By on October 21, 2014

cadillac-dealer-inside

Facebook commenters and the automotive press aren’t the only ones feeling the lash from Cadillac boss Johan de Nysschen, as dealers themselves are feeling the pressure to step up their game.

Automotive News reports that while some Cadillac dealerships have nothing to worry about, and are, in fact, completely on-board with de Nysschen’s alphanumeric global vision, those on the low end of the totem pole fear they may be selling something else if they can’t compete on the level their new boss expects of them.

Specifically, de Nysschen may want to consolidate the brand’s network of 924 dealerships into a more BMW/Mercedes-esque number — hovering in the 330 – 370 range — with a similar focus on urban markets. Though neither he nor anyone representing Cadillac have stated such plans were on the table, dealers like Claude Burns and an unnamed dealer in the Midwest are going on the offensive to maintain their spots: a new expanded floorplan for the former, lawyering-up with an attorney who represented dealers during General Motors’ bankruptcy for the latter.

As for the boss himself, de Nysschen had this to say about the future of his dealerships after his meeting with them last month in Las Vegas, where he outlined his vision for the brand and their role in it:

It’s very clear to me that many, many dealers already have risen to the challenge. On the other hand, when those customers engage us in our dealerships, we cannot afford that the experience is anything other than confirming that this is a first-class brand. And not all of our dealers are there.

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131 Comments on “Cadillac Dealers Prepare To Step Up, Or Leave, Sales Game Under De Nysschen...”


  • avatar
    VoGo

    This will be a challenge for Cadillac. The buying experience expectations of a 70 year old man looking to get the new Sedan de Ville with wire rims is really different from the 30-year old metro who saw that ATS commercial and wants something that can run with his buddies’ bimmers.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Even in the Detroit area, where GM sells a bunch of Cadillacs they have problems. There are garbage dealers and nice dealers that also sell Buick. Like you said, if someone is buying an 3-series or A6 competitor, having a Lacrosse parked next to an ATS may not send the best image.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        “Like you said, if someone is buying an 3-series or A6 competitor, having a Lacrosse parked next to an ATS may not send the best image.”

        Eh, it’s a Lacrosse, not a Cruze. BMW buyers often have to contend with Mini on site, and honestly, in larger metro areas, people are used to giant multi-brand mega dealers. There’s a dealer right near me that sells MB, Porsche, BMW, Infiniti, and Honda, all under one roof, and you can walk showroom to showroom without it being readily obvious they are different. I don’t think it’s a big deal.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I don’t think it’s a big deal as the dealership I used to frequent was a VW/Audi/Porsche dealer. They have done significant renovations to make the Audi and Porsche area seperate and more exclusive than the VW area. Same service bays, but different waiting areas.

          The Cadillac dealer I am referring to specifically has an XTS and Lacrosse next to each other on the floor. There is another dealer that has a Sonic and CTS on the same floor. If it is going to be a shared dealership, I think Cadillac should at lease try to carve out their own space.

        • 0 avatar
          bosozoku

          Buick ain’t Mini, and Cadillac ain’t BMW.

          They need to do this like Lexus. You know, the overall market leader in the luxury segment?

          • 0 avatar
            smartascii

            I dunno. Have you ever seen an attractive Lexus dealership? The service is generally above reproach, but the aggressively dated brown concrete buildings with even browner signage does not compare favorably with other dealers.

          • 0 avatar
            IHateCars

            I agree with bosozoku…Lexus service should be benchmarked by pretty much every near luxury/luxury dealer. I’d rather have top notch service/staff in a nice building than contemptible service/staff in a really nice building.

          • 0 avatar
            kmoney

            +1 If Cadillac wants to compete they really need to bump up their HR practices. I bought a Suburban LT from our local Chev/Cad/GMC dealer and the salesman and sales manager were like something out of a movie. This guy was wearing a tan members only jacket, worn out slacks and running shoes. He just spit out the same canned and cliched BS lines throughout the entire 3+ hours sales experience. This is in a major Canadian city and probably one of the highest volume Caddy dealers in Western Canada.

            When we bought our LX570, the service was great to the point that I keep our salesman’s contact info to give to people when the topic of buying a new car comes up in conversation.

        • 0 avatar
          01 ZX3

          Are you in the Chicago area?

    • 0 avatar

      test

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    “But others, especially lower-volume Cadillac dealers, are worried. They fear that de Nysschen wants to consolidate Cadillac’s network of 924 dealerships and reshape it in the mold of BMW or Mercedes-Benz, which have two-thirds fewer stores, mostly in urban locales, and outsell the average Cadillac store by nearly 5-to-1.

    One Midwest Cadillac dealer who returned from the Vegas gathering wasn’t in the mood to draw up expansion plans. Instead he called Richard Sox, a Florida lawyer who represented many Cadillac dealers targeted for termination around the time of GM’s bankruptcy in 2009.

    Sox said the dealer, whom he declined to name, is on the outskirts of a large urban area and must compete against several bigger Cadillac stores.

    “He feels like there’s a good likelihood that he’ll be targeted as Cadillac looks to reduce its dealer count,” Sox says.”

    http://www.autonews.com/article/20141020/RETAIL07/310209837/cadillac-dealers-feel-the-heat

    Let the litigation flow like a breached dam.

    Seriously, I’d much prefer to have a Kia dealership than a Cadillac one, and so would nearly any sane dealer.

    In the heart of Cadillac home turf, on the border of Oakland/Macomb County in the metro Detroit suburbs, a Cadillac-Buick-GMC dealer 12 miles from my home is killin’ it with a new Kia dealer they just added while they absolutely choke on a glut of Cadillacs.

    That dealer has NO problem, in the middle of GM country, seein’ ya in a Kia, but can’t get hardly any butts in a Cadillac Alpha/Sigma/Whateva.

    Remember that this is the heart of the GM Employee Price, too.

    Johan “Don’t f*ck with me brah!” de Nysschen is going to save Cadillac with even higher priced cars like the forthcoming CT6, though, that will be priced in Mercedes S Class territory, and manage to sell fewer units than the Allante once did, and will truly mark the beginning of Cadillac’s we’re-turning-things-around-for-30-years-now successful turnaround plan.

    Johan – a man with a plan.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Glassman in Southfield doesn’t have Cadillac, but they did well for themselves going from orphan brand GM dealerships to Kia, Hyundai, and Subaru.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        The best thing that ever happened to Glassman was getting away from GM’s insanity.

        The only dealers truly happy to sell GM product at present (as has been the case for quite some time) sell new Chevy or GMC pickup trucks.

        And when the pent-up demand for trucks that’s been quickly satisfied over the past 6 years has been finally satisfied in what is an historical cyclical basis, even the new GM truck dealerships will have some lean years ahead.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      Ashley Schaeffer didn’t like selling Kias…

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      @DeadWeight

      His plan seems to be build specialty models and then try to sell them as volume models, then enact low cost changes and rhetoric when that doesn’t work.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        First, Reuss had to do damage control after Johan (or his wife) insisted on a SoHo home, then Reuss had to deal with Johan’s farcebook “Come at me, brah!” insane rant, and now, there will be massive fallout from Johan’s Vegas “just trust me” follies (as franchisee attorneys are already being called).

        And the Chronicles of Johan has just begun.

        • 0 avatar
          lzaffuto

          He completely screwed Infiniti. I realize that some of what has happened to Infiniti is Nissan’s fault as well, but he was brought in to fix it. Instead all he did was run off the brand’s already shrinking number of loyal customers like me and didn’t bring any new ones in to replace them. He’ll turn Cadillac around the same way.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      I don’t get the religious zeal here. At this rate, I’m expecting you to crash a 747 into the RenCen.

      It’s not that hard to figure out what’s up:

      -GM wants Cadillac to be like the Germans
      -GM hires German who was part of the process of being German
      -German guy then behaves as a German guy should

      The problem here is that it took many years for the Germans to become the Germans who we know and admire today. Cadillac is trying to do in 3-5 years what it took the Germans at least 10-20 years or more to accomplish.

      The real issue here is whether GM has the patience needed to play this game (and whether GM recognizes that this game is more difficult now than it was twenty years ago.) If/when that fails, it largely won’t be the German guy’s fault: ironically, he’s mostly just following orders.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        He’s South African of Dutch ancestry, but be that as it may, could you work any harder to excuse him from what will likely be his massive failure in turning Cadillac around?

        Cadillac’s problems are not of the type that can or will be fixed by a single bullet point de Nysschen has raised as a strategic approach in his vision statement.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          His nationality is obviously not the point. The Teutonic references are particular to his industry experience, obviously.

          The problem with your freakout view of the world is that you’re too much in a panic to stop and analyze it. Chill out for a moment and give it a bit of thought.

          Let’s suppose GM interviewed a guy like me to do the job. Here’s what would happen:

          -GM would give me a timeframe for achieving their mission

          -I would tell GM that they are expecting too much, and that their plan is about ten years too late, i.e that the American BMW plan is not going to work, that the brand focus should be on the Escalade and vehicles similar to it, and that someone ought to turn Opel into GM’s uber-German car brand, sharing a channel with Cadillac

          -At this point, the meeting is going to wind down to an uncomfortable early end, no one is going to refill my coffee, and I’ll be missing out on the fancy dinner and drinks that I would have otherwise enjoyed that evening

          In other words, the only guy who is going to get this job is the guy who tells them what they want to hear. If it wasn’t him, then it would be someone else.

          This guy advanced in the industry by learning how to play the game. The fault lies at the top of GM for having an unrealistic plan and then expecting some fall guy to execute it.

          If the company fired this guy tomorrow, GM would be in the exact same place. They’re going to do this, no matter what.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You’re spot on, I also had to chuckle at the 747 comment as awful as it may be given the reality of such scenarios.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            Very insightful look. This is probably more realistic… he is just the face of GM’s executive obstinance, at least till he’s replaced.

        • 0 avatar

          So dose that make him Afrikaan? and is it Ok if I make fun of them?

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        I think the even bigger issue here is whether or not this is even a game worth playing. All of the German’s segments of growth are in non-traditional German segments (for the US). On top of that, the Germans are investing heavily in green tech, partly out of necessity (impending Euro 7 emissions mandates), and partly out of having a clue what the market actually wants. Cars like the i3/i8 are a glimpse into the future; Cadillac is relentlessly pursuing the completely obsolete past. It’s a real tragedy.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        “The problem here is that it took many years for the Germans to become the Germans who we know and admire today. Cadillac is trying to do in 3-5 years what it took the Germans at least 10-20 years or more to accomplish.”

        And the Germans had a clear way to differentiate themselves from the American luxo-barges of the ’60’s, ’70’s and ’80’s. They steered! I’ve driven Cadillacs from that era. They kinda-sorta went where you pointed the nose. Cadillac is now playing catch-up in that regard. And that’s a tough sell because, why buy the wanna-be when you could have the real thing?

      • 0 avatar

        the Germans and Japanese aren’t all that. it’s GM that is so weak that others filled the void.

    • 0 avatar

      true that! they don’t get it and never will.

  • avatar
    bk_moto

    “It’s very clear to me that many, many dealers already have risen to the challenge. On the other hand, when those customers engage us in our dealerships, we cannot afford that the experience is anything other than confirming that this is a first-class brand. And not all of our dealers are there.”

    What he’s saying here is that any dealership that is still adding vinyl roof treatments to the cars is a dealership that should be out of business. And he’s right.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    If this is about improving the dealer image (no vinyl roofs and pushy salesmen with cheap suits stinking of cigar) that’s great news, but if this is about sales volume, I think he needs to calm down a little. He’s playing what I believe to be the right long game (push prices higher) but he’s gotta get that that comes at the expense of volume and won’t happen overnight.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Higher prices can only come when your product is valued more by your customer base. If prices go up, but the perception stays the same, sales will fall. To maintain sales, there must be some noticeable improvement to the product/band.

      Moving to NY doesn’t improve the product. Changing names doesn’t improve the product. Introducing a new, expensive model may improve brand perception, but I unless it ends up in a bunch of athlete’s/celebrities driveways, I doubt it will have much effect. Improving dealerships will improve perception of the brand, but I doubt slashing the number of dealerships will help. I don’t know if he’s explicitly said anything about how the actual products will be better than they currently are.

      That may be why people have such a problem with what he’s doing–they don’t know how he’ll make Cadillac build better, more desirable cars.

  • avatar

    Is it a good idea to publicly say that some of your dealers are crappy?

    Instead of saying “And not all of our dealers are there,” I think that “We want all of our dealers to deliver that experience” is less likely to turn off potential customers and would likely go down better with the dealers as well.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    He’s about five years too late. The opportunity to trim the dealer network was during the bankruptcy, when those franchise agreements were subject to discharge through the court.

    As for focusing on urban, this may not be the right time. I would be curious to know how Cadillac’s sales are allocated; if a lot of them are in peripheral markets, then I would imagine that focusing on markets where the Germans are strongest would be akin to walking into propeller blades. Hit them where they ain’t, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I think “walking into propeller blades” is GM’s internal slogan.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Regardless of ze Germans, slashing the number of dealers and concentrating them in a single type of market certainly won’t increase sales volume. Even if sales numbers stay up, lack of diversification means sales will be subject to more volatility.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Cadillac does have too many dealers, and that is problematic on a lot of levels.

        I can’t blame GM for wanting to cut (although they should have done it during the BK.) It’s the urban angle that has me wondering.

        • 0 avatar
          geeber

          Based on my observations of rural Pennsylvania, your concerns are valid. Cadillac does sell SRXs and Escalades to well-to-do rural residents.

          The ATS and CTS haven’t gained much traction in those areas, but that is more because trucks and crossovers rule.

          Walking away from those sales isn’t necessarily a good idea at this point.

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    “On the other hand, when those customers engage us in our dealerships, we cannot afford that the experience is anything other than confirming that this is a first-class brand. And not all of our dealers are there.”

    I sincerely hope he is not using mercedes or audi as an example. Those dealers really and truly suck. What sells those cars like whats ells KIA is product.

    If you want an example of where cadillac should be dealerwise look at lexus. Inb fact that is probably where cadfilliac should aim product wise.

    I read nothing that tells me the new cadillac will be dynamicaly great, it sounds to be all about self drive. Cadillac also does not know what it wants to be. I makes cars that are either boats, or cars that have too grip handling for their segment. The powertrains pretty much suck for a luxury car, maybe Ok for chevy, once again try a lexus v8.

    What is cadillac going to offer, another 3.6 v6 varainat with a sound like a hoover. Or some type of pushrod v8. Now I have nothing against pushrod v8s’ they are light small and powerful, but they are not refined and smooth, at least not the chevy ones.(the old 425 caddy was a peach)

    In otehr words before blowing out dealers, come up with some excelelnt product, american cars witht he virtues of otehrs without aping them, so far there is no sign of excellent product. The new designs have lost the plot styliticaly and dynamicaly they are too hard and sharp and hard for twhat they are while the powetrains are sub par, and the interior could best be described as a travesty of bad taste and poorer function.

    As to dealers. I much preder the service at my local phrmaciosts to dwayne read. I much prefer a resteraunt owned by the chef to a chain.
    Point is sometimes if you are selling upscale, the personal touch is preferable to corporate gloss. Its why my chevy servicing experience is infintly superior to my wifes mercedes experience, although mercedes does have a noice cappuchino machine.

    in short I woudl not be throwing out the babby with the bath water based on what some conmsulting company thinks a dealer experience should be based on bogus online surveys.

    i woudl also develop soem excellent product, dynamicaly sound without being too hard or harsh(look at jag dynamics) cars with actualy luxury interiors, not fake plastic chrome and trully crappy screes fgoir everthing. Wjhatever you touch see or smell shoudl eb a delight. get the designer from the rpevious range rover. Also dont think as Mary Barra aparently does thta trowing soem electronic self drive tech and a few screns will syddenly make aluxury car, thtat is Gm missing the plot again and a hiding to nowhere.

    • 0 avatar
      Tosh

      I can tell that you don’t like screens (at all). But you’re right: that the problem is and always will be about ‘the product.’

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Agreed – it is the product.

        Pharaoh said, “Lazy, that’s what you are—lazy! That is why you keep saying, ‘Let us go and sacrifice to the Lord.’ Now get to work. You will not be given any straw, yet you must produce your full quota of bricks.”
        Exodus 5:17-18

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      You are spot on. with the Lexus dealership experience being the model. At these price points, it’s not just about the car but the ownership experience. People that leave Mercedes and go to Lexus do so for this, not because they don’t like the car, but prefer the Lexus dealership. At both Mercedes dealerships I have worked at, you don’t automatically get a loaner. Very few get dropped off at the customers location. Lexus customers do. For Cadillac, it would be even easier, since they have many more dealers, and smaller areas that would have to be serviced for loaners.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I realize this man has not been in his job very long but here’s what he has done thus far:

    1. Renamed existing models.
    2. Hung out in Vegas.
    3. Issued statements on Facebook.
    4. Made announcements on product decisions which took place prior to his appointment.
    5. Threatened dealers.
    6. Moved his office to NYC.

    What’s next, constant tee times?

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Damn..what does Caddy have to do to make you guys happy…Or better question what did they do to make some of you so made?

  • avatar
    ajla

    On a scale from zero to 10 , just how worried are the Germans and Lexus about a Cadillac revival?

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      -17

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      They should be worried. They say generational preferences change. Our grandparents drove Cadillacs. Their kids switched to BMW, Mercedes, and Lexus. It seems the pendulum could be ready to swing in the other direction.

      Furthermore, Mercedes and BMW rely very heavily on luxury sales in the US. If Cadillac starts to claw away at their marketshare, and Buick remains very strong in China, it could lead to serious problems.

      China is where things could get interesting, imo. If de Nysschen is really as big an egotist as he seems, GM will struggle to stop him from trying to assert Cadillac primacy over Buick in China. Everybody wants to rule the world. De Nysschen will probably not want to share the limelight with another luxury department in GM.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Here’s the fly in the ointment of the alter reality of what you stated, though; Cadillac isn’t “clawing away” at the sales of Audi, Mercedes or BMW.

        In fact, just the opposite is occurring.

      • 0 avatar
        wolfinator

        You make a valid point, but I just don’t see Cadillac positioned to take that market share.

        At the moment, (around me) Audi is the one hoovering up all the younger(ish) people who don’t want a Bimmer or a Lexus. I live in a tech-heavy area, and I also see a shocking number of Teslas. I could see them grabbing even more share in the future.

        People have endlessly discussed the issues with Caddy’s product. They also have an image problem – they’re viewed as either for old farts, or for brash young “urban youth”.

        None of that is conducive for stealing the image-conscious young brand snobs that buy premium cars to look successful in front of their little snob friends.

        • 0 avatar
          TW5

          As you point out, Audi’s rise has been recent and rapid. We can probably both agree that the youth market and certain style-conscious demographics within the luxury market are quite fickle, regardless of age.

          If we can accept that Audi can rise from relative obscurity, I see no reason to assume that Cadillac cannot. Furthermore, luxury purchases are often made by business minded individuals who are playing obscure signaling games with one another.

          If you are a business professional, and you are using a brand to signal some sort of message about wealth, power and competence, would you be better served signaling with an American brand or a German brand? To me, it seems that Cadillac have a big competitive advantage in the luxury vehicle segment. To unlock their advantage, they must stop building shoddy cars, and abandon the old-timey American-centric naming system of the past. Perhaps, building good cars, without glitchy CUE systems and campy chrome is a big ask, but I don’t see any issues with the Cadillac brand.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Audi entered the US in 1970.

            The brand gained some traction, only to lose it with the 60 Minutes unintended acceleration debacle in 1986.

            Its first shot at a US recovery was the launch of the A4 in fall 1995.

            Depending upon how you look at it, it has taken them 19 years or 44 years to get this far. Nothing recent or rapid about that.

          • 0 avatar
            johnny_5.0

            Look at their respective lineups.

            Audi: A3/A4/A5/A6/A7/A8/TT/R8/Q5/Q7 (+ soon to be Q3)
            Cadillac: ATS/XTS/CTS/SRX/Escalade (I’m not even going to count the ELR)

            Audi takes you all the way from “~$30K fresh out of college and you can afford a ‘luxury’ car” to a drool worth R8 or land yacht A8. Then there’s the deep performance lineup with S models of almost everything and the ever growing RS stable.

            Throw in better styling. Add a dash of better interiors. Sprinkle something better on the hood for badge whores.

            Cadillac is in no place to steal Audi’s thunder.

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            Audi’s US recovery was built off a single car – the B5 A4, introduced in September 1995. It moved Audi’s US sales from 12,000 in 1994 to 25,000 in 1996, and 34,000 in 1997. And it immediately restored Audi’s market credibility as a viable option to MB and BMW.

            For many years thereafter, the A4 and A6 were the backbone of Audi sales in North America. The A8 didn’t generate major sales numbers, compared to its competitors, and the TT was a nche player. The product line expansion noted by johnny_5.0 is relatively recent.

            So, it is possible for a single model to spearhead brand revitalization. But it’s rare.

            Audi did it with a clear plan that started with the A4, and followed up with a totally revamped product line.

            The Audi experience was similar in some respects to Chrysler’s revival in the early 90’s, which began with the LH cars, but also completely renewed (and vastly improved) the product line across all brands within 3-4 years.

            The question is whether Cadillac really has a product-centred plan, or if they’ll simply repeat the now-traditional GM plan of some new names and grand proclamations that things are on the verge of getting better, but not backed up by segment-leading products.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        Wasn’t there a recent study that showed that kids are very likely to drive what their parents did? Poor quality and product drove people away from Cadillac… not rebellion from parents.

      • 0 avatar
        sproc

        I can appreciate this idea. My grandfather’s drink was a Manhattan. To my dad, they were and are for old people. Of course, it became my cocktail of choice as well.

        But here’s the rub: Quality Bourbon, vermouth, bitters and cherries either haven’t changed in 60 years or have only gotten better. Not sure I can make the same argument for Cadillac. I should be the target customer for an ATS. I actually thought it was a very handsome car when it came out, and early impressions were promising. But after pouring over professional and owner reviews, I’m not sure I even want to test drive one, let alone shell out German-level money.

        Hey, I’m all about the dealer experience for a premium car. Bringing my wife’s Audi in for service is generally a pleasure (except for the bill, but I knew what I was getting into). But until you make me interested in the product itself, the dealer experience is meaningless.

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          I used to love a good Manhattan, but then I decided I don’t really like vermouth or bitters. Now I just sip bourbon; Buffalo Trace, Eagle Rare, Knob Creek, or some Templeton Rye. Even Jim Beam Black is pretty good for the price (~$20/750mL around here).

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I like Basil Hayden if I’m not in the mood for something lighter tasting. All the Jim Beam owned small batch brands are pretty decent.

            My father bought be a bottle a Balvenie Doublewood 17 Scotch whisky for my birthday and I find that to be excellent. It takes me a year to get through it because craft beer is my go to.

        • 0 avatar
          MLS

          Manhattans call for rye, not bourbon.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            Bourbon can be substituted for almost every other form of alcohol. It can even replace the cream in your morning coffee (two cups max).

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          I should also be the target buyer of Cadillac. I test drove a couple at the car show, and I was impressed (I left with a more favorable opinion of them than when I went in). However, I have no intention of buying one because I don’t care for the Art & Science styling, and the back seats of the cars I sat in were terrible (I don’t accept that for a luxury car). I also have a hard time believing they are worth the asking price.

          Could Cadillac win me over? Maybe, but not through most of the things they’re trying now. If I could get Lexus-level service at the dealership, that would make a big difference to me. But most everything else, no, not really. I don’t idolize the Germans, so that approach leaves me meh.

          If I liked the looks more, and if the cars were more ergonomic, didn’t have CUE, and if I could feel I was getting what I paid for, then I could certainly be interested in one. If Cadillac can’t do those things, they probably will never get a sale from me.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      ajla, Cadillac doesn’t sell well now, what has changed that would entice potential buyers to consider a Cadillac product in the future?

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      ajla, yet another comment lost in the vast ttac-server void………..

  • avatar
    honda_lawn_art

    They could probably start with their website, damn thing looks like it was made by AdBlade.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Here’s my take:
    In the couple of months since he’s led Cadillac, JdN has:
    – addressed Cadillac’s talent issue by moving some functions to NYC
    – addressed the product issue by confirming the go-forward product plan
    – started to address branding by defining the model nomenclature and pricing
    – started to address distribution by focusing on dealer performance.

    I’m not saying JdN is the next automotive savior and is doing all the right things – only time will tell. But blaming him for all the sins of Cadillac’s past is unfair.

    At least JdN is addressing Cadillac’s issues head on. Can you say that about any of his predecessors? Can you name any of his predecessors?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      – addressed Cadillac’s talent issue by moving some functions to NYC

      Which accomplishes virtually nothing for the brand’s product or its real problems.

      – addressed the product issue by confirming the go-forward product plan

      Which he had no part in designing or implementing.

      – started to address branding by defining the model nomenclature and pricing

      By issuing ignorant edicts based on what he felt worked for Audi (what did he do with pricing, raise it again?).

      – started to address distribution by focusing on dealer performance.

      So blame the dealers for being unable to sell overpriced product nobody wants?

      “But blaming him for all the sins of Cadillac’s past is unfair.”

      I completely agree, but coming into a difficult job already acting like GOLFTUS says to me he: (1) doesn’t care, (2) doesn’t have the tools/ability to actually do his job, (3) is simply incompetent or (4) some combination of the above.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        28,
        This is a good conversation. Thanks for advancing it. My thoughts:

        1. On talent: long term this is the #1 battlefield Cadillac needs to win. I know this move kicked up a lot of dust in earlier posts, but I see it as a positive. NYC is one of the few places on earth with true expertise in brand development.

        2. On the product plan, it’s important that the new leader give direction, and nothing is as important in this business as having a plan to deliver product. No, JdN didn’t create it, but he needed to give direction. To SportyAccord’s point, I think more crossovers are in order, but I’m no expert.

        3. The nomenclature is what it is. I recognize that most people hate it. It worked for Audi and Benz. Not so much for Infiniti, at least so far.

        Pricing is a challenge. JdN recognizes that you can’t have a luxury brand without charging a premium. But with inferior resale values in a market driven by leasing, Cadillac is challenged. My recommendation would be to keep pricing high, inflate resale values and use additional equipment as a means of discounting.

        4. Distribution. Of course, the best solution is to sell 5X as many vehicles, but that won’t happen. So rationalization is appropriate. As is requiring the dealers deliver the right customer experience. It doesn’t mean you blame all dealers, it means you pick the winners and work with them to make them even more successful.

        I sense a lot of hate for JdN. I am no fanboy; I just ask we give him a chance.

        • 0 avatar

          10-15 years is not a chance.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @VoGo

          I agree a most interesting conversation, ty.

          1. Talent is one of these vague but important things and I’ll agree to its general importance. However where do the talent holes lie in the overall division? I don’t have the answer but I’d be shocked to learn Cadillac/GM is low on MBAs and marketing execs and needs to run to the store to get more.

          2. I think I would have bought it more if JdN had given credit to whomever did come up with the lineup and then give his ringing endorsement of said plan. I think its pompous to take credit for something you had no hand in, even if you were just made boss. I agree with you and SportyAccordy on the need of a small CUV, but I’d caution them on going overboard.

          3a. AFAIK none of the German majors outside of VW proper ever used naming on cars in North America and that was by choice. All of the sudden to drop names you’ve used for fifty or more years in order to ape a competitor reeks of desperation and shortsightedness. I’ll repeat what I said previously, in other markets rename the cars as need be, but in North America use English names for fracks sake.

          3b. That’s the problem, Cadillac is not a “luxury” brand and hasn’t been in decades its premium at best (I would argue semi-premium). One of my spammed posts detailed the sad state of resale of MY13 CTS RWD “Luxury” trim, which in two model years lost 43% of its msrp value while the comparable Mercedes E350 RWD depreciated 33% in the same period (both sets of cars sub 25K miles). Since most leases I’ve seen target the buyout price at around 70%, this means Cadillac is probably taking a bath on their cheap lease programs when they go to dump the cars at the Manheim factory sale. Resale is a complicated animal as you may imagine, but Cadillac has not had it in at least two decades. This isn’t a problem when you sell your cars directly and your buyer takes the huge loss, this is a problem for your captive finance arm and banking partners if your lease pricing is too low to cover the actual depreciation costs. The reason zee Germans can exist in a leasing culture is because they have created such demand for their products they can calculate their leasing (and warranty) costs so accurately within the expected depreciation amount, final resale does not become an issue for their finance arms. Raising prices does not necessarily raise resale, Lincoln’s pricy Zephyr suffered from the same problem as I believe its two year wholesale valuation was just under 50%. If Lincoln couldn’t get the suckers to buy out their lease at 70%, 65% (or whatever), the finance company is going to eat the difference when it hits the block. If RenCen or JdN “got it” regarding pricing and resale, they would accept the reality they are not all that and a bag of chips, lower the msrp significantly of their car models, and get folks to buy them and not lease them. If you’ve got an endemic resale problem and can’t/won’t fix it, I think it makes more sense to not own the things and suffer a loss on the block.

          4. Dealers and distribution are complicated at GM because of the separate channels and how each brand is sometimes structured. The old approach was to essentially build the same models across most brands so each channel had X models in each segment to offer. This seems to have continued in Chevrolet and BPG, with the latter offering upscale versions of what Chevrolet is offering. Cadillac though is a different mix, what would probably make more sense is to combine Cadillac and Buick dealers so each dealership could cover all FWD/RWD/AWD segments and help eliminate redundancy. If Cadillac is serious about these S-class models, then I wonder if their plan is to go full line like Chevrolet and offer B though F segments and everything in between. If this is there plan so be it (I’m leaning toward it will fail) but for the moment they only offer four real models in various configurations with only so much of a market for those models. Singling out the dealers is not the issue, you have to give them the tools to succeed.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @VoGo

          spam1

          I agree a most interesting conversation, ty.

          1. Talent is one of these vague but important things and I’ll agree to its general importance. However where do the talent holes lie in the overall division? I don’t have the answer but I’d be shocked to learn Cadillac/GM is low on MBAs and marketing execs and needs to run to the store to get more.

          2. I think I would have bought it more if JdN had given credit to whomever did come up with the lineup and then give his ringing endorsement of said plan. I think its pompous to take credit for something you had no hand in, even if you were just made boss. I agree with you and SportyAccordy on the need of a small CUV, but I’d caution them on going overboard.

          3a. AFAIK none of the German majors outside of VW proper ever used naming on cars in North America and that was by choice. All of the sudden to drop names you’ve used for fifty or more years in order to ape a competitor reeks of desperation and shortsightedness. I’ll repeat what I said previously, in other markets rename the cars as need be, but in North America use English names for fracks sake.

          3b. That’s the problem, Cadillac is not a “luxury” brand and hasn’t been in decades its premium at best (I would argue semi-premium). One of my spammed posts detailed the sad state of resale of MY13 CTS RWD “Luxury” trim, which in two model years lost 43% of its msrp value while the comparable Mercedes E350 RWD depreciated 33% in the same period (both sets of cars sub 25K miles). Since most leases I’ve seen target the buyout price at around 70%, this means Cadillac is probably taking a bath on their cheap lease programs when they go to dump the cars at the Manheim factory sale. Resale is a complicated animal as you may imagine, but Cadillac has not had it in at least two decades. This isn’t a problem when you sell your cars directly and your buyer takes the huge loss, this is a problem for your captive finance arm and banking partners if your lease pricing is too low to cover the actual depreciation costs. The reason zee Germans can exist in a leasing culture is because they have created such demand for their products they can calculate their leasing (and warranty) costs so accurately within the expected depreciation amount, final resale does not become an issue for their finance arms. Raising prices does not necessarily raise resale, Lincoln’s pricy Zephyr suffered from the same problem as I believe its two year wholesale valuation was just under 50%. If Lincoln couldn’t get the suckers to buy out their lease at 70%, 65% (or whatever), the finance company is going to eat the difference when it hits the block. If RenCen or JdN “got it” regarding pricing and resale, they would accept the reality they are not all that and a bag of chips, lower the msrp significantly of their car models, and get folks to buy them and not lease them. If you’ve got an endemic resale problem and can’t/won’t fix it, I think it makes more sense to not own the things and suffer a loss on the block.

          4. Dealers and distribution are complicated at GM because of the separate channels and how each brand is sometimes structured. The old approach was to essentially build the same models across most brands so each channel had X models in each segment to offer. This seems to have continued in Chevrolet and BPG, with the latter offering upscale versions of what Chevrolet is offering. Cadillac though is a different mix, what would probably make more sense is to combine Cadillac and Buick dealers so each dealership could cover all FWD/RWD/AWD segments and help eliminate redundancy. If Cadillac is serious about these S-class models, then I wonder if their plan is to go full line like Chevrolet and offer B though F segments and everything in between. If this is there plan so be it (I’m leaning toward it will fail) but for the moment they only offer four real models in various configurations with only so much of a market for those models. Singling out the dealers is not the issue, you have to give them the tools to succeed.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @VoGo.

          I agree a most interesting conversation, ty.

          1. Talent is one of these vague but important things and I’ll agree to its general importance. However where do the talent holes lie in the overall division? I don’t have the answer but I’d be shocked to learn Cadillac/GM is low on MBAs and marketing execs and needs to run to the store to get more.

          2. I think I would have bought it more if JdN had given credit to whomever did come up with the lineup and then give his ringing endorsement of said plan. I think its pompous to take credit for something you had no hand in, even if you were just made boss. I agree with you and SportyAccordy on the need of a small CUV, but I’d caution them on going overboard.

          3a. AFAIK none of the German majors outside of VW proper ever used naming on cars in North America and that was by choice. All of the sudden to drop names you’ve used for fifty or more years in order to ape a competitor reeks of desperation and shortsightedness. I’ll repeat what I said previously, in other markets rename the cars as need be, but in North America use English names for fracks sake.

          3b. That’s the problem, Cadillac is not a “luxury” brand and hasn’t been in decades its premium at best (I would argue semi-premium). One of my spammed posts detailed the sad state of resale of MY13 CTS RWD “Luxury” trim, which in two model years lost 43% of its msrp value while the comparable Mercedes E350 RWD depreciated 33% in the same period (both sets of cars sub 25K miles). Since most leases I’ve seen target the buyout price at around 70%, this means Cadillac is probably taking a bath on their cheap lease programs when they go to dump the cars at the Manheim factory sale. Resale is a complicated animal as you may imagine, but Cadillac has not had it in at least two decades. This isn’t a problem when you sell your cars directly and your buyer takes the huge loss, this is a problem for your captive finance arm and banking partners if your lease pricing is too low to cover the actual depreciation costs. The reason zee Germans can exist in a leasing culture is because they have created such demand for their products they can calculate their leasing (and warranty) costs so accurately within the expected depreciation amount, final resale does not become an issue for their finance arms. Raising prices does not necessarily raise resale, Lincoln’s pricy Zephyr suffered from the same problem as I believe its two year wholesale valuation was just under 50%. If Lincoln couldn’t get the suckers to buy out their lease at 70%, 65% (or whatever), the finance company is going to eat the difference when it hits the block. If RenCen or JdN “got it” regarding pricing and resale, they would accept the reality they are not all that and a bag of chips, lower the msrp significantly of their car models, and get folks to buy them and not lease them. If you’ve got an endemic resale problem and can’t/won’t fix it, I think it makes more sense to not own the things and suffer a loss on the block.

          4. Dealers and distribution are complicated at GM because of the separate channels and how each brand is sometimes structured. The old approach was to essentially build the same models across most brands so each channel had X models in each segment to offer. This seems to have continued in Chevrolet and BPG, with the latter offering upscale versions of what Chevrolet is offering. Cadillac though is a different mix, what would probably make more sense is to combine Cadillac and Buick dealers so each dealership could cover all FWD/RWD/AWD segments and help eliminate redundancy. If Cadillac is serious about these S-class models, then I wonder if their plan is to go full line like Chevrolet and offer B though F segments and everything in between. If this is there plan so be it (I’m leaning toward it will fail) but for the moment they only offer four real models in various configurations with only so much of a market for those models. Singling out the dealers is not the issue, you have to give them the tools to succeed.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I’ll see if I can get this to work.

          I agree a most interesting conversation, ty.

          1. Talent is one of these vague but important things and I’ll agree to its general importance. However where do the talent issues lie in the overall division? I don’t have the answer but I’d be shocked to learn Cadillac/GM is low on MBAs and marketing execs and needs to run to the store to get more.

          2. I think I would have bought it more if JdN had given credit to whomever did come up with the lineup and then give his ringing endorsement of said plan. I think its pompous to take credit for something you had no hand in, even if you were just made boss. I agree with you and SportyAccordy on the need of a small CUV, but I’d caution them on going overboard.

          3a. AFAIK none of the German majors outside of VW proper ever used naming on cars in North America and that was by choice. All of the sudden to drop names you’ve used for fifty or more years in order to ape a competitor reeks of desperation and shortsightedness. I’ll repeat what I said previously, in other markets rename the cars as need be, but in North America use English names for fracks sake.

          3b. That’s the problem, Cadillac is not a “luxury” brand and hasn’t been in decades its premium at best (I would argue semi-premium). One of my spammed posts detailed the sad state of resale of MY13 CTS RWD “Luxury” trim, which in two model years lost 43% of its msrp value while the comparable Mercedes E350 RWD depreciated 33% in the same period (both sets of cars sub 25K miles). Since most leases I’ve seen target the buyout price at around 70%, this means Cadillac is probably taking a bath on their cheap lease programs when they go to dump the cars at the Manheim factory sale. Resale is a complicated animal as you may imagine, but Cadillac has not had it in at least two decades. This isn’t a problem when you sell your cars directly and your buyer takes the huge loss, this is a problem for your captive finance arm and banking partners if your lease pricing is too low to cover the actual depreciation costs. The reason zee Germans can exist in a leasing culture is because they have created such demand for their products they can calculate their leasing (and warranty) costs so accurately within the expected depreciation amount, final resale does not become an issue for their finance arms. Raising prices does not necessarily raise resale, Lincoln’s pricy Zephyr suffered from the same problem as I believe its two year wholesale valuation was just under 50%. If Lincoln couldn’t get the suckers to buy out their lease at 70%, 65% (or whatever), the finance company is going to eat the difference when it hits the block. If RenCen or JdN “got it” regarding pricing and resale, they would accept the reality they are not all that and a bag of chips, lower the msrp significantly of their car models, and get folks to buy them and not lease them. If you’ve got an endemic resale problem and can’t/won’t fix it, I think it makes more sense to not own the things and suffer a loss on the block.

          4. Dealers and distribution are complicated at GM because of the separate channels and how each brand is sometimes structured. The old approach was to essentially build the same models across most brands so each channel had X models in each segment to offer. This seems to have continued in Chevrolet and BPG, with the latter offering upscale versions of what Chevrolet is offering. Cadillac though is a different mix, what would probably make more sense is to combine Cadillac and Buick dealers so each dealership could cover all FWD/RWD/AWD segments and help eliminate redundancy. If Cadillac is serious about these S-class models, then I wonder if their plan is to go full line like Chevrolet and offer B though F segments and everything in between. If this is there plan so be it (I’m leaning toward it will fail) but for the moment they only offer four real models in various configurations with only so much of a market for those models. Singling out the dealers is not the issue, you have to give them the tools to succeed.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Well VoGo it looks like I can’t post my response.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      He’s not really addressing their issues though. Small CUVs are the future. That’s where the Germans are going or are. How does Caddy respond? More sedans, while their breadwinner SRX languishes out of complacency. Market is responding to tech and efficiency, which the Germans are responding to with stuff like Audi’s TDI line and BMW’s i line. How does Caddy respond? Cringe worthy commercials celebrating “Brembo brakes”. Non German players cannot compete without significant price advantages, period. How does Caddy respond? Typical GM hubris. Store brand 3 and 5 series’ at actual brand 3 and 5 prices. How could we fail? Customers are stupid, all they want are high prices, Brembo brakes and empty promises of cars nobody is buying.

      Pch101 hit the nail on the head earlier on this page. He is this month’s parrot for the musings of Cadillac’s executive old guard. GM is still bitter that the Germans confirmed that Cadillac had gone from the standard of the world to being a laughing stock, and for about 30 years remained in the wilderness thanks to inbred cost cutting and generally having no clue what the market actually wants. Their obsession with being BMW in 1994 as the Germans are diversifying and adapting with market demands is proof of this.

      I would wager that none of what he is proposing will come to be. I would not be surprised if all this talk is a move to position Cadillac for a sale, or to boost stock, or something other than actually documenting a way forward for Cadillac. If it actually is the way forward they plan to take they are doomed.

      • 0 avatar
        Tosh

        “Their obsession with being BMW in 1994 as the Germans are diversifying and adapting with market demands is proof of this.”

        What happened in 1994? After Allante but before Catera…?

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          Being BMW in 1994- i.e. being BMW as they sold the E36 & E34, and were selling their cars on the merits of their dynamic prowess. This was back when gas was dirt cheap and the economy was fundamentally sound to the point that people were happy to pay an equivalent of $50K for an E36 325i. It’s a totally different game now, but GM wants to play like it’s 20 years ago.

    • 0 avatar

      he has diminished brand equity by screwing up names even worse than they were. he is determined to further increase prices beyond what people will pay. he has alienated current Caddy customers with a pompous attitude sure to offend, and he has frightened franchisees over their livelihood. he is trying to make Caddy into something it isn’t. I say he’s about the worst fella they could have found. but then, GM wouldn’t know talent if it was staring them in the face.

  • avatar

    De Saster

  • avatar
    readallover

    If Caddy really wants to eat the Germans lunch, do it in the service dept. Be Saturn, no more GM service speak: `They all do that`, `we cannot duplicate the problem`, `we need to keep the car to wait a week for the part to arrive`. Just fix it, with no arguments or charging for things that should be covered under warranty. That is where the Germans are weakest.

  • avatar
    Fred

    There are a lot of rural GM dealers, selling Cadillacs, along with everything else in the GM portfolio. They will be asked to invest X dollars to sell Y number of cars. I assume they will drop the brand and then you have to wonder if those customers will drive 100+ miles into a urban area to buy a Cadillac?

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    It’s obvious that in the past, Cadillac set its barrier to entry so low that a lot of marginal Chevy/Buick/GMC dealers wandered into the Cadillac business. Doesn’t generate many sales, but since the brand requires so little overhead and additional expense they don’t care.

    One dealer in the article sold 36 Caddys in all of 2013: 3 a month! That owner isn’t going to spend the kind of money Cadillac wants him to in order to compete with the 50 unit/month Mercedes store down the road, but he’s not going to give up easy Escalade money without a fight.

  • avatar
    Tosh

    Cadillac has too much historical baggage to succeed again, and nothing but a name change AND separation from GM can ever save it. I can’t think of ANY OTHER company with so much epic fail in its history from which to recover. It just goes on and on: V8-6-4, Cimarron, Catera, Allante, BLS, Escalade…

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Both Kia and Hyundai were somewhere between a joke and a disaster in North America from their respective introductions only until more recent years.

      • 0 avatar
        Tosh

        Maybe the first couple of Hyundais were a joke to some (like Japanese cars in the 50’s), but never a disaster? So no real baggage…

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Kia and Daewoo were both sales disasters when they were first introduced to North America. I don’t recall Hyundai lighting up the charts until they introduced their 100K warranty. I do also recall us specifically avoiding all used Suzuki and Hyundai product at auction in the mid 00s. Today I imagine they have their own lane, what a difference a decade makes.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Kia_Motors_automobiles

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Scare tactics from the boss.

    This is a great indicator that he uses fear and not respect to get his way. I wonder how many bodies there are under him as he climbed to the top.

    Poor leadership, maybe de Nysschen should isn’t the guy to run a business like Cadillac.

    He isn’t worth working for.

  • avatar
    wmba

    One thing Cadillac should consider is how they screw the product together. Similar fit and finish to other GM products doesn’t cut it.

    The day I drove a 6MT Accord Sport and later an ATS was a bit of a revelation for me. Underhood, the Honda was precision assembled, even to the way the sealer between body panels was applied. The interior was similarly flawless, but the paint was an orange peel disaster. The ATS had an obvious flaw in the steering wheel trim, underhood looked like any other GM, average, but paint was good. Assembling an expensive car with good quality materials in just a so-so fashion isn’t really good enough these days. There just isn’t an aura of “hey, nice!” when I hopped in.

    The Audi A3s they flog around here are made in Germany. They look worth the money when you go over details, even if the design itself is minimalist. The Caddy just doesn’t really reflect its price to me. Perhaps they should consider a bespoke assembly plant.

  • avatar

    anyone remember Bill Knapp’s? it was a successful Midwest restaurant chain with outlets in Florida as well. in an effort to improve business they hired an outsider who promptly changed the menu and dramatically altered the decor in effect alienating their customer base. they closed shop not long after. I miss their chocolate cake and chicken noodle soup.

  • avatar

    anyone remember Bill Knapp’s? it was a Midwest restaurant chain with outlets in Florida as well. in an effort to improve business they hired an outsider who promptly changed the menu and dramatically altered the decor thereby alienating their customer base. they soon after closed up shop. I miss their chicken noodle soup and chocolate cake (free on your birthday).

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Scare tactics never work, they just alienate the employees that work for you and the dealers that sell you product. GM needs to make Cadillac more like the original Saturn experience where service is the main priority. GM needs to rise to the level of the Lexus experience. Lexis is a good brand but in all honesty it is a Toyota. Cadillac should not even try to compete with BMW or Mercedes. Cadillac needs to add a CUV similar to the Buick Encore and not try to add high priced low volume cars. If anything Cadillac needs to expand their market more by having a price point below BMW, Mercedes, and Lexus but having much better service. Bumper to bumper coverage of all maintenance and warranty for the first 2 or 3 years and stand behind warranty. This will increase the resale value of Cadillacs and people will be more prone to buy a Cadillac again. If Cadillac doesn’t make a large profit for the next couple of years then so be it, they should be concentrating on long term profitability by gaining more customer loyalty and acceptance.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Cadillac is really taking on the wrong sort of Europeans. Jaguar/Land Rover is a much better target. The Escalade line et al are akin to LR and the sedans are like Jag.

    Has anyone ever had a bad experience at a JLR dealer? Doubtful. NO ONE does hospitality better than the Brits, they have the Oxford Butler Academy for crying out loud.

  • avatar
    Stovebolt

    New York City? Nothing there carwise since Car and Driver left, last century

  • avatar
    mags1110

    Is it the bulidings, or the fact the whole line up looks gaudy, chunky and ghetto the problem? And how much more chrome and large size rims can they fit on the escalade? I love my American trucks, but give it a rest

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    I agree that moving to NYC, the most anti-private car market in the US is dumb. Why not LA?

    Also, quit assuming that Caddy still sells the FWD DeVille “boat”. Yeah it was dated and many had fake carriage roofs, but that was 5-25 years ago. The XTS is more modern, and not “huge”.

    Also, they do have a dedicated assembly plant in Lansing building CTS/ATS. Up the quality would be the best bet, and make the new cars there too

    They are stuck with the Escalade, but should make it more exclusive and not just anyone can get it for “no money down”!

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      I would presume that de Nysschen wants to live in or near there.

      I would also presume that he wants to put some physical distance between himself and Detroit, in the hopes that he can have some degree of autonomy.

      I would question how the latter is possible, when the basis of the plan obviously came from Detroit. He is going to be judged by his ability to achieve their objectives, no matter where he is. Being away could actually make things worse, since he won’t have the same opportunities to schmooze, get intel and become part of the inner circle.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      There are still lots of wealthy people in the New York City area who own cars. It’s one of the top markets for luxury cars in the United States.

      Not every rich New Yorker lives in a high-rise apartment building in Manhattan. Many of the high-rise dwellers have a house in the country. They own a vehicle that they drive to get there (and drive once they are there, as those areas tend not to have any mass transit).

  • avatar

    anyone remember Bill Knapp’s? it was a Midwest restaurant chain with outlets in Florida as well. in an effort to increase business they hired a hot shot outsider who promptly changed the menu and significantly altered the decor thereby alienating their loyal client base. soon after they closed up shop for good. I miss the home made chicken noodle soup and chocolate cake (free on your birthday).

  • avatar

    testing the failure to record posts. ridiculous IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      fourthreezee

      This is just all nonsense…
      There are decades of poor quality GM products (Cadillacs especially), that spoke/speak for themselves as folks left them in droves for other brands (mostly Japanese). The creative destruction that a bankruptcy would have wrought would have displaced the multiple tiers of feckless GM apparatchiks and something good might have risen from whomever purchased the assets at bankruptcy. But the market-distorting hand of pandering politicians reached down from their D.C perch and bailed GM out with our tax $$$$ – which left the feckless fools in place along with the rancid culture. And we see the results.

      Friends don’t let friends buy GM cars… Ever

  • avatar

    anyone remember Bill Knapp’s? it was a Midwest restaurant chain with outlets in Florida. in an effort to increase business, they hired a hot shot outsider who promptly changed the menu and significantly altered the decor thereby alienating the client base. shortly after they closed up shop. I miss their home made chicken noodle soup and free chocolate cake on your birthday.

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