By on September 28, 2013

2014 Nissan Rogue

At some point in the crush of the news cycle, Nissan unveiled an all-new Rogue for 2014, based off their new CMF platform. The Rogue will still retain 4-cylinder power, but will now seat seven, moving up a class size. But for those who want something smaller, Nissan’s got something for you as well. The old Rogue.

The old car will be renamed the “Rogue Select” and priced at under $20,000 starting in January. The Rogue Select will continue to be imported from Japan, while the 2014 Rogue will be built at factories in TennesseeĀ and South Korea. Both factories will be required to meet demand for the new car, which is expected to sell 150,000 units annually.

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39 Comments on “Nissan Will Sell “Rogue Select” Alongside New Model...”


  • avatar
    Flybrian

    And by ‘you’ you mean ‘Hertz’ and ‘people who can’t qualify for a CR-V’.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      And here I thought the Captiva Sport was something only Detroit would do.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The Impala Classic must have started a trend!

      • 0 avatar

        I think the Captiva and Rogue Classic actually make sense. They have high fixed costs that they’ve already spent for tooling, design, DOT/EPA certs, ect. They’ve got demand for rental companies for small SUV’s. This lets them sell the rental companies SUV’s, while still keeping the resale value of their newer SUV’s up by not flooding the market with a bunch of used ex-rentals (which would hurt residuals and drive lease prices up). It also means that GM and Nissan don’t have to worry that there will be a bunch of ex-rentals on the market that may cause someone to decide to buy an ex-rental and cannibalize sales from a new vehicle.

        Win-Win.

    • 0 avatar

      Amd at ‘Hertz’ this will be a “full-sized SUV”.

  • avatar
    cc92oct

    I guess the old Rogue must still be selling well. Its bland though. Its like a rolling blob on small stilts.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “Its bland though. Its like a rolling blob on small stilts.”

      So, you can still sorta see out of it, it’s got good snow clearance and now it’s under 20K. Short list.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        No you certainly cannot see out of it, atleast not out the back! Brother’s GF has one for a long daily commute. They live in the backwoods of central PA so AWD comes in handy, she gets 30 mpg fairly consistently in mostly rural and highway driving. Decently priced and efficient for an AWD. those are about the only things going for it. Interior struck me as cheap and cramped.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          It’s got over 40″ of headroom and the driver seat is height adjustable. I’ll bet your brother’s GF doesn’t know that and has the seat down (girls always want the seat down). The seat height adjustment helps somewhat.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            As far as seat height adjustment helping rear visibility, that’s definitely not the cause of it. The hatch glass is tiny, constricted by the enormous D-pillars. The HVAC/console intrudes on knee room, which gives the impression of a cramped driving position. It just lacks the airiness of a CRV, to compare apples to apples.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Personal opinion, Rogues are hard to see out of due to the rear styling. Seat adjustment and such don’t help much due to the root cause, chunky rear pillars, small windows.

  • avatar
    Landcrusher

    Bought one for Mom. Not quite as nice as the Honda or Toyota, but much less expensive. It replaced a 1990 Maxima with 60,000 miles on it.

    :)

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      If you don’t mind my asking, how tall is your Mom?

      My wife’s 4’11” and that makes visibility with high beltlines and pedal reach a challenge.

      • 0 avatar
        Landcrusher

        My Mom is 5’8 I think. We went to the CUV to make it higher for her and easier in and out than an Altima or Accord.

        The smaller height thing is something often solved by upgraded seats, but not always. Sometimes the manual ones are better.

        What I did with Mom was took her to dealers who still had large show rooms and started trying on cars like they were clothes. I learned with selling airplanes that preconceptions on best fit are too often wrong.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          “trying on cars like they were clothes”

          Hilarious! That’s exactly how I phrase it with my wife. Joking and making analogies to clothes buying are my only hope of EVER getting her to dealerships. And even then I have to plan decoy trips to some other store *near* the dealership and then wheedle her with “as long as we’re out here..”

          You know, over on The Thread That Ruggles Ate, I wanted to ask him if he has any concept of how much latent hate for dealerships exists among every man and woman in America. But I’ve argued with clever priests before.

          • 0 avatar
            brenschluss

            Try the Forester, if you haven’t. Big ol’ windows on that thing, excellent visibility.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            I love the Forester… it’s one of the most sensible, retro-looking vehicles still available. The tractor-like FE doesn’t really matter.

            But our next purchase isn’t for me and so far I haven’t succeeded in getting not-me over to the Subaru store. She’s teaching 4 courses this semester so it looks pretty hopeless near term.

          • 0 avatar
            wsn

            Buy her a Mini Cooper if you love her. Find another wife if you don’t.

            FYI, Mini Cooper is indeed built for small people. I am 5’11” and I am at least 8″ too tall for it.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      What did Mom do with the cherry 4DSC?

      • 0 avatar
        Landcrusher

        Unfortunately, it wasn’t that cherry. She drives to work each day, refuses to retire. Less than a mile, to a spot in the Houston sun. Went ahead and traded it to avoid the hassle of a sale. Also, we only traded it because the mechanic was tired of fixing it and asked her to get rid of it!

  • avatar
    IndianaDriver

    Wow. That old Rogue style is like 7 years old now. It’s starting to get long in the tooth.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Rouge classic. Wonder how many will be for fleets and rentals.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      Oops spelling it’s Rogue. Oddly enough for a few years Rambler sold a sport coupe/hardtop version of the American called the Rogue.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Don’t tell Sergio. He’ll claim the nameplate came with the Chrysler intellectual property and sue Nissan.

        Unless Daimler or Cerberus gave away the name, like Iacocca gave Lancer to Mitsubishi. He should have let them have Belvedere and kept Lancer.

        • 0 avatar
          MRF 95 T-Bird

          This would make an interesting thread. Current vehicles with names from other manufacturers vehicles past. Past-Plymouth Duster. Current-Dacia Duster.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            That *is* interesting. Meanwhile, I’d always wondered how Bentley and Lincoln ended up both selling a car called the Continental at the exact same time, multiple times.

  • avatar
    LeeK

    Why another seven-seater in the lineup? Isn’t that the segment for the new Pathfinder?

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      This segment of the market is becoming very competitive. The strongest will succeed. Then some of the less profitable brand/models will drop off.

      Survival of the fittest, sort of like evolution.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    If you’ve got to have AWD and got to have NEW this would be the option. It will be interesting to see who buys the “Rogue Select” in my area. The local Dodge/Jeep/Chrysler/Ram is next door to the Nissan store. The Jeep dealer has been doing a brisk business in cheap low option Patriots so it will be interesting to see what happens when the Patriot is gone and the Rogue Select is the cheapest option in CUV AWD

  • avatar
    klossfam

    Just like the Infiniti G37 being sold along side the new version Q50. Maybe Nissan just finds it hard to let go…or let go of the HUGE profits on these older models where all the development costs are already amortized…As others noted, the Rogue Select: Coming soon to a rental car lot near you!

    • 0 avatar
      Piqutchi

      This led me to think, what if Nissan kept the G37 but sold it as a Nissan for an audience with slightly less income (like young car buyers)?

      They could sell it as the Nissan Skyline, which would mean the youth obsessed with Skylines could own one (even easier than if they went up to the new Q50).

  • avatar
    segfault

    Lulz. They should call it the Rogue Classic or Rogue Heritage Edition, like GM or Ford.

    Toyota tried the seven seater thing with the RAV4 and abandoned it. I don’t think the back seat will be big enough to be usable.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Since this new Rogue looks quite a bit like the Altima and uses Altima components, I suspect that the next Murano will look quite a bit more like the next Maxima….

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Funny, take the chromed V off the front, and you’ve got a Saab 9-2X, or something.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    I really have no idea how on earth the Rogue outsells Mazda’s CX-5. The Mazda is just so much better in so many ways. Personally, I wouldn’t buy either of them though, but I’m not a CUV kinda guy either.

  • avatar
    EspritdeFacelVega

    This is not the first time Nissan has done this. In Canada the boxy 2nd gen late-80s Sentra soldiered on throughout the 90s as the low-buck “Sentra Classic”, selling alongside the posher (relatively) 3rd gen Sentra.

    Speaking of which, Mexico still has the 3rd gen (too bad there’s no SE-R): http://www.nissan.com.mx/autos/tsuru


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