By on August 2, 2016

2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe. Photo courtesy Hyundai

Hyundai’s rear-drive sports coupe is dead.

First reported by the Globe and Mail, the Genesis Coupe’s 2016 model year will be its last in the U.S. and Canada, a company spokesperson confirmed today. A replacement is expected to follow sometime after 2017, but it won’t carry the Hyundai badge.

With Genesis now its own brand, the automaker can’t have a model that carries both names. The coupe’s platform mate, the former Hyundai Genesis sedan, transforms into the Genesis G80 for 2017, but its two-door sibling won’t make the cut.

“A new, more sophisticated and luxurious coupe appropriate for the new Genesis brand is currently under development,” said Christine Henley, PR manager for Hyundai Motor America, after confirming the discontinuation.

So, the four- and six-cylinder sports coupe that arrived in North America in 2009 as a 2010 model leaves the market after a two-generation run. Its departure leaves Hyundai without a traditional sporty offering.

As for Genesis, the luxury marque’s initial offerings are the 2017 G80 midsize sedan and G90 full-size sedan, with a compact G70 sedan and two crossovers expected to follow. A sixth model — which we now know to be the coupe — should appear within a few years.

[Image: Hyundai Motor America]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

80 Comments on “Hyundai Discontinues the Genesis Coupe; Upscale Two-Door Planned for Genesis Lineup...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Honestly, it’s about time. The styling is wak and doesn’t match the sedan, and the Genesis name being applied to two separate cars never made sense. Further, it’s not really luxurious enough to wear the badge.

    This should have been called either Tiburon Elite, or Tosca (S.K. name for Tiburon).

    “Would you actually like a G35 coupe, but don’t want to feel out of place when dining out at Burger King? The new Genesis Coupe!”

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Yeah, I didn’t understand why the Genesis Coupe got its name, either. It shouldn’t have been called the Tiburon, but it could have been called something else. The cars themselves were not all that related, even though they shared a very basic platform.

      Side note: a friend of mine just about cried when he got a steal on a used 2.0T Genesis Coupe, thinking he could swap in the 4.6-liter V8 or the 5.0-liter V8 from the sedan, and I (having already done the research) basically had to tell him it couldn’t be done without significant expense and an engineering degree.

      But you can, as with most things, LS-swap a Genesis Coupe.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        I always that they should have designed the coupe to take the 4.6 and 5.0 V8s. When the car first came out, some journalists thought it could be a competitor to the Mustang, and maybe it could have, if a V8 was offered.

        And, LS-swap all the cars!

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          That would have been the smart choice, IMO. Even if Hyundai never offered a production V8 Genesis Coupe, giving enthusiasts a chance to V8-upgrade within the Hyundai ecosystem would have fostered a lot of love for the car and the marque.

          This is something that Ford, GM, FCA, Honda or Toyota would have considered and probably accounted for, but not a company like Hyundai, which was fresh to proper sports cars at the time.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        The correct swap is a 4B11 out of a frisbee’d Evo. But yeah, some people like wheezy, piston-slappy, dump truck engines too.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        You don’t like the name “coupe” because the definition of the term has devolved. Coupe used to mean 2-door.

        Today, coupe is defined as “more expensive version of our 4-door standard vehicle, but with less rear headroom.”

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Well, it hasn’t *really* devolved. See, “coupe” roughly translates from French to “chopped-off”, and originally rather referred to having a more cut or sleek roofline. In that regard, the X4, X6, ZDX, A7, CC, GLE-Class Coupe and the general onslaught of “four-door coupes” aren’t oxymorons.

          Somehow, we’ve gotten to the point that we feel it rigidly describes a vehicle with two doors on the sides, probably because those are usually the vehicles that have such chopped rooflines, but that’s not strictly true.

          Note: it is also possible to have a two-door sedan, which would be a two-door vehicle with a fairly-formal sedan roofline, and that (but for its two missing doors) is about as functional as a similarly-sized sedan. I’d say the last example of that was probably the Mercedes-Benz CL-Class, specifically the C215 version (2000-2006).

          As far as the name, I think that what CoreyDL means is not that the Genesis Coupe wasn’t a proper coupe, but rather that it shouldn’t have carried the Genesis name. The sedan and coupe really weren’t similar to one another at all, and probably shouldn’t have been sold in the same room. Hyundai should have picked another name for the coupe.

          • 0 avatar
            DevilsRotary86

            “I’d say the last example of that was probably the Mercedes-Benz CL-Class, specifically the C215 version (2000-2006).”

            I think there is a strong argument that the current Dodge Challenger is the last of the last 2 door sedans, with its almost-notchback roofline.

            http://www.dodge.com/assets/images/vehicles/2016/challenger/packages/rt%20classic/2015-challenger-packages-rt-classic-1.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Having it called the Genesis Coupe caused nothing but confusion in the showroom. People came in expecting a luxury coupe, but instead found a sort of Mustang competitor. I had one customer who had the bad habit of buying a new car every 6 months or so trade in his Genesis sedan for a Coupe without test driving it. I tried to warn him but he wouldn’t listen. He traded the Coupe back in after a few weeks.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Hey, AMC used a completely different body for their Matador coupe vs. the Matador sedan/wagon, and Plymouth and Dodge for their Satellites and Coronets, respectively, and no one batted an eye.

      Although it was a different time then.

    • 0 avatar
      chiefmonkey

      Agree about the styling. I would still love to drive a 3.8l one day to see if it’s a credible sports car or a completely run-of-the-mill effort. My guess is the Genesis coupe was always more of the latter than the former, but who knows…

    • 0 avatar
      LIKE TTAC.COM ON FACEBOOK

      Korean Volkswagen owners now wish they had bought a Genesis, but now all they have are Lamentations, thanks to the Acts of Korean Judges. They will now be in Exodus from “German Engineering”, and Chronicles report that said engineers are now looking for a new Job. Predictions are that Hyundai will soon have Revelations of improved sales Numbers.

  • avatar
    JMII

    So when does a downscale Miata / BRZ / FR-S coupe from Kia come out to replace this?

    Agreed that the Genesis Coupe name itself never made any sense, since it was not connected to the sedan in anyway, other then at one point they shared the same V6 (I think?).

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Yeah, that 3.8-liter is just the bigger version of Hyundai’s corporate Lambda V6, which is mainly applied to RWD-based vehicles, like the Genesis, Genesis Coupe, K900, Borrego and first-gen Sorento (although I think the Azera used it at one point). Nothing special.

      The FWD-based ones (current Sorento, Santa Fe, current Azera, Cadenza, Sedona, etc…) make do with the 3.3-liter.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Yet another bonus of the Veracruz was that it got the 3.8 as well, though is FWD based.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Ugh…the Veracruz. I remember that steaming pile of crap. Getting a 3.8 in place of a 3.3 does not in any way redeem that ugly duckling. They actually marketed it as a premium SUV, never mind that it paled in comparison to its nearest competitor, the also-unloved Subaru Tribeca / B9 Tribeca (but at least it didn’t have a flying vagina face).

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Hey, what was wrong with it besides the looks? Big V6 and decent enough space. Marketed as premium so the interior was decent on the upper trims.

            And makes a good used buy since nobody remembers or wants one, but shares common parts with the other Hyundai offerings.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Well, it certainly is ugly.

            And now that I know Hyundai and Kia can make real, proper luxury products (starting with the first-generation Genesis sedan in 2009), the company’s earlier attempts really bother me, such as the previous Azera, the Veracruz, the Amanti and the ill-fated XG350.

            I think my issue with the Veracruz is that Hyundai really did try to say it was a luxury vehicle, a Lexus or Acura alternative, and it was anything but. I suppose you could pass it off as a cheaper, more-round version of the contemporary (2nd-generation) Acura MDX, if you were so inclined.

            It’s also the same problem I have with pretty much every Chrysler product made in the mid-late 2000s. I still probably wouldn’t buy anything Chrysler makes, but you have to admit that the interiors and attention to detail are *waaaay* better than they ever were in that era.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I can understand if the marketing didn’t match the product. The XG350 was a hot oil-leaky mess (I think that’s due to the US market engine. They run forever as the Grandeur as taxis on LPG in S. Korea.)

            And the Azera was a mess as well. The only redeeming feature of the Amanti were the giant LED indicators in the bumper, which I liked.
            http://cdn.pinthiscars.com/images/kia-amanti-2005-wallpaper-5.jpg

            While I am at it, I think they should have tried the early 00s Equus here. It was staid enough to attract the Town Car type customer, and didn’t -actually- have any Hyundai badges on it. I would actually drive that car. RWD and 5.0 V8.

            https://tizona.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/hyundai-equus-centennial.jpg
            http://i.wheelsage.org/pictures/hyundai/equus/autowp.ru_hyundai_equus_1.jpg

            The Veracruz is on my list of things to check out for used SUV cheapo reliable thing, with the gen 1 MDX, and Tahoe/Yukon. Have ruled out the gen 1 RX as they’re too old and cost too much for the miles.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        My 09 Sedona has the 3.8 V6 – an impressive engine, to me, at least.

        (The newer 3.3 has more power, but it’s supposedly more peaky.)

        At one point I recall the Genesis Coupe V6 was the winner in a car rag contest between it, the Camaro V6, and Mustang V6.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          We had a Kia Sorento, but it was a 2003, so it had the 3.5-liter V6 with only 192 HP. The Sorento got upgraded to the much-better 3.8-liter V6 with its 2007 facelift.

          My mother nearly bought a Genesis 3.8, but pulled the trigger on something else, so we didn’t get to have that engine in our fleet, even though we’ve had a lot of Hyundai / Kia products.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          True, SCE, but the Camaro and Mustsang (and Challenger) V-6s have a huge advantage – V-8 versions with the same basic styling. Voila! Instant halo effect.

          Genesis came in one flavor only: boring.

          Hyundai would have done the model a huge favor by at least doing a model with a hotter engine.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        The 3.3 MPI and GDI was also offered in the Genesis sedan in markets outside of North America. The 3.3 will be offered as a twin turbo for the upcoming Genesis G90.

        RWD Vehicles have the 3.8 Lambda II RS (Reardrive Sport) in GDI and MPI versions.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Hardly surprising as it is tough to compete in that price-point against the Pony cars.

      The GenCoupe was always more of a coupe companion to the segment beneath the Genesis/G80 and even then, not luxurious enough (unlike the upcoming G70 sedan).

      The new Genesis RWD coupe is going to be a bit larger and more of a GT.

      May seem antithetical to say this – but this new RWD coupe will have it easier competing against the likes of Infiniti and Lexus than the Pony cars.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I wonder if it’s the halo coupe Hyundai previewed not that long ago, or something more line with a mainstream luxury coupe, like a 4-Series/RC/ATS Coupe/Q60 fighter. The Q60 (previously the G35 and G37 Coupe) has always been a value proposition, so stealing its crown might not be too challenging, although the new version promises to be significantly more refined.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Another sporty car bites the dust. The pickings are getting kind of slim in that segment.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Yes, whatever the new Genesis brings to the market will be a lot more upscale—and thus a lot pricier—than the Genesis Coupe. It pretty much *is* the Mustang, Camaro and Challenger, at this point.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        This is why I was wondering if they won’t chase the Miata / FRS market with a Kia offering. Of course its hard to compete with the Mustang in the bang-for-buck category.

        While the Challenger may be a sports car its really a throw back to the traditional muscle cars, IE: it goes great in a straight line.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          It’s a tiny market, but if Kia wants to lose money trying to compete with the Miata, no car fan will object.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          I like the Challenger just because it’s a big, powerful coupe that can seat four people in absolute comfort. With the demise of personal luxury coupes—Eldorado/ETC, Thunderbird, Riviera, Cougar, Mark VIII, etc—nothing else currently on the market, south of a 6-Series, can make that claim. Even the semi-cramped-but-mostly-functional mid-sized FWD coupes are all gone, other than the Accord Coupe. I (at 5’10” and with a slender frame) can’t physically fit into the back of the new Mustang unless it’s a convertible…and the new Camaro is even more miserable.

          As far as a prospective Kia, there’s probably a market for something like the BRZ and FR-S (which are 2+2 coupes), but with with more power. But I think Kia had said something about building a RWD four-door coupe…and prototypes of such a product have been seen. I think that’s a better bet in terms of profit.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            *I ding the Challenger on the rather rubbish interior quality.
            *Also non-existent rear visibility.
            *It’s longer than my Cadillac and has 45% of the interior space.
            *The automatic kills all the torque all the time, forcing you to drive like an old man, or floor it.

            +3.6L engine is good/quiet/efficient.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Oh yeah, you did have that Challenger rental.

            I literally can’t see out of the sides of a Challenger. Makes me wonder how people drive them without BLIS (which is iffy, anyway).

            But it’s still a cool car, IMO.

            And how *is* the Caddy? What’d you decide to do about the A/C?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I would look out the rear 3/4 view and see – window trim. Mirror adjustment is so important in that car. But that won’t help you much when you’re reversing.

            So the AC fix was going to be $12-1500, with no guarantee that the Cadillac compressor worked well with the higher pressure of R134 (I’ve read they don’t). So I say eff that, and had them put in a compressor bypass pulley, so now it just spins freely and isn’t attached to anything. When you press the AC button, nothing activates or happens.

            And that’s how it’s going to stay. I’m going to sell when the weather gets cooler, and replace with one of those SUVs I mentioned above.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            A bypass pulley. That’s what I did with my ’97 Jetta when the A/C compressor exploded, and threw shrapnel into the radiator.

            And it’s not like you don’t have another car with A/C.

            You’re also right about selling when the weather is cooler. Here in Oklahoma—in particular—a car with no working A/C is a tough sell in the summer…but you would be surprised how easy it is to sell such a car in the colder months. Like, did you forget that it was 110 degrees outside last July?

            As far as the SUV, I don’t know what the failure rate was with Honda’s 5-speed/V6 woes on the MDX, but that’s something to consider. Ditto for the Takata airbag thing. The Tahoe and Yukon aren’t a bad bet; they’re definitely cheap to own and fix. Hmm…maybe the Veracruz *does* make sense under those circumstances, because it was at least reliable (unlike the Tribeca).

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Yeeeep. Nobody would even come look at it in July, but in September-November I don’t think I’ll have an issue. I must resist having three cars until then.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            GM didn’t have a R134-compatible compressor for the fat-boy Devilles?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I don’t think so. I want to say the K-Body version is not a direct fit.

            Edit: See Scoutdude answer below.

            Either way, it’s simply not worth the cost investment.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            The GM compressor would have worked just fine with 134a. Of course you need someone that actually knows how to properly do the conversion and adjust the clutch cycling switch for optimum cooling. Do it right and it will put out 40 degree air w/o recirc even on a 90 degree day.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Corey

            GM would have had to develop an R134 system for the K-body 4.9 in MY95, have you investigated this?

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @28 cars it has been a couple of decades since you could buy a compressor that isn’t intended for use with 134a and in fact a lot of cars that came with R12 in the early 90’s had systems designed to accept 134a because it wasn’t worth saving a few pennies on cheaper seals and non barrier hose when they knew they were going 134a on that model in a few years.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            I see where you’re going Kyree, which is where I thought FCA should go with the Baracuda name: an upscale Chrysler Personal Luxury Coupe. But, last I heard, the name was to be used on Dodge’s Challenger replacement.

            I think it works better as a Chrysler. The Challenger name is fine, and as their next Mustang/Camaro rival, should be based on the Alfa Romeo Giulia platform.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Kia was contemplating doing so with the Stinger concept, but right now, that looks to be on hold as Kia has other, more pressing priorities, and that market hasn’t exactly been growing.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          I LOVED the Kia GT-4 Stinger concept. I’ll take mine with a n/a I-4 and a manual trans, please.

          Nissan IDx was pretty snazzy, too, but GOOD NEWS! We are getting a new Juke instead! Whew, they almost f’ed up and made a desirable car.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    Very disappointed.
    :-(

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I liked these cars. It’s good to have more choices. It was just too expensive in comparison to the American competition. V6 power close to V8 pricing. And the front end of the post-refresh model was a bit fugly. Faux hood scoops went out in the 90’s.

    It was a good first shot at a RWD sports car for Hyundai. I wish this could have led to the development of a true second generation car. With an optional V8. Any Genesis brand coupe will probably be fatter and less sporty, if it doesn’t just turn into vaporware altogether. Oh, and of course it will cost far more.

    Oh, and I always thought the trim levels on these things were screwy. You get the all-track model with no options, the all-touring model with no options, or the car with all the options. Stick shift, cloth seats, and a sunroof? Haha, no.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      “Faux hood scoops went out in the 90’s.”

      I dunno. The Challenger has had quite a bit of success with faux hood scoops (and faux hood pins, no less). And Ford even brought back the tell-tales (hood-vent mounted turn signals) on the Mustang for 2016, even though I believe the hood vents themselves are either non-functional or too small to make a difference.

      Hyundai’s implementation of hood vents was just particularly poor, functional or not, and really not in keeping with the shape and design language of the car. You need stronger, straighter lines to pull that off.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Well, yeah, but the Challenger and Mustang are selling on muscle car memories…so, hood scoops.

        The Genesis coupe was just too bland for its’ own good.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Yeah, it was more of an amalgamation of weird shapes that didn’t amount to a particular personality. And those hood scoops only helped the car to look more reptilian (which is not a flattering image).

          Then there was the fairly-middling performance.

          All in all, I’d say the car was worth less than the sum of its parts.

  • avatar
    Hoon Goon

    I give the company credit for this car’s existence, but the execution left a lot to be desired. Even the “track” version is a total dog in stock form. Could have been a great car.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    This was a car we were all supposed to like. Cheap, RWD, fast with the V6. Where did it go wrong?

    Only legitimate ding I have against it is the styling and its slightly chunky looks. It’s kind of a big girl. But then so is an Infiniti G, though that wears its weight much better.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “It’s kind of a big girl.”

      Heh… first one I ever saw was from behind as I pulled around it in a parking lot… “Damn! Baby Got Back!”

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Mustang, Camaro and Challenger are where it went wrong. Nobody wants a sporty 2+2 unless it’s a muscle car (or looks like one).

      Plus, it’s a performance car with no real performance options.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        The Asian automakers just have trouble competing against the Pony cars when it comes to the power to price ratio.

        Hence – drastic decline of sales of the Z and even the FR-S/BRZ twins not doing so well these days.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        Recent buyer and owner of a ’16 Mustang Ecoboost Premium here. Funny thing is I didn’t get it because it looks like a muscle car. I got it over the Hyundai because of gas mileage. One of my specifications when shopping was that it had to be EPA rated at least 20mpg city. That’s just a hard line I don’t want to go below. And the Hyundai with the V6 is only rated at 17mpg, so the Mustang won on that account. Of course I could have looked for a used Gen Coupe 2.0T, but I wanted new this go around, and I wanted something a little loaded. The EB Premium really fit the bill.

        You guys will probably laugh, but it really reminds me less of a muscle car and more of the ’92 Nissan 240SX that I owned in college. In terms of looks, sounds, and how it drives. It’s part of why I fell in love with it. Except that it’s a lot tighter in every way of course.

        • 0 avatar
          shaker

          “One of my specifications when shopping was that it had to be EPA rated at least 20mpg city.”

          Did you buy an egg to tape to the gas pedal?

          Seriously, it would be good to know what kind of mileage numbers you can put up – city/hwy, hilly/flat terrain…

          • 0 avatar
            DevilsRotary86

            I get about 18mpg in the city driving normally, dropping to 17ish in spirited driving. For highway use, I get about 33-35mpg driving at 60mph, 31-333mpg at 75mph, and 28mpg at 85mph.

            So better than EPA on highway, worse than EPA in city. That’s been the pattern for every car I have owned for almost 20 years now. Note that when I said “the car had to be EPA rated at 20mpg or more” I wasn’t actually expecting 20mpg. I just wanted to let the EPA rating give an apples-to-apples comparison. I like sporty cars, I don’t expect fuel efficient. But I didn’t want a gas guzzler either. The 20mpg line was arbitrary, but that’s where I decided to draw my “gas guzzler line”.

            And what are these “hills” that you speak of? I kid of course, but I live in North Texas with my most common road trip being to my parents in Indianapolis. It’s been awhile since I have had to climb a hill of any significant height.

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            I bought a Volt for the reasons that you cited – a short commute.

            I’ve used 20 gallons of gas in 10 months –

            Yes, I’ve used coal/nuclear for sure, but it’s a lot more efficient in the same driving as the 2013 Malibu that I traded in – 35-40 MPG vs 19 MPG.

            I
            I
            I
            V (answering your comment below)

        • 0 avatar
          shaker

          Thanks for the reply – someone I work with was looking at an EB Mustang – but we’re in Western PA, where there are plenty of hills, so that might require a bit more from the turbo –

          • 0 avatar
            DevilsRotary86

            In full disclosure, do note:

            – I got the car in May. It’s now August. I live in Texas. On my commute home the outside air temperature sensor regularly reads 105F. My commute at 8AM in the morning is about 90F. I went to Home Depot yesterday at 7:30PM. The OAT still read 100F. This environment is not friendly to gas mileage in a turbo car with an air/air intercooler. I expect the mileage to increase some in the fall to spring, like on every other car I have ever owned in Texas.

            – My commute is all of 5 miles. So I drive for 10 minutes and stop the engine. Also not good for mileage and why I never meet EPA city. I should be using a bicycle, but Dallas was not built for bikes, it’s hot (see above), and my work place doesn’t have a shower available.

            My unconfirmed suspicion is that in a cooler climate with a more reasonable commute, the Mustang in hilly terrain should return about the same mileage as my Mustang driving in burning heat.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I’d say its downfall was weight and styling. Performance wise the V6 will put up comparable numbers to others in its class. Not sure the aftermarket really embraced this car. And with no history it has little street creed. I looked at one before getting my Z… and they are actually really nice cars but just lacked any “wow” factor. Talking to people who track theirs the weight is just too much of a penalty to make it a really “fun” car. Also the interior is a little tight even for a 2+2. As mentioned above if they had gone V8 it would have been a hit due to the price to performance ratio.

      With all that said I wouldn’t overlook these on the used market as then value prop becomes excellent. 350HP + RWD = win. The turbo 4 came in good range of colors including an nice green and they still have decent power, plenty enough to hoon around if desired.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    I seriously considered getting one of these both before and after my RX8, but there wasn’t a package that really interested me, and I was never really into the styling, though it was miles better than the 370Z I was cross-shopping for along with the RX8 (which I eventually purchased, and loved).

  • avatar
    brn

    This car was introduced with way too much hype and the media bought into the hype. Not surprisingly, the buying public doesn’t appear to have also bought into the hype.

    They should have not presented this car as more than it is, called it a Tiburon, and it would have stood a chance.

  • avatar
    Jaeger

    The Genesis Coupe boring? Not any of the ones I have driven. If you think a car needs a 400-plus hp V8 to be fun to drive, you are flat out wrong.

    It has become rather long in the tooth, though, and never was quite up to par with the first generation Genesis sedan, never mind the new one. The move to replace it with something more in keeping with the current line makes good sense.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    This always seemed like a car that should have sold better but it was in a tough spot. Camaro and Mustang enthusiasts were never going to look at anything that was ‘Merican and the Boy Racers didn’t want anything to do with Hyundai (although I’d wager that a Genesis Coupe is miles better to live with than a FR-S or BRZ.)

  • avatar

    Bring back the Tiburon, Hyundai. Pop a turbo four in it, equip it with outward visibility, and do not use the Accent platform for it. Make it a true GTI fighter.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • redapple: Hatch struts still work? W T Fudge? My sawed off broomstick handle was always in the back.
  • kosmo: “How’s that Ranger Raptor coming, Ford? Oh, it isn’t? I see. Thanks for the mobility scooter,...
  • dividebytube: When I’m down south I’m taken aback by the number of decent looking old trucks and even G...
  • redapple: RED…. Great catch. Love it.
  • teddyc73: What an ugly rear end.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States