Mickey Thompson Tests Tire Toughness at King of the Hammers

Jason R. Sakurai
by Jason R. Sakurai

Only 37 of 84 cars finished the King of the Hammers, proclaimed the planet’s toughest one-day off-road race, on time this year. Tad Dowker and Jordan Pellegrino, two racers on Mickey Thompson Baja Boss X tires, were among the finishers.

“The Baja Boss X is an extreme competition tire designed to tackle the toughest terrains,” Ken Warner, vice president of marketing at Mickey Thompson said. “Tested at King of the Hammers and other off-road race and rock crawl events, this tire provides incredible grip and endurance to conquer all obstacles.”

Earlier in the week, we spoke with Heather Tausch, Mickey Thompson’s brand manager, who said they would be testing different tire compounds at King of the Hammers. An already-sticky compound and extra-large four-pitch Sidebiters provide off-road traction on the Baja Boss X. The tire’s Powerply XD angled third ply, plus an extra-thick denier cord, offers better puncture resistance, quicker steering response, and greater stability. A non-DOT approved competition tire, the Baja Boss X also features stone ejector ribs to keep tread grooves gravel-free.

Tad Dowker, who finished in 21st place on Baja Boss X tires, said, “We had seven flats during last year’s King of the Hammers week, including five during the race. The grip and durability of the new 4-ply Baja Boss X allowed us to stick many optional lines in the rocks and smash through the boulder-infested goat trails with confidence.”

GenRight Off Road’s Jordan Pellegrino finished in 23rd on 40×12.50/17 Baja Boss X tires, without any flat tires throughout the race.

Mickey Thompson Tires & Wheels was founded in 1963 by racing legend Mickey Thompson. The company, headquartered in Stow, Ohio, markets high-performance and racing tires and wheels for truck and off-road applications, in addition to street and strip.

[Images: Mickey Thompson]

Jason R. Sakurai
Jason R. Sakurai

With a father who owned a dealership, I literally grew up in the business. After college, I worked for GM, Nissan and Mazda, writing articles for automotive enthusiast magazines as a side gig. I discovered you could make a living selling ad space at Four Wheeler magazine, before I moved on to selling TV for the National Hot Rod Association. After that, I started Roadhouse, a marketing, advertising and PR firm dedicated to the automotive, outdoor/apparel, and entertainment industries. Through the years, I continued writing, shooting, and editing. It keep things interesting.

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  • Dan Dan on Feb 09, 2021

    Soon to be seen slipping all over the road in the rain on a brodozer near you.

  • Teddyc73 As I asked earlier under another article, when did "segment" or "class" become "space"? Does using that term make one feel more sophisticated? If GM's products in other segments...I mean "space" is more profitable then sedans then why shouldn't they discontinue it.
  • Robert Absolutely!!! I hate SUV's , I like the better gas milage and better ride and better handling!! Can't take a SUV 55mph into a highway exit ramp! I can in my Malibu and there's more than enough room for 5 and trunk is plenty big enough for me!
  • Teddyc73 Since when did automakers or car companies become "OEM". Probably about the same time "segment" or "class" became "space". I wish there were more sedans. I would like an American sedan. However, as others have stated, if they don't sell in large enough quantities to be profitable the automakers...I mean, "OEMs" aren't going to build them. It's simple business.
  • Varezhka I have still yet to see a Malibu on the road that didn't have a rental sticker. So yeah, GM probably lost money on every one they sold but kept it to boost their CAFE numbers.I'm personally happy that I no longer have to dread being "upgraded" to a Maxima or a Malibu anymore. And thankfully Altima is also on its way out.
  • Tassos Under incompetent, affirmative action hire Mary Barra, GM has been shooting itself in the foot on a daily basis.Whether the Malibu cancellation has been one of these shootings is NOT obvious at all.GM should be run as a PROFITABLE BUSINESS and NOT as an outfit that satisfies everybody and his mother in law's pet preferences.IF the Malibu was UNPROFITABLE, it SHOULD be canceled.More generally, if its SEGMENT is Unprofitable, and HALF the makers cancel their midsize sedans, not only will it lead to the SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST ones, but the survivors will obviously be more profitable if the LOSERS were kept being produced and the SMALL PIE of midsize sedans would yield slim pickings for every participant.SO NO, I APPROVE of the demise of the unprofitable Malibu, and hope Nissan does the same to the Altima, Hyundai with the SOnata, Mazda with the Mazda 6, and as many others as it takes to make the REMAINING players, like the Excellent, sporty Accord and the Bulletproof Reliable, cheap to maintain CAMRY, more profitable and affordable.
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