get a court-order. In the past, Toyota has said that they make the data available if compelled to by court order.

    • 0 avatar

      I sounds like they gave him the data alright. They just wouldn’t leave him their proprietary laptop so that the cop could play with the data himself.

    • 0 avatar

      So let me get this straight:

      anyone who gets in a front end collisision with another car in theeir Toyota is going to claim “unintended acceleration”?

      THIS IS TOO AWESOME !

    • 0 avatar
      Angainor

      So Roscoe P. Coltrane up there in Harrison is ticked that the Feds came in and did their own investigation on an issue that’s taken on national importance? Sounds like he’s po’d that his big moment in the national spotlight’s been snuffed out before it ever began.

      What makes it so hard for you to accept that in a lot of these cases it’s the drivers fault and not some magical gremlin that has it our for Toyotas?

    • 0 avatar
      Patrickj

      Police in a wealthy small community such as Harrison will tend to act to protect an established citizen. Given the lack of criminal intent or injury to others, and assuming no hassle from the owner of the wall the woman hit, I suspect that Chief Marraccini would have been perfectly happy to bury the data in a desk drawer.

    • 0 avatar
      xyzzy

      @patrickj: The driver was a housekeeper, not an established citizen and probably not even a resident of the town.

  • avatar
    shaker

    The only good thing about this is that gradually, the average driver will be made aware that all cars have the ability to testify against their drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      That’s good? Certainly, a case can be made for tattle tale cars who rat out fraud. Conceptually, that sound fine. But in reality, this opens up a huge can of worms. How long will it be before your car downloads your driving habits to the state, or more likely (and far worse) your insurance company? I think Progressive offers this as a “cost saving” measure for pansy-foot drivers but it is an option. How long will it be before it is required or you are automatically in assigned risk? When you purchased your car, you bought the computer too. Why is that computer and data not yours, and yours alone? I can’t believe that the TTAC family isn’t outraged about this. My car, my computer, my data. People seem to be resigned to this without putting up a fight, yet there are states that don’t even require safety checks once a year. Something is totally wrong here…

      About the issue with the police…why be so trusting of what the police say? In college I saw a dorm-mate get arrested because a cop stepped on his foot in a bar and he uttered a-hole under his breath. He was arrested for this, yet in the local paper, he was arrested for “not bringing is drink inside the bar when politely asked by the police officer”….what a load of crap!!

    • 0 avatar
      crash sled

      “I think Progressive offers this as a “cost saving” measure for pansy-foot drivers but it is an option. How long will it be before it is required or you are automatically in assigned risk?”

      .

      .

      Well, since the government basically forces all of us to buy their version of auto insurance, and since the government will basically be forcing all of us us to buy their version of health insurance, in just a couple days here, I’d say the government will be forcing you to give up your auto black box data in about a week or so. They’ve just needed a big scare and scam like with Toyota, to get everybody worked up, then they could pull it off.

      Once government takes away freedom and liberty, it’s generally gone forever, or until the next revolution. Until then, it’s always a one-way ratchet, as History tells us.

      Now, if people choose to give their own data to Progressive, and get cheaper insurance rates, that’s all fine, and I could even be persuaded to do so myself. Ultimately, then, they’ll be charging us by the miles driven, risk environment driven within, speeds driven, etc. Cold blooded, but that’s how it’ll be.

    • 0 avatar
      HerrKaLeun

      Golden2Husky:

      this is not different than when my home furnace has a malfunction and explodes my house. The fire department will investigate it to determine if I screwed around with it. As soon as you are in an accident and hurt someone (or go on national TV accusing a company) your property may be evidence. Nothing wrong with that. the same way the black box in airplanes improved overall safety since it helped tracking down problems. those investigations are the reason why safety improved, because if you can’t find out why something happened, you can’t fix it.

      I’m still not sure if Toyota really has any fault. So far I haven’t heard of a real case of UA. Especially when people hit other cars this would mean the brakes failed too. No evidence of that. But it seems I can go out now buy a Toyota if i want to be speeding since no cop can arrest me since I always can blame UA :-)

      It’s like in the 1940′s after the Mars invasion radio show, all off sudden everyone claimed to have been abducted by aliens. Or in the 1980′s when every Audi driver claimed UA (until it was proven wrong).

      There may or may not be something tiny wrong with Toyota accelerators. And they sure didn’t handle the problem well. But the only evidence I’ve seen so far is that the majority of the population are stupid and shouldn’t operate a vehicle, and that the mainstream media is useless. But we knew all that before.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      I should point out that, in holistic terms, Canada has better health care than the US, and Canadian provinces that offer public auto insurance offer more equitable rates, better service and less trouble getting claims paid out than those where coverage is through insurance companies.

      Personally, if I’m going to be forced to buy insurance, I’d rather it be single-payer and administered by someone who isn’t out to screw me over for a percentage.

    • 0 avatar
      crash sled

      “Personally, if I’m going to be forced to buy insurance, I’d rather it be single-payer and administered by someone who isn’t out to screw me over for a percentage.”

      .

      .

      How about we don’t force people to buy insurance, and avoid the screwing issue altogether?

      Single payer socialized medicine has its disadvantages as well, by the way. Get cancer in Canada or the UK, for example, and your 5-year survival rate is lower than here in the US, because they ration care, and that means people die who’d still be living if they were fortunate enough to live here in the US. Even a Medicaid patient here, somebody who never contributes a single dollar to our economy or tax base, has better care than the average Canadian/UK’er, who has to queue up for a simple MRI. The US Medicaid patient can probably schedule an MRI this morning, if they need one, and absolutely free of charge. In the socialized medicine joints? Take a number, sucker.

    • 0 avatar
      CamaroKid

      Mr Sled,

      If you want to see what its like to “lose your liberty” try driving around in a place were 70% of the drivers are uninsured… What happens to your liberty when one of these “free” people crash into you a put you and your family into the hospital? Who do you go after to try and recover your lost wages, your bills, etc?

      I hate insurance as much of the next guy, but driving around in a country that DIDN’T mandate at lease some level of basic coverage would NOT increase ANYONE’S liberty.

      And your Fox news info on 5 year Cancer survival rates is just plain wrong too. The best countries for 5 year cancer survival are France and Japan, and both of those have government run health-care. As for US vs Canada.. The Fox News talking points are a little skewed they are comparing ALL of Canada versus Americans with coverage. If you add in the 40 million or so Americans who lack any sort of coverage, Canada and England score higher.. much higher.

      So ya, if you can pay for it American health care is some of the best in the world… if you can’t… you die. Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness… I guess 1 out of 3 ain’t too bad.

    • 0 avatar
      OM617

      “Get cancer in Canada or the UK, for example, and your 5-year survival rate is lower than here in the US, because they ration care, and that means people die who’d still be living if they were fortunate enough to live here in the US.”

      - you think the U.S. system doesn’t ration care? Of course it does, that’s how the companies make a profit!

      I am Canadian, and you seem very misinformed about our system. Most legitimate international analyses place our system above yours and we spend roughly HALF as much as you per capita on medical costs. Also your country’s infant mortality rate and life expectancy measures are worse than Cuba’s. Every system has its problems, but your suggestion that we are all waiting in line anytime there is a problem is out to lunch. Also enough with the fear mongering “socialized, socialist” stuff.

    • 0 avatar
      crash sled

      If you want to see what its like to “lose your liberty” try driving around in a place were 70% of the drivers are uninsured… What happens to your liberty when one of these “free” people crash into you a put you and your family into the hospital? Who do you go after to try and recover your lost wages, your bills, etc?”

      .

      Camaro, if you’re worried that one of the “free” people might crash into you, and put you and your family in the hospital, causing lost wages and bills, then I suggest you buy some insurance to cover that, like the rest of us. I don’t need the government to force me to make that obvious choice, do you? Hard to understand what exactly is your point here. Government controls take away liberty… always.

      As for the health care rant, the 5 year cancer survival rates are quite well known, and published, and are not the domain of Fox News or any other media outlet. That data might not jive with your preconceived notions, but they demonstrate that even Medicaid patients here get better care than the average person in Canada/UK. And Medicaid patients do have “coverage”, by the way. That’s another false meme that this whole health care debate has dispelled.

      Queue up for your MRI in Canada/UK, and then get back with me on levels of coverage and death rates. Our Medicaid patients drive down the block, and this morning, if they want an MRI (they don’t walk, they have cars, and are too fat to walk anyways).

    • 0 avatar
      crash sled

      “I am Canadian, and you seem very misinformed about our system. Most legitimate international analyses place our system above yours and we spend roughly HALF as much as you per capita on medical costs. Also your country’s infant mortality rate and life expectancy measures are worse than Cuba’s. Every system has its problems, but your suggestion that we are all waiting in line anytime there is a problem is out lunch. Also enough with the fear mongering “socialized, socialist” stuff.”

      Actually, OM6, I’m Canadian as well as American, and 95% of my relatives live in Canada and are Canadian. I know all the horror stories about socialized medicine in Canada, directly, from those who experience those horrors. I can give you the list of pain and suffering they’ve experienced, if you’d like, suffering they’d avoid if they were lucky enough to live here.

      As for infant mortality, the US calls every infant that arrives and dies a mortality, and spends mightily to keep them alive no matter what, unlike the socialized medicine joints, who allow them to die, and don’t count them in their mortality statistics.

      Queue up for your MRI, and get back with me. I’m deciding whether I want to go over to the clinic to the North a couple blocks, it’s got great parking, but the one to the South a mile or so away has nice art on the walls that they change out regularly, and it’s interesting to check it out. I can get into either with a phone call. The Medicaid patients might not check out the art, but they get the same care, which is better than the average Canadian.

    • 0 avatar
      Angainor

      “I am Canadian, and you seem very misinformed about our system. Most legitimate international analyses place our system above yours and we spend roughly HALF as much as you per capita on medical costs. Also your country’s infant mortality rate and life expectancy measures are worse than Cuba’s. Every system has its problems, but your suggestion that we are all waiting in line anytime there is a problem is out lunch. Also enough with the fear mongering “socialized, socialist” stuff.”

      Canada spends half as much because the system gives less then half the care. Good luck getting that MRI when you need it.

      The US’s infant mortality rate is worse only because in the US we count EVERY baby born alive no matter how premature. In Cuba and Canada if the baby is 4 weeks early and dies then it’s not counted as a live birth at all.

      But good luck with your awesome system. Hopefully it won’t metastasize while your waiting how ever many months you have to wait to see a doctor. And good luck in your old age. Hopefully you won’t get so sick that the government bureaucrat at the hospital won’t decide it’s just not worth it to spend the geovernment’s money to get you better. I’m sure they’ll give you the best Tylenol money can buy to help ease your pain until you die.

    • 0 avatar
      CamaroKid

      Mr Sled…

      So now you are arguing against yourself…
      I have to buy insurance to protect my freedom… WTF…

      So you are saying that me having insurance makes me more free… and yet when the government says I should buy insurance (as you point out to protect my freedom) that makes me less free….

      And you are missing the KEY point on the 5 year survival rate… Notice how they DON’T tell you about death from Cancer? The 5 year survival rate MEANS that you have seen a doctor, recieved treatment and are recovering… NOTE that if YOU DON’T HAVE HEALTH INSURANCE you are not part of these stats… mostly ’cause you are DEAD.

      Whisky Tango Foxtrot!

    • 0 avatar
      crash sled

      “So now you are arguing against yourself…
      I have to buy insurance to protect my freedom… WTF…”

      .

      No, I don’t think you should be forced to buy anything. You’ve argued that you’re concerned about paying for the costs of an accident. You have the freedom of insuring yourself against that, if you choose to do so.

      Unfortunately, you’re also arguing that you want to force OTHERS to do something. In other words, you’re advocating stealing liberty. They’re not stealing yours, why are you stealing theirs? Just do your thing, and be done with it.

      .

      .

      “And you are missing the KEY point on the 5 year survival rate… Notice how they DON’T tell you about death from Cancer? The 5 year survival rate MEANS that you have seen a doctor, recieved treatment and are recovering… NOTE that if YOU DON’T HAVE HEALTH INSURANCE you are not part of these stats… mostly ’cause you are DEAD.”

      No, the 5-year survival rates are ACROSS THE BOARD. If you’re INDIGENT in the US, and on Medicaid, you get care… better care than in Canada and the UK. Get cancer there, and in many cases, your chances for survival are HALF of those in the US. Not to mention, you don’t have to queue up for a simple MRI.

      Look, there’s no getting around it, the US medical system is FAR superior than the socialized medicine joints, and that’s why my luckier Canadian relatives finangle their way to treatments here, rather than the inferior model there.

      The US system costs more, too, and that is the PRIME concern of all of us, which of course the government is typically ignoring, as they seek to do what you seem to be advocating with auto insurance, mandating it, using some bureaucratic template. Stealing liberty, in other words.

      We have a cost problem. We have a portability and problem. We have an inferior market that doesn’t cross and sell as easily as the Progressive insurance model mentioned above. But the system provides superior care, and the numbers prove this.

    • 0 avatar
      tced2

      Purchasing “uninsured motorists” insurance is in effect buying insurance for someone else. How equitable. I get to pay for insurance for someone else. The one redeeming thing is that it only pays benefits to me – the uninsured person will not be compensated.

    • 0 avatar
      littlehulkster

      Is it possible for us to talk about cars for even 10 minutes before the conversation turns to “HU$$IEN OSAMA STEALING MY MONEY RON PAUL 2012 DIE PINKOS DIE!”, because this isn’t thetruthaboutpolitics.com. There are lots of other places you can discuss these things.

  • avatar
    rhino26

    Oh wow they can finally use the information of the blacks boxes.I think that they should have to give up how they look up the information to and independent investigator. This way they can look at all black boxes of vechiles involved in this investigation. I think this is the only way that they can completely get to the bottom of this. bc right now it just looks like that they will only use the black box information when they can pin it on the driver. If they can use the two from the prius they should have to show the data from the rest as well. With only releaseing certain black bloxes it looks like a cover up.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      I agree. If nothing else comes out of this fiasco, people who buy Toyotas, or any other car, should have the right to access the information in the black box that comes in the cars they paid for.

    • 0 avatar
      tced2

      And if there are going to be legal proceedings out of black box readings, the owner of the car is entitled to know that the recordings (used as “evidence”) are meaningful, calibrated, and reliable. Right now there is no standard for the readings, how frequently they are taken, how long they are kept. For example, it is unclear to me that the readings are not kept with real time – making recreation in time difficult – the readings are just taken at periodic intervals – and the memory only has enough space for a specific number of events.

  • avatar
    Mr Carpenter

    Most OBD II cars (i.e. virtually all new cars) have the facility to save information, and this information is actually considered something which – legally speaking – the police must get a search warrant for in order to access and “read” with specialty equipment. Same thing will apply for “in depth” computer information.

    We had this idjit driver who decided he “just had to” go 72 mph in a 45 zone, accelerating HARD away from a stop light in town near our malls. Four teen girls were at the mall for lunch, and being young and new drivers, they pulled out left across traffic, and bingo the deadly clown in his big SUV and slammed into their small car, killing 3 of the 4 girls instantly. This was a few years ago.

    The DA obtained a search warrant (which is why we know he maxed out at 72 mph) and the court system did its job with a jury trial, and the man was put away so he couldn’t harm anyone else for a few years. I consider that justice (and even light justice, since he did snuff out 3 lives with his selfish foolishness).

    He just got out and it was on the news the other day that he was “popped” by the local fuzz for going 5 over (in other words, they were looking for an excuse to put his @ss back in jail, since the typical driver in this area drives 10-15 over most of the time).
    Of coure, that was wrong. But it’s how our world works, isn’t it?

  • avatar
    CamaroKid

    Mr Sled,

    If you want to see what its like to “lose your liberty” try driving around in a place were 70% of the drivers are uninsured… What happens to your liberty when one of these “free” people crash into you a put you and your family into the hospital? Who do you go after to try and recover your lost wages, your bills, etc?

    I hate insurance as much of the next guy, but driving around in a country that DIDN’T mandate at lease some level of basic coverage would NOT increase ANYONE’S liberty.

  • avatar

    Excuse me. Hello. Hellllllllllloooooo!

    This is a story about the Prius. You know, the Toyota. The killer car.

    Why does the discussion about every second story degenerate into a pissing match about health insurance?

    In the 27 years I lived in the U.S., I never could fathom how a country could get so worked up about something trivial as health insurance.

    The longer I follow this, the more I believe that this Toyota thing has been spun to distract from the health insurance debate. And as we can see, the ploy doesn’t work.

    • 0 avatar
      crash sled

      Excuse me. Hello. Hellllllllllloooooo!

      This is a story about the Prius. You know, the Toyota. The killer car.

      Why does the discussion about every second story degenerate into a pissing match about health insurance?

      In the 27 years I lived in the U.S., I never could fathom how a country could get so worked up about something trivial as health insurance.

      The longer I follow this, the more I believe that this Toyota thing has been spun to distract from the health insurance debate. And as we can see, the ploy doesn’t work.”

      .

      Oh hush up, Bertel. You’re so cold and calloused you’re not even concerned about those gentle Afghanian poppies, who are only trying to survive in this cruel world. ;-)

    • 0 avatar
      CamaroKid

      The Prius SUA numbers are statistically mid pack… No one is arguing that… There are literally DOZENS of cars with Higher SUA numbers then the Prius… including the Town Car, some Volvos and Jeeps.

      The “killer car” seems to tbe the ES350

  • avatar
    pungojohnny

    I’m sure that we will continue to see this “blame the driver” tactic “moving forward”. No real analyst would ever assume that all of these events were caused by the vehicle but the fact remains that 52 people are dead and many more have been injured. The fact remains that thousands of these events were reported long before the recent publicity. The fact remains that Toyota has been stonewalling for years and continues to avoid recalls on many models that are reporting the same problems. Publicizing a few frauds and idiots doesn’t change the facts.

    Toyota. Moving Forward. Whether the driver wants to or not.

    • 0 avatar

      52 people are dead? Show us the death certificates.

      Maybe, 52 deaths were entered into https://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/ivoq/Complaint.cfm where it says “Were there any deaths or injuries?” and if you click “Yes” you can type a number in the box.

      You want 500 dead? No problem, I can do that in a few minutes.

  • avatar
    Mr Carpenter

    One of the differences between Audi and Toyota, is that Toyota has the will – AND the money – to fight back against this and now it is becoming certain that the company is going to do just that.

    Yes, Bertel, it very well could be a distraction to help fill the “news” channels with “stuff” – but I also believe that the whole think stinks like a fish sitting on a countertop for a week.

    I’m dead certain (sorry for the pun) that it’s a witch hunt against Toyota because the District of Control owns part of / fully controls 2 of 3 “American” automakers.

    BTW, I tried to look at a Ford Fusion AWD (only available in AWD) because I’d already sworn off GM and Chrysler products more than a decade ago – but I also wanted to buy a car which was efficient as well as all wheel drive, AND was made in America. (Fusion is Mexican built – last I checked, not “yet” an American state).

    I’m not really an SUV person but had essentially given up hope on finding a car, was going to “settle” for a Santa Fe SUV – then I realized the new Subaru Legacy CVT had come out and went online to check it out literally the night before I was going to go replace my Prius in mid-December. (Here in Michigan, they simply stopped plowing the roads for 3 days making the car undrivable – can’t drive a Prius in 18″ of slush/mush, barely could drive our Sonata).

    Long story short, I got the Legacy. Manufactured in Lafayette, Indiana. I’m grateful that Toyota part own Fuji Heavy Industries (Subaru) now instead of GM, though the car has one feature “carried over” from GM part-ownership which I loathe; the damned high-beams are on 1/2 intensity at all times when the car is in “drive”. I hate that on other cars (and mostly SUVs and trucks) on the road, and the other idjit company that does it is VW.

    I found a “fix” – I just turn the headlamps on and low beam (and tail lights) go on. When I shut the car off, the lights go out.

  • avatar
    Mervich

    Me thinks Crash Sled is also a “Tea Party” Republican. Sorry Crash, you have no knowledge of what you’re talking about and you’re arguments are based on skewed and contrived information.

  • avatar
    SkiD666

    While I don’t doubt that the vast majority of SUA events are driver caused.
    I have to wonder, if there is an electronic issue with the vehicle that is the ‘real cause’ of the problem, can you trust the information that the sensors are sending to be stored in the computer? Maybe the problem is that the sensors are sending the wrong information to begin with.

  • avatar
    rhino26

    I had a ua event on the highway. I have a 2001 honda accord and i was driving down i95 on my way back to work. i was trying to set my cruise control and it would not set. I turned it on and then off. Then i turned it on and set it then hit decel an accel and nothing would happen. I hit the cancel button and then the set button nothing happend it just kept slowing down. after it droped about 15 mph finally i gave up and said forget it and hit the gas pedal. when i did the cruise kicked in and the gas pedal went further down and for a sec the car just went. That was my fault and i admit it. I guess i did not give the computer time to compute or there was just some lag either way those one or two secounds when the car was taking off was a little frightening to say the least. I still knew where the brake was an used it. It did not last long enough to shift into neurtral but if it had that was the next step.

  • avatar
    CarPerson

    This could get very interesting very quickly…

    If the car owner has a lot of money and is determined to prove it was not the housekeeper, that car is going to get torn down to every bolt, nut, and washer.

    Rich people aren’t like you and me.

  • avatar
    pungojohnny

    Bertel, good point about the 52 deaths. I went back and read the specific articles where that was reported, and yes they are saying that certain deaths were “attributed” to Toyota unintended acceleration by individuals posting complaints on NHSTA’s website.

    I’m very disappointed in Toyota’s responses to this issue and I find their efforts to blame the driver offensive because in January my beloved Toyota 4Runner went into high speed acceleration on its own, so I know that it happens. I also know that there are hundreds of complaints by other 4Runner owners of the same issue, but not a single 4Runner has been recalled to date. I’ve since gotten rid of the vehicle and will never own another Toyota. I continue to monitor the issue because I believe that Toyotas will continue to have these events until they fully admit the scope of the problem and find and implement the necessary solutions. In the meantime I fully expect that there will be more accidents, more injuries and more deaths while a great car company dithers over its own corporate culture.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      Well, I’ve searched the web for the last half-hour, and can find only isolated reports of 4 Runners taking off by themselves. And they all seem to be people driving into garages just as the A/C cycles on, raising the idle speed enough to overcome the light brake application usual in such instances.

      Hundreds of reports? Perhaps you could enlighten me as to where these are located? Thanks.

      Since you are one of the few readers of TTAC who claim to have experienced this unintended acceleration of a Toyota at high speed, perhaps you could tell us what happened and how you dealt with the situation. I realize you have gotten rid of the vehicle, and were obviously upset enough to do so.

      You “know” it happens. Let us in on the details, please. I would find it fascinating to hear about it from a car guy’s perspective.


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