By on July 12, 2016

2014 Jeep Patriot, Image: FCA

Compact SUV headlights have a long way to go if they want a passing grade from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

The organization now rates headlight performance, and ] small SUVs are the latest crop of vehicles to undergo testing. The study results aren’t dazzling.

Out of 21 vehicles and 47 headlight options, no small SUV received a “good” rating from the IIHS, and two-thirds garnered a “poor” rating. Only four vehicles — the 2017 Ford Escape, Honda CR-V, Hyundai Tucson and Mazda CX-3 — earned a rating of “acceptable.”

The headlight test is simple. IIHS measures the amount of light emitted by low and high beams, then measures the amount of glare faced by oncoming vehicles. Vehicles scored points if their headlights came with an auto-dimming feature.

A poor score in the headlight test isn’t good for a vehicle’s overall rating. IIHS won’t declare a vehicle a top safety pick if their headlights fail to net a good or acceptable rating.

“Manufacturers aren’t paying enough attention to the actual on-road performance of this basic equipment,” IIHS Senior Research Engineer Matthew Brumbelow said in a statement. “We’re optimistic that improvements will come quickly now that we’ve given automakers something to strive for.”

In March, when the organization tested midsize sedans, the BMW 3 Series was judged to have the worst headlights in the businesses, proving that vehicle price has little to do with headlight performance. With small SUVs, the “worst” list is a lengthy one, and very diverse. Take your pick of nationalities found at the bottom — Audi Q3, Fiat 500X, Buick Encore, Subaru Forester, Kia Sportage, and a number of other Japanese and American models.

Jeep fared the worst overall, with all of its small offerings — Patriot, Renegade and Wrangler — rated as poor. Honda’s HR-V also found a home on the bottom, as did the Chevrolet Trax, Mitsubishi Outlander Sport, and Nissan Rogue.

The “marginal” category was thinly populated, with no domestic automaker found on the second-from-bottom shelf. Earning that title was the Mazda CX-5, BMW X1, Mitsubishi Outlander, Toyota RAV4 and Volkswagen Tiguan.

No particular headlight type fared better than others. Halogen, HID and LED headlamps are found throughout the list, because lumens only go so far towards your final grade. Glare issues demoted 17 of the headlight combinations.

“Glare issues are usually a result of poorly aimed headlights,” said Brumbelow. “SUV headlights are mounted higher than car headlights, so they generally should be aimed lower. Instead, many of them are aimed higher than the car headlights we’ve tested so far.

[Image: Jeep]

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66 Comments on “Almost All Small SUV Headlights are Bad, None are Good: IIHS...”


  • avatar
    JimZ

    Chrysler must have had to try hard to make those big round headlamps suck so bad.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      They’re not trying at all. FCA-Chrysler’s components come from bottom-tier suppliers because they’re the lowest price. You’ve probably read here on TTAC the Fiat negotiators telling suppliers, “cut the price in half, and then we’ll talk.” Well, that might not be the exact words, but close enough, and the Fiat people have been doing it for decades. The corners cut to get those low prices are the reason for FCA’s dismal reliability ratings.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “You’ve probably read here on TTAC the Fiat negotiators telling suppliers, “cut the price in half, and then we’ll talk.””

        yeah, that’s just a meme. people claimed GM was saying that exact phrase 15 years ago.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          There’s an ounce of truth in this case because recent FCA cars and trucks use a single bulb for both high and low beam. Switching to high beam just moves a baffle.

          They are truly underwhelming headlights, but FCA is not alone in offering bad headlights. The IIHS just happened to test 4 FCA models that use the same lights.

          FCA’s components come from the same “bottom tier” suppliers as everyone else’s components. That’s not the issue.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “There’s an ounce of truth in this case because recent FCA cars and trucks use a single bulb for both high and low beam. Switching to high beam just moves a baffle.”

            that’s only done with projector lenses. standard reflector housings use a dual-filament bulb, and the low beams are generated by off-setting the low beam filament above the reflector’s focal point.

          • 0 avatar
            dukeisduke

            It’s the same as in the sealed beam days. The low-high beam headlamp (like a single headlamp setup, or the low beam lamp in a dual headlamp setup), there’s a low beam filament and a high beam filament, in different positions, so that the beam is projected either low or high. The low beam filament is behind a shield, so the light is indirect, and oncoming drivers aren’t blinded by seeing the burning filament directly.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            Some FCA cars use 9012 (aka HIR2) bulbs which are single filament, and work as I described.

            The bulbs look like a 9006, but they don’t have a darkened cap at the bright end. The baffle fulfills that role for low beam. It moves out of the way for high beam, which doesn’t get you much more light. European versions of the same cars use a completely different two bulb system.

            I’ve had the dubious pleasure of driving a 500 on a moonless night, on a dark country road, and I think the IIHS’s rating of “poor” is very generous. They need to add an “unacceptable” rating.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    I’m glad the IIHS is looking at this. It’s rarely part of a test drive, so consumers typically are ‘blind’ on headlight quality when buying. Headlights can be a really important part of the driving experience and safety.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      what I would *really* like to see is a crackdown on:

      1) idiots who put HID capsules in their factory halogen housings*.
      2) the inbred hicks who festoon the entire front ends of their bro-dozers with ultra-bright LED light bars
      3) morons who put illegal-color** halo light headlamp housings on their cars.

      * $500 fine for doing it, and the bluer they are the more the fine increases
      ** I actually saw a Charger driving around with halos which shifted through every color of the rainbow. Was one of those “why is there never a cop around?” moments for me.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        If I were a cop seeing that Charger, I’d pull him over and write him up for driving at night without headlights. AFTER I had put my nightstick through his rainbow lights.

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          Breath deep Vogo.

          Go outside and close your eyes and listen to the harmony all around you.
          Breath deep, relax and let it go…r you will end up on YouTube as a maniac.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Our local sports team’s colors are green and blue. So we get more than our share of morons with green and blue halos around here. Both colors are specifically outlawed in our state, but the cops are fans too so they don’t do much about it.

        Blue in particular is enormously distracting in your peripheral vision.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I decided while trying to get onto 75N yesterday about 5:30 that I need a ticket photo gun. I’ll zap people I see driving in a ridiculous and illegal manner, and then the ticket suggestion gets submitted to the police wirelessly. They get to choose whether to submit a ticket via mail once they receive it.

          Because it was ridiculous.

          Same thing this morning on my 3.3 mile drive to work, where I saw two separate cars throw cigarette butts out their windows.

      • 0 avatar
        zerofoo

        Confession time here – I’m one of the idiots that put HID bulbs into my halogen housings.

        The factory lamps on my 04 Grand Cherokee were awful – very hard to see anything at night. I installed 3000k HID bulbs as I could not find anything in the 2700k range. My lights are a yellowish-white light.

        Next I re-aligned the headlights down to keep the beam from hitting oncoming traffic in the eyes.

        The difference is incredible. I can actually see where i’m going and the light coming from my vehicle is no more annoying to other drivers than the stock lamps in my wife’s 2014 Grand Cherokee.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          “light coming from my vehicle is no more annoying to other drivers”

          I’d really like to know how you came to that conclusion.

          • 0 avatar
            zerofoo

            I’ve driven towards my vehicle in a couple of other vehicles at night on different roads.

            The light is almost indistinguishable from other vehicle light sources of similar color temperature.

            Unscientific, but good enough.

      • 0 avatar
        orenwolf

        “Was one of those “why is there never a cop around?” moments for me”

        I routinely see Toronto cops pulling over cars in downtown Toronto on weekends with light modifications. They have a little clipboard they use that – from what I can tell – has information on whether or not a vehicle should have HID/LED lights or not based on MY. I’ve actually heard some poser arguing with the cop that his mods were “properly aimed!” while getting a ticket. It’s fun to watch. :)

        I almost did this to one of my older cars until I did the research and found that there’s basically no way to properly aim the old halogen bulb lens for HID, and was therefore illegal.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          the problem down here is that equipment violations are usually “fix it” tickets, which means they can be waived if you come to the police station within a certain number of days and show the problem has been corrected.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I got a “fix-it” ticket in California when Grey Davis was trying to finance his bought public sector union votes with fines. When the ticket came in the mail, the fine was $385. All the “fix-it” rhetoric of the officer amounted to was me being responsible to correct the violation in addition to paying the fine. Fortunately, I was able to make my case in front of a judge and not pay a penny, or have to fix anything.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        Hear hear!

        1) HID capsules should only be used with projector conversions.

        2) I hate those LED light bars. There’s no such thing as a beam pattern, so what’s the point, except to tick people off?

        3) The worst? Red halo lights. I mean, won’t some people think they’re taillights when seen from a distance? We know that in most places, it’s illegal to show a white light to the rear, but what about a red light to the front? I think the laws need to catch up with technology (and douchebaggery).

        • 0 avatar
          smartascii

          The laws are caught up. In most states, it’s not legal to have light of any color other than white coming from the front of the car, unless that light is amber and part of a turn signal.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Red light visible from in front of the vehicle is illegal in most, if not all, states; same with blue only not all states enforce it. The reason is that they can be too easily mistaken for official emergency services vehicles and become a safety hazard.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        Ditto, I’d like to add light tints to that too, where people blavk out their lights thus rendering them kinda useless.

      • 0 avatar
        ArialATOMV8

        With putting HID bulbs inside a halogen headlight, I find it less offensive when a retrofit is done. Doing one can be extremely time consuming (and they have to have a custom crafted lens) but, once done, the results will pay off!

        When it comes to Lightbars and color morphing headlights, I respect the use of them but, only in environments that are away from the roadway. It’s amusing in our state, you are allowed to “put on a lightshow” if your vehicle is either offroad, on Private Property or, in a secluded parking lot. Otherwise, users should be in a singe color that is not reserved to emergency apparatus.

        I can agree that this privlidge is abused often. I deal with those jerks every morning during my commute with headlights that blind me. Once even after exiting a wedding at a church, we were blinded by a Ford F-350 with a aftermarket LED light kit around the grill and, a light-bar on while flashing their high beams. Even at sunset, it blinded my eyes (I’m a young adult)

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Kind of defeats the purpose of being high up if you can’t even see!

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      Heh.. the anti-SUV crowd is offered a straw to clutch.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      It appears that the glare to the OTHER driver is one major factor that has driven down the scores. They have a comment about how the CUV headlights should aim downward because the lights are mounted higher. Sounds like most CUVs are aiming the lights properly for a CUV coming the opposite direction rather than a sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        If you aim them to reduce glare on a Miata, or Ferrari, or other low-slung car, the headlights won’t be very effective at their primary purpose, to illuminate the road in front of the CUV and reveal hazards.

        I wonder what standards the IIHS is using – and I suspect it keeps coming up with these new tests and failing scores to induce automakers and/or government agencies to come up with new standards.

        There’s nothing wrong with that, but you have to remember this is an insurance industry funded outfit. You have to be wary that its use of a public safety mantra can add significantly to the cost of the product and improve insurance companies’ bottom line, without an analysis of marginal benefit versus cost.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I believe federal (and some states) standards require a certain amount of light on the road at a specific distance from the vehicle. I’m guessing the IIHS does not take this into consideration, instead complaining that high-mounted headlamps need to be aimed downward, reducing their range, to avoid putting glare into the eyes of oncoming traffic. Aiming them down means they can not see around those corners any more.

        Now, I drive in both a tall SUV and a low compact car; the SUV’s headlamps certainly shine through the compact’s rear window. I agree they should be positioned lower to reduce that problem. BUT I don’t agree that they should be aimed downwards because that SUV’s headlamps already don’t reach as far as that compact’s on a dark road.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          Minimizing risk and inconvenience to “other people”, really ought to be the only concern of laws, should there be any. If that means aiming the lights straight down under the car, so be it. Drive slower or wait until dawn.

          Any compact car owner can also achieve SUV type lighting by mounting a few thousand watts of rally lights on a bracket well above the roof. Gives better shadows for night racing that way. Blinding all oncomers up to and including mining trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Yeah –
        “Seventeen of the rated SUV headlight combinations have unacceptable glare. They include all types of lights — halogen, HID and LED — and none of the headlight types is more likely than the others to have excessive glare. Three of the 17 fell short of an acceptable rating on the basis of glare alone.

        “Glare issues are usually a result of poorly aimed headlights,” Brumbelow says. “SUV headlights are mounted higher than car headlights, so they generally should be aimed lower. Instead, many of them are aimed higher than the car headlights we’ve tested so far.””

        Like when TTAC reported this for sedans a while back, the buried lede is that so much of this is just bad aim from the factory.

        You’d think that would be easily fixed…

        • 0 avatar
          smartascii

          My question about this is, if they aimed the lights lower, less of the road would be illumnated, right? And then they’d just criticize the car because it doesn’t throw enough light.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    “The headlight test is simple. IIHS measures the amount of light emitted by low and high beams, then measures the amount of glare faced by oncoming vehicles. Vehicles scored points if their headlights came with an auto-dimming feature.”

    Beam pattern and a proper cut-off are about the most important things, along with decent reflective range. Headlights nowadays seem to be more about style than performance. The headlights in my 2013 Tacoma are pretty decent, but the ones in my wife’s 20018 Sienna absolutely suck. She blames it on the lenses being cloudy, but really only the tops are cloudy so far – the area where light projects is relatively clear. They just suck.

    I’ve thought about upgrading the bulbs to something like SilverStar bulbs, but I’m not crazy about their shorter life expectancy.

    The best headlights I ever experienced were a set of Cibie’ Z-Beams I once owned. Great reflective range even with standard 55 watt bulbs, and a razor sharp cut-off. The pattern was a backwards “Z”, so that the area off the side of the road had a flat top cut-off, instead one that went up at an angle.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      if the beam pattern is poor, throwing brighter bulbs in there is not going to earn you much more than the rage of oncoming drivers. and DON’T put HID capsules in there.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        I’d never do that. HID capsules should only be used with projector conversions. The thing is, most of the aftermarket projector conversions aren’t tastefully designed – they include some poorly executed LED DRLs and/or halo lights. The kind of things that scream, “Look at me, I’m a d-bag!”

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Toothpaste is very effective at removing the cloudiness from headlight lenses. It’s a lot cheaper than what the hucksters at the Sam’s Club gas station are pushing, too.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        If you don’t re-coat after polishing, UV will just haze them up again super-rapidly.

        The high-quality aftermarket “polish kits” include UV-protectant clearcoats, which is a real win.

    • 0 avatar

      ah, the Z beam.

      I don’t get why this still even a thing. Basic H4 lights with a decent reflector and lens were @ super cheap back in the day. Upgrade to Cibie or Hella and you still spent less than $100 at retail.

      The bulbs are OK and cheap. The technology is also well settled. You don’t NEED HID or multiple lenses or shutters. I have two cars with HID and shutters, and one with HID low and Halogen High. The two bulb setup is better than the others, but both shutter setups do a very good job.

      How can you screw this up ? It is almost like car stereo….to do it poorly seems intentional to force the upsell to the better parts…but as stated, most folks don’t think headlights during what is always a daytime test drive.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        I still remember that the Z-Beams cost $66.95 a pair, back in 1976. I convinced my mom to spend the money on them, and I put them in our ’66 Rambler American. We kept them when she traded it on a ’78 Malibu, and I used them on two other cars after that. I wish I still had them – I let them go with my ’76 Vega GT when I sold it.

        The only negative was the annual ritual of swapping them out for the stock sealed beams, when it was state inspection time, and then putting them back in afterwards. They had a very good boot design, so I never had a problem with water getting in them. I also had some Cibie’ 5-3/4″ H4 high beams that I used in a couple of cars with quad lamp systems (my ’78 Audi Fox, and later a ’68 Pontiac Bonneville), and they didn’t seal as well, leading to the reflectors eventually corroding.

        • 0 avatar

          I lived in NJ too at that time. I had to swap mine yearly too. My VW Scirocco had Z beams. My Nova had 7 inch Hella H4. A Jeep had 7 inch square Hellas. Pretty much every car I had with standard lights got the H-whatever treatment. I only had one cop conversation, where I managed to explain it was a better light with less glare. He looked at the sharp cutoffs and let me go..

          Agreed that many of the current lights aren’t as good as a basic H4 7 inch round……or even close, both for glare and reach. My fancy HID lights are pretty much…even. Seems like a lot of work for not much extra.

          Again, how do you mess this up ? You can make a good light with cheap standard parts….making a bad light is totally unacceptable.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Re. that, I had Hella 7″ H4 conversions in my old Mercedes (and the rectangular version in my Toyota pickup).

      Those things were brilliant, with great light projection and a razor-sharp cutoff and a left-side sign-illuminating spike.

      It’s a damned shame that stock headlights aren’t all that good.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    I’m always behind somebody so I let them worry about seeing stuff. I see their tail lights just fine.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Tangentially related…

    Has any independent group tested aftermarket fog lights and/or driving lights?

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Doubt it, not scientifically.

      I mean, those are *so* dependent on proper mounting and manual aiming that it’d be a nightmare to get good results, and application would be dubious.

  • avatar
    brettc

    It’s great that this is finally in the forefront thanks to the IIHS. Most people buy cars during the day so even if it’s rainy or snowy, you can’t really be sure about night performance until you actually own the thing.

    According to an article I found, SAE engineers are working with the government to allow more advanced headlight technologies to be legal. Hopefully that actually happens. Maybe while they’re at it, they can require all turn signals to be amber, FFS.

    http://www.boston.com/cars/news-and-reviews/2016/04/09/sylvania-reflects-the-iihs-headlight-ratings/yT4htlwxecXypbuGeOvEXM/story.html

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “Maybe while they’re at it, they can require all turn signals to be amber, FFS.”

      This. I hate that more and more turn signals are red these days. With LEDs it’s not hard to make amber turn signals that appear either red or clear from behind when off, so styling isn’t an excuse. It’s pure cheapness by automakers.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        with margins in this industry as slim as they are, why would they add the cost if not required to? and it’s not as simple a matter as bulbs behind a lens; you need additional circuits (i.e. more wire) and a more complex multifunction switch. that’s multiple dollars per unit in cost up, and since it’s not a feature that customers will pay for you either have to eat that cost or raise the base price of the car.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “require all turn signals to be amber”

      I’ve adored amber signals since they started to appear statside in the ’70s. For a couple of decades I went around thinking Euros were way smarter than us.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Love amber rear turn signals. The flashing orange light wakes most of the sheeple up much more quickly than a flashing red light in the middle of their taillight induced highway hypnosis.

  • avatar
    bills79jeep

    “Jeep fared the worst overall, with all of its small offerings — Patriot, Renegade and Wrangler — rated as poor.”

    Not surprising at all. No one is running sealed beams anymore right? The headlights on my Cherokee (XJ) would have been thrilled to be rated as poor.

  • avatar
    zerofoo

    We have a 2012 E-150 van at work that has terrible headlights. I have pocket flashlights that are brighter than the POS headlights on that thing.

    Good thing we don’t drive it at night very much.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    While I agree with the basic precept, I have to disagree with some of their conclusions. Many of their arguments want to both limit the range of the headlamp while extending it simultaneously. How are they supposed to do that? Sure, pointing a high-mounted headlamp downward helps to avoid glare against oncoming traffic, but by pointing them downward you now prevent them from offering a beam that can reach around those corners. Mounting the lamps lower will greatly reduce glare, but now they risk being blocked by any growth on the shoulder of the road, again limiting range around curves and also requiring far tighter specification for aiming as an adjustment of even 1° can change the beam 50′ or more down the road surface.

    If they want to recommend effective changes, try recommending a polarized beam that is visible to the driver of that vehicle only and only presents a location-marking glow to oncoming drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      The problem with polarized headlight beams is that windshields would need to be polarized in the opposite direction.

      Edwin Land, of Polaroid fame, tried to create a workable system in the 1930s, but in the end he gave up. His genius was better utilized doing other things.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    “Only four vehicles — the 2017 Ford Escape, Honda CR-V, Hyundai Tucson and Mazda CX-3 — earned a rating of “acceptable.””

    The issue is that it’s only on certain trim or package combinations; the Escape would be the Titanium trim with Tech Package, the Tucson would be the Limited Trim with the LED lamps (not the HID’s with the ultimate package).

    So only certain models for 2017 would be a TSP+ then. How about forcing the automakers that want to advertise the IIHS TSP+ rating to show that a specific trim only gets that award?

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    The Xenons in my wife’s ’03 Mini Cooper – when they work! – are awesome.

    The Halogens in my ’09 Clubman are just terrible. They don’t seem to throw out much light beyond 20 feet. But at least they are reliable compared to the Xenons ;)

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    This is my understanding of where we are, and were with vehicular lighting.
    I am old enough to remember all vehicles having sealed beam headlamps that had pretty much uniform performance. Only the occasional misaligned headlight presented glare. I can remember them all being pre-halogen lamp color. They were all a warm incandescent color, which are longer and thus lower energy wavelengths. There is a reason red light is used in dark situations. Eyes can develop their night vision absent brighter light and shorter, higher energy wavelengths (towards the blue end of the spectrum). I remember the late 60’s Dodge Polara wit a single supplemental “super light” that ran into trouble in a few states because the color of the light was too bluish.

    When I got a new for 1971 car with the halogen sealed beam headlights with their whiter color light, other drivers were flashing their high beams at me. Whiter light, more towards blue in the spectrum, more glare.
    Then, happy days! The dreaded big government dropped its headlight regulations. Freedom for the automakers, stylists, and marketeers. This has set off a marketing and user arms war of sorts. Brighter light, bluer light, add in fog lamps that operate 99% of the time when there are no foggy conditions, and there is no hope of developing night vision now. We are all driving around with fried eyes at night.

    My understanding of European regulations (gasp, horrors) are that they take vehicular lighting far more seriously. Their low beams have discrete cuts-off, headlights cannot be mounted nearly as high up on a vehicle as they are here, as seen on trucks and school busses. I remember reading that when HID lights came out, specific rules were written for them in Europe, unlike here. Headlight levelers, manual or automatic are standard. I noted years ago visiting France that all the headlights had yellow lenses on them. Yellow blocks blue light.

    Certainly some basic research could determine the proper set of three parameters, light intensity, color, and beam pattern that would result in the most effective night vision for vehicular headlight systems to produce, and write effective regulations to guarantee that they are met.

    Interestingly, Consumer’s Reports has recently been evaluating headlight performance for both effective illumination and oncoming glare. Good to see that IIHS has jumped in on the game. I guess I am not the only one who is distressed by poorly engineered and (yes I will say it, harmful) headlight systems.

    Go ahead, call me a Communist Marxist big government liberal. I can take it like a man, but government regulations are the answer in this instance.

    • 0 avatar
      orenwolf

      Thanks for all the informative backstory!

      With integrated headlamp assemblies now increasingly becoming the norm, as well as LED headlamps that will last the theoretical useful life of the car, I’d have expected factory alignment to be a thing. I hope if it isn’t that it is, in fact, mandated as a result of studies like the ones from IIHS and CR. It’s 2016 folks.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      I’m also old enough to remember incandescent headlights. I agree that the trend toward cooler colors does does not benefit visibility. Your point is very well taken.

      I also remember how those old headlights would fade over time, A LOT. Moving to halogen was an overall improvement.

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    Bluish lighting sucks. I am amazed that some people actually buy 5000K LED lamps for their home. Yes you do get higher efficacy but the quality of the light is horrible.

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