By on January 8, 2019

2018 Chevrolet Bolt - Image: Chevrolet

Humans, like other animals, have an innate ability to detect when something’s wrong in their immediate environment. The sense that something’s amiss, that the natural order of things has shifted in an unusual direction. Of course, this is only achievable if one chooses to open their eyes and look around.

We can all be keen observers if we choose to, and sometimes it pays dividends — it’s said that farmers are traditionally less likely to be killed by tornadoes than non-farmers. And we’ve all seen alien movies where the most obtuse among us don’t realize what’s happening until it’s too late.

Maybe you’ve noticed something odd in your town or neighborhood. Something that should be there … but isn’t.

You probably have a good sense of your town or city’s median income, its demographics, its prevailing politics, and its major employers. You’ve noticed that a larger cut of drivers gravitate towards certain models, brands, and body styles. But have you noticed something missing? What arent you be seeing in your neighborhood, that you should?

Around these parts — where last night I witnessed two urban cyclists battling 30 mph headwinds, heavy snow, and a temperature of 10F — driving one’s ideology is par for the course, regardless of personal misery. For those not interested in projecting their green bona fides, Audi seems to fill in the gap among the well-off urban class. It’s a happy medium between brash, new-money assholery (BMW) and old-money snootiness (Mercedes-Benz). But green is big, and not just because Ontario, until recently, offered obscene incentives for buyers.

Given the very different production capabilities of Tesla and General Motors, it’s hard to ignore that I see more Model 3s than Chevrolet Bolts plying these polite streets. God knows the Bolt had a head start, and it’s the cheaper option to boot. And yet, despite being on sale in Canada for two full years, Bolts remain vanishingly thin on the ground compared to Musk’s launch-compromised wonder car. It can’t just be badge snobbery.

Well, it isn’t. There’s a good reason for the Bolt’s meager showing north of the border, and it’s because General Motors simply wasn’t building enough of them. While hanging out in my local GM dealer back in May, I overheard staff tell a would-be Bolt buyer to check back in six months. They’d probably have some then. The same month, Green Car Reports detailed a Toronto man who was told he faced an 8- to 12-month waiting list for a Bolt. Naturally, the man said “screw that” and bought a Volt instead, commenting that GM needs to “have dealers and manufacturing on [the] same page.”

While GM Canada confirmed the waiting list, erasing a buyer backlog doesn’t happen overnight. In its end-of-year sales recap, the automaker noted an increase in electric vehicle sales compared to 2018. At the same time, its American counterpart announced, “GM increased production of the Chevrolet Bolt EV during the fourth quarter to meet strong global demand, including higher than expected demand in South Korea and Canada, and to begin rebuilding U.S. dealer inventories.”

GM was first with a low-priced, long-range EV, but constrained supply led its rival, Tesla, to make inroads with a moderately priced EV.

That’s my story, but what’s yours? What’s conspicuously missing from the vehicular landscape in your area?

[Image: General Motors]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

72 Comments on “QOTD: Model Missing?...”


  • avatar
    salmonmigration

    After moving from the midwest to the south… Late model Pontiacs. I swear I used to see more Grand Prix than Camrys. Nissan apparently has that market segment on the Gulf Coast.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      ? There is no such thing as a “late model Pontiac”. The brand has been defunct for 8+ years and I doubt there are any Pontiacs left on the road under warranty.

      In my area I have noted many times the lack of any Alfa Romeo presence. There is fairly high income, but the population skews towards brainy rather than interested in displays of wealth. I can only think of a handful of instances of seeing a Guilia in the wild, and it wasn’t local.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Lol, truth, I live in a small midwestern town and old Pontiacs are king around here. They seem to be far better cars then I ever gave them credit for

      • 0 avatar
        dividebytube

        Pontiacs, at least around here in Michigan, were extremely popular with middle-class/blue collar folks or as hand-me downs to their teenagers. The Grand Prix and Grand Am were everywhere. I still see the Grand Prix, even the occasional GTP, but Grand Ams are getting rarer.

        Honestly I was surprised when GM cut Pontiac since I wondered what in the heck were all of these people going to drive instead. The answer is Altima / Equinox / beat-up Charger.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I don’t know about the Altima, but the ‘Nox and Charger is going to be a poor substitute for a 3800-powered anything.

          • 0 avatar
            MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

            “I don’t know about the Altima, but the ‘Nox and Charger is going to be a poor substitute for a 3800-powered anything.”

            —I loved all my 3800 powered cars, especially the Bonnie SSE, but my Hemi Charger is every bit the car it was, with the added plus of RWD.

            Nox I agree with, I am about sick of seeing those toy cars.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I’ve also had a bought new Charger RT and several (bought used) 3800 cars.

            I guess it depends what you want. The Charger is a fun car and looks cool, but the Buick V6 can run on hope and dishwater. The difference in parts prices and effort of most maintenance tasks is also fairly large.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I would absolutely love a late 90s/00s Grand Prix GTP coupe. The best Grand Prix gen ever, IMO. I could care less about a Grand Am, I’d rather have an Olds version if I went with a GM car of that size. Strange that I didnt like the Intrigue nearly as much as the Grand Prix.

      • 0 avatar
        jatz

        “old Pontiacs are king around here”

        This. Around here, half the beer would never be served nor cheap haircuts given if it weren’t for old Pontiacs.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Yes, Pontiacs used to be everywhere, especially the Grand Am. Seems they’ve been replaced by Altimas. I see plenty of not-very-old Altimas with bodies in worse shape than my old Taurus. In the poor parts, I see 2005-era Altimas in the yard with grass grown up around them. They’ve seem to become the car of choice for lower middle class, blue-collar,, as well as the poor.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        Oh yeah. I see plenty of beater Altimas. And the fourth-gen models with taillights that use a clear cover over everything? I see plenty where the covers have fallen off on one side or the other. Design defect?

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I see that a lot, too. I have noticed that those who can afford one seem to be moving up to Accords. I know two former Altima drivers who now have a late model Accord. My neighbor’s daughter currently drives her Altima, but she plans on getting a new Accord soon and will give the Altima back to her mom. I have advised her to get rid of it, I can hear the CVT’s whining getting louder.

          My teenaged cousin who HAD to have an Altima? Well, after the CVT was replaced, its had some other issues and he plans on getting a Fusion next. He drove all the newer midsize cars (except the Altima, he says he’s done with them) and liked it the best. He said he expected to like the Accord more, but didn’t. Maybe the CVT reminded him too much of the Altima? Lol. His second choice was a new Impala. I’d never have thought his choices would whittle down to two Americans, given how easily he succumbs to peer pressure and such.

  • avatar
    theBrandler

    Electric cars. There is one Model 3 that popped up a few months ago, actually now that I think about it, there are two, a white one and a silver one. But other than those, and the occasional Model S you see on the highway, there are no other electric cars at all in my neck of the woods.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      The first time I saw a Tesla, it was the daughter of the owner of the company who had one. They’re both into green technology. It was one of those rubbernecking experiences since the Tesla – at the time – was so rare.

      Now a neighbor a street over has a Model 3. And there is a Model S a few streets over. Now I see them fairly regularly. Not super common like the Equinox/Escape/CRV, which (around here) seems to be the default transportation mode of a lot of people, but enough that they don’t draw my attention like they used to.

      Bolt? I’ve seen maybe one in the wild.

  • avatar
    redgolf

    while at the local GM dealership here in middle Tennessee a few weeks ago, I asked one of the “regular” salesman (they have a big turnover rate of sales people) why no Bolts are being sold here? his reply was ” because in order to sell Bolts the dealership has to make a huge investment in order to service them”! that didn’t make sense to me because they were already selling Volts. they are not even available to look at let alone sit in one and consider buying/leasing one! what a shame since I wanted to go EV ever since I drove a Volt several years ago, I’m just not gonna pay a high price for one! I’m driving a Buick Encore, $15K cheaper!

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    You would see a unicorn before seeing an electric vehicle of any kind in this area (eastern Kentucky). Plenty of trucks of all stripes and a lot of beater Altimas, old Hondas, etc. Ten years or so ago you would have seen a lot of old Pontiacs and Buicks. But I think time has taken it’s toll on them. There are a fair amount of minivans of all ages and types around though.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Wow, this past Sunday we stopped by the library to return some books. While driving through the parking lot i pointed out to my wife 3 different Teslas in the lot; S, 3, X. I have seen a Bolt or two in the wild, Tesla is no longer a ‘spot’ as they are *almost* as common as a Subaru here in CO.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Down here in FL Subarus are not very common as long as you don’t count WRXs on wide tires with huge exhausts.

      Telsas of all kinds are everywhere and are becoming so common they don’t even generate a head turn unless they are wrapped in a unique color. I work in Boca Raton which means high end cars are the norm, for example I see Bentleys weekly.

      But a Bolt? never seen one, whereas I’ve seen multiple Volts.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Technological advanced car but still goes to library and uses card file?

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        I haven’t seen a Card Catalog in a library since the turn of the Millennium.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Was it you that liked early Contours on that d/b/b a while ago? If so, or for anyone else who does, check this one out:

          https://tucson.craigslist.org/cto/d/tucson-1996-ford-contour/6788096112.html

          I’d rather have that than an SVT. Love the cleaner styling of the pre-refresh cars, and they didnt seem to be as decontented as the later ones, either. That one is in seriously good shape for its age. The Contour isnt my favorite car in the world, but I’d love to have that one.

    • 0 avatar

      Tesla is pretty common here in CT. Bolts aren’t uncommon about the same as leafs see one or two a week usually.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Alfa And Nisaan leafs are missing in metro NY, see plenty of models 3’s but almost never see a leaf or a bolt, high income area but it seems that Pirus and Telsa gets the sales, I see 5 or 6 Maserati a week here in my town but almost never see a Guila for Alfa. Also missing are Volvo v90 or xc 90 wagons, see plenty of xc 70’s , pretty popular but it seems all of those buyers when to the Volvo SUV, do not think I have seen one Volvo 90 wagon in the wild. Seems the only new wagons I see around town are MB wagons.

  • avatar
    jatz

    What I’d LIKE to notice missing is the middle-school clunky of nearly every article’s overreaching preamble here.

    The meat is great but the salad and breadsticks are soggy.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    I can’t honestly think of anything, except perhaps the Chrysler Pacifica. Seems like every time I do see one, it has out-of-state plates on it and is just passing through. There used to be lots of well-optioned Town and Countrys around, but most seem to be rolling a 2wd Traverse, Explorer or Tahoe now.

    I see a Tesla extremely rarely, but that’s not surprising. I’ve yet to see a Bolt around here. I do see a few Prius, but only the current gen if I go to a big city. Unless its bought strictly for saving money on fuel, green cars aren’t in vogue down here. And, considering I paid $1.82 a gallon to fill up the Taurus yesterday, there isnt much incentive to buy a fuel saver.

    I dont see a lot of subcompact CUVs, except maybe the Renegade. I very rarely see a Trax and have yet to see an Ecosport around here. Lots of Escapes and Equinoxes.

  • avatar
    jatz

    I have yet to see a Model 3.

    And it’s not like I’m going to miss that have-no-mouth-but-must-scream front end.

  • avatar
    Jon

    In Phoenix, there seems to be almost every type of vehicle. My neighborhood abounds with newish white collar cars (camrys, accords, hyundais, etc.), trucks from the mid 2000s and newer along with a plethora of minivans and crossovers. But just this weekend I ate dinner at a hidden Mexican restaurant where Ford Lobos and old Chargers are the norm. I also work in an area where Teslas are common and most cars are less than five years old. The only vehicles Phoenix might be missing large quantities of are Subarus and Volvos.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Northern KY still see a number of old Pontiacs, Buicks, Toyotas, Hondas, and Nissans but then I live near a major Amazon distribution center. Some of the Pontiacs and Buicks are starting to thin out but like cockroaches they still are present. It is amazing the number of 92-96 Camrys, mid 90s Accords and Civics, and old Corollas I see. Despite neglect it takes a lot to kill those cars which seem to be overbuilt.

    My neighborhood is more prosperous and is full of Buick Enclaves, F-150s, GMCs, BMW crossovers, and lots of Mercedes crossovers. I have seen a few Teslas but very few Bolts.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Northern KY still see a number of old Pontiacs, Buicks, Toyotas, Hondas, and Nissans but then I live near a major Amazon distribution center. Some of the Pontiacs and Buicks are starting to thin out but like cockroaches they still are present. It is amazing the number of 92-96 Camrys, mid 90s Accords and Civics, and old Corollas I see. Despite neglect it takes a lot to kill those cars which seem to be overbuilt.

    My neighborhood is more prosperous and is full of Buick Enclaves, F-150s, GMCs, BMW crossovers, and lots of Mercedes crossovers. I have seen a few Teslas but very few Bolts.

  • avatar
    YellowDuck

    I’ve noticed the same in Southern Ontario. Model 3s all over my town (Guelph); I’ve seen maybe one Bolt.

  • avatar
    cognoscenti

    The Buick Envision (aka “Invasion”). I’ve NEVER seen one in the wild. Is it possible that folks where I live are avoiding them because they know where they are built?

    US Sales Totals (source: GM Authority)
    2019 (YTD) 7,535
    2018 30,152
    2017 41,040
    2016 14,193

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I still have yet to see a BOLT (I’ve seen Volts – an employee at the nearby middle school had one) and I have yet to see a Leaf in the metal.

    We have both a Chevy dealer and a Nissan dealer in town I just don’t think many of the folks in this rural county think much about electric cars although the Toyota dealer has no problem selling Prius (hybrid I know).

    I’ve seen more than a few Model 3s and Model S Teslas (even one Model X) but they seem to be “just passing through.”

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Considering that my commute averages about 18 mph, I’d say we’re not missing anything around here. Really, we have too much.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “”its American counterpart announced, “GM increased production of the Chevrolet Bolt EV during the fourth quarter to meet strong global demand, including higher than expected demand in South Korea and Canada, and to begin rebuilding U.S. dealer inventories.””

    Yet they don’t exist stateside. Could they all simply be in export markets?

  • avatar
    SixspeedSi

    +1 for the Bolt. I live in Pittsburgh and rarely see them, except for the about 30 the city bought for parking services and such. I see many Tesla’s, especially Model 3’s around town now. Nissan Leafs and plug-in Prius Primes as well.

    It’s surprising since the Bolt has great range, but I think it’s let down with a case of the uglies and bad dealer support.

    I see a good variety of makes out here, but Buick models besides the Encore are thin.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      In my area of Northwestern Ohio, the unofficial town vehicle seems to be the Honda Odyssey. There’s an absolute TON of them! There’s also a good smattering of Pacificas, and of course, SUVs and CUVs are as common as ants at a picnic!

      Not more than a couple Bolts — there are more Teslas, probably more 3s than anything else, though I’ve seen one X in the wild. (There’s Model Ses around, too, just not as many, or I mis-identify the S as a 3.)

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    Given that my wife works a nice 15 minute walk from the Tesla factory, and I drive past it on my way to work… Yeah, lots of Teslas. More than Lexi lately.

    Now if only they could teach the Prius drivers how to, err, drive..

    And if the (*&@#$ lot of them could stop texting while driving..

  • avatar
    DedBull

    For living in a truck centric area, and a town with a Nissan dealership, I find the absence of Frontiers/Titans on the ground rather odd. I see more Ridgelines than Nissans. Tacomas are thick on the ground.

    Conversely, for the overall sales numbers nationwide, Mitsubishi has a large presence here. With an aggressive dealer here in the snow belt you can’t go anywhere without seeing an Outlander Sport. Even the Mirage is fairly common around town.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    There’s a crapload of money in Denver, so Ferraris, Bentleys, Lambos (including a Urus the other day), McLarens and other high-dollar rides are fairly common sights. No Rolls-Royces, though. The reason? No dealership here.

    Seems like a good opportunity for an enterprising businessman, if you ask me.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    After reading these responses, it reminds me of a conversation a buddy and I were having last week. We were discussing a similar subject, cars that were on 4th and 5th owners, how they have held up, buy here/pay here candidates, etc. I wonder as these current new cars get older and get passed along down the line, how well will they hold up? At least the late 80’s and 90’s cars were somewhat simple and similar in makeup. I’m just not sure if we will see as many 20 year old Accords, Altimas, etc in 2039 due to direct injection, turbos, 10 speed trans, etc hold up as well as some of their cockroach-tough predecessors.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    In my neighbourhood the CRV is probably the most common 2nd car. Followed by the Nissan Rogue. We also have a large number of Honda Odysseys.

    There are a surprising number of Genesis, Infiniti and Accura sedans in the neighbourhood as ‘first’ cars. Perhaps demonstrating the strength of their dealers or perhaps the demographics as our neighbourhood is one noted for the large number of IT workers and teachers.

    The Nissan Leaf is a far more common vehicle in our neighbourhood than an electric Chev. Although we do have a few Ford C-Max.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    My suburb of ~10,000 people is pretty affluent – I just managed to slip under the cracks by buying a house that was a rental for ~25 years. My mortgage payment is actually cheaper than what the rent was.

    Anyways – unlike most of other areas I’ve lived in – there are waaay less pickup trucks. Maybe one a block? I guess pickups are considered too “blue collar”? I have no idea. There are a lot more minivans, specifically the Honda Odyssey, which are jam packed around the schools during certain parts of the day.

    Other common cars: Audi A4, BMW 3, GMC Yukon (Denali, of course!), Mercedes C or E, etc. And then there are the non-snobs who are more likely to drive a Honda Fit or a Subaru.

    In my 6 years here I’ve seen several Ferraris and one McLaren. And a few oddball cars like a ’70 Camaro covered in racing stickers, or a minty 60s Ford station wagon.

    As far as I know, I’m the only Mustang driver in town! At least I haven’t regularly seen another one. You’re more likely to see a MINI.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Forgot to mention the ‘oddities’ in our neighbourhood.

    An Alfa Romeo Milano, used as a regular driver! Also a Ford Fairmont wagon, also regularly driven. A plug-in Ford Flex. Porsche 944. Cadillac CTS-V wagon. A ’56 T-Bird (garage queen). A Camaro ZL1. A 1968 Camaro regularly driven in the summer. There was a pristine ‘boat tail’ Buick for many years which seems to have disappeared around 2017. And one guy had a British Leyland (Austin) Princess in his garage for a few years, which I never saw driven or running.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Plug-in Ford Flex?

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        The guy has 2 cars. A Flex and a Fusion. And a charger station. I know the Fusion is a plug in. But on a couple of occasions while walking by late at night, I have seen the cord running under/around/in to the Flex. Not sure if it is/was plugged in or just left lying there after charging the Fusion.

        There was a Flex hybrid available. So is there a Flex that is a plug-in?

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          There was no Flex Hybrid or plug-in version, ever. Only the standard 3.5L V-6 and the optional EcoBoost version of the same engine.

          The only thing I could think of, aside from the cord being carelessly left out, would be an engine block heater.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Yep. He plugs in the block heater and the outlet is beside the ‘charger’ for the Fusion. So at night it is easy to confuse which cord runs where.

            I actually spoke with him about it last night. Says that I am not the first person to ask if the Flex was a plug-in. He told me that after a conversation regarding his Flex and Fusion plug-in one of our other neighbours actually went out and got a C-Max.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            lol back when I was riding a 150cc scooter in a variety of weather conditions (back in 2008-2009 when gas prices were silly) I installed a silicone heating pad on the bottom of the air cooled motor to get it going faster in the morning during the winter.

            My neighbor asked if the scooter was electric. He had obviously never heard it running and sounding like an angry weedeater.

  • avatar
    mikey

    I live in the former “Motor City North” Oshawa Ontario…Of course GM ruled here for generations. Not so much now.

    I saw my first S model Tesla 2 years ago. I spotted two of them today at Costco. Two streets over I saw very clean model 3..I figure its new ? Took UBER home after watching the Lions destroy the Packers in week 17. The UBER guy drove a Bolt and raved at how wonderful it was . That would be the one and only Bolt I’ve ever seen .

    Even 3- 4 years ago the GM twins dominated the truck market around here. These days I see a lot of Rams, and F150’s. In the high income neighbourhoods, two late model GM’s were the norm. Today it more like a Mercedes and a Lexus. The rust monster ate all the Grand Ams, and the early “W” cars. I still see quite a few of the re -skinned 06- 12 Impalas, mostly driven by GM hourly, and salary retirees.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Early-’00s Impalas with the monolens taillights have almost completely disappeared here.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Bolt sales are decreasing, while the Model 3 outsold it by 8:1 in 2018 and 18:1 in December alone. So yeah, the Model 3 will be much more prevalent on the roads than the Bolt.

    As for EVs, I rarely see any Leaf 2.0s in the wild, but Leaf 1.0s are pretty rare, too. Heck, the car I drive (Ioniq EV) is ultra-rare, so there’s that.

    Many Pontiacs still survive in my area (Pittsburgh region), but Mercurys have all but disappeared. Buicks remain thick.

  • avatar
    George B

    I don’t think I’ve seen either a Chevrolet Bolt or a Tesla Model 3 on the streets in Plano, TX. The Tesla Model S is fairly common and Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf are definitely present.

    I saw an early 90s Ford Taurus this morning, causing me to wonder when the midsize Tauruses disappeared. Cars don’t rust out here and millions were sold, so there should be a few survivor cars.

    The Chrysler Pacifica minivan isn’t as common as I would expect based on the popularity of the previous FCA minivans.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Aside from mine, I still see a few around, but their values got very low which landed them in the hands of people who drove the crap out of them and junked them when something broke (which is what is currently happening to the Nissan Altima we discussed above). They will survive with decent maintenance, as mine is closing in on 250k and is still a reliable daily driver.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The Pontiacs and Buicks still seem to go on and on even in hooptie status along with the old Toyotas and Hondas. See a number of old Rangers, some Colorados, and S-10s were very common but they seem to be thinning out in part due to the tin worm. F-150s and Rams are everywhere. You see Chevy and GMCs but the Fords and Rams are more prominent. I have seen a 87 thru 91 Camry running around with a Papa John’s sign that is very rusted but from the sound of the engine the tin worm will finish it off long before the drive train. Lots of 92-96 Camrys running around in hooptie status (they seem to be unkillable).

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I don’t see very many first- or second-generation Explorers here in Oklahoma City, and that was a seriously popular car. I imagine a lot of them were crushed during the Cash 4 Clunkers program. Ditto for the Mountaineer.

    I also don’t see very many of the third- and fourth-generation models, which wouldn’t have been part of C4C. The only ones I see these days are the unibody FWD-based body style that’s currently out. What gives?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      The third gen (IRS) was more trouble-prone, the IRS can be expensive to fix and the timing chain issues doomed a lot of the volume 4.0L models.

      I still see plenty of first and second generation Explorers around here, mostly 2wd. The rare 4wd I see brings a smile to my face. I would have had a 4 door first or second gen 4.0L OHV 4×4 if I hadn’t gotten my Sonoma crew cab. I had found several I would have considered, including a couple of manual transmission versions (exceedingly rare in the 4 door body with 4wd, especially in the second generation).

      Interesting note, there was a manual trans available on the 2002+ model. I’ve seen one or two.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      Kyree, I’d blame the C3 automatic transmission and its 5R55 decendent for the disappearance of Ford Explorers. Light duty transmission family, originally designed for the Pinto, manufactured in France, and installed in a heavy vehicle. https://www.thetransmissionshop.com/fords-four-versions-of-5r55/

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    In Central Indiana, the vehicle that seems to be missing is the Toyota Corolla. Even when it was one of the most popular vehicles in the marketplace, it wasn’t particularly noticeable in these parts.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Kyree-I remember visiting several dealers just after Cash for Clunkers seeing a number of Explorers marked for destruction that were trade as Cash for Clunkers. Saw several Grand Marquis and Crown Victorias as well. Many of these vehicles were high mileage and not worth much as a trade in but worth more under Cash for Clunkers. Had someone during that time that Clunkered a high mileage 94 Sedan deVille that was in good shape but not worth much because of high mileage and age–he got a good deal on a new 09 Focus and not only got the amount for the Clunker but a couple of hundred dollars scrap value. At the time I wanted to trade a 2000 Taurus in under the program but the car did not meet the qualifications because the gas mileage was higher. I knew a number of people that took advantage of the program–one with an older Isuzu Trooper and several with high mileage Explorers one with over 200k miles. I see very few old Explorers around where I live but before Cash for Clunkers they were every where. Use to see a number of old Isuzu Troopers and Mitsubishi Raiders before 2009.

  • avatar
    Wodehouse

    I’ve seen only 1 of the current Buick Regal pair and that one was on the showroom floor. It was there for 4 days.

    I was going to nominate the XT4 until I saw a noisy television advert showcasing that what I thought were facelifted Chevy Traxxx were in fact the many Cadillac XT4s that I’ve incorrectly identified.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    We’ve never had government handouts for buying EVs or plug-in hybrids in the Canadian Maritime provinces. Nor can the billionaire who owns 14 different car brand dealerships and the Genesis web presence be bothered to open an Alfa dealership after his Fiat Studio bust at the Chrysler dealership. But they do repairs on Alfas from Autoport, the Halifax NS port of entry for Canada. The ones that won’t start, etc. Source – my best pal is warranty manager at that dealer.

    I’ve seen one Tesla Model S, although there are supposed to be a dozen around among the wealthy, about three or four Leafs, no Volts or Bolts or Model 3’s. Got one friend about to lease an MB E Class coupe E53 AMG, but the 3 year lease is $2K a month, first try. Never considered a Tesla, since his retirement dream is to tour North America with his wife. Hanging around chargers is not on his menu. He might just buy the car outright instead of screwing around with leases, got the dough.

    This is pickup country. If you don’t bribe the populace with government incentives, electric anything doesn’t seem to sell. But a Maritimer will mortgage their life for a high end F150.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Inside Looking Out: I think F35 uses system like that to predict failures and order spare parts before the failure...
  • Lou_BC: “Yes because people like you defunded them…” Ah yes, the “defund” argument. The same...
  • sgeffe: “You’ll LUV this time-share!” (Until you see the 400% YOY increase in maintenance fees!)
  • Lou_BC: @Matt Posky – a positive drug screen in a fatality might get included in substance abuse statistics....
  • EBFlex: “So “meanwhile in automotive news” is a jab to Posky to stick to stories you deem germane but you...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber