By on February 6, 2019

2019 is quickly turning into The Year of the HD Truck. FCA debuted its all-new 2019 Ram Heavy Duty at last month’s North American International Auto Show; Ford teased its refreshed 2020 SuperDuty in the early hours of Tuesday morning. Not to be outdone, Chevrolet debuted its all new 2020 Silverado HD at the Flint Assembly plant yesterday morning. This is the third all-new Silverado to debut in 18 months, and one that aims to be King of Truck Mountain.

Chevy says the 2020 Silverado HD is the most capable Silverado HD ever. But if it wasn’t, why would they even bother?

Some of the highlights of the new model include a comprehensive towing technology suite, two new powertrains, a new Allison transmission, a larger cab, and a stronger, all new frame.

Let’s start with the new exterior. The 2020 Silverado HD is longer, wider, and taller than the current Silverado HD, and features the most differentiation from the light duty Silverado in the model’s history. The roof is the only piece of sheet metal shared between the two trucks. Every other piece is HD exclusive. Crew cab Silverado HDs gain over five inches in wheelbase and 10 inches in total length. That puts it at just under 25 feet long, or only two inches shorter than 1974-1976 Cadillac Fleetwood 75. This is GM’s land yacht, but with significantly more aggressive styling.

Chevrolet says the next-gen Silverado HD has a “chiseled, modern design conveyed in five distinctive personalities.” This chiseled, modern design has proven polarizing at best. No one at TTAC has warmed up to the design yet. As for those five distinctive personalities, those would be the trim levels. Work Truck, LT, LTZ, and High Country all carry over from the old truck to the new one. The fifth trim is called Custom, and offers body trim details and standard 20 inch wheels. It is only available on the 2500HD.

Some of the biggest changes to the new Silverado HD lie beneath the hood. The venerable 6.0-liter gasoline V8 is gone, replaced by an all-new 6.6-liter V8. This direct injection engine makes 401 horsepower and 464 lb-ft of torque. That’s an 11 percent increase in horsepower and a 22 percent increase in torque. The new engine pairs with GM’s tried and true 6L90 transmission. This results in an 18 percent increase in towing capacity.

The returning Duramax 6.6-liter turbo-diesel V8, which churns out 445 horsepower and 910 lb-ft of torque, now mates to a 10-speed Allison transmission. This tranny is unique to GM’s HD trucks and not related to the 10-speed unit found in the light duty trucks. In addition to the new transmission, every component between the transmission and the wheels has been upgraded. This results in a 52-percent increase in max towing capability. The regular cab, two-wheel drive, dual rear wheel diesel Silverado HD is now capable of towing 4,400 house cats, or 35,500 pounds.

 

While the new HD boasts impressive towing specs, Chevy didn’t just focus on the numbers. Engineers also focused on the quality of the drive. According to Chevrolet, over 90 percent of HD truck owners tow some sort of trailer, 30 percent use their truck for pay, while the other 70 percent use it for play. Therefore, they had to create solutions to make the task of towing less stressful and more efficient. The new Silverado features an impressive towing technology suite that features multiple camera angles, a camera system that makes a trailer appear transparent, and smart trailer applications to check everything from trailer tire temperature to water tank levels.

In total, the 2020 Silverado HD offers up to 15 unique camera views, including HD Surround Vision, Bed View, an industry-first transparent trailer view, and an accessory camera. The transparent trailer view helps with visibility through the trailer. This helps while merging on the freeway and navigating parking lots or campgrounds

Another feature under development is a smart trailer integration system. The system is designed to integrate with — and be accessed through — the myChevrolet mobile app, either on compatible smartphones, or on the vehicle’s infotainment system. This system allows owners to monitor and control a range of smart systems, such as water tank levels, HVAC controls, and even power slide-outs in recreational trailers equipped with the technology. Someone towing a compatible trailer with a Silverado HD could turn on the trailer water heater before getting to a campsite.

Rounding out the new trailer towing suite is the in-vehicle Trailering App. This app is complete with trailer light test, trailer electrical diagnostics, trailer tire pressure and temperature monitoring, maintenance reminders, and pre-departure checklist. Many of the in-vehicle Trailering App’s functions, including trailer profile creation and trailer light test, are also available with the myChevrolet mobile app. Not only can a Silverado HD owner monitor the pressure of each tire on their truck and trailer, they can also monitor the temperature without ever having to leave the truck.

The 2020 Chevrolet Silverado HD is the latest product in General Motors’ truck and utility onslaught, and a key profit center. Because of its importance, Chevrolet reached out to numerous owners and built what they consider to be the best HD truck ever. The key words heard throughout the presentation were durability, capability, and useability. While the powertrain doesn’t break  the 1,000 lb-ft barrier, Chevrolet is of the opinion that it’s not how big your torque number is, but how you use it. The brand is confident its truck will tow better and prove more durable than its competition. Only time will tell.

The 2020 Chevrolet Silverado calls GM’s Flint Assembly Plant home and goes on sale this summer. Pricing will be announced closer to the on-sale date.

[Images: Adam Tonge/TTAC]

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68 Comments on “2020 Chevrolet Silverado HD – Longer, Taller, Grille-ier, and There’s a New V8, Too...”


  • avatar
    1500cc

    Why the pic of the light duty truck up top in an article about the HDs?

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    What’s the trim level of the grey-green one? It’s ugly, but not as horrifically ugly as the red one.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Are they handing out free emesis bags for everyone who has to meet one of these things on the road?

  • avatar
    ajla

    I get a new 400ci and a new 445ci pushrod V8? This has been a delightful week.

    Life is pretty good in HD land when the Ford 6.2 is the lowest powered offering.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      It is the only part of the market when displacement is increasing. Wild times in HD land.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        The absence fuel economy regulations on HD trucks means that they will make up an ever larger part of the market. Fuel is cheap. Maintaining and repairing compliance drivetrains and aluminum bodies is expensive. Wouldn’t you really rather have a 400 ci V8 and a transmission that will never wear on your commute? Who will make the first HD with air suspension?

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          Ram has had optional rear air suspension since 2014.

        • 0 avatar
          EquipmentJunkie

          My company has a Ram 2500 with air suspension for towing our 26-ft. flatbed trailer. That air suspension is AWESOME! Wouldn’t order the next truck without it.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          The two big problems with daily driving HD trucks are the unladen ride quality (I haven’t tried an air suspension Ram but the other ones I have been in were extremely stiff) and the massive length. A SWB F-250 *supercab* is 238 inches long. A full-on MacDaddy ’75 Fleetwood Brougham was only 233 inches long

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            My experience is the GM trucks ride the best because of the IFS. Of course “real truck guys” complain about them for that very reason. Taking 10-20 psi out of the tires helps too.

            As for the length, I got used to parking my CCLB (length: 266″) pretty quickly. Most suburban or rural areas are pretty accommodating to larger vehicles and once you learn to back in, it’s really not too bad. I wouldn’t be excited to street park in a city though.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    What is the chain drive inside the transmission? Is that a PTO?

  • avatar
    kkop

    No word on the interior?

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      GM only provided a few photos on their media site for the interior. They also barely touched on it in the presentation. Getting an interior shot at these press events is hard because of the number of people in the vehicles in addition to the lighting.

      It is EXTREMELY similar to the light duty version. Expect a good but not great interior with typical GM parts. I’ve been in the new RAM HD, and its interior is significantly better. The Ford interior is on par, but I am usually more comfortable with Ford layouts. Probably a function of daily driving a Ford for almost seven years now.

  • avatar
    Jon

    Can you post pictures of the cutaway side of the engine?

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      Dropped one in there. Thanks for reading.

      • 0 avatar
        Jon

        Thanks for posting. Looking forward to information on the architecture of the engine. I am a big LS/LT engine fan.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          Its a Gen V engine. The engineer from GM says it takes a little bit from the old 6.0L and some from the 6.2L. I think the best way to describe it is a bigger LT1 that is ruggedized and optimized for HD truck duty. Its a stroked L86 with updates. It has the same 103.25 mm bore. According to my LS people (Bozi Tataevic), the block is mostly the same with modified coolant passages.

          • 0 avatar
            Jon

            An under powered and over engineered long stroke GM V8. This is too good to be true. I wonder how long before it breaks the 500TQ mark.

            I hope they attach the 8L90E or 10L90E soon.

        • 0 avatar
          87 Morgan

          Glad to know I was not the only one drooling over the new LS gasser. First thing I noticed was the coil pack covers, which the Vortec engines do not have and the intake on top is very attractive when compared to the Vortec. I am doing vortec swap into my 57′ and have a new intake and coil pack covers in an attempt to clean up the engine a bit.

          This power plant will make its way into a many a muscle car in a few years.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    Beautiful looking trucks. New gasser will be a big seller.

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    Is there really a need to be up to 35,000 pounds in towing capacity? I get having a large margin of reserve, but that is what, almost six times the weight of the truck itself. Are there any repercussions to such a weight differential? Or is this just the usual truck-guy bragging rights thing? And the looks – ugh. I always leaned toward Chevy trucks based on good experience in the family/friends but talk about a face only a mother could love…

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Since for some users it equals increased income, productivity and or recreation, a resounding yes. The weight differential (pickup under 10K lbs trailering over 30K) means very little. Semis all around you do the same, and with basically the same driver training/licensing and DOT equipment inspections.

      A pickup’s looks/cosmetics also mean very little in this class, no different than needing a “soft touch” dash.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/tpp/offices/ogm/trucks/FHWA_Vehicle-Classes-With-Definitions%20cs.pdf

      Probably the best answer I can offer.

      Here’s another one: https://jalopnik.com/truck-sizes-classification-explained-from-tacomas-to-1613958192

  • avatar
    Dan

    Surprise and delight at a bigger and better gas V8! I’m not sure what it’s for while the Duramax already exists, yeah cheap gas and diesel emissions nonsense but cost of ownership in this segment is for trucks driven by employees and the 6.0 was already just fine for that.

    But don’t look a gift motor in the mouth. Surprise and delight!

  • avatar
    Hummer

    That truck is horrendous.

    That engine on the other hand is something I can definitely get behind. Not sure how I feel about direct injection given how problematic they have been across the industry but more displacement is always good.

    I have to say I am much more interested in the new 7.3L pushrods gasser at Ford, that is very tempting.

    I think GM would have been better served by carrying on the 6.0L and offering a balls to the wall 7.5L+ gasser giving consumers more choice.

    Hopefully Ram shows up to the party, they’ve had the 6.4 out for a while now maybe they can drop a bomb In this field and get a NA gasser with 550+ torque.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      re: “… Not sure how I feel about direct injection given how problematic they have been …”

      Yep. Ford may have a solution with its dual-injection–both port and direct–system, but it hasn’t been around long enough to say for sure (I hope it works; my Mustang has it).

      Otherwise, it’s walnut shell blasting of the intake system every 60K miles or so.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    … And the Road Whales™ grow ever larger. They’re already the cause of many, if not most, of fatalities in multi-vehicle collisions — not of their own passengers but those in the vehicles they hit. And in single-vehicle crashes, pickup trucks reportedly have more fatalities than smaller vehicles.

    Today’s so-called heavy-duty pickups are as large as yesteryears’ medium duty trucks of classes 4-6 featuring a similar body style and they only barely lack the carrying and towing capacity of those Class 5 trucks. The ONLY reason they’re not Class 4 themselves is that their GVWR is a fraction below the maximum weight for their class.

    This race for capacity is a complete waste. Why not let pickup trucks be pickup trucks and let the heavier trucks handle those loads legally. As it is, to tow some of those claimed trailer weights, the driver already needs a CDL; the Class 3 should be restricted to no more than what they could officially tow 30 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Source?

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Why stop at 30 years ago, why not 50 years ago? Why not just freeze vehicle development at the Model T?

      Face it, demand for this type of vehicle has never been higher, and that is because they are more capable and refined than ever. These vehicles are the true flagships of their manufacturers and it shows. My 2019 gas Super Duty can tow and haul more, rides better, is cheaper to maintain, has lower running costs, and is incomparably more luxurious than my old 2001 diesel Super Duty was. Now just in the last week two manufacturers have released all new gas engines even more capable than mine. This advancement is a good thing!

      These also aren’t the arbitrary towing numbers of years past, these trucks are all certified by SAE to handle the loads they are rated for. And whether you think so or not, people actually do use these trucks to their rated capability. Large campers, equipment trailers, stacker car trailers, etc. are all heavy but now well within the legal and safe capabilities of an HD truck that can be optioned up to true luxury levels. Why have to settle for a chassis cab or medium duty truck when a 3/4 or 1 ton now offers the same capability in a better overall package?

      No one is taking away the lighter trucks, in fact automakers are tripping over themselves to bring them back/bring new ones to market. If you don’t personally need an HD truck, fine don’t buy one. But some of us actually need the capacity and/or enjoy driving them. I’m not apologizing for being one of those people.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @DM: “Face it, demand for this type of vehicle has never been higher, and that is because they are more capable and refined than ever. These vehicles are the true flagships of their manufacturers and it shows.”

        — You are right.

        And in 20-30 years they will be seen as a ridiculous fad, just as you claim the old compact pickups were–the type that is on the verge of a new resurgence.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Still slightly uglier than the new Super Duty.

    It’s like Ford and GM are trying to out ugly each other

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      ” out ugly each other” or not, GM is clearly playing catch-up here against Ford, and all of Ford’s innovations.

      For anyone serious about buying one of these trucks (and I may be at some time in the future when I settle down) this should be “no contest.”

      Ford: #1 in pickup trucks.

      No doubt about it. Everything else is an also-ran.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    I see they are still building the HD’s in Flint. That’s where my 2004 Sierra HD was assembled. That thing was perfect when I drove it off the lot. Couldn’t find a thing wrong with it & I’m a picky SOB so that’s saying a lot!.

    If the new gasser is 1/2 as tough as the 6.0 under the hood of that ‘04 they’ve got a great engine. That old 6.0 was indestructable.

  • avatar
    Erikstrawn

    Dear God! Just when I thought we’d hit peak grill they raise the hood 4″ higher than the bed just to fit more. It looks like one of those bulldogs whose head is so much heavier than its butt that you’re afraid it’s going to stumble and roll over its own face at any moment.

  • avatar
    jdowmiller

    What exactly drives these size and horsepower wars? Cheap loans? Willingness to go into extreme debt on a depreciating asset? I just don’t get it. I also don’t know anyone who drives one of these. I live in an urban area and there are some F150s for sure but I work in a rural area near the TN/KY border – nothing but farms there. People who actually use actual trucks for a living. They don’t drive $70,000 HD trucks. They drive beat up old duallies. One person was showing me pictures of her pride and joy the other day – an ‘85 Chevy. I get the feeling the only people buying these big ass HD trucks are posers. Middle class ones at that. People who have no business taking on a $1000 a month loan for the rest of their lifes.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      -People with 5th wheel RVs.

      -People with large boats, race trailers, horses, etc. Hobbies that require something heavy to be towed.

      -Successful farmers, ranchers, construction foremen, etc. People who still need a truck for work, but don’t want a penalty box interior.

      -People who need a versatile vehicle for a lot of uses. I bought my F350 because I plow a private road in winter, tow a car trailer, haul kids and a 200 lb dog, and carry stuff that only fits in an 8 foot bed. Nothing else met these needs as well.

      I guess maybe all of these people are what you would call poseurs. I prefer to think of it as people buying what makes them happy. I don’t understand why truck owners are the only ones who receive such scorn from “enthusiasts” but it never fails on every post about a new HD truck.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @Jack4x: “-People with 5th wheel RVs.”
        — Good answer. The typical 5th-wheel RV weighs in at just about half these new trucks’ rated tow limit; some few as high as 20K but NONE at 35k-pounds.

        Large boats, race trailers, horses, hobbies– all of these typically max out at about 15,000±. Such gigantic trucks as the 350/450 grouping are unnecessary for any but those who tow for a living or manage a large farm or ranch where bulk is more important than weight 100 standard bales of hay weighs in around 13,000#, though I admit to seeing loads near me that consist of 200 bales or more–usually carried by a Class 8 truck, not towed by a pickup truck.

        For plowing snow on long driveways, parking lots, etc. I can see where added weight can offer an advantage… the ones doing that around here carry a salt spreader in the bed, to do more than just plow the road. But for non-commercial work, you don’t need a 350/3500 to carry family, dog, tow a car trailer, etc., a 250-rated truck is more than enough and rides one heck of a lot better, too.

        You are right about one thing; most of these new pickup owners are “poseurs.” The working trucks tend to be standard-cab models while every other truck in my neighborhood (other than one 20-year-old Ram that sees meticulous care and maintenance) is a giant 4-door monstrosity that carries nothing but family and only rarely sees a load in the bed…when they go on trips. I’ll even admit that my mid-sized truck is far more truck than I need… or even wanted… but what I wanted is still 2- to 3 years out and may still be underpowered for towing what I want–at a mere 5000#. A 1990 Chevy S-10 with V6 could tow that much while still 20% smaller in physical size than its modern descendant.

        So really, I ask again: Why do modern pickups have to be so physically large?

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          You do realize that a 250 and a 350 SRW are exactly the same size, ride on the same frame, offer the same engines, etc? A 350 DRW or a 450 is exactly the same length, height, and width as a 250 apart from the width at the dual wheels.

          The difference in ride quality between an F250 and F350 was not apparent to me when test driving, as the only suspension difference is one leaf spring. Perhaps you can easily tell the difference. I hardly think it would be “one heck of a lot better” ride though.

          I bought the F350 over the F250 for a higher payload rating and a more proven transmission design. Again, they are exactly the same physical size and the cost difference was less than a $1000.

          I agree with you that most people won’t need a 35,000 towing rating. I certainly don’t, and didn’t buy a diesel DRW for that reason. It does give me confidence that the subsystems of my truck were designed to handle loads far greater than I intend to put on it. I feel 100x better towing my car behind a Super Duty than a 1990 S-10. That peace of mind is worth money to me, and is worth living with a larger truck.

          It doesn’t bother me if other people buy trucks and don’t tow with them any more than if someone buys a sports car and never drives it on the track. This is the confusing part to me; why it’s such a personal affront to so many here that someone might have a different preference in vehicles and choose to use them in a manner that they wouldn’t. That doesn’t make someone a ‘poseur’.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Jack4x: “You do realize that a 250 and a 350 SRW are exactly the same size, ride on the same frame, offer the same engines, etc? A 350 DRW or a 450 is exactly the same length, height, and width as a 250 apart from the width at the dual wheels.”

            — I will admit to being aware of most of that. However, it’s the details that count and even you noted a different transmission, which suggests that driveshaft and axles are different as well–possibly even the differential gears (not ratios, strength.)

            But full-sized pickups across the board have gotten taller and wider over the decades. My brand-new Colorado is almost exactly the same size as my previous 1990 F-150, barring the F-150 was standard-cab with 8-foot bed and my Colorado is extended cab with 6’foot bed. The width difference is slight–a mere 3″ or so, I believe–from that older truck and the new trucks are notably taller than the older trucks… including my Colorado. There are some parking garages with a 6-foot height limit that a modern full-sized truck simply won’t fit and I question even some of the newest ones, though they have opened up more than the ones built before this growth spurt. Philadelphia in particular has some 60s-vintage parking garages still in use and they clearly post their 6-foot height limit. I’m sure there are other old garages around the country that are no better. Some of these new trucks push 7-foot heights with ease, right off the showroom floor. Why?

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            Ford F-Series trucks have been around 80″ wide for decades. They have also been around the same height for over 20 years. The 2WD truck has increased in height because it sits as high as the 4WD version now. Even then, you are talking about a 4% increase in height.

            Your 1990 F150 was 79 inches wide. The 2019 F150 is 79.9 inches wide. The Colorado is 74 inches wide.

            However, this new Silverado HD is gigantic.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Adam: “Ford F-Series trucks have been around 80″ wide for decades. They have also been around the same height for over 20 years.”
            — I referenced a 30-year-old truck.

            “The 2WD truck has increased in height because it sits as high as the 4WD version now.”
            — Why?

            “Your 1990 F150 was 79 inches wide. The 2019 F150 is 79.9 inches wide.”
            — With or without mirrors?

            “The Colorado is 74 inches wide.”
            — 5 inches isn’t much when you’re used to something 10 inches narrower than that. Like the ’97 Ranger I just sold that was less than 72″ tall and only about 65″ wide. It was also shorter than my current Colorado but I also acknowledge that it was regular cab vs extended while both have/had 6′ beds. I also admit I’m STILL not used to how short the nose is on the Colorado. I tend to stop about 20″ – 24″ short of the bumper of the car in front of me in parking lots, though I now creep forward VERY carefully and use the tailgate camera to help me spot the ends of the parking spot markers.

          • 0 avatar
            jdowmiller

            @jack4x. That’s cool. I get it. I like these trucks myself. I used the poser epithet as kind of a joke. In all honesty my issue with them is they are total overkill. Because I don’t like setting money on fire I drive a car that gets 40+ mpg. Doing so puts me at a serious disadvantage in a collision. To offset that I, too, could decide to drive an F350 or whatever. But that’s not exactly fair is it? Why can’t the guy driving an unladen HD truck back and forth to work drive something f more responsible? I agree with your comment about not judging what someone chooses to drive. The guy doesn’t *have* to lug around 1500 of dirt just to prove something. I’m just saying it seems a somewhat irresponsible choice of a personal vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          ChevyIIfan

          “The typical 5th-wheel RV weighs in at just about half these new trucks’ rated tow limit; some few as high as 20K but NONE at 35k-pounds.”

          That’s because payload will still be the limiting factor when towing large RVs, especially 5th wheelers. Take a 40′ toy hauler with a GVWR of 17,500 lbs. A properly loaded 5th wheeler will have 20% of its weight on the tongue, meaning 3,500 lbs of pin weight. Add a 200 lb driver, 2 kids, a spouse, and 200 lbs of equipment and you are looking at over 4,200 lbs on the truck. Most 350/3500 dualies have 5,000 lb +- payload capacities, meaning you are already within a comfortable margin on the payload of the truck. So the key takeway from this isn’t the “tow ratings”- those are meaningless numbers for selling trucks- when RV towing, payload is usually the limiting factor, so an 18,000 lb 5th wheel is getting close to maximum you can reasonably safely tow without being over you truck GVWR. Towing anything within 5,000 lbs of the “tow rating” will put you wildly over weight on the truck and thus illegal.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Towing anything within 5,000 lbs of the “tow rating” will put you wildly over weight on the truck and thus illegal.”

            On the high-spec diesels this is true, but with the gasoline HD trucks you’ll likely run out of tow weight before payload.

            ramtrucks.com/assets/towing_guide/pdf/2017_ram_3500_towing_charts.pdf

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            A properly loaded trailer of ANY type should have 20% of its weight on the tongue–no less than 10%–simply for better control while towing. The reason some people have their trailers fishtailing is because they’re badly loaded, with too much weight behind the axles.

            But you did make a valid point; “tow ratings are meaningless.”

          • 0 avatar
            ChevyIIfan

            aija, correct, but the gassers only have tow ratings of 13-14k lbs, and vulpine was originally mocking the 35k tow rating.

            Vulpine, a travel trailer (not 5th wheel) should be at 15% tongue weight. The 20% is for 5th wheels only.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @ChevyIIfan: If true, then they’ve changed the rules since I started towing. Especially with the aid of load-leveling hitches, 15% was a median where 10% was minimum and 20% was recommended.

          • 0 avatar
            ChevyIIfan

            I believe they have. I tow an RV and am very active on my RV forum. EVERY one of the senior members (people who have been towing 30+ years), including several who are RV techs working for dealers recommend using 15% tongue weight for travel trailers and 20% for 5ers. It CAN be as low as 10% (some trailers will tow fine there, many will not) but typically settles at 15%.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “t CAN be as low as 10% (some trailers will tow fine there, many will not) but typically settles at 15%.”

            My 250 SeaRay Sundancer has around 5% tongue weight. At just under 4 tons it tows like an absolute dream. That’s where the tongue weight should be with a boat heavy enough to require tandem axles. Single axle trailer and you should have 7-10% tongue weight . 15% tongue weight with a boat is way too much.

          • 0 avatar
            ChevyIIfan

            Carlson, correct, that’s why I said “for Travel trailers”. Of course boats will tow differently, boats don’t have a massive flat front catching all the wind, or huge, 8.5′ flat sides that are 20-30′ long.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The fancy $70K versions are often bought by retirees/snowbirds so they can tow their *house*. It isn’t that much different than buying some 6-figure class A motorhome. Anyone else I know that uses a truck for “work” has a lower trim HD built in the last 5 years. When I go by farms I certainly don’t see 30YO trucks making up the majority of the “working fleet” so you must be living in a time warp.

      • 0 avatar
        ChevyIIfan

        Correct, most quality contractors cannot afford to constantly have 25 year old trucks breaking down and dealing with the business ramifications of that, so they drive ~5-6 year old and newer stripper HD trucks that can be counted on. The ones driving the 25 old beaters are actually the contractors you SHOULD be worrying about more; they typically do poor work and are struggling to make ends meet because of their poor work, thus having to drive crappy trucks. It is a vicious cycle.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      GM says that 70% of their HD buyers are people that use their vehicle to tow RVs/boats/etc for personal use. The other 30% use their HD truck for work. 90% of their HD owners tow on a regular basis. People mostly buy these trucks because they need them for whatever they are doing.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I find that 90% of HD owners tow on a regular basis claim a bit too high to believe. I guess of course that all depends on what you consider a “regular basis” to me that is more than 2 or 3 times a year and more like at least once or twice a month. Way to many of the people who I know who drive HD pickups are in the under 2 or 3 times per year class. Personally I’ve only used my current F250 to tow once in the 3 years I’ve had it. Of course it doesn’t typically get used as a commuter either, though due to the recent and continuing snow it has been pressed into that duty due to it being 4×4.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          The people I know who own an HD truck, often DO use them as daily drivers, as well as for towing and hauling duties.

          The trend toward HD 4×4 4dr trucks is real. It’s the only class where a buyer can still have a respectable choice of brawny engines.

          While half-ton pickups with squirrel engines may be popular with the great unwashed masses, a growing number of buyers are stepping up…. to choice.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    “…I get the feeling…”
    @jdowmiller

    Is that feeling associated with prescription meds? Perhaps in your isolated corner of North America (name it), but you’d have to be on crack to buy one of these for the daily commute, just showing off, ‘More Hat than Horse’, etc.

    If the occasional crackpot can pull it off, for no good reason, congrats, more power to them. But ’80s duallys are so ridiculously obsolete and underpowered/underrated, it wouldn’t be worth it, at least for real work, for hire, for profit, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      jdowmiller

      I’m not sure what you’re saying here. You seem to be agreeing with me. Yes, I firmly believe the majority of these types of trucks are purchased for the sole purpose of showing of and/or outdoing their friends. I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with that, just that it seems like an awfully expensive way of doing so. Every day on my way to work I pass. A gas pipeline connector construction site. The parking lot is chock full of four door lifted HD trucks that surely cost upwards of $50k before enhancements. The beds are always empty. The trucks aren’t off-road. They’re sitting in a parking lot. Sure that’s anecdotal but that’s all I got. I also saw a couple HD trucks today that were pulling trailers loaded with tractors. These weren’t the trucks pictured above – they were base model work trucks owned by businesses.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        You see what you want to see anyway. Worst case, I hope it means one less BMW on the road for every one of those! But even semi trucks run empty more than half the time, so it’s absolutely goofy to “feel” a pickup bed should be full, even 10% of the time, especially the HD class. When owners utilize trailers, obviously their bed do even less carrying.

        Clearly HD pickups are the most likely pickups to be used for work, but also the most likely to wear a full spectrum of “hats”, including showing off.

        If you’ve never witnessed a semi truck (bobtailing) running errands, picking take-out, Starbucks, etc, you’d probably lose your frickin’ mind.

        So it’s hard to tell what burns you about HD pickups so much, but with lifted trucks especially, a bed could be carrying a good amount of compressors, generators, tools, tarps and or other equipment/merch/materials/supplies and you wouldn’t know it.

        You could even say they’re showing off anytime they happen to be anywhere doing anything, including hard/dirty work. But no doubt the lighter the “duty” is (midsize for example), the less likely they’re performing work at any given time, lifted, pimp’t out (Tacoma) or not.

        It’s not that HD pickups outnumber the rest of the pack, but I’m sure they accumulate more miles, showing off or not.

  • avatar
    GM JUNK

    Yikes. Who took the paper bag off? Another GM debacle.

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