By on January 3, 2018

2017 ford fusion, Image: Ford Motor Co.

Everyone who’s excited about the next-generation Ford Fusion, take one step forward.

Not so fast, guys.

A new report lends weight to rumors that Ford Motor Company isn’t all that enthused about letting its passenger cars wither on the vine while buyers look elsewhere for riper, fresher fruit. Fruit with a cargo bay, to be clear. It seems the Ford Fusion’s redesign program is now off the table, turning the model’s future into a giant question mark.

Death becomes Fusion?

According to a document obtained by The Detroit News, Ford has stopped planning for a next-generation Fusion as it decides where it wants its product portfolio to go. The letter sent to suppliers in November states that Ford has cancelled the CD542N program, which would have created a redesigned 2020 Fusion.

Late last year, we reported that Ford was angling to move Fusion production from Mexico (where the sedans sometimes pick up a big stash, man) to China, future home of the Focus. Ford brass refuted the claim, saying no future Fusion will hail from the Orient. At the same time, sources claimed Dearborn informed suppliers that Mexico and Spain won’t build the thing, either. With American factories earmarked for high-margin trucks and SUVs, that leaves… who?

Suddenly, the Fusion’s future resembles a homeless man warming his hands over an oil drum fire beneath an interstate overpass. Has the automaker come to the realization that waning sedan sales aren’t something worth pursuing? (Fusion sales in the U.S. peaked in 2014, falling significantly every year since.)

In a late-year interview with Automotive News, CEO Jim Hackett cryptically implied the Fusion had no future. Advances in fuel-saving technology, he said, were stripping passenger cars of their sole reason for existence. It’s well known that Hackett wants to cull models from Ford’s lineup.

While all available evidence points to a funeral for the Fusion, don’t don the black garb just yet. Another source told The Detroit News that the company plans to keep the current model around for three or four more years. The Fusion’s a lot like Fiat Chrysler’s LX vehicles in that sense, only those models — most of them, anyway — at least have a semi-solid future. It’s also possible the Fusion nameplate will return, just not as a sedan.

In response to the latest report, Ford spokesman Mike Levine told The Detroit News, “Fusion remains an important part of the Ford lineup for years to come with even more new fresh features on the way. We will have more news to share in the future.”

In the meantime, maybe y’all should get your hands on a Fusion Sport, a variant that’s surely destined to become a low-end collectible.

[Image: Ford Motor Company]

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111 Comments on “Ford Kiboshes the Fusion’s Redesign: Report...”


  • avatar
    npaladin2000

    So I’m guessing this is also part of the MidSize Sedan DeathWatch? If not, it should be.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      The first manufacturer to completely drop midsize sedans will certainly be a big milestone in the “deathwatch.”

      • 0 avatar
        npaladin2000

        So I take it you’ve never heard of FCA< the Chrysler 200, or the Dodge Avenger? Don't be ashamed, most other people hadn't either, that's why they're gone. ;)

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          I had forgotten about Sergio “Trash the Product Openly and then Act Surprised when it does’t Sell”.

          • 0 avatar
            npaladin2000

            That’s because even without Sergio trashing them, they were eminently forgettable.

            Next to go will be whatever the Kia midsize sedan is. Since I can never remember the name anyway. Not that many of them are that memorable compared to the Stinger anyway. :)

          • 0 avatar
            brettc

            Sergio pulled an Osborne (except there was nothing better coming to replace the 200).

            There are still a lot of brand new 200s showing online.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            “Next to go will be whatever the Kia midsize sedan is. Since I can never remember the name anyway. Not that many of them are that memorable compared to the Stinger anyway. :)”

            Optima? Doubtful.

            KMMG is able to pick up the slack from Hyundai Alabama for the Santa Fe output so they’re able to scale back production while keeping the line running 100%.

            Sadly we don’t get the Optima wagon or the Optima wagon plug-in hybrid.

        • 0 avatar
          Polishdon

          I disagree. I have a ’16 200s. It’s a nice car. And actually, except for the rear entry, my neighbor thinks it’s nicer and sleeker then his Fusion.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      I believe Nissan’s Altima is destroying the profitability of other players in the market.

      In essence, crap (Nissan) is pushing better product out of the market.

      • 0 avatar
        notwhoithink

        If that were true then the Altima’s sales numbers would be increasing, and I’m pretty sure they aren’t.

        • 0 avatar

          Nissan is doing a lot better than Ford when it come to sedans. The Altima is easily outselling the Fusion, and is a lot more reliable. The war is over. Both Ford and Chrysler surrendered.

          • 0 avatar
            quaquaqua

            The Altima has bottom-of-the-class owner satisfaction. It has huge sales due to embarrassingly high fleet sales, subprime loans, and massive discounts. It’s cheap crap, easily the worst thing in its class.

    • 0 avatar

      There is no need for that. Nissan, Toyota, and Kia have a very competitive lineup of midsized cars that have been quite profitable. I never thought Kia would surpass Ford.

      Wow…

  • avatar
    dwford

    So will leave Ford with just the Focus as a car in it’s lineup?

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      Mustang too

    • 0 avatar

      The truth is that the Altima will survive as the nations third best selling sedan while the Fusion may disappear entirely. Ford does not have the vision to compete with either Nissan or Kia. Toyota is so far ahead it is not even worth comparing them to hapless Ford. Even Toyota’s trucks and SUVs are of higher quality than anything Ford makes.

    • 0 avatar

      Interesting that they’re going to have just -one- car on the CD4 platform in the US, being the Continental. Surely the MKZ will just die as well?

      I’m having a hard time believing they’re going to kill the Mondeo off, given its considerable sales in Europe.

      • 0 avatar
        Ce he sin

        But the Mondeo doesn’t sell well. The reason Ford went with a Europeanised Fusion (which itself began as an Americanised Mondeo) is that Mondeo sales were no longer sufficient to justify a specific Mondeo model.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        MKZ is doing OK. Edge/MKX are on this platform as well. They’d do better to put some weight saving measures into the platform and leverage it out to more crossovers.

  • avatar
    statikboy

    “Advances in fuel-saving technology, he said, were stripping passenger cars of their sole reason for existence.”

    I don’t believe this. Surely any new fuel-saving technology that can be applied to a less efficient model can also be successfully applied to an already efficient model. He’s saying we should settle for (more profitable) acceptable when we could have excellent.

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      The problem is the increase is usually not linear. Applying the new technology to a less efficient model may boost fuel economy 20%, but applying the same tech to an already efficient model may only boost it 5% if lucky.

      Much easier to sell “hey your 25 mpg car is now 30 mpg” versus “your 40 mpg car is now 42 mpg” when you consider the cost of implementing the tech.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I think people are satisfied with anything that pulls down at least 30 mpg on the highway. Why give up the Escape for a Fusion for just a few more mpg?

      • 0 avatar
        Lichtronamo

        Agreed. Sedans have evolved into something people don’t want. To get better fuel economy, the belt lines have come up to reduce glass and weight while making interiors claustrophobic, the sloping rooflines impede rear seat access and headroom, the short rear deck makes getting large objects in/out of the trunk difficult, and low profile tires ride hard and loud. Today’s midsize crossovers are a much more comfortable, spacious, and useful vehicle than sedans; CUVs are much closer to the “ideal” template of the ‘55 Chevy.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “to get better fuel economy, the belt lines have come up to reduce glass”

          Hogwash, Volvo was and is able to deliver superior safety with visibility. Don’t forget the 1998, designed in 1992, P2 platform was still safer than most in 2015ish when it finally left the US. These poor designs is because children rule design studios.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            I thought beltlines were rising to match rising hoods and tall, flat grilles, which were a result of new pedestrian impact standards.

          • 0 avatar
            Lichtronamo

            Glass weighs more than sheet metal = smaller greenhouse area.

          • 0 avatar
            SatelliteView

            You’re insane to claim that a platform designed in 1992 is safer than most in 2015. I’d stop embracing yourself with such utterly ignorant thesis

        • 0 avatar
          rolando

          You have almost hit the target. The problem is that “t r u c k s” such as CUVs/ SUVs etc do not have the same rules as cars. Put them on the same class, as vehicles built and sold as passenger vehicles” and go from there! I don’t know why anyone would pay $5k more for RAV4 than a Corolla, or the equivalent Honda, Ford, etc, but they do

    • 0 avatar
      kam327

      What he’s saying is true. The EPA combined rating of a 2008 Fusion was 21% better than a 2008 Edge. In 2017 the improvement was only 12%. The gap between the two is ever-shrinking.

    • 0 avatar
      notwhoithink

      Yeah, I don’t actually care how fuel efficient they can make a crossover/SUV, I’m still not buying one for myself. My wife can have one to haul the kids in (and she does) but I want a mid-size sedan, period. If Ford won’t sell me one in the future then my current Fusion will likely be the last Ford I buy.

    • 0 avatar

      “Advances in fuel-saving technology, he said, were stripping passenger cars of their sole reason for existence.”

      Really? Only MBA educated American CEO can think along these lines. It may be (or not) true if compare Ford CUVs to Fusion. But Camry, Accord and Altima handily beat anything Ford offers regarding fuel efficiency – if not count Fusion Hybrid which is very efficient and one of the most popular midsize hybrids in Bay Area (most of Fusions sold here are hybrids).

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        And if it is like all the Fusion Hybrids and Energis around here most of them are Titaniums, those should yield a reasonable profit. They do seem to sell well to a demographic that is traditionally considered to favor imports. Sell that person a loaded Fusion Hybrid and maybe they’ll consider an Explorer, especially if they offer a Hybrid, instead of a Pilot or Highlander. The fact that SoCal is by far the strongest market for the Flex was given as a reason they plan on soldering it on through the end of the decade… of course that was with the old management.

        • 0 avatar

          Fusion is based on very solid platform derived from Mondeo which won awards as Euro COTY and can serve another 5 years with no problems. Its weakness as usual are gas engines which are behind of Toyota and Honda in efficiency, esp base engines. But hybrid powertrain is very competitive. So what Ford needs to do is to restyle exterior and interior to attract existing Fusion owners tot he new model and improve gas engines to be more competitive.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    Pretty aggressive move to pull the fourth best selling sedan from the market, more so that FCA pulling the the 200 which was an also-ran in the segment. Could be forward looking if the belief is that there is no future for mid-size sedans in the US being squeezed out by CUV/SUVs, and in Europe/UK by the premium brands coming down market. Ford doing this would signal that midsize the sedan market will be like minivans, Honda/Toyota and one or two others. Could start a domino effect of automakers dropping mid-size offerings.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      If the European idea of premium brands moving downmarket is viable in the US, where does this move leave Lincoln? They’re putting out a good, decently desirable product (once we get past the whining of, “It’s just a dressed up Ford”), and you’d think they’d be perfectly positioned to incercept that marketing move in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      But it’s not being squeezed out by CUVs.

      2016 Fusion sales (don’t have 2017 numbers yet) are lower than the previous three years. However, they are higher than every single year before that. What happened in 2013 that caused and maintained the sales increase? A redesign. Even with the lower numbers, it still blows away the sales of the previous generation Fusion.

      There’s something we’re not being told. Perhaps, development is happening with a different platform.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    A carmaker with the scale of Ford needs to have an entrant in the midsize sedan segment. Even if it is forecast to be smaller than it once was. Remember how quickly everyone wanted to ditch SUVs and Trucks when gas prices went through the roof. The SUV/Crossover craze wont last forever. Global tension, natural disaster, all sorts of things could spike oil prices indefinitely. Seems like a recipe for getting caught with your pants down.

    • 0 avatar
      Gardiner Westbound

      What goes around comes around.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      When truck and SUV sales tanked, it was due to the recession. Those sales weren’t replaced by small cars. The sales evaporated. While sales of smaller cars weren’t hit quite as hard, they weren’t any more profitable. As long as people have jobs to afford the fuel, they will buy the vehicles they want and not convert to perceived penalty boxes.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Do you have a paper map? No? what are you going to do when the govmnt or the Russians will shut down your internet, telephone, etc?

        Stick to the basics. Price of gas or whatever feature regulations, will affect purchase decisions and manufacturing decisions. Fuel economy craze is even today affecting your life. Cars need only thin oils these days. Piston rings are not as tense as before and maintenance must be done timely. Or, disappearance of manual cars is also related to fuel economy at least partially.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      So Ford sells a Fusion, rated at 21/32 and very low markup. They also sell an Escape rated at 21/29 with moderate markup.

      For the consumer, that mileage is ‘close enough’. It’s not like the mileage difference between a Tahoe and a Grenada or whatever they sold back then. CUV’s have been where the money’s been pumped. It also ‘feels’ roomier because of the seating position. And the driving dynamics are fine for the majority of the country.

      Sedans just don’t have a lot to offer for your average driver now. Sport Sedans are kind of a different matter, but even those are falling by the wayside with crazy capable SUVs coming out.

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        That’s part of fords problem – the Camry does 29/41 and is much more reliable. The practical mid-size sedan buyer has no reason to buy a fusion.

        • 0 avatar
          MrIcky

          I’m trying to keep it to similar sizes and power trains, I think the 41 for Camry is their hybrid. Im pretty sure their Rav 4 is right in the same ballpark as the Escape.

          My point is though, you can still get a CUV and get most of the gas mileage of the sedan. You don’t have to choose a sedan if gas prices explode.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        The Ford sedan might get 21/32 but there are few bigger vehicles like the MDX/Pilot (27-28 mpg on the highway) closing in on the same economy specs with a bigger interior.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      The rising popularity of crossovers are a reaction to the last gas crisis. They cushion the impact of high gas prices in a way that SUVs can’t. No one’s going to ditch their CRV/Rav-4 to get into a Fit/Yaris that gets just a few more mpg.

    • 0 avatar
      notwhoithink

      New guy in charge wants to make his mark by doing something bold, so he does something bold and stupid.

  • avatar
    ajla

    What would this mean for Lincoln?

    • 0 avatar
      Lichtronamo

      DN article says Ford will still build a new Fusion in China for China. Ford would have the ability to would build an MKZ off that and could export it to the US. But if Ford is going without a mainstream midsize sedan, how much market is there for a near-luxury midsize (other than Lexus ES)?

  • avatar
    Syke

    Strikes me as being more than a bit shortsighted. Yes, everybody and their brother wants SUV’s and pickup trucks. But what happens when the buying public’s needs change, be it either due to necessity (gas prices) or just the fickleness of the buying public?

    I seem to remember GM back in the Nineties deciding that trucks, trucks, trucks were the future, and they could ignore their car lines completely. Gee, that worked out real well at the first sign of change on the part of the buying public. GM’s cars were old and pathetic, and the Japanese were given the red carpet for the final step of market domination.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Times have changed since then. CAFE regulations have encouraged larger footprints along with further truckification. The small to midsize sedan market is very crowded, price points are aggressive, and further tightening CAFE requirements will require even more content/cost that will be difficult to pass on to consumers. This makes for little margin. All automakers realize this. FCA was the first to pull out in NAFTA because they didn’t have the tolerance for pain in exchange for marketshare. Ford has indicated they are going this way in degrees with Fiesta, Focus and now Fusion. Hyundai/Kia who made their bones on sedans in NAFTA 10 years ago is going hard on crossovers. Look for this trend to continue, maybe even if the regulatory regime is relaxed. Much of the investment has already been made.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      “I seem to remember GM back in the Nineties deciding that trucks, trucks, trucks were the future, and they could ignore their car lines completely. Gee, that worked out real well at the first sign of change on the part of the buying public” So basically- you’re saying they were ahead of their time?

  • avatar
    stingray65

    If they really had guts they would ditch the current Fusion and all car variants of it, and build a Fusion sized sedan/wagon off the Mustang platform. RWD, 2.3 Turbo standard, optional V-8, manual transmission, independent rear suspension, and Shelby and Lincoln variants could easily be accommodated. That would be a real game changer and might even sell in Europe, and certainly be attractive in Australia and the Middle-East.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      Even if it happened, and even if was available with AWD and a hybrid/EV version as it would have to be, it would still probably be cramped inside and hard to see out of. Just buy a Stinger or Charger, that’s the closest you’ll get.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      Sounds cool, critics would love it. They’d sell maybe 1500/mo after the first month- if they’re lucky. It would change no games.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        ~1500/mo would likely be fine for an off-the-shelf niche vehicle selling in the $40k range.

        Ford isn’t planning on killing the Mustang and is keeping it RWD so it makes sense to amortize its currently unique platform across at least one other vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Yep, it’d be pretty gutsy to walk away from a model they sold 192,000 copies of last year, Stingray. Dumb, but gutsy.

      • 0 avatar

        Sedans are moribund because they’re all the same. Anyone who breaks the standard look and cramped insides of modern sedans could carve out a niche. Ford is the logical one to build a tall, slab-sided modern variation on an LTD/Galaxie sort of vehicle, with low beltlines like old Hondas and designed from the inside out.

        It won’t happen. In the area of motor vehicles, Ford’s CEO has about the same vision as Roger Smith did 30 years ago — presumably without the chocolate pudding obsession.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I could see both Volkswagen and Ford being the first to drop their mid-sized sedans, and making the compact sedans into cover-all “tweeners” that provide an abundance of room for most people. You want more space than that? Get a crossover.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      See Crosstrek sales? VW has car like that. If it didn’t cost $30K they might moved a lot of these. I always thought this of Mazda. Elevated Mazda3 and body-cladded Mazda3 hatch would be a hit. And same with elevated Mazda6 wagon which they already have elsewhere.

  • avatar
    gomez

    Ford’s new CEO is not exactly building confidence in his company’s future. He hasn’t given any insight to future product that wasn’t already known under Fields and when he does talk about product it is about potentially killing models. Mullaly and Fields had a pretty good product run and they were out there talking about that product at every opportunity. Seven months into Hackett’s Ford, and not a peep.

  • avatar
    maxxcool7421

    That’s too bad. the Tuner scene is really picking up for the sports. With a e30 tune and tires we had runs recorded in the 12.2 12.4 range all night long. With meth to cool the IAT high 11’s are very doable.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    That’s unfortunate, the current Fusion was the closest thing I found in the midsize sedan segment to solid-but-nimble feel of the MkV Volkswagen. Very enjoyable car with the 2.0T if you weren’t too hung up on a Camry V6 running away from you above 40mph.

    Interesting times where a model that sells over 200K units annually five and a half years after introduction is deemed insufficiently profitable.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    If Ford is going to axe the Fusion (the Taurus is presumed dead) in NA, GM’s move will be interesting. With the Malibu, Impala, Regal, and LaCrosse all on offer, you have to figure at least half of those disappear – Impala and Regal would be my call.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    So in Ford’s logic the same fuel efficiency tricks can’t be applied to the Fusion that can be applied to CUV’s and SUV’s? Gas will never ever go up again? Sedan sales will never ever rebound, especially with less and less choices than before. GM must be pretty happy about this news along with Honda and Toyota

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I was just about to say, and then this

    “company plans to keep the current model around for three or four more years.”

    Exactly. Current model is good enough for next 5 years. How long Infinity G35 was produced without major change? 10, 12 years?

  • avatar
    Advance_92

    This is just Ford being Ford. “Let’s offer a competitive world car to the US, not support it and have it die in a few years. Who cares as long as we make some money in the short term; someone else can figure out a legacy product. Or maybe it doesn’t matter because no one will ever out-F150s us.”
    Merkur
    Lincoln LS
    1st gen Focus
    Fiesta
    Focus RS

    I swear there are as many promises and letdowns from Ford as there are in Russian history starting around 1700.

  • avatar
    Omnifan

    Not surprising that Hackett wants to redo Ford. Hopefully he’ll do much better than his hiring of Jim Harbaugh as Michigan head coach.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Prediction: The fusion will get a redesign – as a fully electric car. That’s why the delay now.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I can think of 192,000 reasons why Ford isn’t dropping this car altogether.

    All this means is that they will proabably do a refresh vesus a redesign on it.

    I could see Chevy dropping the Malibu before Ford drops this car.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Foley

      ^^^ Correct. It’ll be the 2008-11 Focus again…same (admittedly good) platform, but with a (probably) less attractive body and interior.

      In 2012, I took part in a focus group comparing the 2013 4-cyl Accord, Altima, Camry, Fusion, and Sonata. The Fusion was by far my favorite of the five – best handling, best looking, most intuitive interior.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      That’s right, the old “make up the losses with volume” strategy.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Ford is a truck company. They certainly don’t do trucks very well and they have no idea how to properly build and sell cars and SUVs.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    The two statements are in a bit of conflict with each other. On the one hand they have supposedly told suppliers for the plants in Mexico and Spain that 2020 will be the last time their services will be needed for the Fusion/Mondeo. On the other hand we have a person saying that the Fusion will be around for another 3-5 years. The 3 jives with the plan of 2020 being the last MY for the Fusion in the US. However if it were to hang around for 5 more MY’s where would it be produced in 2021-2022? It would not make sense to set up a new line to build the old car on.

    It is also important to consider that in the past Ford preferred 10 year cycles for the body shells of most of its vehicle lines. At the 5 year point they would give them new front & rear clips and usually a new dash too. However the Fusion originally marked a change to a shorter cycle with a refresh after 4 years and a new car after the first one only lasting 7 years. We were on track for an 8 year cycle with the 4 year refresh in 2017 which would jive with a new car for 2021. So maybe this means that they will shift back to 10 years with the Fusion.

    Even with its lowest sales in years when final 2017 numbers are in it will represent about 50% of the sales of vehicles on that platform. That’s right it is on track to match the combined sales of the CUV darlings the Edge and MKX which recently announced to be morphing into the Nautilus as well as Lincoln’s other key players the MKZ and in stretched form the new Continential. So even as it continues to drop in sales it could still represent a significant portion of the sales and thus amortization of a new platform for those other models.

  • avatar

    Nissan and Toyota seem to be doing quite well selling both midsized cars and Trucks/SUVs. Why can’t Ford do the same? Even Kia at this point seems far ahead of Ford in cars. Ford and Chrysler’s are going to become bottom feeders in the sedan market.

    Imagine the sense of pride America would have if it was producing cars at the standard of Nissan and Toyota?

    • 0 avatar
      Advance_92

      Since those Nissans and Toyotas (and Hondas for that matter) are being made in the US anyway the pride should be something the manufacturers are looking for rather than short term profits.

    • 0 avatar

      ” Kia at this point seems far ahead of Ford in cars.”

      Far behind? You are not serious are you? If any brands are bottom feeders it is Kia along with Nissan (and Mitsu which is part of Nissan).

      • 0 avatar

        Kia is now rated number one by JD Powers. Consumers Reports also ranks Kia at the top. Ford is giving up on the Fusion because they can’t compete with Kia and the other Asian makes. Ford and Chrysler have brought shame to America.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I too can’t make sense of this one. Fusion sells, what did someone say, nearly 200,000 units a year? And this isn’t “good enough” to continue? Really? Then add in MKZ, Continental, and whatever else might be on this platform, then view the Fusion as sort of an “added bonus” on the other more profitable models….and still not good enough?

    I can’t imagine that Ford is losing money here. And I can’t imagine that they’re not making basically the same money Toyota or Nissan makes on their 0% for 72 month $5000 cash back Camry or Altima sales.

    I suppose if they need capacity for more profitable models, but it is extremely hard for me to imagine that they will just walk away from 200,000 (and more with the other models) sales. I suppose you don’t have to be a full-range automaker, there is no rule on that, but I would think Ford would want to be covered in this market based on their sales numbers and company size. They’re not niche.

    Oh, and wouldn’t the Mondeo play into this as well? There is another good-selling car that is basically the Fusion. They walking away from the Mondeo too?

    So that leaves me with the question “What the H is going on here?” cuz I sure don’t know. My feeling on Hackett however is that I’m not so sure he knows what the H is going on either. I’ve seen nothing from this guy so far other than he sometimes brings back flashes of Jaques The Knife.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    “A new report lends weight to rumors that Ford Motor Company isn’t all that enthused about letting its passenger cars wither on the vine while buyers look elsewhere for riper, fresher fruit.”

    Strange then that the article talks about exactly the opposite. Ford IS enthused about letting its passenger cars wither on the vine, or it wouldn’t be canceling the new Fusion program.

    They’ll probably sell about 205,000 in the US, 50,000 Mondeos in Europe, and about 105,000 in China plus dribs and drabs elsewhere. What the Fusion needs is weight reduction without becoming a tin can. When the Altima, Accord and Camry are running about 3200 lbs in 4 cylinder form, the Fusion is probably 250 pounds heavier and the Fusion Sport is a hippo.

    But Ford under Hackett is off chasing rainbows because Wall Street and Silicon Valley don’t get excited about good old tin-bashing but prefer fluffy pseudo clouds like Tesla. It ain’t sexy to be a blacksmith so stock prices stagnate, but sell ’em a big line of BS and they go gaga. So I like this quote: “Hackett and Bill Ford said they also want to modernize Ford’s business processes by taking advantage of things like 3D printing, big data and artificial intelligence. Ford recently invested $1 billion over five years in artificial intelligence startup Argo AI.”

    Yup so that’ll do it for stock prices all right. Meanwhile Toyota flogs 700,000 Camrys and Corollas and Honda 600,000 Accords and Civics each year in the US alone, plus boatloads of RAV4s and CRVs some 400,000 each, getting on for 75,000 more each than Escape. And the desperate Rogue is also in that hunt.

    Ford may well be fooling itself chasing ephemera. I couldn’t possibly say. But if these car companies think they’re going to get rich flogging my details so I can get bombarded by ads for eats and other crap on the infotainment screen, while I get driven around by amateur hour version 0.8 beta “autonomy” programs, well they can forget selling me one of their blobmobiles.

    • 0 avatar

      This is a dead-on assessment of Hackett and what the Ford family and board wants from him. Vapor-money.

      Much as I had doubts about Fields’ leadership following Big Al, I’m glad I sold at $12. If anything happens to collapse the F-series franchise, this will get VERY ugly indeed.

  • avatar

    Is it possible that Ford cancels CD542N because it is switches to new modular platform that also optimized for BEV? If thats true then it makes sense to cancel redesign of old platform which would be short-lived anyway.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    Daniel Howes at Detroit News had an interesting column today. It started with Sergio was right. And then this:

    “Traditional car segments, particularly for mass-market volume brands, don’t rank high. And year-end sales numbers won’t help. Ford-brand cars closed last year down 14.9 percent, reports Autodata Corp. GM’s Buick car sales slumped 51 percent on the year; Chevrolet car dropped 16.1 percent; Toyota’s namesake car brand dropped nearly 10 percent, and its posh Lexus car lineup surrendered 23.3 percent last year.

    Yet in December, Ford sold nearly twice as many F-Series pickups (89,385) as it did cars across its entire U.S. lineup (44,871) — evidence that Ford is coming late to a game its previous management team, under ousted CEO Mark Fields, mostly chose not to play.”

    His general take on the reports of the demise of the Fusion in NA is that its an inevitable move that prior CEOs were not prepared to make.

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