By on April 20, 2016

2016 Buick Envision Front 3/4

Buick’s turbocharged, Chinese-made Envision crossover is landing on American shores in early summer, but the price could cause some buyers to rethink their purchase date.

Holding the title of being the first U.S. model manufactured in China, the Envision is already a two-year veteran of the overseas market. Americans are notoriously SUV-thirsty, so it was inevitable that the Envision would make its way here, loaded with a high level of standard equipment.

The starting MSRP for the 2016 Envision is $42,995 (all charges included), a figure that tops the range-leading Enclave, which starts at $39,065 (minus freight, destination and fees).

Available in Premium and Premium II trim levels, the Envision comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that makes 252 horsepower and 260 pounds-feet of torque. The sole engine choice is hooked up to standard all-wheel drive. Leather and autonomous safety functions also come standard, because that’s what Buick buyers expect.

While the price of the earliest models seen steep, don’t expect that situation to last long.

Buick spokesman Michael Ofiara said that although the Buicks arriving in June will carry a $42,995 price tag, more diversity in trim and pricing is on the way.

“There’s a short run of 2016 units until the 2017 units arrive in the fall and will offer more trim levels and a lower starting price of $34,990 for the base model,” said Ofiara.

The Envision fills the gap between the Encore, which gets an update this fall, and the three-row Enclave. Plenty of competition awaits the plush import, including the Cadillac XT5, Acura RDX and Audi Q5.

[Image: General Motors]

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64 Comments on “Buick Reveals Envision Pricing; Stingy Buyers Will Want to Wait for 2017...”


  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    “That’s not a Bruick!”

  • avatar

    #1 I’m really interested in actually understand why China loves Buick.

    Is it the name? They have plenty of options. Why Buick?

    #2 They really need to scrap the plans to build ANYTHING other than EV.

    For the environment’s sake.

    For their lung’s sake.

    China and Africa need to focus on EV for their future.

    Africa’s economy could be ridiculously ultra modern if they went renewable energy and EV. Especially if they were selling their resources towards that end – building EV and other renewable energy sources.

    For God’s sake – those deserts could be gigantic solar fields.

    • 0 avatar
      redliner

      As I understand it, Buick was among the first made-in-china luxury vehicles availible in the late 80s to early 90s. There wasn’t much choice at the time if you wanted a large comfortable premium car.

      Many powerful politicians, state officials and people of influenced bought Buicks in this time period. GM capitalised on this by positioning Buick as distinctly upscale and high quality with state of the art engineering (as compared to Chinese cars of the period)

      Buicks soft suspensions, larger dimensions and quiet interiors were perfect for chauffeured elites. Because of this, people associate the brand with successful people and high comfort to this day, even if the Buicks of today bear little resemblance to the Buicks of 25 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      Emporer drove a buick. No, really, he did. But that was bavk in like 1938.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Going straight EV in a place that pretty much gets its electricity from power plants burning dirty coal isn’t exactly a good idea.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    It’s just one Trifecta tune away from 100 MPG and HELLCAT beating 708 HP!

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I’m trying to figure out which logistics are causing GM to only offer loaded-up examples, at first…loaded-up examples that will probably have miserable lease offers and get passed over by competing cars. From the outside, it doesn’t make a lot of sense.

    As far as your statement about the car “Holding the title of being the first U.S. model manufactured in China,” that isn’t strictly true. The Volvo S60L—known here as the S60 Inscription—is built in China, which is easy to tell because the VIN starts with L. Also, there was that short-lived Coda run of EVs, which were built in China and sold here. But this is the first American-branded car to be assembled in China and sold here in the ‘States.

    • 0 avatar
      here4aSammich

      The average age of a Buick buyer is still up there. The cost of the lease isn’t going to be an issue, and a lot of buyers will be cash deals. Bringing loaded models first simply is a way to make bigger margins per unit sold. They could have made the 2016 run less loaded, but chose not to.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Buyers increasingly these days want their vehicles loaded up, esp. with all the latest safety tech.

    • 0 avatar

      I suspect they don’t have a choice. They want the sell the model here ASAP, but they probably only have the capacity to send the higher-end models since the vehicle is selling very well everywhere else.

      • 0 avatar
        ixim

        No, more likely the idea is to sell loaded models to first adopters willing to pay the price. If they don’t sell, there’s always incentives. My guess is they will sell out initially, followed by cheap leases on low line models. Just like what happened with the Encore.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Send them back to china together with those who buys them

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Doesn’t stop people from buying TV’s, iPhones…ect, does it?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        No, it doesn’t stop most people because most people are self-indulging. But I have not purchased a single Apple product. Although, if Americans are ready for socialism (as Bernie following shows), why not buy stuff from country that is ran by communist party. In contrast, in Vietnam we needed to stop “spread of communism”.

        Bottom line – hell with GM. If they build it in China – I let Chinese buy it. As I said before – Japanese car is built in Japan. American car is built in America. So, If I buy American car – It is built in America.

        • 0 avatar
          ttacgreg

          With all due respect, I wish you would look up the dictionary definition of the words socialism, communism, public, Marxism. Your inaccurate usage of those words indicates an ideological bias.

          • 0 avatar
            "scarey"

            @ttacgreg- You should go live in a socialist/communist/marxist country (like Cuba.) and THEN lecture us about the meanings of those words.
            For about 25 years.
            Am I ideologically biased ? You bet I am !

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          Modern electronics are made either in Japan, Korea or China. Your “I don’t buy Apple products” doesn’t mean jack when your Android came off the production line 1 building over.

          Every single OEM uses many Chinese suppliers and that applies to engine components all the way to external trim pieces.

          “Bottom line – hell with GM. If they build it in China – I let Chinese buy it. As I said before – Japanese car is built in Japan. American car is built in America. So, If I buy American car – It is built in America.”

          Funny when GM, FCA and Ford make cars in Europe and Mexico and send them here. Hyundai/KIA, Toyota and Honda make them in the United States.

          Sounds like your’re SOL with everything.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          slavuta,
          To hell with the American BMWs, Toyotas, etc we have in Australia!

          Why should buy from countries that manufacture better quality vehicles, like Japan and Germany? Toyota and BMW from my re-collection are not an American brand.

          Your comment really displays your rustic approach.

          Do you know what socialism is? America has a mixed economy, which is based on a shared social and free model.

          Australia and several other countries have what is called a free market economy.

          Don’t confuse politics (your simplistic paradigms) with economics. They do work together but are a similar as using terms like respect and fear. Both are similar in many ways, but are completely different.

          You fear and seem to be insecure.

        • 0 avatar
          tekdemon

          lol, I wonder which phone you bought that doesn’t contain at least 80% Chinese produced parts in it. Even the Korean made phones will use heavy percentages of Chinese parts inside. But honestly the market will sort things out, if a Chinese built Buick is noticeably worse than an American built Buick then people just won’t buy them, fueling rampant nationalism and trade wars is an idiotic way to go about things.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        But at the same time, there isn’t exactly much choice when it comes to buying those things as opposed to autos.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      That’s almost everyone in the US of A, good luck with that mass deportation.

      But here’s a brief how-to if you’re stoic enough:
      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12056295

    • 0 avatar
      Von

      Slav, many cars will have a large portion of their components made in China, from spark plugs to radiators, wheels, mufflers, electronics, switches, seats, glass, etc, etc, etc. If you are really opposed to the Chinese thing, you can’t really own a car that’s less than 15 or 20 years old.

      Just checking all the components will take a non-insider a very significant amount of time.

      So great theoretical rant, but impossible to not have some amount of money going to the Chinese when you buy any modern car.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @von “. If you are really opposed to the Chinese thing, you can’t really own a car that’s less than 15 or 20 years old.”

        I remember family members complaining about Taiwanese sourced auto parts back in the late seventies and the lack of quality. So, you might have to go back even further.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Ah, but Taiwan was “the real China” back then. The PROC was “mainland China.”

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Drz…

            No, the PRC was “Red China.” “R-E-D China.”

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            You are correct, but that doesn’t mean that I am also incorrect in this instance.

            “Mainland China (中国大陆), Chinese mainland or simply the mainland, is the geopolitical area under the direct jurisdiction of the People’s Republic of China (PRC).”

            When anyone in the US said “mainland China,” they were, of course, referring to “Red China” in a slightly more polite fashion.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Maybe off topic but if Trump wins and tariffs them, will they raise the price or is there enough fat in that 42k to absorb it?

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So with a launch like that, will there even be a press fleet available until 2017?

  • avatar
    threeer

    But in an email I got from Mr. Mark Reuss back in January, the Envision is “U.S. engineered,” and all of those profits go “right back to Detroit!” I’m kind of disappointed that I steered my mother into a Buick Verano back in 2012. Heck, not much left in the Buick lineup that is American-made anymore, is there? Consumers won’t care (if they are even remotely aware) that it’s made in China.

    Getting harder and harder to find anything really made here. While the majority of my household appliances, furniture and yes, even my clothes, are made here, household electronics and such are nigh on impossible to find made here. At least with automobiles, I still have a choice…

    I’m sure they’ll sell every single one boated over here, and Mr. Reuss will sleep well at night knowing all of that profit floated back to MI.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      “But in an email I got from Mr. Mark Reuss back in January, the Envision is “U.S. engineered,” “….

      In the same way that some Sears-sold Craftsman power tools are “U.S. Designed” (but made in Guangzhou).

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Actually, the meat of their lineup – the LaCrosse, Enclave and Verano – is all American-made. The Regal is made in Canada, and the convertible is from somewhere in Europe (but they’re going to sell about six of them, so who cares).

  • avatar
    nickoo

    I bet they sell more than the elr.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “The starting MSRP for the 2016 Envision is $42,995 (all charges included), a figure that tops the range-leading Enclave, which starts at $39,065 (minus freight, destination and fees).”

    True, but the base Enclave doesn’t have leather and AWD. With that, and all the safety goodies, you’re looking at around $50,000 before the inevitable cash on the hood.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    “Sure, I’ll be happy to pay a premium for some of that superior made in China quality!”

    Said no one ever.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Volvo XC90 buyers?

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      iPhone buyers (myself included) too. Designed by Apple in California but made in China! It is like that line in Back 2 the Future where Doc jokes the reason his time machine broke down was the “Made in Japan” circuits, to which Marty says “but Doc the BEST stuff come from Japan” because in the 80s Sony, Panasonic and JVC ruled. This was the same county we dropped the bomb on, so things changed big time.

      China can make very good stuff, its the knock off junk you get from the off brands that everyone remembers. Like a Coby(TM) DVD player I won at a company party that lasted… and I’m not joking here… for exactly ONE movie playback before breaking. Pure garbage.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Yeah, that’s impressive.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Just like the Buicks, I’m sure.

        Tappety-tapping this out on an iPhone 6s, but somehow Apple can get it right. Since GM seems to fail more often than not, I ain’t holding my breath on this one!

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        The problem is that General Motors is THE poster child automaker that goes for the lowest cost bidder, demanding bottom-barrel pricing over all other criteria from its suppliers (which hate it, by the way; GM is the automakers suppliers literally detest the most).

        Chinese suppliers have advanced to the point where they can build most components (there are still exceptions on truly intensive and proprietary laden components, where they can’t compete with German, Japanese, Canadian, and US suppliers) to the quality specified by the automaker client, but GM goes for lowest price first, above all else, nearly every time.

        Check out the tidal wave of complaints being lodged against GM due to the poor quality of the steel, turbochargers, radiators, electronics and electrical components, and suspension components (cracked axles, broken control arms, and even broken driveshafts) on many of their vehicles, much of these due to Chinese suppliers.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    MTD uses Chinese engines on their outdoor power equipment. I just bought a rear engine Troy Bilt riding mower with a Chinese made engine. The engine is very similar to a Briggs and Stratton. My lawn mower mechanic said many of the engines for lawn equipment are being made in China.

    • 0 avatar
      Von

      Briggs and Stratton opened a huge plant in China. Something like 3,000 laborers.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Those 4-cycle engines are used in a lot of stuff sold in the US, among them Champion (and other) Portable AC Generators, Portable Air Compressors, various lawn-mower brands, and lawn-edgers.

        Contractors love them because they’re cheap to buy and after you run the p!ss out of them and they wear out, you just buy another new one.

        They’re not worth rebuilding. The people who use them for their job just write them off as the cost of doing business.

        We could not do that with B&S engines made in the US of A. They were expensive and rebuilding them was costly and time-consuming.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          Did the B&S engines last longer than the Chinese ones?

          Is there a real quality tradeoff and an actualy choice to make (short lived cheap and disposable vs long-lived) or would there be no point to buying the B&S engine?

  • avatar
    ixim

    Here’s hoping that by 2018, the Envision will be leasing for the same crazy low subsidized rates as the current Encore.

  • avatar

    Stop the Invasion, Boycott Envision. I will not sell any of these and will convince everyone possible to stay far away.

    Buickman
    Founder
    GeneralWatch.com

  • avatar
    FromaBuick6

    First off, “Buick Envision” sounds like a pointless corporate mission statement authored by some MBA flunky from a second rate B-school.

    There’s no reason why Buick-GMC dealers need this in addition to the Encore, Enclave, Terrain and Acadia, especially when all the existing Buicks and GMCs are already made redundant by Chevy and Cadillac. I’m sure Normie or one of the other GM shills will tell me I’m wrong, because reasons, but the truth is most competitors struggle to make a case for selling two CUVs per size class, while the General insists on offering three or more per category.

  • avatar
    Eyeflyistheeye

    I’m one person, but if I can hold off on buying a car made in China (before any smartasses chime in, I mean final assembly) I’ll do it for as long as possible. Even the Honda Fits in Canada made in China have rust issues that their Japanese made counterparts didn’t have. It’s not like I’m even saving any money on this compared to its competitors manufactured in North America or Korea (I doubt anything in this class is still made in Japan except for the odd Mazda CX-9 and the Lexus RX).

    And this is different than Volvo for many reasons. The United States government didn’t bail Geely out nor has Geely or Volvo ever sold their cars appealing to American patriotism. Hell, I’d trust a Chinese-made Volvo over a Chinese-made Buick since I know Geely is working damn hard to make a great impression while GM is probably going to use Chinese production to cut even more corners.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    I know not a single one of these Buick’s will go for anything close to sticker price. BUT isn’t this thing still priced at least $8-10 grand too high? There are literally 50 other cars in this class. $43k is a well equipped Grand Cherokee around here. Or Ford Edge. Or 48 other things.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    This is good for GM. With all the “bullsh!t” commentary from those that can’t see the forest through the trees.

    GM needs to remain competitive first and foremost. GM’s competitors are using China as well. The great American icon the Mustang has a Chinese built Getrag MT82 fitted.

    Thailand builds many cheap vehicles as well for GM, Ford, Honda, Toyota, Mitsubishi, Nissan, etc. The cost of labour is cheaper in Thailand, does this make for a poorer quality vehicle? No.

    I find it amazing that not one person has stated that the US is becoming more an assembly point for vehicles and not a complete manufacturing centre.

    I have read that not many jobs in the US vehicle industry has increase in line with the increase in vehicle production. Why? Because more and more components are sourced externally to the US and NAFTA.

    Vehicle components/parts in many cases do not come under some of the protective measures that apply the vehicle assembly.

    So, which country is doing better? China or the USA?

    I think both are benefitting, as is the case with most global trade.

    • 0 avatar
      Eyeflyistheeye

      This coming from the schizo who continuously insisted Australia made the best cars in the world but applauded that the short-sighted Abbott government didn’t try to save Holden while it costs more to retrain and give unemployment bennies to the Fisherman’s Bend workers. Not to mention you guys are totally fucked in terms of having any manufacturing infrastructure to make planes, armaments or ships in case of a war. Why don’t you go trade in your BT-50 on a Great Wall? We’ll wait.

      Yeah, you’re one to speak.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    China is benefitting. Chinese are getting decent jobs, which allow them to provide the essentials of life for them and/or their families, and pay taxes to the Chinese Govt.

    “GM is benefitting”. Who/what is GM? GM will be more profitable. The CEO will make $10-20 million in bonus as a result. The top 20-50 execs will do very well, but not nearly as well as CEO. The salaried managers will do well, but nearly as well as execs. The salaried and hourly will do well–better than the average American worker in 2016.

    The free trade fantasy is that it allows everyone to do what is best, to the benefit of all. The French make good wine for less–let them make wine, not us. We make good jet engines for less, let us make jet engines. Let’s trade, wine for jet engines, we both benefit.

    The reality is this: all those components, and finished vehicles, imported from overseas could have been made here in the US. This would have employed people, who could provide for themselves, AND pay taxes, so the govt could provide a safety net. Yes, things would cost more. People would just have to choose what was important.

    Instead, the USA has let corporate America outsource it’s manufacturing. Essentially, corporate America has stolen American jobs and sent them overseas. This enriches a relatively small amount of people at the expense of many more people, who now must work as waiters, or Wal-Mart attendants for $10 waiting on the lucky ones.

    Yes, stolen jobs from Americans to generate more money to go to the “chosen few”.

    Maybe that’s why 1 out of 6 Americans uses food stamps now. Or half of Americans don’t pay income taxes. Because they are broke. Because far too many jobs were outsourced.

    It may be better for the world overall, but it’s worst for the US. And there are signs everywhere that the US is regressing toward 3rd world, as pockets of the 3rd world slowly progress. Roads? Airports? Bridges? Infrastucture? Flint water? All going backward.

    It’s not sustainable. 7 year car loans will only work so long….

    That’s why Bernie and Trump are so popular…most Americans in the real world get it.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Slow clap. You are correct Tom. The way I see it, corporations are given the protections of our laws in exchange for an agreement to provide jobs that take care of our citizens. We do not give corporations the protections of our laws so their top brass can become billionaires!!

      “Pro-trade” folks like to say, “oh, the U.S. is sophisticated, we shouldn’t be stooping to the level of building things. Ew.” Whenever someone says this, I’m smiling and thinking “moron who can’t see outside his own bubble.” Just walk through any city, town and village in the U.S. and really look. You will see that there is a HUGE pool of people who are made for manufacturing work, and aren’t going to be computer techs, lawyers, or doctors.

      If GM does not give them jobs, then we have to subsidize them. We subsidize them directly through taxes needed to sustain them, and we subsidize them indirectly through lowered property values, higher crime, and generally a lower quality of life.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Labor is the cheapest commodity on earth, and it has been (since NAFTA, GATT, MFN trade status for China) and will be (TPP) a continuous chase by global multinationals for the cheapest labor for the absolute cheapest labor in any nation having even a remotely functioning infrastructure (Chinese are actually losing labor/assembly jobs to Thailand & Vietnam now over a difference of 90 cents per hour).

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “most Americans in the real world get it”

      Yes, but usually not before youthful hormones, ignorance and hope result in their breeding up families and thus adding more weight to the collapsing structure.

      I daily see the facial expressions of the brighter ones when they suffer an episode of getting it. Makes me glad that one of the immutables of human existence, along with murderously rapacious greed, is threescore and ten.

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