By on April 5, 2011

click “CC” for english captions

When DBM Energy, an unknown German “mailbox company,” announced it would attempt a world record for the longest single-charge EV trip, the reaction from observers and industry insiders was nearly universally dismissive. Even when the drive was completed, and DBM’s electrified Audi A2 completed a 600km (373 miles) journey under observation, the skepticism lingered. Then, when the record-setting A2 burnt in a fire, the mystery deepened. Did the enigmatic battery start the blaze (as, a DBM battery apparently already has in a forklift), or, as DBM suggests, did a jealous German OEM try to kill their miracle battery breakthrough with a convenient arson? That puzzle hasn’t been hashed out, but according to AutoBild, Germany’s Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing) as well as the Ministry of Industry have tested the DBM battery for

extreme climate and air pressure changes, electrical short circuits, overloading or incorrect polarity and to mechanical influences such as vibration, shock and impact

The result? It’s safe! DBM has also made a 454km (282 miles) journey this month in a battery with less capacity than the world record-setting pack. More testing will be done, but it seems that DBM is on to something with its “miracle battery,” and the German automakers may yet be forced to abandon their long-held preference for hydrogen fuel cells.

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3 Comments on “German “Miracle Battery” Gets Government Safety Stamp...”


  • avatar
    savuporo

    Oh ffs .. its not a “miracle battery”. By available information, the gravimetric density of it is probably 20-25% above currently generally available lithium batteries.
    The driving distances that they talk about are not revolutionary by any means.
    More important metrics are $/wh and sustainable charge/discharge rates.

  • avatar
    The Doctor

    So basically all they’ve determined is that it’s a battery that meets safety regulations, not that it’s a magical wunderbatterie that meets any of the claims put forward by its manufacturer?

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    Oh, that thing? Of course it’s safe – it’s full of balsa wood.


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