By on March 9, 2018

2018 Subaru WRX STI Type RA, Image: Subaru of America

Is Subaru, a scrappy-but-approaching-the-mainstream automaker, about to ditch the manual transmission? That’s what some are gleaning from comments made by Subaru UK managing director Chris Graham on the sidelines of the Geneva Motor Show this week.

Speaking to Auto Express, Graham mused about the brand’s EyeSight driver-assist technology and Subaru’s desire to include the suite of safety aids on all of its cars. The trouble is, EyeSight isn’t available on Subarus equipped with manual transmissions. If you’re looking for goodies like automatic emergency braking and lane departure warnings, a Lineartronic CVT had best be on your wish list, too.

Graham’s comments point to a Subaru that’s prepared to weaken the bond between driver and car in the name of increased computerized control.

“I’m not sure if it’s compatible at all with a manual gearbox,” he said of the automaker’s EyeSight technology. “There are certainly no rumours we’ve heard that manual will continue, or Eyesight will be [offered] with manual.

Continuing, Graham said, “My gut tells me it will be Eyesight with Lineartronic ongoing and long term. They want to steal the mantle of the safest car in the world. I think if they do that, then they say ‘here’s a manual without Eyesight’, they’ll just ruin that [message].”

Is there nothing the future can’t do to piss off traditionalists? For now, Subaru remains something of a three-pedal holdout, offering a six-speed manual on a number of cars — including the vaunted WRX and its musclebound STI twin. All five trim levels of the WRX come standard with a stick for 2018.

However, Subaru really wants a reputation as the world’s safest brand, and that means shoehorning EyeSight into as many models and trims as possible. In the case of the WRX, the model remains on the old Impreza’s platform as it awaits an all-new generation. The model’s age has preserved manual availability, it seems.

While Graham’s thoughts aren’t necessarily company policy, there’s no doubt they’re guided by Subaru’s intentions. If given a choice, sticks would stay.

“For me an STI has to be a manual in the guise it is today, however if you look at [auto-only] M-series BMWs, I don’t think this is the end and I’d be very excited if they had a hybrid petrol STI,” he said. “That would be phenomenal in terms of its acceleration.”

Well, if Subaru goes the hybrid route for its next STI (and why would Graham mention this?), we can certainly kiss the stick — in that model, at the very least — goodbye.

2017 Subaru Impreza Sport Exterior, Image: Subaru

Subaru’s Lineartronic CVT isn’t much to get excited about when encountered in, say, a low-end Impreza or Crosstrek, but it certainly holds its own in hotter models. The CVT’s natural inclination for rapid, paddle-actuated shifting makes it a better choice than a traditional automatic in sporty models, and less trouble-prone than its quick-shifting, dual-clutch cousin.

Still, shifting into “M” or “S” while keeping your left foot firmly planted against the dead pedal is not nearly the same experience as working the clutch and giving your right arm a workout. Being one with the car, in a sense. If Subaru eradicates manuals, the brand would find itself moving dangerously close to the center of the mainstream.

Of course, buyers might disagree. And these days, Subaru’s beating a growing crowd of buyers off with a, um, stick.

[Images: Subaru]

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71 Comments on “Subaru Exec Spins Frightening Vision of a Stickless Future...”


  • avatar
    Sub-600

    They will almost certainly alienate their performance minded customers. The rest of their base just want to go on treks to the L.L. Bean Factory Outlet. They don’t care about sticks unless their dog is fetching one.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Depends. If the car’s quicker with the automatic – which is actually the case with any number of automatic-equipped performance cars – the enthusiasts might not be all that upset.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Not if that automatic is a CVT

        Subaru will need a planetary auto at the minimum. I personally don’t care if the stick dies but I get why people will be upset. (Stickshift makes people who can’t drive think they can)

      • 0 avatar

        “If the car’s quicker with automatic…”

        The difference between the acceleration of any given performance car with a clutch or a slushbox is too small to make more than a tiny difference in enjoyment behind the wheel. The difference between driving a manual and a slushbox is huge.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          “The difference between driving a manual and a slushbox is huge.”

          You ASS-U-ME that the “automatic transmission” equals “slushbox”.

          Bah. Dual clutch transmission (specifically VW DSG) or GTFO.

          Here’s your cake. You may eat it, too.

          • 0 avatar
            KevinC

            Why so smug? If you are in love with your DSG box, that’s great. You don’t have to go crapping on those who prefer a 3-pedal driving experience. It’s a bad look. Buy/drive what you prefer, and allow others whose preference is different to enjoy their choice too. Get it?

      • 0 avatar

        “If the car’s quicker with automatic…”

        Oh, come on. Even a full second’s difference in acceleration to 60 makes little difference in driving experience. Unlike the difference between driving a manual and a slushbox.

    • 0 avatar
      Garrett

      Hey! Some of us like LL Bean and driving stick.

      • 0 avatar
        gottacook

        A few related points to consider: Subaru and L.L. Bean let their licensing deal expire in 2009. And every Outback and Forester L.L. Bean edition came with the old-style automatic as standard equipment. (The Outback Beans were 6-cylinder cars, whereas the Forester Beans used the ordinary 2.5-liter.)

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    God that’s just what they need. 300 turbo pancake 4 hp attached to a CVT.

    The EVO is dead, might as well dig a grave for the WRX.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Boring cars for boring people, and the only interesting model they sell has an engine that hasn’t been touched since 2002.

    • 0 avatar
      gottacook

      I am not a boring person and neither is my wife, I assure you, and between us we’ve been driving at least one Subaru since 1986. Two of our current ones are sticks. But we have automatics for our kids (’07 L.L. Bean Foresters) because even if we taught them to drive stick, there’s not much chance they’ll have a stick car to drive when they’re older.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      There’s nothing boring about driving a manual Subaru in winter on studded tires with the nannies off.

  • avatar

    Vehicles that do not offer a manual transmission are NOT on my list of acceptable cars to buy. PERIOD.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    OK, before everyone gets lathered up…no one likes that the manual might go away, but then again, this theoretical automatic WRX may or may not have a CVT. It might well be something like the DSG in the GTI, which actually makes that car *quicker* than the manual version.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The DSG version is faster to the junkyard too.

    • 0 avatar
      Boxerman

      DSG killed the lancer evo.

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      The ignorance towards the CVT is changing. Many years ago F1 banded the use of the CVT.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        It’s unfortunate that they banned it before it proved itself. Like ABS and traction control, they should have allowed it to develop to show whether the technology truly advances the racing breed before killing it off for the sake of the fans’ entertainment. Nobody would want to hear twenty cars screaming at the same rpm all day.

        I suspect the dual-clutch units in the current vehicles are lighter and have lower parasitic losses than a CVT anyway. They have enough speeds to keep the engine in a narrow powerband, but even that isn’t terribly necessary with the turbo engines and fuel limitations.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        I’m not certain that the dislike of CVTs is entirely ignorance though. I still wouldn’t want to buy a CVT, simply because I don’t personally know of any that have been reliable over the long run; the Toyota hybrid’s planetary system excepted.

        During my last test drive session I actually preferred the operation of the Honda HR-V’s CVT over the planetary 6-speed of the Mazda CX-3. On the same loop, the CVT reacted smoothly and instantly to my corner exit inputs, while the CX-3 required a couple of clunky, unpleasant downshifts. The manual Mazda3 operated perfectly, doing everything exactly as I wanted, of course.

        But I’d still prefer the CX-3’s 6-speed over a CVT because I’d have more confidence in its long-term reliability. I accept any ignorance I might have in regards to CVTs and welcome any information that might change my view.

        • 0 avatar
          bullnuke

          @rpn453 – Wife drives an ’11 Outback w/ CVT. Current mileage @124k miles. CVT servicing done: drain and refill of tranny fluid at 62k miles which was done because I don’t believe in “lifetime fluids” at a cost of $48 and my labor. Issues: none. Car is used for daily 60 mile roundtrip to work over country roads with multiple stop signs to her job in a small town. Climate: typical Western Ohio 4-season from -12deg to 90deg, icy/snowy roads in winter, hot and humid in summer. My short experience.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            I hope they’ve figured it out, and I hope that tranny is still going strong at 250k miles!

            I don’t mind fluid changes myself, especially if they make it as easy as that of a typical manual. I even do it on “lifetime” drivetrain fluids. I actually like seeing the fluid condition and adjusting the intervals based on that.

          • 0 avatar
            bullnuke

            For a point of reference on transmission durability, our ’98 GMC Yukon has gone through 3 GM4L80-E trannys in 190k miles, the first dying at around 78k miles and the second at 165k miles. As usual, YMMV.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Yeah, the specific transmission is more important than the type. There have been many terribly unreliable planetary gear transmissions over the years. But at least I know it’s possible to make them durable. I don’t know that for sure about CVTs.

            Maybe that HR-V CVT will turn out to be a more durable transmission than the Mazda CX-3 6-speed. I never even had to think much about it though because the buyer went with a manual Mazda3 anyway. I’m confident they’ve got that figured out.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        WTF do you mean by “banded”? You’ve said that twice now.

    • 0 avatar
      IBx1

      Who cares if you get to 60mph 0.04 seconds faster with an automatic? You’re not driving the car, you’re only steering it. If there’s no clutch pedal, you may as well just buy a camry or something.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    And what about for those who don’t consider automatic braking or lane keeping systems to be “goodies”?

  • avatar
    TW5

    We need to do something to save the manual transmission. Throttle can be applied along a spectrum ranging from max fuel efficiency to maximum performance. This spectrum is controlled by the transmission. Max fuel efficiency is basically wide open throttle in a high gear, while max performance is wide open throttle in a low gear.

    Automatic transmissions cannot operate on the full spectrum. Market paradigms compel manufacturers to design transmissions for performance, since that’s what the average driver expects when they open the throttle. Automatic transmissions do not have situational awareness. They don’t know when the vehicle can be lugged around at wide open throttle without traffic around. Auto transmissions don’t know when it’s okay to downshift and coast to a light, rather than holding gear during deceleration.

    The supercomputer that can operating a conventional ICE Otto-cycle engine is between your ears, and a manual transmission is what links your brain to the powertrain.

    Anyway, I think I’m going to start a petition for EPA off-cycle credits for manual transmissions on petitions.whitehouse.gov. If the petition gets 100,000 signatures, it could make a difference.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      I’m guessing you’ve never driven a Porsche 911 GT3 RS on a racetrack.

      If you want to find out how good an autoshifted car can be, Xtreme Xperience can set you up.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        I’m guessing you don’t understand his argument.

        Calibrating an automatic for pure performance is easy. Just leave it in the lowest possible gear at all times. Calibrating an automatic for pure efficiency is easy. Just leave it in the highest possible gear at all times.

        It’s all the in-between stuff that happens during street driving that is difficult to optimize for a wide range of driving styles. The best they can do is make it predictable, which it was with older hydraulically-controlled automatics. They aren’t into that concept as much with the computer controlled ones.

        Sure, paddle shifters give you control over gear selection, but not quite to the degree of a manual, where you can skip directly to any gear any time it’s appropriate. It’s a bit ridiculous sequentially shifting through a 7+ speed transmission in traffic.

        A simple “hold” button would be a great street performance feature for many automatics. You could push it as you’re squeezing the throttle on a curve exit or on-ramp and it would hold the gear until redline to allow precise control of slip angles, rather than downshifting at inopportune moments. I suppose any automatic that allows you to slip in and out of manual control with the press of a button already does this.

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          I think I do understand his argument. I have had a few sessions with the GT3 at Atlanta Motorsports Park, and man, that PDK is telepathic, it’s always in the correct gear (and that’s not always the lowest one for the given speed). It’s just amazing.

          Read this review: https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/05/2015-porsche-911-gt3-capsule-track-test/#more-1032033

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            I believe you that it operates better on track than any manual ever could. But it never has to deal with the duality of street driving, where the driver may want optimal efficiency and relaxation one second, and optimal performance the next.

            But I suppose there’s no reason it can’t do that well if enough effort and respect for the driver goes into the calibration. Just like stability control, where the best systems can help even the best drivers, but most are set up only to compensate for the worst. The computer knows exactly what you’re doing with the steering wheel and throttle; whether you’re making minor steering corrections and squeezing the throttle properly to reach the optimal slip angles. It should know what you’re trying to do and be able to react properly if it doesn’t have to compensate for the potential for completely inappropriate driver inputs.

            I realize I am fully ignorant of the state of automatics on the forefront of performance technology. The only dual-clutch unit I’ve driven is a Powershift in a Focus. If you can set me up with a test drive of that 911 I’d love to try it!

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          Like I said, Xtreme Xperience is ready when you are.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            It doesn’t look like they allow you to drive the cars on the street. I’m sure there are rentals available somewhere though.

        • 0 avatar
          TW5

          @rpn453

          Hold button would be nice, particularly on modern conventional automatics that have lock up in most gears.

          Unfortunately, as you point out, predictability is what the manufacturers feel compelled to offer. Even the ECO button on most cars is only good for a 2%-3% improvement. I suppose we can’t really blame them. If a family had a fatal accident because ECO mode didn’t deliver enough performance to safely attack an onramp, the litigation cold be ugly. Hold button might be less problematic from a liability standpoint.

          Anyway, the motivation behind my post is that many experienced manual drivers will handily beat the EPA estimates by employing a few basic techniques. In the case of my Wrangler TJ, my combined fuel economy routinely beats the EPA hwy estimate. All I have to do is short shift during acceleration and downshift during deceleration. It does wonders for the 4.0 Liter’s fuel consumption.

          It’s sad that EPA testing doesn’t capture the real world for some manual vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Fuel economy ratings are one of my biggest gripes about the decline of manuals, as many here probably know. The numbers always look bad for the manuals when the automatics can shift however they want while the manuals must be shifted in a way that is not optimized for efficiency.

            With my ’04 Mazda3, my overall fuel economy has matched the EPA highway rating. With the ’98 Pathfinder I had previously, I beat it by over 10%.

            I’m okay with manuals dying, but only for the right reasons. EPA fuel economy ratings are unjust and contribute to the death of the manual.

      • 0 avatar
        TW5

        Not interested. However, an argument could be made that paddle-shift supercars that operate in true manual mode (no dummy overrides) should receive the same treatment as a manual transmission.

      • 0 avatar
        OneAlpha

        Xtreme Xperience?

        Is that run by a bunch of dudebros wearing backwards baseball caps and giant pants?

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    quicker is a total misnomer.
    Yes in drag race an autobox these days may be fractionaly quicker.

    on the road though theyre slower dull witted and frustrating to use even with paddles.
    The modern autoboxes are the worst, second guessing he driver, either pretending theyre on track holding a gear to long and wonshiftign when youre just goign 30 because there in sport mode, or in comfort slow to kickdown and when the do kickdown regardless of mode there is serious delay while the computer dials up the engine. Modern autoboxes are lawyer cars, they let you spin the tires but only so much, no holding a drift or doing anythign otehr than fake peel out. Like drive by wire suytemnts they are inconsisstent and suffer from delayed reactions, but yes on paper they do perfect launches..

    Frankly they suck way worse than the old 3 speed slushboxes which were at least intuitive. Modern autoboxes are robo cars where the driver suggests something the car may or may not comply with.

    But yeah on paper theyre quicker, and people buy paper specs.

    The bottom line, there are sportscars and there are transport modules. Subaru used to do both, i guess not anymore.

    Theyre all missing somethign big though. 60% of buyers buy transport modules, the rest buy a vehicle that inspires, hence the sale of trucks and sports cars. Tranbsport modules, any brand will do as good as the next so allw eneed is 3 manufactuers globaly

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    Like me, most people here love manual trannies.

    And also like me, most people drive automatics, not because it’s ‘easier’ to drive in traffic (though for many, that is a compelling reason), but because it’s easier to find a vehicle they like as an automatic.

    If people were adamant about manual transmission (and manual steering, and manual windows, or sunroofs or anything), the desire to profit would motivate automakers to offer them.

    Even the vast majority of BMWs, not to mention Corvettes and Porsches, are sold with manuals. Heresy!

    I’d prefer to buy “American”. Because I do a lot of business with GM, it’s prudent for me to drive one of their vehicles.

    I had 4 choices: Colorado (NO), Camaro (couldn’t find a ‘base’ stick), Corvette (NO), and Cruze. So I drove the Cruze. Decent car, not great, but the man trans was pretty joyless, as the ratios were spaced wider than the Grand Canyon. So I bought a used Buick Regal Turbo–less than a new Cruze, and better car. But automatic.

    And now, with all the wondrous opportunities to integrate automatics with the car’s other systems, combined with the (manufacturing) efficiencies of automatics, it’s harder than ever for the manual to survive.

    Which is sad, because as others wrote, manuals are better in so many respects. When it snows, I can’t pick my gear, so I can’t start in 2nd

    If you want something done correctly and/or well, do it your self.

    Same goes for driving. If you want to drive well, it’s easier if you control your gears.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      What, people actually want non-power steering?

      (I can understand not liking a *bad* assisted steering system, but I’ve driven without power steering, and *it sucks* unless you’re driving a city car – and a good power steering system is neither hard to produce nor bad for handing or feel.)

      Manual windows? FFS, people, it’s 2018, and there have been *reliable* power window systems since the ’70s – and manuals won’t let you roll down the passenger window to clear rain or snow off it from inside.

      Most of the failures I see people complain about are window *regulators*, and those aren’t related to the motor; manual regulators fail, too.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        I would like driving a lightweight car with unassisted steering and brakes. Probably the last street car like that that I had the pleasure of driving was a 1982 Fiat X 1-9.

        I assume the Lotus Elise had neither of those assists, and that’s probably the most recent car without either power assist.

        The windows, I don’t care about.

        • 0 avatar
          la834

          > I assume the Lotus Elise had neither of those assists, and that’s probably the most recent car without either power assist.

          nope, currently available Alfa Romeo 4C has unassisted steering. Its best feature IMO!

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      That’s not a good excuse. You can factory order a car to get the stick. I ordered my Audi simply because I couldn’t find a single one within the 500-mile search radius that the dealer was willing to search and swap. So I placed an order and got one exactly the way I wanted it. That’s the only way to really help save the manuals.

  • avatar
    OzCop

    Shamefully, the stick shift is slowly but surely disappearing from our choices of auto vs stick. OTOH, those of us who recall the glory days of the first sedans and sports cars with four speeds and a stick coming up from the floor will also fade eventually. Personally, I don’t care how well the modern DSG and similar trans perform in the real world, I still prefer a stick shift in my performance sedan or sports car.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    I hope they sort out their CVT’s better than my friend’s 2017 Crosstrek’s.
    The imitation upshifts upon acceleration are just plain silly. I suppose they wanted it to feel like a geared transmission.
    Worse still is when using the paddle shifters to gear down on long descents, the transmission does some pretty nasty surging and bucking with zero change in accelerator pedal input.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      I think that hokey imitation shifting on CVT’s is silly also. The original idea was deliver relatively smooth, continuous application of power similar to the old Dynaflow’s years ago (agreed: some manufacturers do this better than others) as well as reduction in fuel consumption (not a strong point for the old Dynaflow by any measure). But geared-automatic purists’ complaints caused re-programming for faux gear changes. My wife’s ’11 Outback has the CVT but, thankfully, none of the faux-shift logic nor rubber-band feel. Using the paddles truly locks-in a fixed ratio and works great for deceleration on hills. I prefer my 6mt but I prefer the CVT in her car over the vast majority of automatics that I’ve driven over the last 50 years.

  • avatar
    jmo

    I love manuals and that’s all I’ve had for 20 years. But the advent of traffic assist where the car can drive itself in bumper to bumper traffic means I’ll never get one again. For me that’s the final nail in the coffin.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    This almost hits all the TTAC check boxes

    – Manual-good
    – Subaru-Birkenstock
    – CVT-bad
    – Mazda6 is better

    (3/4 isn’t bad).

    Get over it. The manual isn’t “going to be phase out” it is being phased out. Go on any lot and see what the stock is like. Dealers can only stock according to sell-through, and if sell-through is dwindling, they have to do their due diligence.

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      +100
      Mazda trolls are lurking.

    • 0 avatar
      Tele Vision

      This is why I’m both hanging on to my ’07 CTS-V like grim death AND ready to throw money at it for the rest of my life. The manual ‘sports sedan’ is dead. Long live ( my ) ‘sports sedan’!

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Sir, may I tempt you with this ultra-unicorn, mint, CTS-V WAGON?

        Saw it the other day at this dealership. If it’d been a manual, I might now be volunteering for kidney-donation-for-cash duty.

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      I’ve been hearing that for nearly 20 years now, yet there are still many, many vehicles available with a manual trans. Sure, some day they’ll be phased out, but then so will ICE cars too. Look forward to your electric car future, complete with no transmission at all.

  • avatar
    mcoman

    “Well, if Subaru goes the hybrid route for its next STI (and why would Graham mention this?), we can certainly kiss the stick — in that model, at the very least — goodbye.”

    Why would we have to kiss the stick goodbye if a hybrid STI become available?? Just because the big player in the hybrid game (Toyota) doesn’t offer a manual transmission hybrid doesn’t mean that a hybrid system in incapable of working with a manual transmission. There have been plenty of manual transmission hybrid models mass produced in the past 18 years. The 1st gen Honda Insight, the 1st gen Honda Civic hybrid, and the CR-Z to just name the ones that come to mind. I suspect that a hybrid STI will happen, soon, and I am willing to bet it will be available with a manual transmission.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    We have three cars in our family fleet, a Fusion PHEV with the dual motor electrified CVT, an Explorer with a torque converter/planetary gearset autobox, and a Patriot with a CVT. I was prepared to dislike the Patriot, but I think that Jeep set up the CVT correctly, in that a small press of the accelerator doesn’t get you a big increase in engine speed, unlike the Nissan and Toyota CVT equipped rental car’s I’ve driven. The Explorer is fine, the gearbox is smooth for what it is, but it doesn’t respond as quickly as either CVT. The best of the three is the Fusion, the response to the accelerator pedal is near perfect.

    I spent 30 of my first 40 years driving stick, including the 12 years previous to buying the Fusion. I don’t think I’ll go back to a stick, unless I get a dedicated track car. The automatics do a better job now than I do, something I couldn’t say 10 or 15 years ago.

    Making a CVT into a sporting transmission is just a matter of making a performance oriented software map for it. Whether Subaru is up to it or not, I can’t say.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    It doesn’t bother me if manuals are phased out because there isn’t enough interest to make them profitable. I can still enjoy vehicles with automatic transmissions. But it saddens me if they’re phased out on the belief that everyone should wear diapers. I don’t think I can ever enjoy a vehicle that nannies me.

  • avatar
    Kato

    “The CVT’s natural inclination for rapid, paddle-actuated shifting makes it a better choice than a traditional automatic in sporty models..”

    Umm, it’s not shifting Steph..

    also, no manual = no sale.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Some performance cars are fine with an automatic.

    Some really require a stick to be in character, and the WRX is one of them. If Subaru decides to go stickless they should just kill the WRX off and sell an “Impreza Turbo” instead.

    I’ve been missing having a stick around lately. I’m fine with the everyday vehicles in the household (a PHEV and a giant SUV) being automatics, but it would be nice to have a fun car with a stick. I think eventually I’ll buy one, probably an E46 convertible, but too many other expensive life events have happened recently.

  • avatar
    kurtamaxxguy

    Perhaps more will become clear during the New York Auto Show at end of March, where Subaru’s supposedly going to showcase the ’19 Forester. A Japanese article has already suggested the turbo XT might go away, and that Eyesight will be standard on all Forester models.

  • avatar
    Kato

    Manuals in Foresters are rumoured to be going away entirely. A friend is considering getting one of the last ’18 manual Foresters before they go the way of the Dodo.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    This isn’t about a stickless future.

    It’s about a control-less future.

    Subaru is about 5 years away from selling pods.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Manual vs Automatic? BAH! Crank start, planetary gears, spark advance, and side curtains. Y’all have gone soft.

  • avatar
    KevinC

    Here’s what I don’t understand – why can’t Subaru offer this “EyeSight” stuff with a manual? Our ’17 Mazda3 has all this stuff – autonomous braking, lane departure warning, plus radar cruise control – and it’s a 6MT. My Golf R also has all this stuff on a manual. Sounds like a BS excuse to just move away from manuals, hiding whatever their “real” motivation might be.

    • 0 avatar
      eliandi

      i was wondering when someone mentioned a manual and automated safety features do not contradict each other, same as a manual and a hybrid do not contradict. What you are hearing is marketing justification, not engineering capability.

      That said to buy a manual you have to be persistent. My wife and i drive only manuals. I buy used cars so it is just a matter of shopping around. Hopefully that does not change else I just have to keep buying older and older cars. My wife buys new cars. The previous one they had a manual car to test but to get the car she wanted she had to special order from factory and wait. The last one there were no manuals to test drive, but they found what she wanted in another state and shipped it.

  • avatar
    dima

    I do not have much experience with traditional CVT, I do have experience with eCVT. I can tell you on my Cmax hybrid it performs GREAT! Better then manual or traditional 6 speed auto. So give technology chance.

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