By on March 26, 2014

pitfall2

Henry writes:

Sajeev,

My wife and I are planning on taking a large 20 day vacation this summer where we plan on driving aver 5000 miles with our three older children. My wife drives a 2008 Ford Taurus X, which we love, but does not have enough space for a family of five for such a long journey. We were originally going to rent a minivan from the local enterprise, but a two week rental will set us back $1,300 with tax.

Ouch.

Recently I noticed that there are some good deals to be had on fourth generation Chrysler minivans. My wife and I bought two of these vans new, a 2001 and a 2005, and we loved both vans. This has me thinking, why not just buy a loaded up low mileage van for around $3,000-$4,000, use it for the summer/trip, and then sell it after we are done. Any advice?

Sajeev answers:

If you have the cash flow/time to buy-then-sell AND assuming you can do a bit of repair with your own hands, then yes, you should absolutely do this! This will be cheaper than renting (obviously) and maybe even flying to your destination. Plus, road trips are all about the journey.  That said, let’s make sure you are safe and not stranded on the journey.

A list of items you must check on your short list of minivans you want to buy, then sell:

  • Tires, tires, tires. Road trips are hard on old tires, so new-ish tires are almost mandatory. And not just tread depth wise, also age wise. Don’t forget the spare, either!
  • Service records: buy the van with the most comprehensive service history. Even if it’s Barney purple and has stains/rips inside, that’s the safest bet.
  • Fresh fluids, good rubber hoses/wipers/belts/vacuum lines, fresh brakes and all the stuff we preach in this column on a regular basis.
  • Clear headlights with new bulbs, as you will drive at night and want to actually see where the hell you’re going.

There are other granular bits to discuss (strength of transaxle if subjected to neglected ATF) but that’s hard to armchair in terms of being a relevant concern to your short-term ownership.   I would buy the van with the most records, the best tires/brakes you can find and hope you can add value in your ownership (via repairs and detailing) so you can actually make money on your vacation!

Best of luck with that.

Send your queries to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

 

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82 Comments on “Piston Slap: The Buy or Rent Pitfall?...”


  • avatar
    danio3834

    I’ve bought cars for single purpose events before, then sold them. It’s a bit more hassle than it’s worth IMO. Selling used cars sucks, it really does.

    Plus, with a vehicle approaching 10 years old, you might not know exactly what you have before you set out on your 5000 mile journey. Those vans in that price range will usually have north of 130k miles on them. You could end up like a friend of mine who borrowed a 2000 Montana for a trip to Florida from Detroit and spent the first day or two of his vacation changing a head gasket in a HoJo parking lot along I-75 somewhere in Kentucky.

    The Taurus X is pretty decently sized inside, maybe invest in a good sized roof mounted cargo carrier to free up space inside.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      This. Or even one of those hitch mounted platforms for the coolers, etc. Or a travel trailer. Buying a beater van to drive your whole family 5000 miles is a terribad idea.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      The Taurus X may be big enough to haul Baruth’s music gear, but it’s still not going to be comfy for two adults in front and three _older_ children sitting hip-to-hip in back for, ahem, a 5,000-mile road trip. If the OP actually wants to enjoy his vacation, $60 a day to rent a minivan where everyone gets their own seat seems like a small price to pay.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        The Taurus X does have a 3rd row of seats that aren’t useless. I sat in the back of one and it wasn’t a notably worse place to be than te 3rd row of most minivans.

        • 0 avatar
          DC Bruce

          Unless they’re small, people riding in the third row of most minivans are not very comfortable. That’s why people buy Suburbans.

          • 0 avatar
            sastexan

            Our Odyssey is very comfortable in the third row for two people – proper seat height and all. A third and it is a little narrow. The second row seats can slide for more (or less) room. I know the Sienna is similar. I didn’t find the third row in a rental ChryCo van very comfortable.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            That’s funny because the third row of a Suburban is a horrible place to be. At least in a minivan there isn’t a giant live rear axle where your feet are supposed to go.

            I’ve only ever sat in the third row of ChryCo and Toyota minivans, but I’d rather be in either one than a Burban.

          • 0 avatar
            DougD

            That’s why you see so many top carriers on Suburbans, you’re supposed to put your legs in there before sitting in the third row.

          • 0 avatar
            greaseyknight

            Ever ridden in the 3rd row seat of a GMT800 Suburban? Not a good place for a 6 foot adult. From what I remember, the 3rd row of our Windstar was about the same space was as the Suburban, maybe even a little more legroom

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      +1 for the roof box. I did a similar trip with my family, three kids and my mom. Roof box saved the day. Sears x-cargo is cheap and big. Not the fancy wavy one, the big bulbous 20sqft one.
      Just invest in some soft bags, leave the suitcases at home and watch the weight limits on the roof.
      I couldn’t imagine buying a beater for such a long drive. The last $3000 car I bought immediateley needed about $600 worth of brakes and tires, misc things. Then you still don’t know what fun thing might go boom with a car loaded with family.
      Just imagine you stuck in BFE with a broken hoopty minivan with your family pissed at you reminding you that you did a dumb, dumb thing.

      • 0 avatar
        BobinPgh

        But don’t you have to save some space on the roof for Aunt Emma? Or do you plan to put the little kids in the X-cargo?

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        Roof bags/boxes work; but if you stop at a different place every night; it gets to be less than fun lugging suitcases up on the roof and back down again. We have done this with the Durango; and I can think of more enjoyable things than trying to keep you balance on that narrow bumper and hanging on with one hand while unloading suitcases with the other; it is good exercise to lift a fully loaded large suitcase to the top of a such a tall vehicle with one hand while trying not to scratch the paint; especially if it is wet.

        The last time we did it; I actually threw a folding step stool into the back so that at least I had something decent to stand on; and not end up in the hospital somewhere with a fractured skull and concussion from falling off.

        Renting a small trailer and hitch would be cheaper than a minivan; and easier than a roof box. I would consider that as well.

        • 0 avatar
          zamoti

          I respectfully disagree on the trailer. Did that, sucks ass. No visibility, heavy, noisy thing boppling around back there. Parking is a drag also. Crap gas mileage, awful driving experience. You still need to secure it.

  • avatar
    Matt Foley

    The buy-then-sell plan sounds good, but I’d go for a RWD conversion van rather than a Chrysler minivan. Sure, you’ll burn more gas on the trip, but you’ll have more room, captain’s chairs in the second row and a bench/bed in the back. Most importantly, you won’t have to worry about a Mopar transmission leaving you stranded 2000 miles from home.

    • 0 avatar

      And if all else fails, you can live in it… DOWN BY THE RIVER!

      I second the full sized van approach–and gas mileage isn’t that much worse than some minivans–especially if you get a Dodge with a V6 or the Econoline with the I6.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        The V8 vans would probably get better fuel economy than the V6s or the minivans for that matter. This guy is talking about hauling 5 people, and more stuff than he can fit into a Taurus X. The V6s will feel the weight, while the V8 vans won’t. You can also find them for very cheap these days. I also disagree on the comfort. The Chrysler minivans in question had good front seats, but the rest were terrible.

    • 0 avatar
      Roberto Esponja

      Heck, no. I used to sell both conversion vans and Chrysler minivans, and minivans are more comfortable. Conversion vans have those poofy seats that will kill your back on a long trip.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    So you buy a POS, spend maybe 10 hours on that, drive a POS for a while while fixing it along the way, then sell the POS, another 3-5 hours wasted. All to save 3 day’s worth of average salary. Or $300/per person. On a monumental trip with your family. Think about it.

    There are used car dealers that rent decent vehicles too though again, I am not sure the savings over a new van from Enterprise with national network would be worth it.

  • avatar
    alsorl

    I’ve know a few people that have purchased vehicles for a single purpose. One did OK and saved some cash. The other two failed miserably. One was stranded out of town with his family, trans failure. The other ended up having to rent a larger truck anyway. In turn losing money. So maybe search for a cheaper way to rent a vacation vehicle. It’s going to cost you money either way. So why not do the safe thing and just rent a vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      BobinPgh

      Was this National Lampoon’s Family Vacation?

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      I throw my advice along these lines too. Shop the rental for a while, deals can be had. Check your financial institution, credit card, and any membership shopping you may frequent and back that up with on-line sleuthing. Don’t be affraid to ask for both discounts at once. Once you’re bouncing from rental agency to agency they sometimes get generous while attempting to seal the deal. Time is on your side here so take advantage of it.

  • avatar

    One of my siblings is a criminal defense attorney. They live in an apartment, commute via mass-transit to the court – and due to the high traffic density and high traffic penalties (i.e. traffic tickets) – and lack of parking – chooses not to buy a car, even though they could easily buy one. What they did instead was got a “ZIP CAR” membership which allows them to “borrow” (rent?) Zip Cars. They last visited me in a Mazda 3.

    It’s a good idea for people who don’t want the expenses of a car, but I feel that I need the freedom of being able to hop in my cars any time without reservation and drive whenever/wherever…

    Yes it costs a lot (even more when you’re getting less than 12 MPG), but life’s too short to drive boring cars.

  • avatar
    darkwing

    Yeah, for a 2-3 week domestic trip, it seems like more trouble than it’s worth. My gut tells me that a month would be the minimum to break even with a small car, and two or three for something like a minivan.

    Are you sure you’re getting the absolute best rental rate you can? It’s worth checking with all the majors, looking into whatever discounts you have access to (credit card, rewards program, organization, etc.), upgrade coupons if you’re not committed to a minivan, etc. For comparison, I quoted a two-week minivan rental with unlimited miles from my local airport National, and with my Amex Platinum discount (10% + three free additional drivers), I only came up with $650 + tax.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      My thoughts exactly. The last few time I’ve rented, it’s cost me $30/day with unlimited mileage. You’re at nearly $100/day. Phone around.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      Yeah, I was going to add a comment to question the rate this guy is getting for the van rental as well. National at Logan in Boston quotes $2481 for a minivan for two weeks in July, but with the merest of effort typing in discount codes (KLM Flying Blue works well if you don’t have an Amex Platinum) I was able to get it down to $781 all-in with unlimited miles. It seems to me the peace of mind of a new vehicle that you don’t have to worry about breaking down, don’t have to research buying, and don’t have to go through the hassle of selling, is more than worth $800 (less whatever the difference in gas between a ca. 2000 engine with 130k miles on it and a new Caravan that easily pulls 30 on the highway).

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      Do rental companies still limit you to the state in which you rent and adjacent states before they tack on additional cost? When I looked at renting to drive cross country, my rates skyrocketed when they found out that I was not staying in WV and the adjacent states.

      • 0 avatar
        darkwing

        The majors don’t, as long as you drop it off where you picked it up. The one-way fee is pretty variable, but can be small.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          Enterprise, interestingly enough, is the exception to this – they’re simply not set up for one-way rentals, and charge you through the nose for it/

        • 0 avatar
          sirwired

          You really gotta ask; Budget isn’t tiny, but they tried to surprise me once with a state restriction.

          And the “neighborhood” franchise locations, even branded by the majors, will sometimes have restrictions that you wouldn’t see renting at the airport (for much higher cost.)

          • 0 avatar
            BobinPgh

            If you’re going to the airport why not just fly? Maybe some of the kids can hide in the overhead compartment.

    • 0 avatar
      mypoint02

      The biggest thing with rental cars is making sure you don’t rent from an airport location if you can avoid it. Cities have figured out that tourists and business travelers are easy marks for tax revenue and they can’t vote anyone out of office, so they gouge them. The tax rate on rental cars at major airports often exceeds 50% of the base rate, sometimes even much more than that. It usually makes more sense to pay for transportation to and from an off airport location if you’re going to have it more than a few days.

      I’m renting a car this summer for a cross country trip. I used Costco Travel with Avis as the rental company, using a local office. My rate was $300 all in for 10 days (premium car – intermediate SUV would have been the same price). I’ll have to get a Costco membership before then, but I’m still coming out ahead. If I would have rented the same thing it at O’Hare, it would have been close to $700. Prices can vary widely, even with the same company at different locations in town. Check the Flyertalk forum. They post discount codes and coupons. Just make sure you’re entitled to use them. Good luck!

  • avatar
    TR4

    $200 for a trailer hitch plus $15/day for a 4′ X 8′ enclosed rental trailer would get you 140 cubic feet of extra space.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      This isn’t a bad idea at all.

      • 0 avatar
        kosmo

        Agreed, and if you check out RV places like Camping World, you can rent similar trailers that are lower profile, for better rearward vision, mileage, etc.

        And you can do much better on the rental price with more looking and bargaining.

        • 0 avatar
          zamoti

          I respectfully disagree on the trailer. Did that, sucks ass. No visibility, heavy, noisy thing boppling around back there. Parking is a drag also. Crap gas mileage, awful driving experience. You still need to secure it.

  • avatar
    morbo

    Ask for a monthly rate, from both the airport counter group and the fleet group of your nearby Avis/Hertz/Enterprise. I knew a contractor at the airport that was sending people out monthly. hertz put them in a Taurus Limited or Chrysler 300 for about $400/month (swapped each month for whichever one was at the counter. I can’t imagine a minivan would be much more.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    You can find a much better deal on the rental. Enterprise and hertz are tier 1 in terms of expense. Look away from airport locations as they all have additional taxes and fees that mount at an alarming rate. I am a fan of National and regularly rent for $30 a day or slightly more.

  • avatar
    sundvl76

    Bad idea. You’re really rolling the dice, with your family’s safety and comfort as the stake.

    I agree with those who advise you to rent, and you may find a less-expensive quote. Whatever, it’s worth the $$ in the long run.

    FWIW, we ALWAYS rent a car when we take road trips. The rental rate for a standard-size car from Hertz, per mile, is less than it costs us to drive our own small SUV, when you recognize ALL of the costs involved including gas. The big plus is peace of mind. Wreck? Mechanical trouble? A replacement is just a phone call away. You won’t be stuck in Podunk for 5 days while your ride is fixed.

  • avatar
    mcarr

    Buying a “cheap” van and selling afterwards seems like a lot of work. With a family of five, you should probably already have a van, so why not just trade in the Taurus X on a newer mini van?

    Otherwise, if you love the Taurus X, the rooftop carrier and/or small cargo trailer is the way to go.

  • avatar
    BobinPgh

    Boy, this trip sounds like loads of fun, I am glad I will never face having to deal with a minivan. Couldn’t you leave some of the kids at home?

  • avatar
    sproc

    $1300 for the rental may sound like a lot now, but in addition to the time wasted buying/registering/selling, just imagine what a major repair on the road will cost. Even if you’re a skilled DIY type, it’s not like you’re going to have a garage full of tools at hand.

    I’d love the piece of mind that if I have troubles 2000 mi from home, I just trade it for a different one at the local Enterprise/Hertz/Avis office.

    One more thought: A cosmetically run down van with way out of state paper temp tags may make you a major target for every Super Trooper looking to score the next major drug mule bust. Even with truly “nothing to hide,” I’d rather avoid the fun of a couple of hours on the side of the road waiting for the dog and getting every suitcase pulled apart!

  • avatar
    Jean-Pierre Sarti

    you are over thinking it my friend. as someone who regularly travels the country via our highways and prefers driving over taking planes i can attest that there is nothing better than the piece of mind of renting.

    whenever there is a problem with the vehicle all you have to do is find a local branch and tell them you want another vehicle and bingo, you get another vehicle and on you go.

    don’t you want to spend this vacation having fun with the family instead of thinking about and worrying about the vehicle?

    1,300 + gas vs 5 plane tickets is an easy choice to my mind.

  • avatar
    Sam P

    Today I learned that a crossover that will seat 6 or 7 people isn’t big enough for a family of 5.

  • avatar
    DougD

    The minivan buy idea just makes my skin crawl. Taking an unknown vehicle on a huge road trip sounds like an invitation to having lots of hours to consider your wisdom. At the side of the road. With your angry family.

    The convenience, peace of mind and post-trip cleanup are worth the rental money, agreed that you should be able to find a less costly rental.

    If you can’t field the cost of a rental either pack light or go for the top carrier or small trailer. Or take a smaller vacation.

    • 0 avatar
      BobinPgh

      A minivan in her driveway made my sister’s skin crawl too. When she had her tubal ligation and they put her under, she said, no minivan, no minivan…..

  • avatar
    mkirk

    Tell your kids to suck it up. I went cross country once in a 76 Corolla wagon!

    • 0 avatar
      BobinPgh

      The problem there is that these breeder vacations are no fun. You don’t get to see anything. It’s just lets visit other large family relatives and yak all the time when you see other people go and see and do fun things you can’t do because your parents had too many kids.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    You might be able to go with a Chrysler van again and be ok!

    Watching The Walking Dead has taught me you can find a Chrysler van which has been parked for 3+ years, and it’ll have air in the tires and start right up, as soon as you put some gas in!

    An old Saturn won’t work, don’t try that.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    This does not seem like a good idea at all. First off, bring your tape measure, or your smallest kid and compare their comfort (or lack thereof) sitting in the third row of the Taurus X vs. a Chrysler minivan. Then see how much more luggage space — if any — exists behind the third row of the minivan. The improvement will be pretty small.

    A much better idea, I think is to either get a Suburban (where everyone will be comfortable and there will be adequate room for stuff), or the little trailer idea. The big, truck-based vans like are used for Airport limo services carry a lot of people but, frankly are pretty dangerous on the road and, of course, are big gas-suckers.

    Or, understand that, back in the days before minivans and the like, lots of kids rode three abreast in Mom and Dad’s Ford Country Squire station wagon doing long drives when air travel was pretty much a luxury item.

  • avatar
    Kaosaur

    Can I vote for “buy only if it’s a supercharged Previa”?

  • avatar
    Mikein08

    Rent, rent, rent. My brother rented a GMC Acadia for 3 weeks for $600.
    You ought to be able to get a minivan for under $1300. Shop around.
    If your rental breaks down, it’s the rental company’s problem, not yours.

    And … you should be glad you don’t have to board your dogs for the
    whole time. I’ve got 3 dogs and boarding them for 3 weeks gets mighty
    pricey!

  • avatar
    carguy

    Atari 2600 Pitfall FTW!

  • avatar
    sastexan

    Rent – there are thousands of rental discounts out there. Local locations for big chains saves on airport fees / taxes and are willing to negotiate. If you have AAA, Hertz has some pretty good rates / coupons.

  • avatar
    mikedt

    When doing the buy vs Hertz calculation don’t forget to include the sales tax, registration fee, plate, title fees, insurance, etc., if you want to drive your “temporarily owned” car in a fully legal manner. The state doesn’t care that you’ll only own it for a month, they’ll want all their fees. And depending on the state, those fees can really add up.

    Combine that with the peace of mind of renting a pretty much new car from a national chain and you might want to rethink your buy/sell plans.

  • avatar
    robc123

    Like the other poster said- rent, what’s your time worth? enough to have idiots kick tires on CL? getting in state registration? what if it breaks down?

    If I remember correctly I combined a blind government workers, vetran’s association, naacp, circus union worker, costco, PETA, and a livestock association of NM discount codes together and got a smoking deal, it was around 65% off.

    just google them on the flyer talk- slightly kidding on the codes, not the discount- those minimum wage idiots don’t check shi…. so go nuts.

    IF it was longer and 20 days was 2 months in the UK, I would say buy the Bristol and then ghost ride it off a cliff before your flight.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    I don’t think it works either way. Most rentals (at least out west) won’t let you drive more than one state away. Double check before you rent. Unless you are awfully good with a wrench, buying a used car is a crapshoot.

    It looks to me like you could buy a new minivan for 19 and sell for 17, so I guess that’s an option.

    Its too bad. Dad used to customarily rent a station wagon when we took our Easter trips as a kid. It was dirt cheap back when rental cars were used as a back door way to discount cars.

    Edit: Well, I see that Mac Haik Ford in Houston still rents cars pretty reasonably. Around $400 bucks per week for their larger vehicles. If they do it, then dealers in your area probably do too. Neither the Transit van nor the Flex are listed–naturally.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    2 words…Roadmaster Wagon

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    On second thought: I agree with the poster who said to tell the kids to suck it up and take the Taurus. So they take turns sitting in the middle.Boo Hoo. How do you squeeze in? Pack light. Very light. Two changes of clothes, shoes and swim trunks per kid, plus toiletries.

    Compensate by taking two extra days to get there. Stop at the places you whiz past normally. A couple of extra nights in a motel is maybe $700 bucks. You are still way ahead of the game. Most decent motels have a coin operated washing machine you can use. if not, you will stop at a laundramat every couple of nights. Most families stop traveling after dinner, so there is some downtime there. A couple of pieces of clothing might have to be purchased in a strange city. That’s not a big deal either.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      As far as I’ve ever seen the Taurus X doesn’t have a middle seat anywhere. I think a 2nd row bench was offered, but I’ve never seen one equipped that way. They are pretty much all a 2x2x2.

  • avatar
    ajla

    When I was a kid, my family of five used to take annual trips between Fort Worth and the Michigan Upper Peninsula. That’s around 3000 miles round trip. The vehicles my family owned at the time were an ’89 Caprice sedan and a ’92 Plymouth Grand Voyager.

    The Caprice wasn’t much fun to take, but the minivan did a nice job.

    What we did was remove the middle seats and then my sisters and I sat on the third row bench. This made the van’s third row feel much roomier. Obviously this works better if your “older” children are like 10 years old and not 17 year old offensive linemen.

    Another thing my father did was install a second battery and a power inverter in the Plymouth. This allowed us to watch movies on a small TV/VCR combo, charge our handheld video games, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “Another thing my father did was install a second battery and a power inverter in the Plymouth. This allowed us to watch movies on a small TV/VCR combo, charge our handheld video games, etc.”

      12yo me is envious of 12yo you. Your father was indeed wise.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    As a father of four, I’d suggest driving the Taurus and leaving the children at home.

    I looked up pics of the Taurus X. I’d guess the 3rd row seats aren’t removable? Are the 2nd row seats removable?

    Being thrifty by nature, and depending on the nature of the vacation, I’d give some thought to some combination of seat removal, a car-top box and a small enclosed trailer.

    The Taurus X doesn’t look to be a lot smaller than an ’01 Sienna minivan and we’ve taken the family of 6 on a number of vacations in that (we once did resort to using a car-top carrier).

  • avatar
    CompWizrd

    Try a different period of time. I managed to rent a Sienna for a month for $700. They wanted $900 for two weeks. We drove it from the Detroit area to Montana and back in about 9 days.. had a few new rattles in it when we were done with it, but it held up nicely.

    My wife drove it for the rest of the month, came in handy when her Malibu blew its head gasket the second time in a year or so.

  • avatar
    CapVandal

    Non airport Enterprise has all sorts of deals. The list price on larger vehicles is high.

    Don’t buy and sell a car. If it goes great, no one will care about saving $1000 or whatever. But if it goes south, and the vacationed is either ruined or seriously messed up, it goes on your permanent record. No statute of limitations. “Remember when Dad bought the junky minivan?” You buy a used sports car. “Remember when Dad bought the minivan. Some people never learn.”

    They will be telling this story at your funeral.

  • avatar
    CapVandal

    From my local Enterprise Web Site:

    A Tahoe for a grand. Or Standard Size SUV for $650

    Large SUV

    Chevy Tahoe, Ford Expedition, or similar
    Room to seat 7 passengers
    V8 engine
    Air conditioning
    Premium audio system with AM/FM/CD
    Cruise control

    Power windows and remote power locks

    View other Vehicle Classes:
    <>

    Mileage Restrictions

    MILEAGE IS UNLIMITED IN THE CONTINENTAL USA.

    Your Dates and Times

    Start: Apr 1, 2014,Noon

    End: Apr 14, 2014,Noon

    Price Quote

    2 Weeks @
    $ 476.99 USD $ 953.98 USD

    VLCRF $ 14.30 USD

    Subtotal $ 968.28 USD

    AUTO RENTAL TAX $ 48.42 USD

    SALES TAX $ 0.00 USD

    * Total Estimated
    Charges $ 1,016.70 USD

    Standard SUV

    Hyundai Santa Fe, or similar
    Room to seat 5 passengers
    Automatic Transmission
    Air Conditioning
    AM/FM CD Player
    6-Cylinder Performance
    Tilt/cruise Control
    Split Rear Seat

    View other Vehicle Classes:
    <>

    Mileage Restrictions

    MILEAGE IS UNLIMITED IN THE CONTINENTAL USA.

    Your Dates and Times

    Start: Apr 1, 2014,Noon

    End: Apr 14, 2014,Noon

    Price Quote

    2 Weeks @
    $ 301.99 USD $ 603.98 USD

    VLCRF $ 14.30 USD

    Subtotal $ 618.28 USD

    AUTO RENTAL TAX $ 30.92 USD

    SALES TAX $ 0.00 USD

    * Total Estimated
    Charges $ 649.20 USD


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