By on May 24, 2016

1965 Buick Riviera

The first name that comes to mind when anyone says “Buick two-door” could make a comeback.

General Motors wants to use the storied Riviera nameplate on a future vehicle, and it now has the trademark application to prove it, GM Authority reports.

The automaker filed the application on May 18, specifying that the name is meant for vehicle badging. A previous filing for the name came before the unveiling of the Riviera design concept at the 2013 Shanghai Auto Show, but that one wasn’t in the “badges for vehicles” category.

The name brings carries a suitcase packed with historical appeal. As Buick’s entry in the “personal luxury coupe” game, the Riviera was always a large, technology-laden two-door — a sub-Cadillac status symbol.

Think back to the jagged first generation Riviera, one of the great designs to emerge from the 1960s, or the “boat-tail” Riviera of the early 1970s. Try not to remember the bloated, vinyl topped luxo-barge of the late ’70s and ’80s, and think instead of the graceful (and powerful, in supercharged form) Riviera of 1995-99.

Much of the talk of Buick’s need for a show-stopping halo car died off when the brand positioned the 2016 Cascada convertible — a rebadged Opel — as its status offering. Critics said the model was less likely to reignite passion for the brand, and more likely to make rental customers say, A droptop Buick? Wowzers! How much for the Mustang, though?

The gorgeous Avista concept Buick rolled out earlier this year actually did ignite a fire in many hard-core Buick skeptics (and in far less cynical people, too). Imaginations took flight.

A lithe, range-topping luxury coupe, maybe built on the rear-drive Alpha platform? It probably wouldn’t be a high-volume model, but it would be something to be proud of — especially for a brand that plans to import a crossover from China.

Then GM went and poured cold water over everyone’s dreams.

Tony DiSalle, Buick’s U.S. vice-president of marketing, admitted in March that the automaker sent the Avista off to GM concept purgatory. Enthusiasts groaned, knowing all too well the chances of a model escaping that well-populated place.

“It was purely a concept and meant to generate some buzz,” DiSalle said. “No other plans for now.”

Right now, it seems all Buick can talk about is the need for more crossovers and SUVs. The brand plans to kill off the Verano, likely next year, because its volume is too low. There’s even a chance that other traditional car models could follow.

Buick’s global chief Duncan Aldred once stated that the brand’s future holds a smaller numbers of high-volume vehicles, with no room for low-volume niche products.

None of this looks promising for the return of a vehicle worthy of the Riviera nameplate.

Perhaps Buick plans to bring the nameplate back from the dead, slap it on a sexy concept, then kill the thing off once again. Worse, the name could be applied to a crossover or SUV. Would GM be that sacreligious?

Or maybe there’s something sneaky afoot.

The Orion assembly plant near Detroit will soon lose the Verano and begin production on the all-electric Chevrolet Bolt this fall. It’s well known that GM wants to be a big player in the EV world, and the recent factory shuffles and model changes will leave Orion with suspicious spare capacity.

Is it possible the Riviera nameplate will return on an electric halo car? At this point, all bets are off.

[Image: Greg Gjerdingen/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)]

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128 Comments on “Riviera, Resurrected? GM Files Trademark Application for Famous Nameplate...”


  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    Sadly, it’ll look NOTHING like this one.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Well, at least it *appears* that if they build it, it won’t be assembled in China…one of the few Buicks that wouldn’t be foreign-made.

  • avatar

    Use the design concept in a remake of the Patrick Swayze bone-crusher “Roadhouse.” Because Hollywood is so, you know, original. It worked for the Camaro in “Transformers.”

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Loved the used Riviera cameos in Roadhouse. First when Dalton drops off the keys of his ’64 with a homeless dude on the street before jetting off in his Benzo Coupe, then later buying a ratty looking maroon ’65 and asking the salesmen if the headlight shrouds work and stopping by the junkyard to buy a trunk full of spare tires.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Buick, please don’t do this.

  • avatar
    Snail Kite

    As a young person, all the name means to me is “old person car.”

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I felt a great disturbance in the Force, as if millions of voices suddenly cried out in terror, and were suddenly silenced. I fear something terrible has happened.

  • avatar
    shaker

    Slap some Ventiports onto the ELR, make the MSRP $50k.

    Profit.

    GM, you OWE me :-)

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I had no idea the Riviera name was so “storied”.

    The problem with this is that Riviera (and most Buicks) has an image of just another nondescript GM from the 1980’s. If there was some history before that it is long gone and won’t even register in the minds of younger buyers.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    The vehicle pictured was from General Motor’s true glory days, when it not only held a dominant 50% US market share, but actually created good, bold, distinctive, American-Greatness, plush riding (the vehicle pictured had a ride that was velvet), V8 powered, throaty exhaust, bad-to-the-bone vehicles.

    Now, Buick and General Motors is a “lowest bid supplier, whether Thailand, Malaysia or especially China” (check out newish vehicle & even new-dealer-lot vehicle corrosion on underside of Guangzhou Motors vehicles from Chinese Steel) driven maker of cheap & definitively un-cheerful craptastic sh!tboxes best suited for China, India and other emerging markets.

    See you all at Cadillac’s Cars & Coffee @ Uwe & Melody Lee’s 12,000-sq.-ft. “experiential,” Fragranced by 12:29, Timo Weiland PopUp SoHo Cafe Haus!

    • 0 avatar
      murphwaterpolo

      Buick need to go back to the glory day. Many moons ago my uncle in West Va used to mail me American car brochures back to Ireland. As an engineer he favoured the Buick brand. Some years later in 1977 I hitch hiked from NY to California. Among a number of memorable rides including a White Freightliner (shades of Townes) the most memorable was in a slightly modified boat tail that was driven by a cool dude at speeds up to 120 mph through the wheat fields of Kansas. Buick needs to dream of trans continental travel again.

  • avatar
    Varezhka

    So… a LaCrosse coupe?

    or will we see our first 2-door (3-door) CUV from Buick? Maybe some of the Buick’s core customers have hard time entering the Encore, so they will release a larger door version of it.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    Don’t get excited- there’s no market domestically for a Buick coupe.

    The Riviera historic fanboy market is a niche category within a niche category- how many modern consumers even know what a Riviera was?
    Atop that ,I don’t see many articles bemoaning a shortage of used Riviera models due to high demand. Which only reinforces the point- unlike the equivalent year Eldorados the 3.8 Rivieras aren’t saddled with the time bomb Northstar motor . Find one in good shape and you’ve got a durable ,stylish and luxurious coupe.

    Can’t say that about the Mark VIII . Or a used German 2 door in “As Is” status.

    GM is likely applying the name towards a CUV of some sort, probably a top end one.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      What’s wrong with the 32V mod motor? Sure I’ve seen Mark VIIIs in the junkyard but I find it hard to believe a serious baked-in engine flaw put them in there.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        I’ve seen quite a few Mark VII’s with over 200k on the clock. The most failure prone part was the air suspension- as has been the same with any make/model that used it. But, the rest of the car was mechanically sound.

  • avatar
    stars9texashockey

    The 1979-1985 Riviera does not deserve to be lumped into “the bloated, vinyl topped luxo-barge of the late 70’s and 80’s.”

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      From a modern standpoint, the ’79 E-bodies were enormous, but at the time, they were quite trim, even smaller than the B-bodies and only slightly longer than the A-bodies.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The Cadillac styling did it better than the Riv, frankly. The horizontal lamps didn’t work on that one.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Of course, I’m always partial to the the Oldsmobile model of any shared B-O-P (or in this case, B-O-C) car.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I thought the mini-blind slats grille on the early ’80s Toro was quite odd.

            http://carphotos.cardomain.com/ride_images/1/1267/1701/3165850002_large.jpg

            Eldo had much more cohesion!
            http://www.mcsmk8.com/80-ELDO-LRG/HR/CARS-34.JPG

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Yes, the Eldo had more in common with its fellow Caddys than the Toro did with the other Oldses, but I think that was the point of the Toronado: being different. It was imperative that Cadillac’s models shared a common look, because there were only 3 at the time (full-size, Seville, Eldo), but Olds, as a full-line marque, needed distinction in its models.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            *My criticisms do not apply to the Toronado Caliente because I find that awesome.

            And don’t forget, there was an Eldorado Touring version as well. That was very special.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      My grandmother had an ’85 Riviera with the V8, in brown with brown leather. She used to let me sit on her lap and steer the car The steering was so light, you could steer it with your pinky.

      And her father had an ’84 Riviera T-Type, white with a blue interior.

    • 0 avatar
      Whatnext

      Thank you, I’m glad somebody said it! The E-body Riviera was a good looker for the time, when done without the vinyl roof. Make mine a T-Type with the turbine wheels in black.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “the Riviera was always a large, technology-laden two-door — a sub-Cadillac status symbol.”

    I feel the Toronado always trumped the Riviera in technology.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Tech? How can you forget the first touchscreen CRT in a car?

      (OK, maybe it deserves to be forgotten…)

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Didn’t the Trofeo get the CRT at the same time?

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          And so it did…in color, no less.

          Tip of the hat…

          (But if I remember right, the CRT was an option on the Riv before it became available in the Toronado…and may have been on the E-body model too.)

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            The E-body designation was used on the Riviera from its inception in 1963 through the end of the seventh-generation model in 1993. It switched to the G-body designation for its final generation, 1995-1999. So you’d have to be more specific.

            But the touch screen was only on the seventh-gen, which bowed for MY1986. And judging by the fact that the touch screen was removed from both the Riviera and the Reatta for their 1990 refreshes suggests that it was not well-received by the car’s target customers.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You sayin’ old people PLC customers don’t like computer?

            “Hey kid, help computer.”

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I wonder if any of Buick’s typical customers looked at the touchscreen-equipped Riviera and uttered the now-infamous phrase, “That’s not a Buick!”

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I remember reading somewhere that you could get a CRT on the ’85, which was the last year before it downsized (again). Anyone know for sure?

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            A few minutes of Googling and perusing forums says there were anywhere between 100 and 500 CRT-equipped ’85 Rivieras.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            That’s what I thought. I seen to remember actually seeing one so equipped. Thanks, Doc.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Huh. You are correct. I’m not sure why they did that.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I do not approve of the non-mention of the nicely shaped and large enough FWD 3800 Riviera from 90-93. It had superior build quality to the one which succeeded it.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      G-body vs E-body? Ehhhh.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The trim, interior, and paint quality on the G was absolute crap.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          All of the sudden we have a Buick connoisseur.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You think I haven’t shopped those final version Rivs before? I has! Design is just fine, I love the hugeness of it and the 3800SC. The execution of design is nearly malaise bad.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m familial with the G-body Riv, the E-body Riv though its been ages since I had seat time in one.

            The other thing to ask yourself is, which model year of G-body did you sample? The MY95 sold 50K examples, the MY96 to 98 only sold about 10-11K per annum, an 80% drop for MY96. The majority of the Rivs still out there statistically will be 95s, and its possible after the drop materials were cut (or perhaps increased?) for subsequent years.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Hm. I looked at them as a whole, overall and never singled out a particular year. I also watched a long, GM-created video on YouTube about “correcting” the quality control issues on the car.

            They tried to build a $35 car for $27, and it showed.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            They do exist, 28. I have a soft spot for Buicks, too (I do own one, after all).

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Oh, no, he’s right. They were bad. Which sucks because the design was gorgeous.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I see in another thread here you were talking about the dash design/plastics. I agree the dash materials in the E-body were probably slightly better but I personally preferred the swooping G-body dash over the dated 80s looking E-body’s.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Aesthetically the final one is fine, as long as you don’t have to sit in there and feel the materials, while clear coat flakes off and hits the window. :D

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’ve never seen a paint issue on a G-body Riv so I can’t quite relate.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Paint

            https://northmiss.craigslist.org/cto/5584505476.html
            https://stlouis.craigslist.org/cto/5574820982.html
            https://nashville.craigslist.org/cto/5551384367.html
            https://allentown.craigslist.org/cto/5592225844.html
            https://orangecounty.craigslist.org/cto/5544684793.html

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      As far as I’m concerned, the Riviera ceased to exist after the 1985 model year.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I dunno, my dad had a G-body and I got to tool around in it for a day. It was far better looking than the outgoing model, and the supercharged 3800 was damn nice. I liked the basic dash design and how it echoed the 1963 Riv.

      But you’re right, the interior was craptastic.

      Still, I have a soft spot for that car and the Olds Aurora.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        It’s the plastic, so_many_trim_seams inside. They did the same thing to the Deville for ’94, and then again (even more) in ’00.

        I have no complaints about the Aurora besides engine issues.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Oh, yeah, it was that mid-’90s GM plastic too – same color as Jell-O butterscotch pudding. Even the leather was plasticky. The interior on the Aurora was far better.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I love the design of the 1995-1999 Riviera, but you’re right; the interior was full of hard plastic, and the paint quality is laughably bad. And even though the drivetrain is solid, the car itself falls apart around it. But it seems to be endemic of GM build-quality at the time. There aren’t too many GM cars that were well-screwed together during the 90s, to be honest. The Lincoln Mark VIII, which is the Riviera’s closest competitor despite the former being RWD, seems to have been far better constructed.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I feel like in ’94 and ’95 GM cost cut the crap out of all their vehicles with regard to trim and integrity of construction and paint.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          They used such thin paint! Most 90s GM cars I see are worn down to the primer in multiple places.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          That’s very possible, but if true I would think it should have been earlier. GM nearly went bankrupt in 1992, perhaps orders went out to cheapen the next generation of product?

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Bingo. GM went on a brutal campaign of decontenting (our customers don’t want ABS brakes) and cost-cutting in the mid-90s, driving several suppliers to ruin and building millions of cars and trucks with sub-Chinese-grade parts.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’d buy that argument about post-92.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Keep in mind that it takes a few years for the decision to work its way down the line to the end product, so the real crap didn’t show up until 1995 or so.

      • 0 avatar
        carsofchaos

        Electrical gremlins were a nightmare in the 95-99 Rivs

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Much of the talk of Buick’s need for a show-stopping halo car died off when the brand positioned the 2016 Cascada convertible — a rebadged Opel — as its status offering.”

    HAHAHAHAHA

  • avatar
    Pch101

    I see these trademark/patent/etc. stories from time to time, but I’ve never seen an article that quantifies how often these sorts of moves are followed by the product being delivered. It may just be hedging; it’s not as if trademark applications are expensive.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    As a huge Riviera fan, I’m seriously hoping the brand revives that nameplate. But most likely, it’s just so that GM can keep the trademark. They’ll use it for something menial just to retain the rights to it, but I doubt that any production Riviera will surface.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    No one’s considered the idea of a four-door coupe, ala Mercedes CLS?

    But if Buick does a Riviera, it damn well better be worthy of the name. If I had a dream garage, a ’63 in silver and a ’66 GS in black would be in it…and I’m going with the ’66 being the better looking of the two. A perfect design, far as I’m concerned.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8a/1966_Buick_Riviera_GS_-_Rear_View.jpg/800px-1966_Buick_Riviera_GS_-_Rear_View.jpg

  • avatar
    BigOldChryslers

    If Buick does an electric car, they need to call it Electra. Never was there a more fitting historic vehicle name to reuse.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    Have there ever been any studies why Americans no longer like luxury coupes? It was always one of my favorite product lines.

    I’m sure the proof is in the sales, but I wonder if it’s a chicken or egg type thing where nobody bought them anymore because carmakers stopped investing in it and let it wither on the vine.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Mine too, and I’m not aware of any. I think whatever the reasoning is, it is multifaceted.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Because “children” and “their stuff” now “require” a giant SUV. It’s no longer enticing to look ready for personal luxury and for driving into the city with elegance.

        The desired appearance is one of sports adventure and a spirit of outdoor lifestyle activity and excitement.

        • 0 avatar

          Just like all those Bernie Sanders kids want ponies, today’s upscale families want a Range Rover. Failing that….

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Methinks the trunk of a Continental Mark IV is large enough for all of the kids sh*t. Part of the problem has been the deliberate emasculation of men both socially and economically, as it was they who were the primary consumers of the Personal Luxury Coupe.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            /r/theredpill is leaking again.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Truth is treason in an empire of lies.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Can any of your assertions be backed up with any kind of empirical data? I mean, besides the men buying most PLCs (which is kind of a given, since men bought most cars anyway).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m loathe to quote from the fringe, although the article itself cites many legitimate sources:

            “#1 The labor participation rate for men has been steadily declining

            #2 Back in 1950, more than 80 percent of all men in the United States had jobs. Today, less than 65 percent of all men in the United States have jobs.

            #3 During the last recession, men lost twice as many jobs as women did.

            #4 According to Time Magazine, unemployed men are significantly more likely to get divorced than employed men are.

            #5 According to the Economic Policy Institute, the “real entry-level hourly wage for men who recently graduated from high school” has declined from $15.64 in 1979 to $11.68 today

            #6 Between 1969 and 2009 the median wages earned by American men between the ages of 30 and 50 dropped by 27 percent after you account for inflation

            #9 According to one very surprising study, “young, urban, childless women” make more money in America today than young, urban, childless men do.

            #14 According to the Pew Research Center, only 51 percent of all American adults are currently married. Back in 1960, 72 percent of all adults in the United States were married.

            #15 Males account for approximately 70 percent of all Ds and Fs in U.S. public schools.

            #16 About two-thirds of all students in “special education programs” are boys.

            #17 The average American girl spends 5 hours a week playing video games. The average American boy spends 13 hours a week playing video games.

            etc.

            http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/archives/32-facts-that-show-how-men-are-being-systematically-emasculated-in-america-today

            Number six is of particular interest when we pair it with some Pew Research data on pay gaps:

            “In 2012, among workers ages 25 to 34, women’s hourly earnings were 93% those of men”

            http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2013/12/11/on-pay-gap-millennial-women-near-parity-for-now/

            So since wages have been stagnant in real dollars since about 1980, and women’s wages at the time were about 65% per Pew, is it woman’s wages have risen 32% or is it men’s wages have *declined* 27% and woman’s wages remained largely unchanged excluding outliers?

            Food for thought.

            http://www.epi.org/publication/charting-wage-stagnation/

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The labor force participation rate is not an unemployment measure.

            Please understand what it is prior to citing it.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            This is a broader topic than unemployment, but if you insist #1 may be withdrawn.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Citing “the economic collapse blog” as a source just makes me shake my head.

            The conspiracy theory/ melodramatic approach to politics, with all of the data distortions and sloppy research that necessarily accompany it, interferes with critical thinking.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m not going to sit here for hours and type up a formal research paper. The blog cites real sources such as:

            http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/economy/story/2012-01-29/cnbc-mancession/52826370/1

            http://www.bloomberg.com/news/print/2011-08-25/obama-seeks-jobs-plan-as-u-s-workingman-status-further-erodes.html

            https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/married-couples-at-a-record-low/2011/12/13/gIQAnJyYsO_story.html

            http://money.cnn.com/2013/06/19/news/economy/men-workforce/index.html?source=yahoo_hosted

            Shake your head if you must, but some of its arguments are indeed valid. Number six from Bloomberg combined with Pew research data is especially interesting as it suggests no wage growth for males after inflation and limited growth for females over a thirty year period:

            “Men who do have jobs are getting paid less. After accounting for inflation, median wages for men between 30 and 50 dropped 27 percent–to $33,000 a year from 1969 to 2009, according to an analysis by Michael Greenstone, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology economics professor who was chief economist for Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers.”

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I got what I asked for.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            28, he’ll just keep stalling and trying to discredit you because he really can’t retort the facts you provided. Its a pch101 hallmark.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            A healthy dose of skepticism aside, I’m always amazed at how some people shut their eyes to the reality around them.

      • 0 avatar

        Me too.

        I’ll give you some thought-starters:

        – SUVS SUVS SUVS. Once GM and Ford figured out how profitable they could be, there was no turning back. Coupes became a pain to do.

        – Disappointing Product and Diminishing Results. The 1986-80 GM E coupes. The 1988-96 GM W coupes. The 1989-97 Ford Thunderbird. 1993-98 Lincoln Mark VIII. 1995-99 Buick Rivierea. 1993-2002 Cadillac Eldorado. All of these products were both product and sales disappointments compared to their predecessors. They cost money to make and market, and their sales became a fraction of more profitable sedans, pickups, SUVs and then CUVs.

        – The Japanese Saw No Market. As younger buyers shifted to mainstream brand Japanese sedans and US trucks/SUVs, the Japan makers saw little market in this segment. OK, Honda still offers a few coupes, Nissan did until recently but Toyota got out of that with the last Solara. Again, those sales were dwarfed by sedans, pickups, SUVs and then CUVs.

        – The German and Japanese Luxury Brands Took Up Slack. They’re more performance-oriented, but isn’t every $60-$100K coupe from BMW, Audi, M-B, Infiniti and Lexus something of a continuation of the big luxury coupes?

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          Ford not initially offering a V8 in the 1989 Thunderbird and Cougar was definitely a mistake, and it’s probably no coincidence that after a sales drop, sales rebounded somewhat following the return of the V8.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I can never decide if I’d rather have a T-Bird Super Coupe or a Mark VIII. Maybe both.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Mark VIII is probably easier to find, I don’t remember the last time I saw a Super Coupe.

            I think there was a super short lived supercharged XR7 as well.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            When I do see a Super Coupe, it tends to be very ratty. The Mark VIII is certainly easier to find in nice shape. People realized at the time it was the last of the breed and held onto them.

            Saw a very pristine pearl one drive past last night, two old people in it (I’m thinking original owners). It was the derpy later one with huge elephant face.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Except Toyota does offer a coupe, albeit a sporty one that isn’t related to a sedan: the GT86 (the artist formerly known here as Scion FR-S).

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Because everyone and their mother wants to be an Uber driver. Can’t get that $$ with 2 doors!

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      I think a big part of it was the decline of the American middle class and the fact that a lot of people just don’t have the bucks to put into new cars in general.

      If they do have the bucks, they want something with 4-doors, and most likely they want an SUV or a crossover with all-wheel-drive.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    No other American car will ever touch the ’65 Riviera’s classically elegant design. Bill Mitchell’s best work.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    No faith in Buick anymore; does anyone really need more Encore like things which look like Porky Pig on stilts? I don’t get the attraction with buyers for these things. At all.

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    .. there’s no market for it, nobody buys it, what would be the competition .. bla bla bla ..

    Bob Lutz is right > these corpo-rats should stop over-calculating .. people are not computers, .. just build a “cool” car and people will buy it ..

    This thing or modern Eldorado (BTW: where is CTS coupe “halo car” , again there’s no market for it ?!?) could be called sort of “poor mans” Continental GT or S-class Coupe’s .. but if they would be equiped with top GM engines and cool, traditional american “personal-lux-car” design …

    This modern “uniformi-sized” order by segments/classes(ATS/A4/C-class/3-series > CTS/A6/E..) is really borring ..

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Reatta comeback. I’ll take one, fixed rear side glass & all…

  • avatar
    zipper69

    If the restyled and much cooler Volt is there why not use that as the base with a two door shell ?

    Too simple ?

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