By on February 26, 2014

Bob King

With declining membership and fees paired with a defeat in a close election recently held at Volkswagen’s plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., the Detroit Three fear the United Auto Workers not only have no future, but their replacement would bring back the days of turmoil settled over a decade before.

The Detroit Free Press reports the three Detroit automakers worry the UAW could be absorbed by another, more hostile union not as willing to keep labor costs competitive with overseas competitors, as well disrupting the brokered peace which set lower wages for new hires and health care concessions that brought United States production costs on parity with Japan.

Meanwhile, the UAW continues to weaken, as annual dues fell by 40 percent to $115 million over the period between 2006 and 2012 with membership falling by 30 percent to 382,000 in the same period, having peaked at 1.5 million members in 1979. The union’s assets totaled $1 billion in 2012, making the UAW the wealthiest union the U.S., though $300 million in assets were liquidated in the six-year period to pay operating expenses while spending was cut 15 percent; $47 million in assets were sold in the last year alone to balance the union’s budget. Further, with lower wages from new workers unable to fill the coffers fast enough to make up the difference, the UAW may raise dues for the first time in 47 years.

In UAW president Bob King’s view, the union has no future without an organized South, where transplants such as VW and BMW have expanded in the region over the past decade as more and more factories in and around Detroit closed. King’s potential successor, secretary-treasurer Dennis Williams, has vowed to fight on, from higher wages for new hires to more organization battles in the South; the UAW recently filed an appeal with the National Labor Relations Board over the outcome of the Volkswagen vote.

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87 Comments on “UAW Money Woes Worry Detroit Three...”


  • avatar

    > has no future without an organized South

    You know the chips are down when you’re going all in on the South; or is that the other way round?

    • 0 avatar
      RangerM

      What is the UAW’s product, and why should people from the South be willing to pay for it?

      • 0 avatar

        The product is the road out of serfdom, and no toll in life is free:

        http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/02/qotd-how-can-the-uaws-damaged-brand-be-fixed/#comment-2847497

        • 0 avatar
          RangerM

          Most of these Southern autoworkers are hardly serfs, and becoming one (under a particular political party) isn’t attractive. Try again.

          • 0 avatar

            > Most of these Southern autoworkers are hardly serfs, and becoming one (under a particular political party) isn’t attractive. Try again.

            They choose to think like serfs, so who am I (or you) to differ? “Becoming one” to marching on the manor with pitchforks is attractive to their own self-interests, but like typical serfs they believe their own position in life is just according to a higher power.

          • 0 avatar
            RangerM

            So, if the workers aren’t as unhappy as the UAW thinks they ought to be, they’re simply ignorant of their plight?

            And I suppose they need the “higher power” of the UAW to save them from their ignorance, right?

            And with that attitude, it should be no wonder why they gave a big middle finger to the UAW. Repeatedly telling people how stupid they are isn’t attractive, either.

          • 0 avatar

            > So, if the workers aren’t as unhappy as the UAW thinks they ought to be, they’re simply ignorant of their plight?

            Again, plenty of serfs throughout history to this day were perfectly content with working hard in this life with promises of wealth in the next one. You could say that type of dumb happiness is what makes for an ideal serf.

          • 0 avatar
            RangerM

            Again……

            Repeatedly telling people how stupid they are isn’t attractive, either.

          • 0 avatar

            > Repeatedly telling people how stupid they are isn’t attractive, either.

            Whatever, I’m not here to market the UAW, only explain why they “fail”. If anything, I agree with your claim that the stupid aren’t going to change their mind anyway because they’ll never accept the ugly truth.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            This word serf, it doesn’t mean what agenthex thinks it means. Serfs had no rights. They had no property that was really theirs. They had no say in their governance. They lived to pay taxes and rent, like people under a Democratic administration with an empowered EPA and voting done by proxies that levy their own rents. The people working in southern factories are more free than those in union states. Their property rights are superior. Their votes are their own. They can be rewarded for their own achievements, untethered from the collective approach of the left. Calling them stupid is either dishonest, deranged, or…stupid.

          • 0 avatar
            RangerM

            >If anything, I agree with your claim that the stupid aren’t going to change their mind anyway because they’ll never accept the ugly truth.

            I don’t recall claiming anyone is stupid.

            You interpreted incorrectly.

          • 0 avatar

            > Serfs had no rights. They had no property that was really theirs.

            Whereas you must own the factory you work (unlike those *other* naive serfs, right?) in with commensurate rights. Make some serf freemen and apparently they don’t think they’re serfs anymore. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serfdom#Freemen. Even the serfs back in the day weren’t so dumb.

            > Their votes are their own.

            Guess what, it was the same dummies protesting gubmint redistribution of political power.

            > They can be rewarded for their own achievements, ..Calling them stupid is either dishonest, deranged, or…stupid.

            I rest my case these people really are hopeless. Again, toss out a handle of peanuts and watch them scurry over each other aiming to please. The few smarter ones propose they gotta stick together but evidently get outnumbered by the dummies. LOLOLOL.

          • 0 avatar

            > I don’t recall claiming anyone is stupid. You interpreted incorrectly

            I’m sorry, what’s your word of choice for people who refuse to accept their objective stupidity?

          • 0 avatar
            RangerM

            >I’m sorry, what’s your word of choice for people who refuse to accept their objective stupidity?

            “agenthex” comes to mind.

          • 0 avatar

            > “agenthex” comes to mind.

            Ok sure, “free” people who put the self-interest of those above over their own are the smart ones, and those mocking them are the dummies.

            You can’t make this shiit up.

          • 0 avatar
            RangerM

            >Ok sure, “free” people who put the self-interest of those above over their own are the smart ones, and those mocking them are the dummies. You can’t make this shiit up.

            Maybe those “free” people figured out you don’t plow the field with your dairy cow or, per the example of those mocking them, butcher it.

          • 0 avatar

            >Maybe those “free” people figured out you don’t plow the field with your dairy cow or, per the example of those mocking them, butcher it.

            That may be true if they owned the cow. Until they do free people put their own self-interest before the shareholders. Take a guess at what the serf-minded do.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            There is no freedom without property rights. Nothing you create can be your own. Any security you have is at the whim of your master. agenthex’ idea of freedom is slavery.

          • 0 avatar

            >There is no freedom without property rights. Nothing you create can be your own. Any security you have is at the whim of your master. agenthex’ idea of freedom is slavery.

            Plenty of property rights back in the serfing days; try to live in the manor instead of your hovel and see what happens. Not so different with the slaves either.

          • 0 avatar
            RangerM

            >Take a guess at what the serf-minded do.

            They ignore you.

          • 0 avatar

            >They ignore you.

            The comedy at their expense aren’t for them. I’m not under any illusion they’d ever grasp it.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Working under a union is just another form of serfdom, if you insist on using that comparison.

          • 0 avatar
            doctor olds

            A UAW friend was bemoaning not being able to get a raise for working harder than others!

            He seemed to think this was management’s doing, rather than a contractual provision and fundamental unionist philosophy.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            >> A UAW friend was bemoaning not being able to get a raise for working harder than others!

            Among my neighbors are an e.r. doctor, an oncologist, a few sports stars, and some fund managers. Guess who has the biggest houses and makes the most money. Clue – the sports stars are in the middle.

          • 0 avatar

            > Working under a union is just another form of serfdom, if you insist on using that comparison.

            Consider reading the link posted. Free people act in their own self-interest. Serfs appeal to ideological rhetoric and call it freedom. This bad habit shouldn’t be foreign to a libertarian.

          • 0 avatar

            > A UAW friend was bemoaning not being able to get a raise for working harder than others!

            How the hell do you “work harder” on an assembly line? Do the next guy’s shift, too?

            In any case, toss the “better” (doesn’t matter the metric) serfs a few extra peanuts and watch them fight for your affections. Works on the pea-brains every single time.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “Consider reading the link posted. Free people act in their own self-interest. Serfs appeal to ideological rhetoric and call it freedom. This bad habit shouldn’t be foreign to a libertarian.”

            In the case of VW Chattanooga, the UAW didn’t really offer much in the way of individual advancement to those workers as compared to other plants. In their case the UAW would be nothing more than a lord to pay for “protection” they don’t particularly need.

          • 0 avatar

            > In the case of VW Chattanooga, the UAW didn’t really offer much in the way of individual advancement to those workers as compared to other non-union plants. Except perhaps having a lord to pay for “protection” they don’t particularly need.

            In this particular case I believe UAW specifically wasn’t going to negotiate wages or somesuch restriction as part of the work council. So, sure, perhaps they should be looking for a better union.

            Given the general outcry of “lazy overpaid union jobs”, it seems obvious the UAW traditionally did fairly well.

          • 0 avatar
            doctor olds

            “How the hell do you “work harder” on an assembly line? Do the next guy’s shift, too?”

            The UAW has many non-assembly line jobs.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Is this a discussion about organized religion or disorganized labour?

          • 0 avatar

            > Is this a discussion about organized religion or disorganized labour?

            It’s the same peasant religion with some of the terms refreshed; per above: “plenty of serfs perfectly content with working hard in this life with promises of wealth in the next one.” ie. be happy with low wages now and when you get up there you’ll be rewarded.

        • 0 avatar
          geeber

          As long as the union and its supporters cling to the notion that transplant workers are serfs laboring in factories straight out of a Dickens novel, they will continually fail in their organizing attempts.

          That simply isn’t what is happening in the real world – particularly in the Honda, Nissan and Toyota factories.

          If the transplant operations manage their plants the way the Big Three did in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, the union will eventually win an organizing drive. The problem, however, is that even the Big Three no longer manage their plants the way that they did in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s.

          • 0 avatar

            > That simply isn’t what is happening in the real world – particularly in the Honda, Nissan and Toyota factories.

            It probably helps where most of those factories are located. Note the mentality doesn’t appear to be a mere choice, they revel in it: http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/02/vw-labor-leaders-fight-to-establish-u-s-works-council/#comment-2858953

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            They can afford to have that “mentality” because the transplants aren’t making the same mistakes that the domestics did during the 1930s and 1940s, and, in some cases, continued making well into the 1970s.

          • 0 avatar

            > They can afford to have that “mentality” because the transplants aren’t making the same mistakes that the domestics did during the 1930s and 1940s, and, in some cases, continued making well into the 1970s.

            I’m not debating whether they can “afford” that mentality, only that it undeniably exists. They’ll do well enough to not starve by leaching off other regions all the while chanting against redistribution.

          • 0 avatar
            jimbob457

            agenthex is an obvious and transparent agent provocateur. No responsible UAW representative would be so daft as to refer to the very workers he is wooing as “serfs”.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-02-24/conspiracy-theory-true-agents-infiltrate-websites-intending-manipulate-deceive-and-d

            It could be that he works directly for the O###a regime. Their level of arrogance and idiocy would make calling people they’re trying to persuade stupid serfs seem like SOP. Hell, it worked on all the stupid serfs!

          • 0 avatar
            JD321

            Paying union dues and retirees to do nothing is the road out of serfdom…Just ask F.A. Hayek

          • 0 avatar

            > No responsible UAW representative would be so daft as to refer to the very workers he is wooing as “serfs”.

            True, you gotta sell it better when dealing w/ dummies. “Solidarity” sounds better than “you serfs better get your act together instead of getting picked off individually”, but it’s the same thing. Marketing works, that’s why there’s so much of it.

          • 0 avatar

            > It could be that he works directly for the O###a regime. Their level of arrogance and idiocy would make calling people they’re trying to persuade stupid serfs seem like SOP.

            In my free time I’ve been helping Obama build new camps, culling GOP voter lists for the NSA, and storing all that Zyklon.

          • 0 avatar

            FUUK I SAID TOO MUCH THE DELETE DOEST WORK

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            ?

        • 0 avatar
          scottcom36

          You’d call me a serf, but I don’t want a union in my shop because I don’t want to work with people who call a joint and a 40 ounce beer “lunch”. The UAW helps people who do just that to keep their jobs when they shoulda been fired.

          • 0 avatar

            >You’d call me a serf, but I don’t want a union in my shop because I don’t want to work with people who call a joint and a 40 ounce beer “lunch”. The UAW helps people who do just that to keep their jobs when they shoulda been fired.

            Yeah gotta volunteer for a paycut and work more hours too to better serve those shareholders.

      • 0 avatar
        Waterview

        +1 RangerM

        I’ve offered this observation a number of times as well. I’m neither a supporter nor detractor of the UAW, but I think their marketing – particularly with respect to the Chattanooga campaign was beyond bad.

        If I’m a prospective member (i.e. “BUYER”), exactly what products/services/value are you offering me for my dues each month? Is it better healthcare, safer conditions, more money?

        The UAW also has a real image problem they need to address. Perhaps even admitting that their approach in Detroit was, in part, misguided and move to offer evidence of how the union has become more modern/contemporary to fit today’s workplace.

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          Not only that, there were claims of UAW intimidation w/ the card check vote which seems to have been borne out by the actual secret ballot vote.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Union intimidation is nothing new. It existed decades ago and surely exists today.

            I remember the four flat tires on my dad’s car when he refused to join the Federal Employees union at his civilian Air Force job in LA.

            The union goons could have just snapped off the air valves. Instead the enforcers punctured the sidewalls with an ice-pick.

            Coincidence? I think not. Intimidation? That would be my guess. That or retribution for not joining.

            Maybe we’ll see some of that at the VW plant soon.

    • 0 avatar
      american motors

      The word PLANT is an abbreviation for PLANTATION. The Confederate Army was composed of officers who had plantations and troops who were poor dirt farmers who worked on small plots – all fighting the damned UNION to keep the South the way it was. Does this now make sense to you?

      • 0 avatar

        > The word PLANT is an abbreviation for PLANTATION. The Confederate Army was composed of officers who had plantations and troops who were poor dirt farmers who worked on small plots – all fighting the damned UNION to keep the South the way it was.

        Where does Obama and Al-queda fit into this?

  • avatar
    raph

    Are there more hostile unions? Given the press the UAW receives I would have thought the UAW was the worst of the worst.

    • 0 avatar
      hf_auto

      I don’t know if they’re worse, but the machinist’s union representing Boeing machinists in Washington is pretty gnarly. Their recent 777X “negotiations” were idiotic and aggressive to an astounding degree.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      check out the dock workers on the west coast who have a provision that the employers pay the more senior members even if they drive the shipping industry out of Portland.

  • avatar
    xflowgolf

    Agree with the general sentiment the UAW has a branding/value proposition problem.

    Others have already brought up, what value do they provide the workers… but I’d also question, what do they bring to the employer?

    They will always have some conflict representing the best interest of wages and such, that goes with the territory, but I’ll offer up a comparison to skilled trade sector unions.

    Electricians/Plumbers/pipefitters/etc. all have strong training/safety apprenticeship, etc. programs. If you hire a licensed journeyman, the job is likely getting done right.

    What if the UAW clearly brought the best workers, conducted training/fitness, teaching continous improvement techniques, quality analysis programs, etc. etc. UAW auto workers are presented as the best option to hire based on skill/speed/competency, etc.

    I realize alot of a jobs are unskilled labor, but I still think there’s a method for the UAW with it’s cronies and management to redirect it’s efforts and funds to not only rebrand themselves, but to legitimately offer something more (to both the workers AND the employers).

    • 0 avatar
      teasers

      This is actually quite an amazing idea. UAW could rebrand themselves in a whole new way. Imagine if the UAW became very selective about who they allowed in. Perhaps drug testing was required in the organization, and people with high absenteeism at work had there UAW membership stripped.

      All the sudden being a UAW member means something again, and it means something to the car makers. Perhaps someone became a member based off past, non automotive experience and a thorough selection process. Now, when I do go apply to GM, GM sees I’m a UAW member, and wants me as an employee. They know I’m going to at work early, there everyday, do a quality job, and work safely.

      They would be more inclined to hire me at a good rate, because if they didn’t, UAW would label that plant and/or manafacturer as a NON-UAW plant, and quality UAW applicants would be told by the UAW not to apply. If they could build the reputation as a quality labor force provider they could move into other areas like mechanics, and require training with them as well.

      This would work very well in Right to work states because new hire and training can be very expensive, especially when this must be done several times over.

    • 0 avatar
      CobraJet

      You are exactly right, and I have been saying the same things for years. The UAW should have spent time and money building a reputation as an organization of highly trained and skilled workers. You want the best? Hire UAW workers! I’m a transplant automaker? I want the best workers so I want UAW! As you say, training, building skills, and all the rest.

      As it is, fairly or unfairly, the UAW worker is thought of as a slacker whose only interest is screwing with management and doing just enough to get by.

    • 0 avatar
      hf_auto

      I’ve seen one case where the union brought value to the employers. The union was very fair and level-headed when it came to negotiations, so there was a good working relationship. The benefit to the company was effectively a single point of contact for all of their factory-floor human capital. Rather than negotiating with hundreds of workers individually, the company could just deal with the union reps. It took a lot of burden off HR.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      This concept doesn’t work for automaking. Every automaker has its own approach to assembly, and workers need to be trained for that particular approach.

      It isn’t similar to construction, where the product is essentially handmade and requires skilled craftsmen in order to do it right. That talent can count for a lot.

      In contrast, the assembly line is designed so that someone with modest skills can do the work, and the quality of the work is determined by the other inputs. An assembly line that doesn’t work without highly skilled or heroic line workers is, by definition, not an assembly line — the whole point of an assembly line is to minimize the errors that come from the human element.

      What the union could do is to act as a sort of outsourcing unit for the HR department, as someone else here has mentioned. Let the union serve as the front-line response unit for dealing with problematic employees, and as a tool for providing peer-level support that reinforces the training.

    • 0 avatar

      > What if the UAW clearly brought the best workers, conducted training/fitness, teaching continous improvement techniques, quality analysis programs, etc. etc. UAW auto workers are presented as the best option to hire based on skill/speed/competency, etc.

      While a value-add on the part of the union is certain a nice, well, value-add, that’s not their essential proposition. The union isn’t there to sell itself to management; they’re not business consultants. The union sells itself to the people on the other side of the table.

  • avatar
    VCplayer

    An interesting cycle of business we seem to be developing. I can’t imagine a hostile union would succeed long term at anything more than forcing even more production to Mexico and overseas.

    Kind of strange to think of the D3 as having an interest in the survival of the UAW though. If I’m in management, I’m probably thankful for the passage of right to work laws in the north and studying non-union factory practices at Toyota or Honda plants.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      The companies financially don’t have a interest in the survival of th UAW, however when the UAW pretty much controls GM, and ford and dodge to a different extent, the companies have no choice but see the UAW as an interest of theirs.
      GM wants to open a new plant? Has to be UAW or the UAW will strike other plants or do whatever other forms of intimidation they have at their disposal.
      D3 can’t speak out against the UAW or that individual will be brought down.

      It’s legalized Mob rule.

      • 0 avatar
        VCplayer

        I think the point of the article is that the automakers feel better about maintaining their relationship with the UAW rather than some new entity.

        Or to put it another way, better the devil you know.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Are you guys not aware that the autoworkers in Mexico are unionized, and that they are more strike-prone than their US counterparts?

  • avatar
    mfgreen40

    xflowgolf You make a good point, but I doubt if the current uaw worker could be retrained.

  • avatar
    CarnotCycle

    The best way for the UAW, or any American private-sector union, to start ‘re-branding’ itself is to de-couple from leftist political machinery. Going to Republican-leaning places (like the South) is a hard sell for what essentially is an extension of the Democratic party, and little else at this juncture.

    This is especially true given where Democrats are entrenched in successful businesses – from Google to Tesla to Facebook – there is zero interest about organizing their labor.

    And there are interesting opportunities for unions if they pursue more of their skilled/certified ‘guild function’ relative to their industries vs. the endless politicking that dominates their budgets and strategy today.

  • avatar
    E46M3_333

    Good riddance.
    .
    .

  • avatar
    love2drive

    I don’t really understand why anyone builds cars in the US under this threat. Any auto maker, not just VW and the Big 3. Surely you could build in mexico or south america in general and not have to concern yourself with UAW bullying. We have laws that deal with safety issues, the “need” for union protections is much harder to make a case for now. If you have collective representation for compensation reasons, you equate strong performers with lesser performers. Pair that with the fact that the greatest growth in the industry is not expected in this continent but in Asia, and why go through all this? They build here to avoid the tariffs, but at some point those benefits are marginalized if you can’t say you have full control over your costs. I’d move headquarters out of the US – the market is saturated and it increasingly is becoming too expensive to run a business here.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    At one time, the unions loosely existed to keep their members from being serfs.
    I truly believe they did good at one time. Then it became lucrative. Very lucrative and well.. we know what happens with power and money. Fast forward to the latest gov-engineered depression/bailout and we find that union’s usefulness lessened. The gov stepped in and made the rules. A union now is another layer of life mgt that no one wants and no one wants to pay for. There is no benefit. I don’t blame them one bit for saying no in the South.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The UAW needs to be dissolved.

    The ideals that came from the left leaning labour movements don’t just work as well this day and age. I think many right leaning and businness people are more progressive than labour unions.

    Look at how government regulation now protects the worker. The unions were apart of these changes. But, like building a home once the work is done do the builders hang around?

    The unions will have to go as they are no longer needed and to create situations to justify an existence of a resource wasting ideal is not logical.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    “I truly believe they did good at one time. Then it became lucrative. Very lucrative and well.. we know what happens with power and money.”

    Wise words. Very wise words.

    The Unions were very useful during the early stages of industrialization. Obtained many benefits and protections for the worker.

    But it has failed to adapt with the times. And money, lots of it, became involved in the equation.

  • avatar
    bnolt

    “Whatever, I’m not here to market the UAW”

    Boy, you sure have me fooled then. Here’s a guy that posted incessantly during the Farago/bailout era and then disappeared for 5 years or so. Now he’s back rat-a-tat in all his condescending glory. Maybe he’s just been lurking for the all that time and really does have some passing interest in cars. I’m betting he’ll be gone as soon as this issue is resolved one way or the other (which, unfortunately, might take quite some time). Pure Astroturf.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Probably did hard time.

    • 0 avatar

      >Now he’s back rat-a-tat in all his condescending glory.

      People often remark on this, but the reality is pleasant surprises are still rare no matter how low the expectations.

      >Maybe he’s just been lurking for the all that time and really does have some passing interest in cars.

      The car articles have fewer banging their helmets against the short bus windows; less opportunity for laughs.

      >Pure Astroturf.

      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/02/uaw-money-woes-worry-detroit-three/#comment-2864105

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    They dont know yet that the moment they will ‘escape’ from union boss control…they’ll be ripped by their ‘new’ greedy VW bosses (..i.e: .. in few weeks wages cut by half .. and than fired, because VW’ll close factory and move out to .. china or mexico..:) .. welcome to globalisation ..

    ‘executive kinda guys’ don’t care about you (you are just ‘human resources’:) .. they care about ‘company strategy/position’, cost cutting, .. and their bonuses .. :)

  • avatar
    joe_thousandaire

    The Big3 are in no way worried about the UAW going under, its just a nice thing to leak to the press, “oh jeez I hope you guys don’t go under, cause we’re such good friends and all”. The fact that this was reported by the openly liberal and pro-union Freep says allot about its b.s. level too.

    As far as what xflowgolf is saying about rebranding the union, he’s missing the whole point of the UAW to begin with. The entire existence of the UAW since its inception has been to take the lowest skilled, least educated, and laziest members of the American work force and give them simple repetition-based jobs at which they cannot fail or be fired from. Then through force of numbers make management pay them all upper middle-class wages. Absolutely no one who works for the UAW sees their membership as something to be earned, it is a birthright handed down by the gods to every GED or equivalent man and woman here in Michigan.

    • 0 avatar

      > Then through force of numbers make management pay them all upper middle-class wages. Absolutely no one who works for the UAW sees their membership as something to be earned, it is a birthright handed down by the gods to every GED or equivalent man and woman here in Michigan.

      Sounds pretty awesome, looks like some entitled conservative types are just jelly they can’t make that much so they gotta drag everybody else down. Hmm that sounds familiar.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Your just trolling for attention no?

        • 0 avatar

          It’s perfectly accurate. Just because it causes bu77hurt doesn’t mean it’s trolling.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            So conservatives are the ones who feel so entitled that they fight tooth and nail for nationalized health care, welfare, free phones, an obligation/right to a job… Yea thats it.

            Doesn’t cause me no bu–hurt, I’m sitting here laughing at your complete disconnect to the real world.

          • 0 avatar

            > So conservatives are the ones who feel so entitled that they fight tooth and nail for nationalized health care, welfare, free phones, an obligation/right to a job… Yea thats it. Doesn’t cause me no bu–hurt, I’m sitting here laughing at your complete disconnect to the real world.

            Weren’t you just boasting about a keen politically independent intellect? Why does this read like every other post on the Free Republic?

      • 0 avatar
        joe_thousandaire

        Yeah bro, it was awesome! Right up until the Japanese competition showed up and started offering Americans quality vehicles instead of the haphazard results of a jobs program for the intellectually challenged.

        I hate to take the bait, but FYI no UAW slob makes more than me except maybe Bob King.

        • 0 avatar

          > Yeah bro, it was awesome! Right up until the Japanese competition showed up and started offering Americans quality vehicles instead of the haphazard results of a jobs program for the intellectually challenged.

          If you can’t grasp why it’s epically awesome for the intellectually challenged to reward themselves upper middle-class wages while you cast envious eyes for failing your own measure of success despite supposed superiority then these judgements seem suspect.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “Absolutely no one who works for the UAW sees their membership as something to be earned, it is a birthright handed down by the gods to every GED or equivalent man and woman here in Michigan.”

      That’s how some would have it, if they could. But the reality now is even the UAWs strength in numbers can’t guarantee workers that. If I were an assembly worker, I wouldn’t want what they bring to the table any longer. Second tier UAW workers now make less than most non-union transplant workers.

      • 0 avatar

        Ironically it was because the transplants weren’t unionized that the UAW had to 2 tier in a way that it’s now undesirable to transplant labor. If those transplant guys had been smarter, they’d all be rolling in it now.

        Dumb people always messes things up for everyone else.

        • 0 avatar
          racer-esq.

          If you really want to unwind history they only got the transplant factories, instead of them going to Mexico or staying at home, because of right-to-work laws and an anti-union culture.

          • 0 avatar

            > If you really want to unwind history they only got the transplant factories, instead of them going to Mexico or staying at home, because of right-to-work laws and an anti-union culture.

            Fair point, but imo doesn’t alter the conclusion above. The smart move would’ve been to set a trap for that bait.


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