By on April 24, 2013

American consumers may have been robbed of a chance to buy the Mahindra pickup, but how about one from Great Wall?

China Car Times has a quote from Great Wall CEO Wang Feng Ying (lifted from the paywalled Automotive News China) about possible plans for Great Wall products – made in America, no less.

Great Wall Motor Co., China’s largest SUV maker, expects to begin selling SUVs in the United States around 2015, making it the first Chinese automaker to enter the American market in volume, the president of the company says. The automaker is also actively exploring whether to build SUVs in the United States. “Since the United States is far away from China and its import tariffs on vehicles are not particularly high, we would prefer to build the vehicle locally,” Wang Fengying told Automotive News China on Sunday at the Shanghai auto show.

Great Wall is apparently preparing a pickup truck for the U.S. Market as well. Already on sale as the “Great Wall Steed” in the UK, reviews have been particularly dreadful. While the British motoring press are hardly paragons of objectivity, a recent report by Bernstein Research, involving a complete teardown of a Great Wall SUV followed by a road-test, found that their products are far behind the standard that Western consumers are used to. Combined with a fairly ambitious timeline for launch and the notion of Great Wall products on sale in the US looks somewhat far-fetched.

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66 Comments on “It’s No Mahindra, But How About Great Wall?...”


  • avatar
    Easton

    No thanks. I’d rather drive a 15 year-old S-10 after a front end collision with a brick wall than that thing. I would probably be safer too.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      Speaking of Chevy trucks, this Great Wall Steed is just a poorly made knock-off of the Chevrolet Colorado/GMC Canyon/Isuzu D-Max (with a different front clip to try to distinguish it), so if you really wanted this you could just get a used Chevrolet Colorado or GMC Canyon, or try to find one still sitting on dealer lots.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        The Chevy Colorado is already a piece of crap, imagine how bad a knock-off will be.

        The Colorado and it’s turkey of a 5-Cyl engine got creamed in quality by the 1998-spec Ranger.

  • avatar
    cfclark

    I’ll buy one but only if they keep the name “Wingle” for the US market.

  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    And I think I’ll keep driving what I got. They are going to have to have better quality than the bikes and ATVs that come from China in a crate. Mine starts, drives, and doesn’t have any front engine damage (yet).

  • avatar
    jco

    after reading Bertel’s excellent feature last week about the Daimler joint venture.. the nicest thing I can say is that perhaps the Chinese are now where Hyundai was the Excel first arrived here. which is to say probably 15 years from selling a car here that can hold up as well as any other modestly priced car on sale in America.

    i can’t see a Chinese vehicle making it out of endless recall hell, though.

  • avatar
    Larry P2

    Wow! This is precisely what TTAC has long and loudly proclaimed to be the ideal vehicle: An extra-cab, diesel-powered, mid-sized truck. I fully expect that if and when it ever goes on sale in America, TTAC editorial writers will show up in a massive show of force, physically shoving aside the competition in the mad rush to be the first one to own this gem.

    You would think this editorial would be breathlessly effusive in its praise, given the fact that this automaker has built and will sell precisely the vehicle that this site has long demanded. Most importantly it was not built by GM.

    The reviews I have read weren’t that bad.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      It isn’t just this site (ttac). The same sentiments are expressed by commenters on PUTC. Many people would love to be able to buy a small pickup truck with four doors and a diesel engine.

      But fear not, this will never come to pass in the US! The UAW and ALL light truck manufacturers will vehemently oppose and lobby against such an import or transplant.

      That contingent has successfully kept Mahindra out of the North American market and will continue to oppose all manufacturers that threaten the status quo of truckdom in North America.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadEd

        I’m not sure that I agree. Ford has an up-to-date small four-door diesel pickup (Ranger) as does Chevy (Colorado) on sale overseas. A four-door diesel doesn’t need to be marketed as a value proposition, so it may not necessarily be viewed as a threat to their full-size lines. Both of these vehicles are ABS and airbag equipped. The Colorado is already slated to be sold here, so it will pass the crash tests. As fuel economy standards increase, these small diesels may be needed for CAFE compliance.

        I was in Thailand last week, and saw these two (along with the plenty of Isuzu D-Maxxes and Toyota Hiluxes) on the roads. Both look very sharp. We have a D-Maxx based SUV over there (the MU-7). The turbo-diesel is a very nice drive. Plenty of torque, and noise levels are not objectionable. I bet that it has the same engine as the Colorado, as the trucks appear to be badge-engineered twins.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Ed, I am Pro-Choice when it comes to cars and trucks for sale in the US. The more the merrier is my creed.

          I’m all for letting the buying public’s demand sort out the gory details of who lives and dies in the market place.

          The Ranger, Colorado/Canyon and Dakota died in the market place, slaughtered by the Tacoma.

          So, if Mahindra, Tata, Hyundai, VW, Great Wall, or any of the aspiring small-truck builders want to try their luck in the US market place, I believe we should let them.

          The UAW and the current automakers doing business in the US do not want to see that happen because it impacts their sales and dilutes their profits, and in the case of the UAW, these trucks more than likely would not be UAW built.

          If Ford, GM or Dodge/RAM COULD have brought something viable to the North American market, they would have done so decades ago.

          OTOH, Toyota without competition in this segment sees no reason to upgrade their dated Tacoma line.

          But it is my view that, once someone introduces a 4dr with a small diesel to this segment, we’ll see Tacoma come online with a 4dr with a small diesel, and outdo them all.

          Tacoma is just holding back right now, going with the flow, nurturing their profits. And since Toyota is the largest automaker on the planet, they have nothing to worry about from any of the others.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @DeadEd
          The Izuzu Dmax runs a 3.0 litre Izuzu turbo diesel. Not as powerful as the Colorado, but a more economical engine.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        They are vastly better than the Mahindra and yes they have lifted their crash rating to something reasonably acceptable.

    • 0 avatar

      Do you have a URL where “TTAC has long and loudly proclaimed”? Or you mean TTAC commentors? Even if we correct the slanderous sentence by adding “TTAC B&B”, it would still be false. Some proclaimed loudly, sure, but others pointed out how inferior small trucks are as soon as they are asked to haul anything. If a truck is made this small, it has to be much more economical to sell. A Aussie-style ute, perhaps. And even then it just won’t sell in a volume of larger trucks.

  • avatar
    ToxicSludge

    I’m not sure if ‘great wall’ pickups will be any worse,or better then anything mahindra once tried to get away with here several years ago.I’ve been a truck guy most of my life and I would never buy a chinese vehicle no matter where it’s built.I hate commie countries,and work to avoid buying anything from there or other commie countries.

    • 0 avatar
      infinitime

      Wow, did you just step out of a time machine from 1965? Have you been to China? They are about as “communistic” as Mexico.

      • 0 avatar
        ToxicSludge

        I spent enough years fighting them.And china’s govt is as communist as it gets.Just because they like money doesn’t mean they aren’t ardent commies.

        • 0 avatar
          MPAVictoria

          Quick define communism for me.

          • 0 avatar
            Charliej

            Communism is whatever he doesn’t like.

          • 0 avatar
            corntrollio

            Exactly. Even Soviet-style communism wasn’t “communism” as defined in 19th century political philosophy. It called itself communist and had some elements of communism, but there are lots of countries that call themselves “socialist” or “communist” that are merely self-given names for what they actually do. Soviet-style communism was far more authoritarian, oppressive, and top-driven compared to the model of the theorists.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Unlike the hair-brained theorists, the Soviets had to find a way to actually implement reverting a population to slavery.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Exactly CJ. There never has been or ever will be a communist country. It is just a term statists and totalitarians use to mask the reality of what they are doing.

          • 0 avatar
            Dirk Stigler

            China today combines statist economic control of resources and heavy industry with political repression — and official nationalism to distract the people from said repression. In the political dictionary, that’s the definition of fascism.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Yes Dirk, exactly right.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          I think an Autocratic Dictatorial Government would be a better way to describe them now. You cold also add they would like to use a bit of “Gunboat” diplomacy as well.

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    Haven’t we collectively as an automobile market effectively purged junk from our marketplace? I mean, you can throw a dart at virtually any offering right now, get in, and drive it for the greater part of 100k miles with routine maintenance.

    Mahindras. The Nano. This thing. Why are we so hell bent on introducing problems just to save $2,000? Buy a used car, for chris’sake. You really trust a Chinese company to honor a ‘new car warranty’ better than a GM CPO Colorado or Nissan Certified Frontier?

    • 0 avatar
      Otterpops

      Trucks are different. There is no road-legal small truck for sale in the US, and the used ones are getting long in the tooth: too old for fleets, and a little rough around the edges for a lot of potential private users. There hasn’t been one since the demise of the Ranger; and IIRC that was getting a little big when it went away. For whatever reason no manufacturer in the US market seems willing to change that. So any time some new kid comes along with a small truck, people start paying attention.

  • avatar
    infinitime

    Should be more or less an old Isuzu platform using an obsolete Mitsubishi-derived engine, under newish-sheet metal. If my past experience with Chinese trucks are to go by (Zhongxing, GreatWall), then they should be crude but durable for the hard bits (transmission, differential, transmission), but flimsy for the accessories and soft bits (radio button falling off, power window motors burning out prematurely, flaky paint).

    They’re pretty rugged, if the Libyan rebels are anything to go by…

    http://chinaautoweb.com/2011/05/zhongxings-grandtigers-in-libyas-civil-war/

    May not be a bad deal at $10,000 – $15,000 new, much better deal two years used at $4,000 – $5,000. :)

  • avatar
    threeer

    God help me if I see one of these on the road here in the States. Are we completely resigned to allowing China to dominate us in every facet of production and manufacturing simply because they pay their workers peanuts in comparison to the rest of the world? I sincerely hope that this idea dies a quick death. But what do I know? They’ll probably sell a million of them, putting even more US workers out of jobs, all the while leaving us wondering why our unemployment rates continue to rise…

  • avatar
    Summicron

    I don’t need to buy cheapo 3rd world entry-level if I get another truck. And I sure as shootin wouldn’t buy one new even if I wanted to experiment.

    OTOH, what a tough truck market we are to enter for such a company even in the best of faith and with something really new & different. But this ain’t that.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The author could have picked a picture of a current GW pickup. The link I provided is a CURRENT model Great Wall pickup.

    From the comments I’ve read here it isn’t much different from what is on PUTC. Uneducated crap and fear.

    The GW pickup isn’t that bad. We’ve had them for quite a few years now and they are becoming more popular as each year goes by.

    They aren’t comparative to the other Asian utes either. But they are not try to state they are comparative.

    As Highdesertcat pointed out they are cheap and are surprisingly acceptable. There are a few horror stories about them, but google any vehicle from any manufacturer and you can arrive at more or less the same conclusion.

    They are actually built on a very similar chassis to the Tacoma, a Surf chassis. The body is an Izuzu body and they used to run Mitsubishi drivetrain components.

    All I can say is the world better be ready for the arrival of cheap Chinese vehicles, that will do what you want. That is not walking to go to work or shopping or down to Lowes.

    http://www.carsguide.com.au/news-and-reviews/car-reviews-road-tests/great_wall_v200_diesel_4wd_dual_cab_ute_review

    • 0 avatar
      ToxicSludge

      Hey Al,we,as Americans don’t want certain things here in our country.You guys do,and buy what you want,and we’ll do the same.We don’t need anyone telling us what we need or should buy,or be willing to buy.”Uneducated crap and fear”,you say.I say we don’t want to buy junk,and won’t.I myself will stick to American brands built on this continent.Others are free to do what they want to.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        Yep…I read labels…it is indeed difficult to find certain products that are American-made, but dangit..I try to assure that I do (even going to lengths to order things on-line versus running to the store to pick something up). We all have our preferences, and mine just happens to be something not made in China. I’m sure many other Americans won’t look twice at the origin as they drive by the closed up shops and stores in their hometown in their Chinese truck, but it won’t be me.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @ToxicSludge
        For the first time I disagree with your comment, like us you guys seem to buy alot of Chinese stuff already.

        We have people with the same mindset and yet they are selling vehicles here and in other countries.

        The US isn’t the only country that fears the Chinese. But reality is reality.

        I remember similar sentiments when I was about a kid concerning Japanese vehicles in the 60s and 70s, but worse remember the term “Japcrap”. Because WWII was still fresh in peoples minds, if the Japanese can do it, trust me the Chinese will.

        But I bet you would by a Japanese vehicle now. Don’t get me wrong I’m not pro Chinese. Just because something comes from a country you don’t like doesn’t make it inferior.

        Have a look at some of the Paris to Dakar Russian trucks. I’m much against the Russians as the Chinese, but those Russian trucks are awesome race vehicles.

        • 0 avatar
          threeer

          It isn’t so much a “fear” of the Chinese, Oz…it’s (for me, anyway) trying to maintain a sense of national pride and looking out for citizens of this country by seeing them working to assemble and manufacture goods. But it is hard to compete when the cards are stacked so far against us when it comes to their trade practices and labor rates. I blame as much of this imbalance on the US consumer as anything else, since we tend to flock to Walmart to buy things on the cheap, never seeing the bigger picture and wondering why our neighbors and family members are out of work. I have deeply personal reasons why I try as hard as I can to buy American (not just “anti-Chinese), and I won’t apologize for that, even if it comes off as being nationalistic and protectionist in theory.

          While America may be struggling, we do still have choices…and some of us chose to support American companies and American workers as much as possible. China is far from being a benign and friendly nation to us and while I’m not proposing open hostilities towards them, I would like to see the spreadsheet tilt more in our favor. But as long as we don’t demand forming JVs (or effectively handing over IP rights or face having them stolen to begin with) and paying our workers pennies on the dollar while facing horrendous tariffs for foreign goods, America will struggle mightly against the Chinese manufacturing juggernaut.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @threeer
            Most manufacturing isn’t leading edge stuff nowadays.

            Go back 60 years I would agree with you. There were only a handful (basically OECD) countries with the resources ie, power, transport infrastructure, etc to be major manufacturers. This isn’t true today.

            We have to become a lot more creative in the way we are as nations if we want to remain successful.

            You can’t just blame other countries because they don’t have the same standards of living, infrastructure and expectations by citizens to survive.

            Our great countries started out some way as well. Remember the Boston Tea Party? The US was able to export to Great Britan cheaply. Would it have been right for the British to think you were the bad guys. Do you view yourselves as ‘villans’. No. Then expect the same for the rest of the world.

            I think alot of you have to consider certain aspects of society globally, be objective and bring into focus what is really going on outside of your country.

            Thinking poorer nations can just expand and improve their standards of living to be the same as the US and Australia overnight is ridiculous. This would increase the cost of production and make their exports more expensive. But how can this be achieved?

            Our advantages as countries is our massive infrastructure from education, transport, communication, power generation etc. We have to look at what we have and maximise it to our benefit.

            Not continually blame other for our shortfalls and deficiencies.

        • 0 avatar
          ToxicSludge

          Al,I buy American (as American as it gets now a days)and never bought a Japanese car/truck,and will not knowingly do so.Why would I want too? For my needs the ‘big 3′ have plenty of choices and the money pretty much stays here…..mostly.I have spent a lot of my life ‘elsewhere’ and I fully support ‘American’ as much as it’s possible these days.

          I despise the chinese govt.In my experiences ‘around’ I have found for the most part,people are people,it’s the govt’s that are really bad.But that in no way equates to me wanting to buy their goods.

          My life experiences have taught me some very valuable lessons and gave me some permanent prejudices that right or wrong,good or bad,are a part of me.As far as russian trucks,(and their prime movers),I don’t know much about how fast they are,but they sure were tough as nails to destroy.

          • 0 avatar
            threeer

            back at Oz…I can when the rules and regs of said countries purposefully stack the deck against us. I understand that the standard of living in China WILL rise and that the cost benefits will shrink (to some degree)…but when it is nigh on impossible to conduct business in China (without forming a JV…or giving up technical/IP rights…or simply having them stolen outright…or facing massive tariffs if you try to import), then I’m more than fine with assigning blame. I don’t “blame” the typical Chinese worker who is making peanuts, as I truly believe that as information and knowledge continues to creep into their society, the typical worker will demand more and more of what others have. That demand will drive down the huge competitive advantages they have that we simply cannot compete with (unless we want to revert back to substandard living conditions).

            I will agree with you that we need to do more to “get ahead of the curve” to see where we can get our workforce trained and educated in the areas that we can excel at in order to right the ship of our country’s economy.

            And I still won’t entertain buying one of their trucks…:)

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Big Al from OZ,
          If the Chinese start acting more like the Japanese in the 1930′s, then all bets are off.
          As it stands they have a very large OFFENSIVE Navy. Have been using Electronic Warfare to spy on and disrupt competitors.(including this country)
          Seem to have a lot of “claims” on territory held by their Asian neighbours and is a “friend” to some rather loathsome dictatorships. It is not a very open society having pretty stringent censorship on the general press and the Internet. As well they have the highest execution rate for criminals in the world.
          As of Today:
          http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/24/us-china-japan-islands-idUSBRE93N0N720130424

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Robert Ryan
            You are correct in your assumption.

            I think the Chinese are at a tipping point both economically and politcally. The Chinese ruling elite realise they have to loosen the constraints on its population or face defeat by the people. If they don’t it will be messy.

            The Chinese Ruling elite aren’t controlling their province and city politcal subordinates very well. And they realise this. The provinces are quite different in their style as they aren’t isolated as much from the general population.

            I think they would turn with the correct impetus. The rich regions along the coast of China would turn against the ruling elite as well.

            The issue with the islands can turn nasty, but if China has an exteranl war a civil war will develop like what occurred after the Japanese were forced out after WWII.

            This time the Reds will lose and good riddens to them.

            China is not really in a position to fight a war and win. It wil lose both internally and exteranlly. The ruling elite realise this.

            A war in our region would be very ugly and draw in many nations.

            The other side of the coin is if change occurs to fast the country will end up in shambles. I hope the ruling elite make the correct decisions and let democracy evolve in China.

  • avatar
    Jellodyne

    I understand the appeal of making them here to bypass the chicken tax, but for chimp’s sake, what’s the point of a Chinese truck without the low cost which comes from using cheap Chinese labor and minimal Chinese environmental regulations? Is it their unsurpassed quality control? Is it their world class design (remembering that you need to respect IP rights in this market)?

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      these people are hardly stupid

      they can see the day that Chinese labor gets more and more expensive and they need to hedge their bets

      they’re already in Eastern Europe with factories, expect North Africa and lower soon

      i used to work in clubs where older folk and retired service people congregated – these people only bought Ford and GM

      they would never buy Japanese and German cars

      then Ford and GM screwed them and suddenly the car parks were full of Toyotas although there were some stalwarts

      soon these people were all dead

      their kids and grandkids all drive Korean and Korean made Fords/GMs and wear chinese made Iphones

      welcome to the 21st century

    • 0 avatar
      Summicron

      “for chimp’s sake”

      Interesting expression that I think you’ve used a couple, three times lately.

      Is it because W’s been on the tube so much with his new Prez Center?

  • avatar
    corntrollio

    Some of you didn’t read the article. Great Wall suggested that they might open factories in the US for US-market vehicles.

    Chinese labor costs keep going up and up. Labor costs in China in 2000 were 1/5 of what it cost in Mexico. Now it’s 3/4, because labor costs in China have more than quintupled in that time, but in Mexico wages are only up 40% since 2000:

    http://www.economist.com/news/special-report/21566782-cheaper-china-and-credit-and-oil-about-start-flowing-mexico-becoming

    There are many analysts who believe that manufacturers may start on-shoring the production of goods that are destined for the US in the next several years because the cost of making goods in China is getting so high and shipping costs have increased too. As such, it’s no surprise that Great Wall is thinking about this.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      Of course…”thinking about” and actually succeeding in building a plant here in the US are two different stories. While we do buy (unfortunately) a lot of Chinese goods, I tend to think that the national opinion of such a large-ticket item being built by a Chinese company here in the States would face a very, very large uphill battle to get off the ground.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Gee… when I Googled “Great Wall Steed Review”, each review I read (I checked out four) said it was a perfectly acceptable vehicle, especially for the price offered. Not terribly refined, and some cheaping out in minor places. Some minor negatives about the torque band of the engine.

    Hardly “dreadful.”

  • avatar
    infinitime

    I appreciate the sentiments of many of the posters, but to deny the benefits of comparative advantages in manufacturing is non-sensical. Look at the keyboards you are typing on, chances are, it is made in China, along with now 90% of the world’s computers. Your monitor, ditto. About every electronic appliance in your home, with the exception of a few high-end units from Korea and Japan, are probably made in China.

    Before one goes on about how the Chinese worker is being exploited by its oppressive government, a look at REAL living standards suggests that most Chinese workers are several-folds better off today, then they were just ten years ago. In that sense, this pseudo-concern for the wellbeing of the “exploited” Chinese worker is little more than a straw man argument to justify one’s prejudices against Chinese products.

    While some believe that Chinese outsourcing has come at the expense of the American worker, that is simply not the case. If China was not the destination for outsourcing, our products would still be made abroad, but more likely Mexico, eastern Europe, or southeast Asian. If anyone should be complaining about China stealing their jobs, it should be the Mexicans, eastern Europeans and Vietnamese.

    The “commie” government so vilified on these pages, largely mirrors the US in its implementation of macroeconomic policies and corporate governance. They do not represent a competing model of development as the Soviets once did. Instead, they are seeking to beat us at our own game. We’re just not happy when they learn to play that game as well as we used to.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      “If China was not the destination for outsourcing, our products would still be made abroad, but more likely Mexico, eastern Europe, or southeast Asian. If anyone should be complaining about China stealing their jobs, it should be the Mexicans, eastern Europeans and Vietnamese.”

      Yes, that’s exactly right. That’s why more manufacturing for US consumption is going to be in Mexico. If you look at the link I sent above, the labor costs for China vs. Mexico are becoming comparable, whereas Mexico used to be 5X China in terms of labor costs.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        “That’s why more manufacturing for US consumption is going to be in Mexico. ”

        I sure hope so. And I hope it is sooner rather than later. Maybe it’ll keep more Mexicans on their side of the border, rather than sucking us dry on our side of the border.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      “global outsourcing” has come at the expense of the American worker in large part because Americans want it cheap and fast…never mind that it tends to cause things like their family and friends being out of work. It isn’t just China, I get that. We’ve not done an adequate job of preparing our workforce for the types of jobs that we CAN and SHOULD excel at…ones that would drive innovation, technology and yes, manufacturing right here in America. I understand that in some arenas, certain jobs will likely never return to our shores. But that doesn’t mean that I have to actively support them by purchasing their goods to the largest extent that I can (again…understand that with some products, it is nearly impossible to NOT buy from China, for instance). But where and when I have a choice to buy American, I will. If somebody else down the street wants to buy Chinese by active and deliberate choice, they certainly have that right.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @threeer
        If most everything in your home and country was Made in the USA what do you think your standard of living would be.

        How much would costs of living increase, double, triple? Boy, it sounds great and patriotic, but be realistic.

        All of the buy American people have to realise this. In Australia we have the buy Australian people as well.

        All of these people seem to be upper middle class with Arts degrees, unionist and/or civil servants.

        • 0 avatar
          Charliej

          As a citizen of the US, I really hate to say it, but the US is yesterday. Countries like Mexico and China, are tomorrow. Look at Britan after WW2, broke and noncompetitive with the US. The US is now broke and noncompetitive with China and Mexico. According to the US State Department, there are one million US citizens living in Mexico at this time. I now live in Mexico. The people in Mexico are not afraid of the future. They do not believe that there is anything that they can not accomplish. They are looking to the future, while the US population looks to the past. It is not possible to return to the past, the only way is forward. Other countries don’t care what the US thinks, they are going to do what is right for their citizens.

          • 0 avatar
            Summicron

            ” The people in Mexico are not afraid of the future.”

            I think that’s called being ‘in shock’.
            With a past and present like theirs, what’s left to fear?

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            No sht Summi. Goddamn right they welcome the future. Hell, they pray for the future. Anything is better than the past or the present. Many of them pray for a future in the US. What the hell are you talking about Charliej?

        • 0 avatar
          Mark45

          What you are not considering is that higher product costs creates repair jobs. In the past there were TV/VCR repair shops that the cheap Chinese products eliminated. Now most TV’s and DVD players are throw away items. Same with computers, small printers and fax machines, & small appliances. If the prices for these products go up people would start getting them repaired. The cost of living is already going up for the necessities(food,housing,transportation,utilities), it’s the non-essential items that are kept lower priced due to China manufacturing.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    GWC will assemble their vehicles here from knock down kits made in China. This is true with some of the Korean vehicles and in the past with the Japanese. At least Americans will be employed assemblying these vehicles. At least it will say “Hecho In Estados Unidos” and not “Hecho In China.”

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Jeff S
      I agree that eventually the Chinese will set up factories in overseas countries, actually they already are. I figure Foton and Great Wall will make pickups in the US within 10-15 years. Why not.

      Then there will be Chinese people complaining that money and jobs are being taken away from China.

      Sound familiar.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I agree with much of what CharlieJ says. Not only are we living in the past, we have gridlock in our government. We have a government the operates on sequesters and shutdowns. We have crumbling infrastructure where China is building new infrastructure. We need to take a serious look in the mirror and decide what direction we as a nation should go in. I agree that we should support more of our own industries, but then we also need to look at foreign based corporations and the jobs that they can provide by setting up plants in the US. We can never go back to the past, we can either go forward or stagnate.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I was going to say how great it would be to have a Suzuki Sidekick/Geo Tracker sized SUV with 4×4 manual trans and diesel power, slap a snow plow on it and go. But then I realized I should likely just get a tractor to do the same job – better.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    I don’t know man…I drove a bunch of these in Iraq and they felt like someone took a 250,000 mile HiLux and copied it out of cheaper materials. Maybe they have gotten better but I’ll let someone else test that theory out. We occasionally got to drive some Tata trucks my last tour to Afghanistan and I wouldn’t mind one of those if the price was right. You always felt let down when you got the Tata however that you didn’t get a Defender as they and 70 series Land Cruisers were also common. Anyway, you buy a great wall first and report back in a few years.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    And I can take “far behind the standard” if we are talking a solid front axle and windows you have to roll up yourself. I have the feeling he is referring to things like corrosion resistance and frame rigidity however based on my experience.

  • avatar
    Ooshley

    I wonder if they’ll sell you Yanks the “Asbestos Edition” like they did us down-under.
    http://news.drive.com.au/drive/motor-news/asbestos-parts-in-recalled-cars-wont-be-replaced-20120815-247jv.html


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