By on April 10, 2018

Image: General Motors

Getting quite a jump on next year’s reveal, General Motors released a teaser of the upcoming 2020 Chevrolet Silverado HD on Tuesday. The heavy duty pickup slots between the revamped  1500 model unveiled in Detroit in January and the new medium-duty 4500/5500/6500HD trucks shown at March’s Work Truck Show in Indianapolis.

Those latter heavy haulers now share the Silverado name, bringing all of Chevrolet’s full-size-and-up trucks into the Silverado fold.

With the 2020 Silverado HD, the family will be complete. Prototypes hit the road soon, GM claims, but it’ll be a while before we get a full view of these new HD trucks.

The big reveal comes next year, the automaker states, though it’s likely we’ll see Chevy follow the same sort of timetable taken by the 2019 Silverado 1500. Sneak peak in December, then a splashy unveiling in Detroit in January. Sales to follow by summer.

From the teaser photo provided, it’s obvious a radical streamlining campaign has not taken hold at GM’s design offices. The hoodline of this Z71 off-road model appears as flat and imposing as the prow of a Dreadnought-class battleship. The air-sucking hood scoop remains to feed the Duramax diesel V8 underneath.

Chevrolet hasn’t ditched its chrome suppliers, either. A horizontal crossbar spits the grille higher up than before and, in doing so, rekindles memories of the previous-generation Colorado. Unlike the HD’s smaller 1500 sibling, the driving lamps aren’t positioned in the stratosphere. Drivers sometimes need to see nocturnal animals in their own county.

GM doesn’t have much to say about the next-gen HD, only mentioning the “increased durability and validation standards, and the bolder, larger proportions” of the new truck. We have to wonder if the launch will bring a new salvo in the ongoing heavy duty torque war. Currently, the 6.6-liter Duramax V8’s 910 lb-ft trails Ford’s 935 lb-ft.

If you’re wondering where the GMC Sierra HD teaser is, well, it doesn’t exist yet.

[Image: General Motors]

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25 Comments on “2020 Chevrolet Silverado HD Completes the Truck Trifecta...”


  • avatar
    jack4x

    Diesel engines may get the splashy headlines and outrageous torque but for the majority, even of HD owners, a gas engine will tow and haul everything needed at a much lower running cost. I hope GM finally puts some effort into theirs, the 6.0 has now carried on unchanged through 2 generations of Ford 6.2, the Ram 6.4, and the imminent appearance of the Ford 7X. I’d love to see an all new big block engine, come on GM we know you know how to build one.

    • 0 avatar
      IBx1

      A diesel will get 20mpg while towing what a gas engine struggles to hit double-digits hooked up to.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        What diesel gets 20 mpg towing? Even downhill?

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          Objective comparison tests show modern HD diesels struggling to reach 20 mpg empty, let alone pulling a load.

          Even if it were true though, diesel fuel is more expensive, maintenance is several multiples of a gasser’s, payload is lower, and of course the diesel itself is close to $10k up front. You’ll get some of that back at resale, but modern emissions equipped diesels are a riskier bet long term than a gas engine or earlier diesel.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Your mileage will vary, but the wives tales persist, and probably helps sell a lot of diesel engines.

            “TFLT” (youtube) got the 6.6 Duramax down to 2.8 mpg, but that’s the extreme side (not bad for what it is), full throttle, 7% hill, 20K+ lbs behind the truck (dually 3500 crew, 4X4, etc).

          • 0 avatar
            cdotson

            +1, modern diesels’ complicated emissions both strangle the emissions and performance plus negate long-term reliability advantages. With diesels being so heavy these days opting for that engine even kills payload ratings to the point you can’t safely tow the over-inflated GCWRs due to lack of sufficient payload for pin weight.

            I’m with you on the time being ripe for a return of the big block gasser. GM should evive the 8100. FCA should put out at least a 7L Hemi.

            The only advantage diesel still carries is for people who absolutely refuse to let their gas engines sing in the power band while towing uphill. There seem to be entirely too many of these people for no good reason. The other day two of my kids slept as my 4.7L Ram pulled almost 4k rpm in 3rd at WOT down I-95 at 70mph travel trailer in tow.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            My limited experience with the ~2016 Ford 6.7L diesel F350 has been well under 20mpg unladen. The sucker kicks like a mule once that torque wave hits, but it seems to inhale fuel at nearly the rate of the late-2000s 8.1L Vortec and Ford’s own 6.2L gasser I also occasionally use.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            HD truck buyers seem to *hate* reving their engine over 3.5k and unfortunately all the current gassers need moderate RPMs to make power because at-heart they are all “truck” versions of muscle/sporty car engines.

            The solution, as others have pointed out, is to build a new (possibly turbo) big block or V10 that’s engineered to never see the north side of 4000.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            I think the return to the medium duty market bodes well. Ford has kept their V10 alive for that market and is bringing out the 7X to replace it (hopefully also as an option in F250/350!). The last time GM sold medium duty trucks, the only gas option was the 8.1. The 6.0 isn’t going to cut it in that application, so unless they are going diesel only, I think a new gas engine is a must. If they are smart they would allow that engine to trickle down into the consumer grade pickups as well.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            With all this talk about the superiority of gas engines I’d fully expect they would be popular in true HD trim. If they can perform better AND at a lower cpm at 25k gcvwr the same will hold true at 80k+. Just sayin.

            Difference in payload is negligent in context of actual tow ratings. If you really need the extra 500 pounds of actual payload, IE in the bed payload, you should be looking at a MD platform anyhow. A diesel pickup has enough payload to tow a house.

            RE towing at WOT at 4k rpm in anything. No doubt modern engines are capable of doing so in moderation. Do that day in and day out at max gcvw and you’ll be doing well to see 6 figures on the odometer. I’ve seen this first hand in f550 gasser service rigs running right at gvw on the daily.

            And really, who buys a HD truck in any trim and worries about unladen fuel mileage? Really?

            It seems as though many of the views here are indeed biased due to general usage of members that frequent here. I agree a gasser is a better option for most. Not necessarily the case for everyone. There is an undeniable advantage when used for their intended purposes.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Fewer than 50% of all new pickup trucks ever see anything approaching gross vehicle loads with their first or second owner. Fewer than 20% are used for commercial purposes in any way; that includes farming and construction which are the jobs for which they were originally designed. These modern Road Whales™ with crew cabs are simply not working trucks in most cases–they’ve replaced the true full-sized sedans like the big Panthers and whatever GM’s body type was called.

            Yes, as a commercial truck the diesel engine is certainly practical. But for the roughly 70-80 percent that are NOT used commercially, the diesel is a waste of time and money; diesel fuel price with, if not above, premium gasoline now. The people claiming the gasser is better want the quick acceleration and high-revving engines in order to show off–especially now that “rolling coal” is illegal and a pullover/impounding offense in many states.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            Vulpine, please post a source for your statistics. I’ll be eagerly awaiting.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I have to admit I can’t find the data at this time. However, I have seen reports on multiple automotive sites that enumerate how pickups are used by their owners and the vast majority have them almost strictly as family cars and/or status symbols. This is clearly demonstrated by the fact that their luxury level has skyrocketed, along with their prices. No longer are they working vehicles with just a few comforts; they’re luxury vehicles that might (just might) occasionally tow or haul a load. A proper listing of registrations in any state will reveal how many are purchased for work vs how many are purchased for pleasure.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Who would “published reports” on something so ambiguous? Except around 40% of pickup sales are fleet orders. More so for HD, less so for midsize.

            Too many pickups wear all kinds of hats, blurring the line between “work truck”, family truckster, and or weekend play.

            With 2nd or 3rd owners it likely shifts to more “work” orientated. But luxury high-end pickups are bought up by business owners having to spend all day in their trucks, (office on wheels) and they want the absolute best, and sure don’t want to pick up clients at the airport in sticky vinyl interiors.

            Hot Shotters, rodeo circuit, ranchers and the like, get the $80K (sticker) pickups for max “resale” with “high freeway miles”, after driving the balls off of them in a short timeframe.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          4 cylinder ones….

          The Colorado for sure, but even the medium duty ones can get, at least, awfully close as long as speeds aren’t excessive.

    • 0 avatar
      IBx1

      To clarify; rip off the unreliable emissions equipment and get a clean tune and you’ll see decades of efficient service.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Most won’t go the expensive and or illegal delete/tune/straight-pipe route, but they shouldn’t “need” to go there.

        The “lubricity” of diesel fuel is what gave diesels their longevity, coating the cylinders, injectors, fuel pump, etc.

        Except the lubricity (cetane) is mostly taken out of diesel fuel now. There’s expensive additives that help, but again, you shouldn’t have to go there.

        • 0 avatar
          mason

          It’s not the fuel itself that’s the problem, at least not in anything with modern technology. The problem, at least at the consumer level is the oems lack of dedication to proper fuel filtration. The US has some of the lowest standards in the developed world regarding transportation and storage of fuel. A real problem given the ever increasing injection pressures and tight tolerances in modern HPCR systems.
          Ram finally got the filtration game right in their pickups in 13, a real f/w separator on the frame and a 2 mic final in the engine bay. I’ve seen several examples of these trucks with over 350k on original injectors/cp3. Given the multiple injection events compared to the old single event injectors that’s an accomplishment.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Cetane is not lubricity. Wow!

        • 0 avatar
          cdotson

          Cetane has nothing to do with fuel lubricity; cetane is a rating of the fuel’s ignition delay post injection per a standard.

          Lubricity was stripped out of diesel with the ULSD requirements. It was the sulfurous compounds that were either directly responsible for lubricity or bonded to the lubricating compounds. When the sulfur had to come out of the fuel much of its lubrication qualities came out as well. The sulfur had to go both to satisfy the low-SOx emissions requirements and to play nice with all the exhaust after-treatment equipment.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Bolder larger proportions? The DLO is already just a pimple on top of a wonky 10-foot tall front end. Can’t wait to see another generation of GM trucks where the front bumper scrapes the pavement but the frame is knee-high.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      Couldn’t agree with you more. The 2019 Silverado 1500 already resembles a caricature of the current overgrown trucks, which themselves are a caricature of good truck design. The HD will be even worse.

      And also yes, these chin spoilers that are 4″ off the ground are pathetic. I’ll give up 1 mpg to be able to park my truck against a particularly tall curb.

  • avatar
    Polishdon

    And for the drivers with bad eyesight, you will still be able to identify the truck that rear-ends you….

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    GM truck styling has kept me out of their showrooms for the last 15 years. Glimpses of this new HD Chevy promises to keep the streak alive. I’m hoping that the new GMC will be better.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    As SNL’s “Black Jeopardy” puts it… “Aw HELL no!”

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