By on April 9, 2014

2013 Chevrolet Volt Exterior-001

General Motors announced Tuesday that it would invest $449 million into the two plants responsible for assembling the Chevrolet Volt in preparation for the next generation of the plug-in hybrid’s arrival in 2016.

The Detroit News reports $384 million will immediately go into the Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant for body shop tooling, equipment and other plant upgrades, while the remaining $65 million heads for the Brownstown Township battery assembly plant for expanded production of GM’s advanced lithium-ion batteries, as well as any future technologies that come down the road. The investments are expected to last for the next two years, and would add 1,400 new jobs to both facilities.

As for what fruit the investment will bear, GM vice president of North American manufacturing Gerald Johnson announced the next generation of the Volt will roll into showrooms in 2016 as a 2016 model, with production slated to begin in the autumn of 2015. Though he didn’t go further into what the new Volt would bring to the table, a number of analysts said the PHEV would likely gain an improvement in range over the 38 miles currently provided in electric-only travel.

Further, two new vehicles will accompany the new Volt within the next couple of years, including the Buick LaCrosse — expected in mid-2016 — and an all-new large Cadillac sedan set to be the brand’s flagship that would begin production around the same time as the next-gen PHEV.

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142 Comments on “GM Invests $449M Into Next-Gen Volt Production...”


  • avatar
    alsorl

    A friend of mine gets over 900mpg in his Chevy Volt. He drives about 43 miles round trip to work and plugs it in every night. Great car, quiet, roomy, very well put together, and is pretty quick off the line. He payed around $28,000 after tax breaks. Not sure why I don’t see more Volt’s on the road. If your not an anti-America made product type of moron, it could be the perfect car.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Agreed. I can only figure it’s a combination of upfront price (even with the tax breaks) and people’s not understanding that the Volt is even much more economical for typical driving than the Prius.

      $20,000 Accords with 40 MPG highway make it a tough argument to pay lots more for a compact in order to save gas. But this technology is so good, I can see it becoming waaaay more popular on a wide range of models from various makers very soon.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The Volt is not a compact?

        • 0 avatar
          tonycd

          Corey, maybe I wasn’t clear. I’m saying the Volt is a compact, and it’s at a price disadvantage against suddenly rather economical midsizers like the new Accord.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I was implying that it was -not- a compact, but I see that I’m wrong. It just looks so large, like Accord sized.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Inside, the Volt is a subcompact at best. It is the least comfortable or roomy four door car I’ve encountered. The trunk is small too, such being the cost of carrying two drivetrains. Does it make economic sense? If you’ve got no morals and are happy taking from your fellow man, the numbers might work for someone that can’t do arithmetic and has the right commute.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        A big problem with the Volt is most people have no clue what it is or how it works. GM has done a horrible job marketing one of the best vehicles they make. If you read stories about peole shopping for a Volt it seems that many Chevy dealers don’t want to be bothered selling one.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          People don’t need to know it works. I doubt everyone driving a Prius knows how it works.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            You completely missed my point. Many think iit is an electric car that goes 40 miles and then dies, as one example. I’m talking on a consumer level, not an engineering level, when I say most have no idea how it works.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Do people really think that? I feel sad for America. I thought with all the press and ads that wouldn’t be a problem at this point.

            I like the Volt. I would think about buying one if the rebate could be used as a down payment. It is used as a capitalized cost reduction in a lease, but I usually buy.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            If people were any smarter, there wouldn’t be subsidies for cars like the Volt. Bit of a catch 22.

        • 0 avatar
          tonycd

          I agree, Carlson.

    • 0 avatar
      gtrslngr

      alsorl- Your so called friend … is either deluded .. been doing the KickaPoo Joy Juice or 420 thing … or is the world biggest liar ! Guaranteed the person has never seen 100 mpg .. never mind 900 . Gee … you wouldn’t perhaps be yet another GM shill now …. would you ?

      As to tonycd … have a look at the heavily discounted leases …. which are losing GM money hand over foot .. that are on offer for the VOLT at present . The reason GM cannot give the POS away is easy to suss out

      1) They are a pos .. being a DaeWoo/CRUZE with a Pep Boys Elmers Glue party dress on and the pretense of being high tech

      2) GM was stupid enough to try and market what is a PlugIn Extended Range Hybrid … as an EV .. which the VOLT most definitely is not

      3) And yes … the price tag .. which can in no way shape or form be justified considering the abject lack of quality in materials and workmanship in the VOLT

      The VOLT being proof of the old adage ; ” You can fool some of the people some of the time . But you cant fool all of the people all of the time ” The VOLT being one of the few times the American consumer did not fall for the hype and bs of the manufacture .. and chose to .. Jus Say No

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        Yes, GM could have marketed the Volt better.

        The materials and workmanship have been vindicated by favorable results from independent voter surveys, including Consumer Reports (which has scored the reliability of many other GM products negatively).

        The rest of your post isn’t worth answering, except with a pro tip that you post less and attend remedial logic and grammar classes more.

        • 0 avatar
          gtrslngr

          Seriously ? Yet another editorial comment from the Zeros & Ones peanut gallery ?

          Yeah … you bet …. you’re really in a position to criticize me . Uh huh .

          I’ll bet youre a real pro as well . Pro what .. god only knows . But a pro something I have no doubt

          As far as the materials and workmanship ? On what planet ? Take a good look at the wheels alone on a VOLT . Suffice it to say the wheels on a $20k Jetta are ten times the quality .

          Now take your little Zeros and Ones and try picking on someone who actually gives a damn what you think . Capice ?

          • 0 avatar
            brenschluss

            “As far as the materials and workmanship ? On what planet ? Take a good look at the wheels alone on a VOLT . Suffice it to say the wheels on a $20k Jetta are ten times the quality .”

            Yeah, grammar is not the real issue here, rather the weird things you’re saying that don’t make sense.

      • 0 avatar
        alsorl

        Gtslr…. you need to educate yourself about the volt before you make an even bigger fool out of yourself then normal. The volt can run strictly in electric mode for a certain number of miles. Its called a plug-in hybrid. My friend also can use one of two charging stations at work. And yes he went over 7500 miles on one tank due to the technologies that an American company created. He has also had over 18000 trouble free miles. And dude what’s up with all the ……. in your posts. Is that the du or silent moments when your thinking ?

      • 0 avatar
        miatalove

        Gtrslngr,

        I don’t know if you have ever driven a Volt, but I happen to own one and I love it. I’m getting about 70mpg (plus spending about $1.30 to get a charge which lasts about 35 miles every day) and I calculate operational savings over my previous Acura RL will be ~$2k/year at $4/gallon and 15k miles per year.

        Aside from the gas mileage, I’m just genuinely impressed by what a nice car it is and how well it drives. I’ve owned about 20 cars in my lifetime (everything from a Chevy Chevette to a Lexus LS) and this is one of my favorites on its own merits, regardless of efficiency. It’s kind of fun switching between my old Miata and the Volt and appreciating the differences between analog and digital.

        I think if you are a “car person”, and you approach this car with an open mind, you will walk away with at least an appreciation for it, if not more. That was certainly true in my case, and I didn’t have any “green” motivation, save a desire to spend less on gas. I guess I don’t understand where the hate is coming from?

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      I’m a fan of the Volt but always cringe when I hear someone say it gets 900 MPG. The Volt may go 900 miles on a gallon of gas, but it doesn’t get 900 MPG. Once the battery is exhausted the Volt is EPA rated at 37 MPG. Pretty damn good considering it is hauling around that heavy battery pack.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      If what you say is true – 900 mpg – then they should cancel all the tax breaks.

      This modern Edsel should sell itself.

      • 0 avatar
        brenschluss

        Saying it gets 900 “miles per gallon” is a little misleading (if you’re easily misled,) but I don’t see why it wouldn’t be possible to actually go 900 miles per gallon of gas used. That doesn’t sound outlandish, if you rarely use the range extender and charge it nightly.

    • 0 avatar
      Crosley

      I’m sorry, but the 900mpg claim is so ludicrous.

      It’s almost like saying because you carpool your car’s fuel economy doubles and your Prius actually gets 100 mpg.

      These cars are so crappy that even with the taxpayer paying people to buy them, GM still is losing money on them.

      Nobody wants the Volt, it was an epic failure, and let’s not even talk about all the house fires.

      Corporate welfare fails again.

      • 0 avatar
        brenschluss

        Applying em-pee-gees to a car that doesn’t always use gasoline is what’s ludicrous. If I have ten gallons of gas in a car that doesn’t use it, I’m getting an infinite number of miles per gallon.

        I also don’t see what makes it a bad car. It’s expensive, sure, but I can think of more expensive cars that aren’t as fit for purpose as the Volt.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        No, let’s talk about the fires.

        There was a poster on TTAC for a while who called himself “VoltsOnFire,” with a Photoshopped image of flames cascading off a Volt as his avatar. It quickly became apparent that he hated the Volt, and deliberately misled other readers about the fires, out of a personal distaste for our president’s insufficiently reflective epidermis.

        For the record, the fires on Volts took place only after the cars had been IN A CRASH. Moral: If you crash your Volt, get the batteries checked. Which, metaphorically, you might also want to do with yours.

        As for that snippy little bit of ignorance about “corporate welfare,” it’s addressed elsewhere in this thread, so I won’t waste space debunking it again.

        • 0 avatar
          mikey

          VOF is still alive, and well here at TTAC.

          He has a different name now.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Is he that gtrslngr guy?

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            No…I don’t like the Dude. I’m still not going to “out” him. My moral compass goes back to my early years on the plant floor. You could hate the ground a guy walked on, but you would NEVER rat him out.

            If you go back to last summer after TTAC had a reboot. VOF came back with a different name, he told us all, at the time.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            VOF – Geez why did you guys have to bring up that worthless tool. I had all but forgotten about him. Talk about “non-value added”, that clown epitomized it.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      I still want an energy cost label the way appliances have energy usage info on them. It’s a way to compare gas and electric driers/ovens etc. Why not get some standardized assumptions about city/hwy mix and cost of various fuels and make a stupid standardized energy cost per year label that goes on the window? That way logic impaired individuals (none here, of course) can have a number to look at and figure out if the cost of the diesel/hybrid/unicorn fart machine is worth it to them.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        05, I think that’s a pretty good idea. And as more alternative fuels come into widespread use, it’ll only become more useful.

        I’d think the practical obstacle might be the constant flucutation in cost between, say, electricity, gasoline and diesel fuel (and/or whatever comes next), since what we consumers really care about isn’t how many ergs are used, but what they cost us.

        • 0 avatar
          05lgt

          I think an annual update would be enough. It’s all about trying to predict future energy costs, and anyone who can do that accurately will be doing something more lucrative than making labeling requirement data sheets. Since it’s just a guess annually works for me.

  • avatar
    285exp

    It’s especially nice when you can get other people to help pay for your car, it makes the $17,000 premium you’d have to pay over a Chevy Cruse a lot less painful. You can buy a lot of gas for that. Yep, only morons wouldn’t want to pay an extra $17k to save a few hundred bucks a year on gas, that’s why you see so many Volts on the road.

    http://www.cars.com/go/compare/trimCompare.jsp?acodes=USC30CHC301J0,USC30CHC311A0

    • 0 avatar
      alsorl

      Cruzes are smaller 4 door sedans. The volt is in a different class of auto. Prius? Yes it competes with the Prius plug in.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Yah! I wonder if they are making any money on them yet, or if it is still subsidized by the US taxpayers.

      Don’t misunderstand, all you Buy American lovers, I think there is a place for any and all offerings sold in America for those who want to buy them – but just not subsidized by the US taxpayers.

      If the taxpayers are still springing for the $7500 tax credit then it is just a further handout to GM in addition and far beyond the billions we already wasted on a dead company.

      Since the F150 is the best-selling vehicle in America, I would like to see the taxpayers subsidize each sale to help Ford get a share of all the handouts GM continues to get.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        No, cat, it’s not a handout to GM. It’s an incentive to get motorists into what’s pretty much the most environmentally responsible car on the road.

        Warning: I’m about to use the word “welfare” positively in a sentence. The preamble to the U.S. Constitution states that one of our republic’s goals is to “promote the general welfare.”

        Not just “welfare” as in “Give Goldman Sachs a trillion dollars to enrich a few corrupt bankers (while screeching like a stuck hog over giving automakers a fraction that much because said bankers have dropped the ball, thereby saving a million middle-class jobs at the moment the nation is on the brink of depression). But rather, “the general welfare” as in “encouraging behavior that won’t eventually choke us all to death and destroy the climate through fossil fuel overuse.” (And yes, I’m aware electric cars use electricity from coal-fired plants, but it’s still a net plus.)

        Even Republicans use tax breaks to modify behavior All The Time. It’s supposed to be a better, less oppressive way to promote society’s goals than regulatory bans in the eyes of anti-”welfare state” types like yourself. At least, those who aren’t blinded by vendettas.

        • 0 avatar
          gtrslngr

          BS ! Plain and simple ;

          1) A $7500 tax incentive is given to the customer … while an additional $7500 is given directly to GM . Fact is We the People are still subsidizing the manufacture and development of each and every VOLT sold … which means … you buy one … you paid for it three times over . Aint you just a brilliant little feller

          2) There is absolutely nothing environmental about the VOLT . From cradle to gave like most its ilk a single VOLT creates a larger carbon footprint … along with extensive environmental damage than twenty full size SUV’s despite the minor savings in gas . Mental ? … maybe … Environmental though ? In yours and GMs dreams

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            do you have any source for you comment about GM also getting $7500.00? What about Tesla?

            The environmental argument can be made of any hybrid or electric car.

            Are you really Kixstart with a different screen name?

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            I’m offended by that.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            I don’t agree with most of what you say but even I wouldn’t compare you to a rabid, foaming at the mouth, dog.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Tony, I agree, whoever is in power abuses that power in any number of ways, including subsidies and tax breaks to their biggest contributors.

          My point in subsidizing the F150 was to illustrate what a shot in the arm that would be for the economy, Ford AND the UAW! Now that would have a positive effect. But EVs? Any EVs? Their sales are equal to a statistical error in the SAAR of any given year.

          We’ve already covered my opposition to bailouts, handouts and nationalization to anyone, anywhere, anytime, to include banks, mortgage lenders, investment houses, car makers, on both Main Street and Wall Street.

          And let me reiterate my position on the whole Electric Car thing; I think they should be available for anyone who wants to buy one — just not subsidized by the US taxpayers.

          If Canadians, Mexicans, Chinese or whatever want to subsidize the sale of EVs, goody for them!

          Hey, Golf carts are also on the market. People use them in many retirement and golf course communities and on college campii throughout America. But Golf carts aren’t subsidized. PEVs are the same as Golf carts, just bigger, more expensive and overhyped. And subsidized.

          Both suffer from the same malady: Range Anxiety.

          • 0 avatar
            tonycd

            cat, that’s the beauty of the Volt, though: No range anxiety. You run out the batteries, you get home on the charge generated by its gas engine.

            That’s exactly the tremendous technological advantage it has over other all-electric cars (I’m looking at you, Leaf) that GM has sadly failed to publicize.

            About your larger point: There’s been a lot of demonization of “government picking winners and losers” versus “the magic of the free market.” IMO, history proves this is a bunch of ideology-driven hooey. Not only has America benefitted from a host of industries built on investment of public money (railroads, airlines, Internet) – and not only has Japan kicked our ass for decades by doing exactly the same thing for its growth industries, directly and indirectly – but you could very well argue the entire automotive marketplace we love was built the same way. No, government didn’t pay all the car companies. But guess who built all the roads?

        • 0 avatar
          05lgt

          Don’t forget that a capital gains tax seperate and lower than other income tax is the biggest welfare/social engineering program out there. But, it does promote investment which is good for the welfare of the nation.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        highdesertcat

        The tax credit goes to the consumer and it is also part of the Tesla buying experience, Leaf, Prius, Accord Hybrid…all of them.

        This credit has been around since 2005, so it is hardly a handout to GM.

        • 0 avatar
          gtrslngr

          Tax credit …. yes … further subsidizing of each and every VOLT coming off the line though ? That goes straight into GMs pocket . Unlike Nissan – BMW [ with the i3 ] Toyota – Honda …. all of them get bupkiss . The only other one being kept afloat by We the People is in fact TESLA . Get the facts straight before making such uninformed claims

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            are you delusional? you can type in “hybrid tax credit” and see that they all qualify for one. It’s nice they internet at the “homes” these days.

          • 0 avatar
            gtrslngr

            PonchoIndian – The only delusional one on this subject good sir is yourself . Either that or you’ve been partaking in GM’s KickaPoo JoyJuice lately .

            GM [ VOLT ] and TESLA get an additional Tax Payer financed subsidy for each and every car manufactured .. with an additional subsidy going to both for every car sold

            You can ” type in ” all you want … but the facts are the facts

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            I’m asking for a link to these so called facts…

            So Nissan must get money for every Leaf?

            Toyota gets money for every Prius?

            You shouldn’t take your tinfoil hat off on Wednesdays, you know this is what happens.

          • 0 avatar
            alsorl

            Ponch. You will get no facts or links from the bearded man sending out posts from his moms basement.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Guys! This is really NOT a point of contention because even the most intellectual and sage gurus among us must realize that a $7500 tax credit (which goes to the buyer of the Volt regardless if it is an individual or business) allows GM to sell the Volt for full pop, thereby realizing a full profit margin.

        Indirectly, the tax credit (or subsidy) does go to GM, because GM makes the sale BECAUSE of the tax credit.

        • 0 avatar
          PonchoIndian

          highdesertcat

          If you want to take that stance, which I suppose in a round about way is correct, you also have to say that the same rebate also goes to Toyota, Tesla, Nissan, Honda, BMW et al. This is a Government created tax break, not something GM created. It was in place long before GM was in the hybrid or Volt business.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            PonchoIndian, I am opposed to ANY subsidies going to ANY manufacturer. I thought that was clear, but if I wasn’t clear enough for you, you have my sentiments now.

            Realize that when the Volt was being perpetrated on the general public, the Prius et al had been on the market for a long time before that earthshaking revelation.

            In order to foster the sales of the overpriced Volt, the current administration did a C4C for GM to boost sales of the Volt.

            But they could not ignore the other EV manufacturers or they would have been slapped with a law suit that would have taken decades to clear the US Supreme Court.

            So, begrudgingly, the current administration made the tax credit(to the buyer/owner) available across the board.

            But only the Volt was promoted in the shpiel on the nightly news heralding this advanced concept of getting SOME buyers to buy an EV that they otherwise would never have bought or could never afford.

            As it is, the Prius line of vehicles does sell exceptionally well, especially in states like CA where subsidies abound through all sorts of venues like Solar panels on your roof, etc etc etc. thanks to the taxpayers of CA.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            I read you.

            For what its worth, I’m in complete agreement with you (other than trying to link c4c to be a direct benefit for GM specifically, that’s a little biased feeling and lots of paranoid conspiracy theory there). C4c is not was not a US only event.

            I am no fan of the current administration, never have been.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            PonchoIndian, I haven’t been a fan of any administration since that of Ronald Reagan.

            But I dare say that I had high hopes, hopes that were ultimately dashed, for the current administration.

            I thought America had reached a milestone by electing its first half-African/half White-American president.

            Especially in view of all the promises about how THIS administration would be getting it right and being transparent like none other before it, and all.

            Add to that the murmurs from the community of the “people of color” and the young people who stated it was time for the brown people to run America and show the rest of us White people how it was done correctly.

            Similar to Ray Nagin of New Orleans after Katrina and his Chocolate City comment. We know what happened to old Ray Nagin.

            Six years into this O**** mess of what we call the NEW, IMPROVED, BETTER THAN EVER spread-the-wealth-around America, a lot of people are a lot worse off than they were during Shrub’s eight years or Clinton’s eight years.

            My whole premise for this comment is that we, the people, should not be subsidizing the Volt or any other car maker but that we should let the market place determine who in business lives, and who dies.

            Solyndra, A123, and other such follies were dead at the start and no amount of infusion of money from the taxpayers was going to keep them alive.

            I say let the chips fall for EVs where they may. If they are a good thing for ALL of us, the buyers will get behind it and scarf them up, big time.

            What buyers are scarfing up big time is the F150, year after year after year. Let’s subsidize those vehicles and put taxpayer money where it counts.

  • avatar
    gtrslngr

    Dumping yet another $449 million dollars into a car GM despite deep discounts … ludicrously low lease prices and incentives up the yin yang cannot GIVE away !

    Same old GM . Different day perhaps … but the same old same old Head in the Sand Self Deluded GM … e.g. SSDD .. or better yet SNAFU

    Someone here actually needs to ask if the VOLT is making any money for GM ? Seriously ? Aint y’all been paying attention son ? Here’s the facts ;

    Neither the VOLT … nor its EU/UK cousins ( Vauxhall / OPEL ) derivatives have made one solitary dime for GM ….. with all of them … including the upmarket ELR version … have so far cost GM billions

    The VOLT …Making money indeed ! More like bleeding off money faster than a stuck pig in a slaughter house

    Ahhh … the GM faithful . Living proof ole Dr Tims alive and well and spiking the water supply at each and every GM facility Worldwide … be it office / factory / dealership etc … as well as the water bottle they send their customer home with .

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      How long did it take for Toyota to see a profit on the Prius? I don’t believe it was profitable until at least sometime during Gen 2 production of the Prius.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        That first Prius was preeeeety derpy.

        • 0 avatar
          gtrslngr

          Yeah but its still a hell of a lot better than the pos badge engineered VOLT …

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            There was no need for any more than one period there.

            “badge engineered VOLT.”

            No space, no multiple periods. Punctuation (normally) touches the last letter before it. Like this.

          • 0 avatar
            gtrslngr

            CoreyDL – Save your pithy and irrelevant little editorial comments in your vain attempt to validate your existence for those who actually might give a damn what the likes of you does or does not think . Though I’m guessing y’all are following some out of date little grammar school rule book and barely thinking at all .

            Give it a shot … along with an extensive reading of contemporary authors and poets … of which I may or may not be one of . Cause son … yer edumacation [ spelling intentional for dramatic effect ] is somewhat … how shall I say this … lacking

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “of which I may or may not be one of .”

            Yes, pure poet there. I know your commentary is extremely valid and important to everyone here. It would just be easier to read without all the nonsensical punctuation around it. Simplify it for all us proles who can barely keep up with your transcendent thoughts.

          • 0 avatar

            Grammar is a code that serves to make communication easier. Grammar can and does change. Some, like James Joyce, can masterfully change it around and manipulate in ways that make others shake their heads in wonder. Some, like you, just give other people headaches. Anyway, if you wrote more according to convention you might find it easier to win people over more to your ideas.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Bingo bingo Marcelo.

          • 0 avatar
            alsorl

            Cory…… the …. gives …. emotion… and .. wisdom..

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            I figured his period button was on the fritz from the ashes produced from the crack-pipe he’s smoking.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            i,,, understand [ok ] ..,

      • 0 avatar
        gtrslngr

        Wrong again . One year ! And even so … in the first 12 months Toyota lost less money than GM did in the first six months of VOLT production

        Face it . The VOLT and all its derivatives is GMs White Elephant and rapidly becoming GMs very own Edsel

        Interesting factoid ? Despite the BMW i3 still not being on US showroom floors as of yet it has already outsold the first three years of the VOLT et al production … in presales and orders alone . While GM has been constantly scaling back VOLT production … BMWs rushing about trying to figure out how to increase i3 manufacturing capacity

        The VOLT /ELR / Ampera … a loser from day one . And destined to remain so thru out its production run

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I feel like they haven’t sold enough of the current Volt to warrant this big money spend. Why not put more money into the LaCrosse and that big new -inevitably- FWD Cadillac?

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      “Why not put more money into the LaCrosse”

      Large car sales aren’t exactly on the upswing.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        That’s a fair point, but neither are the Volts!

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Given the track record of GM to deny, misdirect, misinform, obfuscate and otherwise delay, delay, delay, admission of any problems with the cars they make, I wonder what awaits us about the Volt in five or ten years from now.

          Does it have problems that GM is aware of but they just aren’t telling the public about it? Not farfetched. Right now there is the ignition-switch debacle that some say goes all the way back to 2001.

          Do people have to die before anyone with knowledge steps forward and informs the general public? What does it take for the US government to get involved in a problem, especially since the US government is so deeply entrenched with GM because of the bailouts, handouts and nationalization in 2009, and currently with the tax credits and promotion specifically of Volt vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Yeah Toyota, Ford, Chrysler, Honda never does anything like that either…Can’t say Toyota just paid billions in fines and will pay out more in compensation to others…

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    Nice car.
    Get rid of the buyer “incentives”.

  • avatar
    PonchoIndian

    who is this gtrslngr?

    I freakin love this guy…he is off his rocker.

    I wonder if he is a former writer form here or something…

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Glad to see GM is going to keep investing in this technology and not let it whither on the vine. I got one more year before I put a Volt in my garage. My demo 3 years ago sold me on it. We put 125 miles on it in a little over 2 days and never burn’t a drop of gas. And the driving experience was premium. My wifes brand new A4 drives like a Model T compared to that Volt.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Toyota didn’t see much a a return on the first gen Prius but went on to dominate the hybrid segment and reap healthy returns. Kudos to GM for also taking a long term view on technology.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      My son was working in Japan when the first Prius was introduced in Japan, and only for Japan. He said the sales in Japan were very good and better than expected. Many buyers were “first-time” car owners since owning a car in Japan is far more costly than it is in the US or Canada.

      As to whether Toyota actually made money on each sale in Japan, no one knows that except Mr. Toyoda and his senior staff. But EVERY sale of a Prius was a return on their investment because EVERY sale of a Prius put one more Prius in front of the buying public, and could have contributed to stirring more interest in this new form of transportation.

      The Volt clearly was a late copy cat in the EV battles. Where Prius took the Hybrid approach, the Volt was an all-electric drive platform with a generator on-board to replenish the battery (to keep the car going for the duration of the contents of the gas tank), heralded as the most advanced thing on the planet, and priced accordingly.

      Most Americans can’t afford one. They could buy TWO Cruze cars for the price of ONE Volt. So the Volt was relegated to be a toy for the idly wealthy, like Tesla.

      At least Elon Musk made no bones about that. His philosophy for Tesla was, “if you wanna play, you’ll have to pay”. And is has played well.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        “The Volt clearly was a late copy cat in the EV battles”

        Huh? No one else currently makes anything with Volt’s technology.

        Its not like Toyota developed the Prius hybrid system as it is, it was developed by a company in the USA and basically stolen by Toyota.

        • 0 avatar
          SayMyName

          “No one else currently makes anything with Volt’s technology.”

          Ever stop to think maybe there’s a reason for that? It’s been, what, seven years since GM first announced Voltec? Where’s the rush?

          The only people the Volt makes sense for are those who drive 40 miles or less per day, who would be better served by an electric-only car in the first place. With the Volt, they’re lugging around 400+ extra lbs of iron-block engine and gasoline that serves little purpose in their day-to-day routine.

          Refined hybrid technology, as offered by the Prius, is where the answer lies. You get all the benefits, all the time. That’s also why the Prius is the better bet for a greater portion of the population, and is why Toyota continues to refine it versus wasting any time or money on “range extender” nonsense.

          • 0 avatar
            tonycd

            saymyname, your ideology is showing.

            The last problem with the Volt is the technology, in my opinion. The technology is tremendous. The person who needs to get by with only one car (which is nearly all of us), and usually goes less than 40 miles but occasionally wants to go farther without fear of being stranded, is an absolutely ideal customer for a Volt

            It gives the advantages of a pure electric — which the Prius, while terrific, does not — without the crippling deficiency of range anxiety that limits the usefulness of the Leaf and other pure electrics. The Prius can’t give you “all the benefits” of a Volt, unless you can tell me how a Prius can travel 40 miles without using a single drop of gasoline (and no, shipping a Prius on the back of a flatbed truck doesn’t count). I have to conclude you’ve simply lost your objectivity about the Volt because it’s a controversial GM product.

          • 0 avatar
            darkwing

            Pot, kettle.

            Or would you rather lay out some TCO numbers to prove your point?

          • 0 avatar
            SayMyName

            tony, I’m quite confident in my ideology, though I fail to see where I necessarily revealed any such political position in my rather measured post.

            Operating the Volt in its most efficient mode – pure electric – gets you 40 miles before the “range extender” kicks in. While in pure electric mode, the Volt is saddled with 400+ lbs of dead weight, hampering its efficiency.

            Once the iron-slug 1.4 kicks on – as it must if you’re going to travel any appreciable distance – you’re getting fuel mileage only moderately better than a conventional compact. Volt owners are lucky to crack 40 mpg with the engine running.

            So tell me – where’s the Volt’s advantage? Drive it as an electric and you’re lugging around a useless engine; run the engine, and you’d be better off in a Cruze Eco.

            On the other hand, with the Prius you’re benefitting from improved mileage across the board, to the tune of 50+ mpg. That’s why Toyota sells a lot more Prii than GM can muster with Voltec.

          • 0 avatar
            tonycd

            saymyname, your argument is that the Volt inefficiently lugs around the weight of its gas engine while running on batteries. I suppose that’s theoretically a disadvantage, but in practical terms it’s still a stunningly economical car with sprightly acceleration for those 40 miles it runs on battery power.

            To me, the point of the Volt’s operation on gas AFTER those 40 miles isn’t that it does it better than any other car — like the proverbial tap-dancing bear, it’s that it can do it at all. The Leaf and its ilk simply can’t, and if you ever got stranded in one, you’d gladly take 39 mpg – or 10 – rather than walk down the highway carrying a gas can (or a battery, or whatever stranded Leaf owners carry).

            To repeat, I don’t suggest the Volt is ideal for everyone. It’s ideal for those who usually go under 40 miles, but occasionally must go longer. For those people, the fact that a minority of their miles aren’t in the Volt’s economy sweet spot simply isn’t that relevant. For those who do 50+ miles of city driving daily, yes, the Prius’s hybrid technology fits them better.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            tonycd: “The last problem with the Volt is the technology, in my opinion. The technology is tremendous.”

            It’s an expensive, overweight, cramped Prius with such ‘advanced technology’ as a giant battery that robs it of interior room and cargo space, an extra clutch, a rearrangement of the gears in the electric drive unit (which they farmed out to what is almost a subsidiary of Toyota), and an iron block engine that Toyota would be embarrassed to put in a Yaris.

            Oh, yes, it also has more powerful electric motors. Yippeee.

            Exactly what part of this couldn’t be done by Toyota, if they were interested in building a car that won’t sell?

            There’s no dichotomy here, it’s a continuum, with the C-Max Energi falling in between.

            And SayMyName is not showing an ideology, he’s giving you an assessment… a good one, too.

          • 0 avatar
            tonycd

            kixstart, “Exactly what part of this couldn’t be done by Toyota?”

            This argument reminds me of when David Letterman interviewed Mike Judge, creator of Beavis and Butt-head. Chuckling at the primitive animation, Letterman said, “Anybody could have done this.”

            Judge just grinned and replied, “But I did it first.”

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            If you compare the MPGe between a Volt and a Leaf, you realize that even though it is dragging around that heavy ICE and everything that goes along with it, in EV mode the Volt is pretty damn close to the Leaf in effciency.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            CarlsonFan,

            The Ford Energi vehicles score better on the MPGe scale.

            tonycd,

            You neglected to include the second part of the question and implied a quote. Do you work for Fox News?

            The fact is, anybody could build this car. It took GM’s special genius to go ahead and build it, sell a meager 1500 last month in spite of a whopping tax credit assist and lose money on every one.

            What advantage does GM get from this? If you look at PHEVs only, they’re roughly equal shares with two other manufacturers offering cars that get far less in tax credits. If you look at it in plug-ins generally, it’s roughly equal shares with 5 or 6 other manufacturers. There’s no strategic marketing advantage in that. Look at Toyota’s share of the HEV market: *that* is a strategic advantage.

            GM hasn’t locked up any technological advantage. The key enabler is the battery which they buy, just like any other manufacturer can do.

            They cheaped out on it in important ways, so it’s not definitively superlative.

            They’ve wasted a $billion-plus apparently to prove that Toyota knows more about the car business than they do.

            The difference between Mike Judge and GM is that Mike Judge didn’t lose money on Beavis and Butthead.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            @kixstart – The Ford Energi are for the most part carbon copies of the Prius. They never operate like a true EV either. So what’s your point? You comparing Apple & Oranges.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Your implication is that high MPGe is good. I am pointing out that there are vehicles that do better.

            The way MPGe works, more EV miles tend to increase MPGe.

            Yet, we notice that although the Volt (98MPGe) has an EV range which solidly beats the rest of the PHEV competition, two of them outscore it (100MPGe for the Energi cars) and the third (the PHV), which has very short pure EV range comes very close (at 95 MPGe).

            Why is that? The conclusion that I draw is that the Volt uses its energy sources extremely inefficiently, which calls your assertion that Voltec outclasses HSD or the Ford system into question.

            Of course, it could be that the Volt is a poor implementation of Voltec but GM has had several years to improve and enhance Voltec yet their newest offering, the ELR, has MPGe that is significantly worse, at 82MPGe.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          >> Huh? No one else currently makes anything with Volt’s technology.

          Actually, the i3 has been in production since September 2013 and is an electric with an optional range extender.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            BMW realized early on that the design of the Volt was superior over that of the Prius. That’s why they hired one of the major players involved with the Volt away from GM and built their own Volt. So thank the Volt for however good the BMW i3 is.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            BMW made the range extender optional – which is why they followed the Volt model. Something they wouldn’t be able to do if they followed the Prius design. BMW also went with an entirely new platform in CFRP.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            BMW hired Weber before the Volt launched.

            And if they recognized the superiority of the Volt, why did they build something that’s not a Volt? They didn’t build a vehicle with electric motors and ICE integrated, they built an RE-EV with mechanically isolated M/G.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Who cares if they hired him before the Volt launched. That’s neither here or there. The point is he was hired because of his knowledge/experise from working on the Volt. And sure BMW didn’t build a carbon copy pf the Volt, BMW recognized the Volt concept as being superior over that of the Prius and put their own twist on ît.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Carlson Fan: “Who cares if they hired him before the Volt launched. That’s neither here or there.”

            Actually, it’s highly pertinent. The guy who developed the Prius, Uchiyamada (uncertain of spelling) is now either Chair or Vice Chair of Toyota.

            Weber got in on the ground floor of a project that GM’s fans insist is an even bigger deal than the Prius, so the sky was the limit for people involved but Weber bailed before the launch. Why?

            Nor is the i3 a Voltec with a Bimmer twist. It’s more like the Fisker Karma than a Volt, a pure serial RE-EV, which the Volt is not.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Cameron,

    The Volt is not a PHEV.

    The engine cannot recharge the battery, unlike ALL the other real PHEVs.

    It must be plugged in to recharge the battery. It is unlike all the other hybrids. It is a vehicle that hauls around an engine which fires up when he battery is exhausted.

    All the other PHEVs fire up the engine for maximum power even when the battery is not exhausted.

    It is unique.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    The dealers I’ve seen in Ohio treat the Volt like the Chrysler dealers treat the Viper…put one in the showroom for the “ohhh, ahhhh” factor. GM, I suspect has a different motivation for vending these vehicles. “How many high-profit Silverado 6.2 liters can I sell for each Volt and still increase our CAFE?”

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    GM did not create the PHEV by any means. Plug ins were available as a conversion to a standard hybrid system. It was first introduced in Japan by Toyota 2002-2003. GM adopted most of this technology through a tech joint venture with Toyota. Your facts are wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      The Prius never Operates as a true EV like the Volt. Never. If you pussy foot the gas pedal while accelerating and don’t drive too fast, you can get it to act like an EV, but it isn’t one. The Volt doesn’t have those limitations because it is an EV. Hammer it all the up to its governed 99 MPH and not once, ever, will it fire up the ICE to help propel it along

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        Presuming this is true, the response of the market is, “So what?”

        Only EV Zealots are going to care whether or not the car acts like a true EV all the time. HSD and the Ford system operate on the intelligent decision that, if you have an engine along, you might as well use it when you need it.

        And I don’t know about Ford but Toyota is certainly making money on this.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          Presuming this is true? Are you kidding me? You really don’t understand how the Volt works do you. Wow that comment right there says a lot. I would have given you more credit than that.

          And sure if you don’t care about the ICE kicking on all the time, raising the cost per mile to drive ithen go with a Prius. Remember the Volt will cover a mile at a 1/4 of the cost of a Prius when in EV mode.

          • 0 avatar
            SayMyName

            The Prius EV is still optimized for engine-on operation, where it nets as much as 60 mpg. With its gas engine running, the Prius is much more efficient in the real world (you know, where the vast majority of us live) than a Volt can muster after its iron slug “range extender” coughs up.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            60 MPG? Yeah right, under perfectly ideal drivng conditions. Which isn’t the real world. I read a story where a guy couldn’t get over 25 MPG out of his Prius because his trips were too short. That’s real world and that is where a Volt or any EV will absolutely crush a Prius in cost per mile to run. And then there is the drivng experience, Rolls Royce or Chitty Chitty bang bang.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          Carlson Fan: “Presuming this is true,” because I didn’t want to bother re-explaining to you that the Prius does, in fact, operate in EV mode. I’d know… I own one.

          It’s true that demand for power causes the engine to fire… here’s where we get to the “So what?” part of my post. By the way, the Volt engine will also fire if it’s merely chilly out. Where’s that “pure EV advantage then?”

          See my earlier post about MPGe and relative efficiency… the Volt is not doing a good job.

          By the way, if you can’t get more than 25mpg out of a Prius:

          A) So what? A regular ICE car would be getting under 10 mpg. For a bit more than a regular ICE car, 25 mpg where a normal car would do less than 10 is insanely great.
          B) To get 25mpg, the trip must be .5 miles or less. Get a Prius PHV. It’s $thousands less than a Volt and, should you need to go out of town, it will deliver 52mpg or better (my experience… and I don’t crawl on the expressway). The 11 mile EV range of the PHV will allow you to burn no gas.
          C) Better still, you should re-think how you live your life. If all you’re doing is trips under .5 miles, don’t waste money on an EV to avoid burning gas; WALK.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      Actually, GM has been making PHEV for decades. They have used the technology in Locomotives and Buses forever, they are the first to used it in a mass produced car. Toyota hasn’t invented anything, they have just taken other’s ideas and refined them.

  • avatar
    ZoomZoom

    I would consider the Volt if all of the following were true:

    1. My daily drive was under 40 Miles round trip
    2. It were made by somebody OTHER than General Motors
    3. It had a quick-change battery pack, sort of like DeWalt or Ryobi power tools
    4. It were under $35,000 and
    5. I could buy additional battery packs so one could always be charging at home
    6. It were manufactured in a non-GM plant
    7. …by non-GM workers.

    # 3 and 5 would very much interest me because I could then use my home as a central hub and just plan my driving so that I would be home to change the battery, rather than plugging the car in and waiting 3, 4, 8, 12 hours for it to charge. Removable battery packs would be a great solution for me..

    But manufactured by GM? No way. Won’t do it. Ever. They made bad products for many years, didn’t correct their management problems, and then sucked money away from the US taxpayer to make it all better. That was theft, plain and simple, and I can’t condone it. That is not “unAmerican” of me no matter how you cut it.

    • 0 avatar
      alsorl

      1. The new volt is around $32000 before tax breaks.
      2. You would have to get over your ignorance toward American made products.
      3. You would have start realizing that putting down GM and union made products makes you look like a complete moron when speaking to people outside your bubble that live in.

      Then and only then you should be allowed to purchae a Chevy Volt.

      • 0 avatar
        darkwing

        You just have to love how “non-GM” and “non-GM workers” somehow turns into “anti-American and anti-union”. Kinda validates what ZoomZoom was saying to start with, eh?

        • 0 avatar
          alsorl

          Let’s see if Mr Zoom has the ability to respond to his anti Union, anti American comments. Or his he like some of the tools that say he would fly the American flag upside down ?

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      So let’s see, ZoomZoo, you have 7 reasons not to buy a Volt.

      Reasons #3 and 5 are basically the same reason.

      Reasons #2, 6 and 7 are all that you hate GM and unionized American workers.

      So, you’re okay with American-built cars so long as the people making them are denied their legal right to bargain collectively?

      The pathetic part of this is, I’ll bet you’re not a billionaire. You just carry water for them. And you know what? They don’t even love you for it. They think you’re a chump.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        ZoomZoom, I’ll amend my comment above. In fairness to you, you did specify GM and GM workers, not all American carmakers or American unionized workers. But I would be interested to know where you stand on union representation of American auto workers generally, and your open-mindedness to buying the products they build.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          zoom zoom owns a Prius, so you can lop him in with KixStart & HighDesertCat Toyota fan boy club for objectiveness when it comes to opinions about the GM Volt.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Considering the opinions of the market mirror our own, I’d say our opinions are pretty solid.

            It sells in the 1500/month range with a $7500 tax credit and other government benefits in many cases. That’s pretty bad.

          • 0 avatar
            alsorl

            Your on point for highdeseret and kikstart. There comments are always predictable and expected for these pseudo “pro American” tools that always just show there real anti-American beliefs. I love America. But think the workers that make A living building American branded cars are trash liberals. Yet if they dig deep into Toyoda they will find that the Japanese government has subsidized there company from the get go. The same Japanese government that just a little over 60 years ago wanted to take over the United States. I’m surprised they don’t also worship Mitsubishi knowing they built the Zero for the Kamikaze pilots that were used in WW II to kill Americans.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            The Volt outsold the Tesla S and Leaf last year in the US and that’s pretty bad? Really? Is this you being objective again?

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            In 2013 sales in the US, the Volt eked out a narrow (500 or so unit) victory over the Leaf.

            In cumulative 2014 US sales, the Leaf is leading the Volt 5184 to 3036.

            YOY, 2013 vs 2014, Volt sales are down. Volts have carried a variety of large rebates, subvented leases and appear to have volume dealer rebates available, too (which is hurting small dealer efforts, if any, to sell the car).

            In worldwide sales less JDM sales last year, the Leaf led the Volt by 34K to about 28K.

            In worldwide sales, less JDM sales, the Volt is probably now losing to the Prius PHV. The Volt has a slim lead over the PHV but the PHV is available in only 50 states and gets just 1/3 the tax credit the Volt enjoys.

            The Volt and ELR combined cumulative 2014 sales are less than those of Ford’s Energi vehicles, which get a far smaller tax credit than the GM vehicles.

            It’s also clear that the Volt loses money on every unit (GM has told us so). We don’t know if the PHV loses money but it’s part of an extremely successful program and a back-of-the-envelope calculations suggest it’s as profitable as a regular Prius. I don’t know about Ford but it’s reasonable to expect those cars are doing OK financially, as they’re also part of a program that seems to be doing tolerably well.

            That’s me being objective.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Kix

            None of what you say is objective. It is you making summations (in your own words), including sales numbers for places that have nothing to do with US sales (so they are not relevant) and than putting your sprinkle of bias and arrogance on it to try to make your point.

            You keep making reference to tax credits based on manufacturer. We all know tax credits were not created for the Volt. Tesla has the same 7500 tax credit as the Volt, as does Leaf. The credits lower from there based on batter size, which more or less means electric drive range.

        • 0 avatar
          ZoomZoom

          Hello and thank you for amending your comment.

          First of all, my post was partly tongue-in-cheek, mixed in with some things that would indeed make me consider an EV. Making light of a spoiled relationship, so yeah you’ll have to exert some energy to break down which is which. :) By the way, it wasn’t my fault that GM and I had a falling out. I didn’t just “turn” against them, they pushed me away.

          And yes, I was speaking purely about GM in my comments above. I have owned both GM and Chrysler cars, and I take issue with both manufacturers for their quality and for their acceptance of taxpayer bailout money. To me, the latter is a moral issue, which makes it a non-starter for me.

          As for subsidies, I would indeed prefer to NOT have any subsidies for anybody. Not for corn farmers, and not for hybrids or EVs. I would also support the complete end of all tax breaks and would like to see everybody get an invoice for taxes due. Make us write the check! It’s true, I did get a $500 tax credit when I bought my car in 2004, but this didn’t even cover my first year of registration, which is yet another tax I pay, among many others.

          No, I still would have bought my car anyway. And having credits did not cause me to prematurely/unnecessarily buy a car since. Taking a tax credit does not mean you support the tangled tax law we have. And as a percentage of the price of a new car plus financing and tags/title, not to mention the hassle of dealing with a dealer, etc, subsidies are not really a motivating factor for me. I’d rather just keep a car for 10-12 years and avoid dealing with dealers and bureaucrats.

          I have not said anything about unions, but I can understand why you would think I’m against unions. After all, there are good arguments that the UAW, with its rich benefits (being paid for not working is indeed “rich” I think), was in part responsible for GM’s downfall. Today, GM is union owned (not the same as employee owned in my book). So naturally, if you can’t separate the company from the union and if I say something against the company, some will think I am speaking against the union, even though I never did; not explicitly, anyway.

          In response to other posts, yes I do own a Prius. But why is that bad? Am I not free to choose how to spend my money? I have also owned or regularly driven Mazda, Chevrolet, Pontiac, Dodge, and BMW cars. My experiences with GM and Chrysler brands were not smooth. My experiences with Mazda, Toyota, and BMW were smooth. Some might have a lot of time to sit and wait while their cars are fixed (for silly crap that disables the car, and sometimes multiple times for the same problem), but finally after decades of buying and caring for my GM cars, I decided to stop this bad habit and start being nicer to myself. Does that make me anti-American? Anti-Union? No, I think it just makes me “pro ME”, but feel free to make of this what you will.

          I might consider a Ford one day, but their cars haven’t excited me for a long time. Even today’s Mustang is just “meh” to me; sorry! Just because I didn’t explain all this in my prior post doesn’t mean I’m anti-American either, and it’s myopic for people to say this based on that.

          My Trans-Am was made in Canada. My Z3 was made in South Carolina. My Corvette was made in the American heartland, and was arguably the LEAST reliable of all the cars I have ever owned. How can anybody expect me to ignore past performance, all in the name of being “pro-American”?

          Only when an auto maker’s management AND line employees realize that some of us have stopped being brand-loyal, then will they have a chance to turn things around. It’s convenient to point fingers and claim that I’m anti-union or anti-American, but that’s just lazy. It doesn’t support me in the exercising of MY rights, and it does not address the root cause of the problem. Nothing will change until this attitude changes.

  • avatar
    brianyates

    GM might want to hang on to that$ 449 million to pay for the huge lawsuits that will result from their mobile ignition switch problems etc.

  • avatar

    I’m more interested in the other two yet-to-be-named cars that will be built there. I’m guessing that one of them will be the Cadillac flagship.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      I’m interested in that too but not as much as what the 2nd Gen Volt will be. Looks like it is gonna be late 2016 until they are actually on dealer lots. The good news is GM is expanding its battery vehicle offerings.

  • avatar
    George B

    I drove the Volt last fall. It has a better interior than I would have expected from Chevrolet, but rental car experience set my expectations pretty low. In the end the big problem is I don’t really want an expensive Chevrolet hatchback with so much battery dividing up the interior space. To me the short stubby proportions of a hatchback are like automotive dwarfism. However, put the same quiet drivetrain in a more upscale sedan shaped car and I might consider it.

  • avatar
    achevroletman

    It is very easy to forget that the American consumers memory span is about as short as John Bobbits junk(post lorenaectomy).This is important to Volt sales figures, because as the price of fuel rises higher Volt sales increase, as fuel prices dcrease lower Volt sales decrease. Americans as consumers are very knee jerk and reactionayry.
    Later on this year I anticipate Volt sales will increase to new monthly highs as the MSRP has been lowered by 5000.00 dollars to 34995.00 for the base model. When GM starts Rebate incentivization later this year, and you take advantage of some of the discount pricing tiers that are available, you will be able to buy a Volt in the 22,000+++ range. The Volt is a great car at that pricepoint.
    In regard to the 449 Million investment in the future of the next generation Volt, it is absolutely the right path. Battery technology will only get smaller and more powerful. This will allow the Volt to become slightly larger, while at the same time greatly increasing the battery only range. Petroleum and petroleum based products will never be the future of our planet, as petroleum is finite and dirty.
    The supposed intelligencia here(in their own minds anyway) that constantly bang the drum about the government bailout of this industry and that industry are the ones with their heads in the sand. TARP loans have been paid back and made billions of dollars in profit for the government(not individually, but as a whole). The United States would have spiraled into a depression along with the rest of the world had those TARP loans not gone out. I very seriously doubt many of the commenters here experienced those dire times during the depression, but my Father did, and we should all be thankful our government took the actions it did.


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