By on April 25, 2016

2016 Buick Cascada Front 3/4 Top Down, Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

After years of covering the automotive industry, I’m still amused by the enormous gulf between auto enthusiasts and “real people.” (I’m talking to you, B&B!) We get excited when Honda decides to offer a manual transmission in the V6 Accord, despite the tens of buyers who will come running for it, or General Motors’ confidence to sell the Chevrolet SS here at all. “Real people” like it when there’s a less expensive way to get into a BMW M product, as well as the ability to go into a showroom and walk out the same day with the same nameplate they know and trust.

A great example of this chasm/schism is the Buick Cascada. Here’s how we imagine the reaction of each affinity group:

Auto enthusiasts/press: “Buick’s decided to rebadge an aging Opel and try to pass it off in the United States as The New Thing in the segment abandoned by the Volkswagen Eos and Chrysler 200 convertible?”

Real people: “There’s a convertible Buick now?”

2016 Buick Cascada Rear 3/4 Top Down Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

In fact, the Cascada has been on sale in Europe since 2013 as an Opel/Vauxhall pair, but it feels substantially older than a vehicle ready for a mid-cycle refresh. That’s partly because of the enormous leap in quality and feature content at General Motors vehicles in the last couple of years.

Can the Cascada’s relatively gorgeous looks save an otherwise mediocre product?

Immediately after picking up the Cascada, I was scheduled to give a talk to journalism students at my high school alma mater about having a life and career as an automotive journalist. The takeaway? If you think millennials aren’t plugged in to what’s going on with cars today, just spend a couple of hours with high school students and ask them about the Volkswagen scandal, what Tesla might be up to, and if the Mercedes-Maybach S600 is worth considering. (According to one student, it so is.)

When the lecture was over, I asked the keen students to join me outside to offer first impressions of the Cascada. As a group, the kids were impressed by remote engine start and the slick operation of the top. One budding auto journo went as far as to compare the side profile of the Cascada to that of a Mercedes-Benz S-Class Coupe. Another admitted some confusion about the Cascada’s American badge, German ancestry, and Polish origins. A third liked the leather seats but abhorred the height of the beltline.

With these impressions gleaned astutely from a non-driving audience far off from the automaker’s anticipated target, it was time to get to work.

2016 Buick Cascada on the beach, Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

Let’s start with the good news. The Cascada is prettier than any recent Buick has the right to be. Parked at the beach with the top lowered, the chrome-tinted strip surrounding the Cascada’s passenger compartment amplifies its long body and downplays its puffed-up proportions. Compare the Cascada to the departed Chrysler 200 and Toyota Solara all you like, but neither of those convertibles had the buxom gravitas to elevate a rental car-spec personality.

With the top up, the Cascada has a rounded, hatchback-like roofline — and it still looks pretty good.

2016 Buick Cascada Front 3/4 Top Up, Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

The situation shifts from “pretty good” to “really?” when dissecting the Cascada’s German bones.

Despite the Cascada’s good looks, there are some significant downsides to actually driving it. In some regards, the Cascada acts and feels more German than it does American. Ride quality is stiffer than you might expect or want from a Buick convertible, a feeling amplified by larger-than-necessary 20-inch wheels. With every bump, an unsettling did we hit a pothole and bend a wheel or blow a tire? ka-thunk is likely to follow. There’s a dummy set of taillights located within the trunk compartment, so that lights are visible even if the trunk lid is up, conforming to European regulation and sensibilities. The cupholders are too small to accommodate anything Venti, let alone a water bottle or a smartphone. The heated seats warm up fast enough as to be prepared for a wintry morning climb through the Alps — although it’s unlikely that any fortunate renters in Orlando will ever take advantage of their strength.

2016 Buick Cascada Rear Top Up, Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

No heated seats are enough to make up for the flawed experience of driving a Cascada, however. There have been enormous improvements in GM’s four-cylinder turbos in the last several years. The Cascada features few of them. Its 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder offers little joy while exploiting the engine’s power. Curb weight is a meaty 3,979 pounds; with four average Americans aboard, it’s tantamount to an unladen Enclave. The Volkswagen GTI has just about the same horsepower and feels entirely more agile and lively. Some of this has to do with the tuning of the standard six-speed automatic, which unevenly straddles fuel efficiency and performance. Recent GM small cars, from the Trax to the Cruze, have proven fuel efficient beyond their specifications. The 1.6-liter turbo should be capable of better than 20 mpg in the city — but according to the EPA (and our casual observations), it isn’t. On the highway, efforts to hit the 30 mpg mark were thwarted.

2016 Buick Cascada Interior, Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

Interior quality isn’t up to the tight, impressive GM standards of late, either. Cowl shake and rattling are evident, as is significant noise, even when the top is up. This does not please passengers in either row. There’s no use turning up the radio to try to compensate for the noise let in by the poorly insulated soft top, either. The Cascada is saddled with an outdated version of Buick’s IntelliLink infotainment system, as well as a relatively tiny, touchscreen information screen at the top of the instrument panel. If you’d gotten used to the quick and brilliant MyLink in recent Chevrolets, you’re in for a disappointment. In addition to being difficult to reach, the touchscreen system reacts slowly, and you’ll never be able to memorize the location of the tens of buttons that control it by feel. You’ll want to make sure your subscription to the flawless 4G LTE wi-fi, arguably the most up-to-date feature on the Cascada, is active.

2016 Buick Cascada Rear 3/4 Top Down Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

But here’s the thing: There was a time, not long ago, that you could still argue that, even for the Cascada’s flaws, it was gutsy for GM to re-enter an almost dead segment and build a convertible that erred on the side of the everyday. Buick is now a victim of its own success. Look at the fit and finish of the new LaCrosse, or the graphics quality of its latest touchscreen nav system.

Recidivism is a complicated behavior. For the Cascada to succeed and attract new buyers (beyond Ellie Kemper) to the fold, Buick ought to triage a refresh and impress the American convertible buying public. All of this adds up to a driving experience that’s a bit of a letdown from the auto conglomerate that’s been delivering win after win recently.

You shouldn’t have to settle for something average, even at the rental lot, and GM knows that. See the Chevrolet Camaro convertible one aisle over?

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106 Comments on “2016 Buick Cascada Review – Best-Before Date...”


  • avatar
    Storz

    I just threw up in my mouth a little bit

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    (Ok getting it out of the way – in my best Elderly Woman voice:)

    “THAT’S NOT A BUICK!”

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    Hooray, another me-too product in a segment that has been entirely moribund for a long time. GM strategy must be full with the dregs.

    The convertible can rise again, I believe in it, but not with lame attempts like these.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    I bet GM makes several improvements to the vehicle and then pulls the plug on it once its actually pretty good.

    • 0 avatar
      Rnaboz

      +100
      I have never understood GM’s logic in this practice. Gives us third rate product, build it better, than yank the rug out.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      …just like Toyota and Honda?

      • 0 avatar

        Nah, neither are good examples of that. Both have strong records when it comes to first-year reliability and make relatively few (sometimes no) changes to their cars during the model run. VW and Volvo, though, have a tendency to do this. As does Mazda to some degree.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Ya, like the FR-S, and the “redesigned Yaris,” and CR-Z, and Crosstour, and the miserable review the HR-V is getting, and the Venza, and the 2012 Civic, and how are those Takata airbags working out, or Toyota 5-speed manuals in the Corolla/Matrix/Vibe, or…

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Is there something wrong with Toyota 5-speed sticks that I have somehow failed to notice in 10 years driving with them?

            EChid’s point still stands… their cars may not excite you and some may not sell in mass quantities but they generally satisfy their owners, which is the important thing, if you want to sell the individual another car.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Repeating the first paragraph – was that for effect?

  • avatar
    Verbal

    Bring back the Reatta.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Curb weight is a meaty 3,979 pounds”

    How the hell is it so heavy? That’s the same as my Cadillac.

  • avatar
    tonycd

    A review that contains valid and fact-backed criticisms, well and professionally written. This guy’s a nice addition to the reviewer roster.

  • avatar
    FAHRVERGNUGEN

    Real people: “There’s a convertible Buick now?”

    Surprised it isn’t “What IS a Buick?”

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Price?
    MPG?
    0-60?

    Where’s the stats panel?

    Where’s the disclaimer regarding provided car/fuel/insurance?

    There’s a duplicated paragraph in the middle as well.

    Sounds like this overall is a rather floppy, too expensive attempt at filling a rental void which had the Sebring/200 and Solara in it previously, and still contains only the dying/expensive Eos.

    This will fail for Buick, and will be a little rebadge exercise which only lasts 1-3 model years. It would have been acceptable as a Saturn, which we all know it would have been had it arrived in 2008.

  • avatar
    tedward

    Sure its an old product, but this is a segment that buick should absolutely be in. If you think of it as a paid for trial balloon and foot in the door this car makes sense.

    For those few people who can’t replace their s40, 9-3, or eos convertibles this is a same price range replacement. As to it being old product, well, convertibles have always been the last updated least invested in sub models. Those buyers don’t care, and the same was usually true of all it’s predecessors.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      +1, tedward. I know three people who’ve had good experiences with, respectively, a 1st-gen C70, a 9-3 Aero, and a 2nd-gen C70. It’s nice that those buyers have options apart from the pony car or Mercedes/BMW/Audi offerings. Furthermore, there’s little downside to GM’s offering a model for which the R&D heavy lifting already has occurred overseas. (I don’t quite get the undercurrent of anger amongst the B&B at the General’s offering Opel designs via Buick. I must have missed the part where these models already had been on sale in the US and Canada as Opels.)

      I also find “old product” complaints to ring slightly hollow. Unless you’re pathologically obsessed with the latest infotainment or are a spoiled car reviewer, 2013 wasn’t that long ago.

      All that said, as I commented below, those wheels are awful. Also, the Skylark nameplate would have seemed to have fit this model quite well.

  • avatar
    Featherston

    I appreciate non-sports car/non-pony car convertibles, so I want to like this. But those 20″ wheels are abysmal. They look awful, and they’re a functional downgrade. I can just imagine the meeting where the engineer is doing a face-palm as the designer and the sales and marketing executives issue the edict that the Cascada MUST have 20s. Ugh.

    Opel, Vauxhall, and Holden Cascadas are/were available with less ugly, more functional wheels. It looks like 18s are still available on the Vauxhall configurator.

  • avatar
    Sob93

    Car is assembled in Poland. Man do I miss Pontiac.

    • 0 avatar
      zipper69

      Have to agree. What pointy-headed pencil pusher decided that Buick would survive and Pontiac would die?
      Pontiac already had the performance and image chops that GM have been pushing with Buick and their asinine “THAT’S not a Buick” themed ads.

      They’ve spent millions to divorce the brand from it’s firmly set “gray, middle aged, PTA, obey the speed limit, blue rinse” image when Pontiac had one in spades.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Come on, now. When it came down to the numbers, Buick had the kind of following in China that Pontiac could only dream of in the U.S. in 2009. You know that.

  • avatar
    scott25

    This article is a definite improvement on the first few Jablansky articles, he’s getting there slowly.

  • avatar

    This will meet sales expectations without a problem. All the criticisms aside, this hits the mark where it counts – premium-branded luxury convertible that’s not $50k.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      +1. As soon as they broughamify it in a year or two by putting a V6 in it, losing the big diameter wheels, softening up the suspension, and dropping a couple grand off the price, all the retired geezers pining for a replacement for their aging Sebring/200 convertibles will be flocking to their nearest Buick dealer.

      In fact, one critical metric I didn’t see addressed was how many bags of golf clubs the trunk will hold.

      Also didn’t know about the taillights visible with the trunk open thing. I can only surmise it only applies to vehicles where the trunk lights are integrated into the lid so as to be visible at night when accessing the trunk contents. Doesn’t sound like a bad idea, really.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Beautiful car.

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    I was unaware that interior quality at Total Recall Motors had improved. Yes, big gaps are mostly passe’ at the company that the taxpayers saved, but there isn’t any room in these, they are still built with cheap materials, and look like the entire kitchen sink of concepts were dumped inside. And that horrific driving experience of looking outside of the modern equivalent of a Nash or a high silled clawfoot bathtub is even worse now.

    I can attest after sitting in most Total Recall Motors products that the interiors are uniforming below average compared to the competition. Improvement from awful to mediocre is not worth noting.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Thank you for being a friend. Travel down the road and back again.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    I hate it. The only convertables worth a darn: wrangler, camaro, miata, mustang, corvette.

  • avatar

    I like that they recruited Ellie Kemper (“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”) to promote the brand.

    It IS beautiful BUT GM can ill afford any misses, even in a segment like this.

    Hope they understand Ellie’s appeal is primarily to Millennials/younger Gen-Xers raised on Toyota/Honda/Nissan. Can’t just show up for the party, you have to be better.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “Can’t just show up for the party, you have to be better.”

      Equinox is better than RAV4? Cruze better than Civic?

      Nah, you have to be cheaper or have better marketing. Don’t forget Nissan and Honda aren’t on the same level they were in the late 80s, Toyota might be an exception.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    I have a suspicion that those tiny fog lights don’t actually do much. In fact I read somewhere that most fog lamps assemblies are pretty much useless for actual fog duty.

  • avatar
    qfrog

    LOL two ton car with a 1.6T! OH GM, how you condescend to your likely knowledge free customers is heartwarming.

    • 0 avatar
      badreligion702

      The 1.6T wouldn’t be all that bad if it was a base engine, with the 2.0T available as an upgrade. But as the only engine in the lineup, it is disappointing.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I sat in one at the auto show, nice interior but its overall ruined by its asinine styling (literally).

  • avatar
    CarnotCycle

    Know nothing about these; but I see a leafblower-powered Pontiac G6 coupe convertible, all tarted up with fancy rims.

    Isn’t that what this vehicle is?

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    I don’t get it, how hard would it be to drop a 2T and 18’s on this thing?

    The mind boggles at times.

  • avatar
    Lex

    Appreciate the review but friendly suggestion, a picture of the console out of the 7 would help. That makes up almost 90% of my decision to buy a car- no joke

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Because the Volkswagen Eos (the market’s previous $35K+, FWD bathtub cabriolet) was *so* successful.

    In all seriousness, I don’t think Buick really needs this car to do anything other than prove that the company still makes sporty cars. Never mind that they won’t buy it; they might be okay with getting that Regal or LaCrosse if it’s in the same showroom.

    That Avista would have been much cooler and a better performance halo car. But when all Buick had to do was change the grille and badges—seriously, they didn’t even change the interior lighting from Opel / Vauxhall Red to Buick’s typical ice-blue—it’s a low-cost solution to infuse some “fun” into the brand.

    • 0 avatar
      qfrog

      GM would have changed the color of the LEDs to fit the “brand” better but they sucked those pennies from the product like like lingering bits of corn on the cob from teeth. Besides, do you have any idea how much more expensive a white or blue SMD LED is than a red?

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        In all fairness, this is pretty much a Verano / Astra cabriolet (much in the same way that the Eos was a Jetta hardtop-cabriolet). The dashboard is nearly identical, so they could technically have used the Verano’s switchgear, which has blue lighting.

        I didn’t know that blue or white LEDs cost more than red ones…but I think their decision to keep the red had more to do with minimizing the costs of converting it to a Buick in general. Converting the lights *at all* would have cost money that they didn’t have to spend, so they didn’t spend it. And they may have even kept the color to make the Cascada look sportier.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      This isn’t even really a halo. It’s just a play to grab a few sales from rental companies and Florida geezers.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, it’ll sell, if to no one else besides rental agencies.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    This car will sell to every not-quite-old-enough-to-be-old woman who’s Sebring/200 convertible is getting ratty and undependable.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      The technical term is “woman of a certain age”.

      My Mom (68)would LOVE one of these. Now that my Grandparents are gone I fully expect her to chop in the Prius-V for something more fun.

  • avatar
    Sloomis

    I like the idea, and I like the looks, but aren’t theses things crazy overpriced for what you get? I think I read they’ll be starting somewhere in the 30s, a bit overpriced for a warmed-over Astra if you ask me. Also, should’ve name it Skylark, seems much more fitting.

  • avatar
    PriusV16

    I like this thing. I’m in Europe, and you sometimes see these Cascadas in the wild (not in abundant numbers, though) as Opels, and they do look modern, elegant, somewhat sporty, and they don’t have that flair of a boy racer around them (yeah, I’m looking at you, Ford Mustang and especially Chevy Camaro).

    As a more-or-less comfortable Riviera cruiser, this thing seems to be just fine. And so it *is* an Opel / a Buick…… who cares what other people think about the brand you’re driving, anyway….?

    Kelley Blue Book also has a brand-new review of the Cascada up on YouTube, and their review mirrors pretty much what Mr. Jablansky has said above.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    “Interior quality isn’t up to the tight, impressive GM standards of late, either.”

    They must have come along ways!

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      I also have problems with that line, and I’ve checked-out all of GM’s latest this Spring at the local auto show. They are only impressive if you’re still driving your grandma’s Celebrity.

      You can’t drop a line like that without backing it up, not in an enthusiast publication.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        As a freelance autojourno he has to cover his hide. A largely critical review of a low priority product like the Cascada balanced by sweet sweet compliments about GM as a whole is a safe way of appearing balanced without angering the source of your test cars.

        If I had read this review before his deplorable Accord Sport piece, I wouldn’t have thought anything of it since it touches on a lot of faults and is mostly well written. But since I didn’t, I’m still very suspicious of his objectivity. He risks nothing by criticizing the Cascada.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I’m tempted to believe the global auto industry has some kind of gentleman’s agreement in which only one or two of these kinds of convertibles are sold in any given model year. VW and Chrysler had their time in the sun, now it’s apparently GM’s turn. Perhaps Hyundai or Kia will chime in with one in a couple years, though it can’t be RWD or innovative or fun in any way; that’s against the rules.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    All of these FCA amalgamations just completely lack identity….might be great cars but jesus the distributed design platform is just painful….

  • avatar
    mcs

    A Mustang convertible with a 300hp V6 is $29,645. Why would someone spend more for this thing?

  • avatar
    TMA1

    All this bitch-basket needs is a handlebar, and it would make the perfect gift for a wife that’s 25 years younger than you are. If it was cheaper, you could buy one for your daughter to take to school instead of that old Golf Cabriolet. She won’t notice that it looks like a 200 with 300 wheels and 2 feet cut off the trunk.

    Jeff’s articles really need to make mention of price. Last week’s Accord article didn’t mention price either. This car apparently comes in only two trims, with basically no options, for either $34K or $37K. At the high end, that’s pricier than the Eos and not nearly as nice. At $25K, this car makes a decent option for someone who wants a convertible, but thinks a Miata is too intense. I wouldn’t be so hostile towards it at that price, but at $34K+, it’s a bad joke.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      24 year younger wives want E Class Cabriolets. It might work with a teen-aged daughter as long as she doesn’t have friends with Mustangs.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      24 year younger wives don’t want convertibles anymore. They want loaded ML350s (er, GLE450s) or Range Rover Sports.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Those are mom-mobiles. What’s the point in getting a trophy wife if she’s going to have the same look as your ex-wife?

        Besides, with the alimony payments being what they are, Buffy will have to settle for a Buick. It’s this or the Enclave, sweetheart!

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        My experience is that a broad cross-section of women, from very young to very old, want luxury-brand crossovers more than any other cars. Sports cars and convertibles, for this group, are like something to drive ironically or a throwback to the ’70s and ’80s. Remember, the famous people this cohort pays attention to aren’t driving Ferraris for the most part, but G-Classes and full-size Range Rovers.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          I agree with you, I was just kidding around. I’ve dated a few women who aspire to own a Mercedes. Which one? Invariably they turn down every sedan, for an unspecified SUV.

          Honestly, I forget the difference between the Enclave and the Encore. I was thinking of the tiny Korean-built one. It’s great that Buick still uses names, but a little differentiation would be helpful.

          • 0 avatar
            threeer

            Encore is the Korean-made/high-Chinese content mini-SUV. Enclave is the full-size made in America variant. It’s quite possible that in the next few years only the Enclave and the Lacrosse will remain as made in USA Buick models and all others may be coming from China (Cascada being the known exception…other vehicles may come from Europe, Mexico or China).

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    A very expensive way for GM to provide European Astra drivers with strange badges that plug right in. I thought that was Vauxhall’s reason d’être?

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Beetle Convertible and Eos convertible are better choices for the market that would find Cascada appealing.
    If you must have a Cascada then lease it and move on after the lease or wait to buy a low mileage used one when they are 50% or less of new cost.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I could see buying one of these after they have come off of a lease. I do not really want a rear wheel drive muscle car and I do not really like VWs. I like the looks of this car and really don’t care if it is a rebadged Opel.

  • avatar
    MonaroCV8

    Well I own one. A Holden Cascada. Bought it when first released in Australia in May last year. I made the smart choice and went with the standard 18″ rims for precisely the reason explained in this article, ride quality. This car is a cruiser, not a sports car, so I don’t want a rough ride. On 18s the ride is great, although I think the front is a touch underdamped, a function of the weight I reckon.

    The Cascada is based on the Astra J first released back in 2009 and the new Astra K has just been released in Europe so this model Cascada is just a placeholder until the next model comes out in a couple years time.

    Worst feature of the car? Terrible turning circle. It is based on a the same Delta 2 platform as the Cruze but the Cascada’s Hyperstruts limit the turning angle of the front wheels compared with the Cruze. My wife and I own a Cruze and the Cascada (as well as my login name sake Monaro) so handy for some intra GM comparisons. The Cascada has 2.5 turns lock to lock, the Cruze more, hence the Cruze has a better turning circle.

    The Holden spec Cascada doesn’t have a touch screen, it has a nav wheel and buttons which give away the car’s design age. With the exception of the screen set up, I love the interior, the stitched dash top in particular.

    In Europe the Cascada is available with a cheap single layer roof and an optional three layer roof. The Holden gets the three layer roof and is extremely quiet, doesn’t gell at all with this review. I can only guess that Buick have specced the cheaper single layer roof because the Holden is tomb quiet with the roof up.

    Performance is the weak link, off the line, off boost you have a 1.6L 4cyl trying to push a 1744kg car, not good, don’t try any low margin of error intersection entries, will get ugly. On the highway, once the gearbox kicks down and you have some decent midrange overboost (extra 20Nm of torque over the standard 260Nm) it is acceptable.

    Best thing about the car? Interior space. I doubt a large RWD convertible such as a BMW 6 series has better front and rear leg room. A rare for a convertible feature is that the rear seats fold down and the boot is actually decent. I like the review’s comment about the front cupholders, I find I can only really have one coffee in the front. The rear seat cupholders are fine. The front seats are truly excellent.

    My car hasn’t missed a beat in the 18,000kms of ownership. I’d happily buy a new one based on the Astra K. I’d like to see blindspot warning, cross traffic camera, better infotainment screen system and a bit better off the line performance.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Sounds nice, too bad about the motor. Putting that little turbo in this is crazy, it’s so heavy you have to be on the boost all the time to get it moving, and there goes your fuel economy. A V6 Camaro gets about the same mileage as this, I know which drivetrain I’d prefer.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      “In Europe the Cascada is available with a cheap single layer roof and an optional three layer roof. The Holden gets the three layer roof and is extremely quiet, doesn’t gell at all with this review.”

      FWIW, the first two responses I got when Googling “buick cascada top layers” were reviews from the Albany, New York, Times Union and Automobile. Per the former, “The Buick’s top is multi-layered and well insulated (thermally and acoustically), and feels snug and indifferent to the weather.” Per Automobile, “The multi-layer soft top is fine, raising and lowering in about 15 seconds (Buick says 17 seconds), and you can do it at speeds up to 31 mph,” and, “It’s surprisingly quiet with the top up, very tolerable with the top down.”

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    There is literally no point having Wi-Fi in a convertible.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Sure there is – streaming Internet music from your phone without using your cell data plan. One thing I love about GM rentals with the WiFi enabled (most of them lately). I’m a cheap SOB with the data, so I never stream otherwise.

      How does it being a convertible make the Wi-Fi less usable? Plus this sort of convertible is rarely seen with the top down anyway – would muss the hair you see.

  • avatar
    Metallicat

    It looks like an evolved Sebring?

  • avatar
    seanx37

    So, 500lbs too heavy, short 2 cylinders and 100hp, and 10k too expensive.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Will I feel ecstatic every time I touch it?

    All I kept thinking about was that obnoxious ladysinger person while reading the review.


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  • jh26036: Who is paying $55k for a CTR? Plenty are going before the $35k sticker.
  • JimZ: Since that’s not going to happen, why should I waste any time on your nonsensical what-if?
  • JimZ: Funny, Jim Hackett said basically the same thing yesterday and people were flinging crap left and right.

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