By on October 10, 2014

2015 Cadillac ATS Coupe

First, there was the move. Then, there was the CT6. Now? Cadillac boss Johan de Nysschen unveils a blitzkrieg bop of a product roadmap, all set to be fulfilled by 2020.

In an exclusive with Reuters, de Nysschen’s overall plan to revive Cadillac is anchored by a roadmap that will expand the portfolio from five models at present, to 10 models by 2020.

Aside from the upcoming CT6 — which will come with a PHEV variant when the flagship debuts in showrooms late next year — he says he just received the green light to bring a range-topping vehicle into the fold, likely to be called either the CT8 or CT9. The vehicle would do battle with long-wheelbase variants of the Mercedes S-Class and BMW 7 Series when it enters showrooms at the end of this decade.

On the greener side of the fence, de Nysschen has designs for an EV, and a potential successor to the ELR that may or may not have two extra doors.

Further down the alpha-numeric trail, two new crossovers — which will wear the XT moniker — will sandwich the SRX, including a seven-passenger model set to arrive by 2018 at the latest; the SRX will be redesigned and renamed in 2016.

Meanwhile, a smaller vehicle positioned under the current ATS, along with the smaller crossover, will share its platform with the next-generation Chevrolet Cruze, and go up against the BMW 1 Series and Mercedes CLA-Class. Both will be in showrooms between 2017 and 2018.

Other parts of the plan include building the CT6 and the successor to the SRX in China, where Cadillac is aiming to move 75,000 units by the end of the year, while Europe will remain in the distance until after 2020.

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111 Comments on “Cadillac Boss Unveils Portfolio Revitalization Plan For 2020...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Cadillac is dead, long live Cadillac.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    So, like what are you doing tomorrow to stay in business, Cadillac?

    Oh, yeah, CT6 (roll-eyes)

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    “..when it enters showrooms at the end of this decade.”

    Where will de Nysschen be by then?

  • avatar
    dwford

    If nothing else, I appreciate his direct talk, his long range planning, his quick moves, and his total confidence in his continued employment over the next 10 years.

  • avatar
    hachee

    Jeez, walk before you can run. I get that they need new models, but reaching down to the CLA zone doesn’t make sense to me, at least not yet. MB, BMW and Audi can do it because they’ve got the prestige that can sell these cars, many of which are sold based on that alone. Cadillac does not, and until they do, I can’t see this as being a positive move. As for cars like the CT6, they need to do this, one step at a time. Does anyone remember how long it’s taken Audi to get there? Until 1994, they never had a large car, and while the A8 sells better every generation, it’s still not a big seller. But I believe it’s helped the overall image, as have cars like the R8.

    But I do agree that it’s good that he’s presenting a long range plan. Whether it’s achievable or not, or whether he’s still at the helm then, these are different matters.

    • 0 avatar

      You’re forgetting the Audi V8, which preceded the A8 from 88-93.

      Cadillac needs a serious flagship yesterday (so does Lincoln). Not many people buy the 7-series or S-class, but the reputation and prestige of those brands rests on those cars. Cadillac is going to need that kind of credibility before it can reach down into Buick territory and sell another Cimarron.

      • 0 avatar
        agroal

        Lincoln already has their range topping flagship in the pipeline. It’s going to be the 2017 Lincoln MKXMKYMKZ Bill Blass Landau Edition. It’s Lincoln’s moon shot car so naturally instead of any actual engineering effort it will share it’s platform and engines with the mass market FWD 2016 Ford ShitStain EXP.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        The credibility of the 7 rests on the 3. Not the other way around. At MB, the S is the foundation, though. I tend to agree Cadillac should be built similarly top down, given the number of overlapping “lesser” brands in GMs portfolio.

        but what Cadillac really needs, is to simply start building great cars. No excuses. Any 10 year old boy can have “visions” of great cars. Who cares? No car yet has ever self assembled based on self important babble in NYC sales and marketing offices.

  • avatar
    calgarytek

    God these people suck.
    At least Acura, with it’s mishmash of @LX can make a decent reliable product. GM is a f***en tabloid.

    Even Hyundai > Cadillac with it’s Equus and Genesis.

  • avatar
    mjz

    Well, despite the controversial model nomenclature, it sounds like a pretty comprehensive plan that will fill out the Cadillac line-up into segments it badly needs to be in.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    Meanwhile, in other news, Generalissimo Francisco Franco is still dead.

  • avatar
    mjz

    I’m glad he did not duplicate the faux pas of renaming ALL of the models ALL AT ONCE, like he did at Infiniti. That was a huge blunder that has led to much confusion. At least he learned from that mistake, I’ll give him credit for that.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    What you are witnessing is the fruits of another internal reorganization. The first major North America reorg was C-P-C and B-O-C, which lasted until about 2002 with the death of Oldsmobile. Then Saturn and later Hummer were brought into the mix, both probably under the C-P-C axis, although toward the end Saturn became a mix of C-P-C product, European oddballs, and specialty product (Kappa). Now we are seeing Cadillac split off on its own orbit as a full line brand while Buick (in North America) has been firmly brought into what was C-P-C while also offering international brand oddballs such as Regal, Encore, and the upcoming Cascada. I disagree with turning Cadillac back into a full line brand similar to but opposite of Chevrolet as it will hurt brand equity in the end, Cadillac will devolve from fake premium (reality: semi-premium) to semi-premium (reality: almost plebeian). For reasons I cannot understand, German “luxury” brands can offer full lines with most of the lesser offerings being less than luxurious, but the upper models tend to be truly luxurious. Cadillac cannot pull this off IMO because none of its products are truly luxurious in any way. The only way to accomplish this is to become truly exclusive and move away from being a volume brand, even with the mediocre product they have been selling it might work. Going in the volume direction will not succeed in the long term. Finally, we’ve actually gone full Cimmaron, again:

    “Meanwhile, a smaller vehicle positioned under the current ATS, along with the smaller crossover, will share its platform with the next-generation Chevrolet Cruze”

    I joked about the failed ELR as being the Electric Cimmaron and while close it does not fit the exact definition being a coupe. Now they will literally clone a Chevy Cruze, wow.

    Based on the article you’re now going to have three CUVs (inc SRX), an E or F segment sedan, a PHEV model of some kind, and talk of one or two B-segment models. This is in addition to Escalade, an almost D platform sedan (Alpha CTS), and a C platform sedan and coupe (Alpha ATS). This is a total of five to six new models in addition to six existing ones (ATS Sedan, ATS Coupe, CTS Sedan, Escalade, Escalade Suburban, SRX). How does this make sense Johann?

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      ““Meanwhile, a smaller vehicle positioned under the current ATS, along with the smaller crossover, will share its platform with the next-generation Chevrolet Cruze.”

      If this is true, it’s corporate malpractice on a gross recklessness level.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        Since the pendulum, by then, will have swung away from TCN’s (Three Character Names), it will be an opportunity to resurrect the proud “Cimarron” nameplate.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Why? The CLA & A3 are doing great, and both have pretty obvious economy car roots. ILX isn’t doing super well but it’s a good car- it adds everything to a Civic it would take for me to actually want to buy one. Cruze is competitive with the Golf… there is no reason they couldn’t make a CLA/A3 fighter out of one.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Because those models are not serious entries to either brand. Why does Lexus not sell a Yaris clone? Why does Rolls Royce not sell a 1 series? Infiniti a Note? You make a point below about offering something nobody else does. The improved Cruze is already sold as Buick Verano. How else can it be improved and made compelling?

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            Not serious entries? The A3 (and Q3 based on it) are responsible for most of Audi’s growth this year. CLA net MB a lot of new volume this year. How are they not serious? How would a Cadillac Cruze be any more serious than those cars?

            Not to mention, plenty of established luxury nameplates are just tarted up mainstreamers. Acura’s whole lineup is based on the Civic/CR-V/Accord. Lexus’ biggest sellers are revamped Camrys/Avalons. The Germans’ “luxury cars” here are cabs back home. So this implication that the world will end if GM tarts up a Cruze as a Cadillac when everyone else is and has been doing the same for years is silly.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I’d rather have an A3 than an ATS, but it’s a toss up between the CLA and ATS (both junk).

            The main point, though, is that it’s nothing less than “a pure Roger Smith move” to now plan on slating an even smaller Cadillac than the already non-competitive ATS, to share its chassis with the upcoming Chevy Cruze, and create a Cadillac Cruze sedan and CUV from this.

            Really galactically idiotic, and worthy of Roger Bonham Smith.

            They should name it the Cadillac RBS in his honor.

            Throw an instrument panel/gauge cluster in it from a Daewoo Lacetti while you’re at it.

            Great job, GM. Good going Mrs. Barra. Job well done, Johan.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The Daewoo Lacetti has a nicer guage cluster than the ATS.

            I’m interested in what they are going to lease these Cadillac Lacetti’s for. If I can get an ATS for between $250 and $275 a month with $0 down, where is the room for the CTCruze?

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            @DeadWeight you’d have a point if

            – the ATS were failing because of its size
            – there werent luxury entries smaller than the CTS that were hitting their manufacturers’ intended sales targets

            Unfortunately neither are the case which makes you “DeadWrong”

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            SportyAccord –

            “- the ATS were failing because of its size”

            Have you spent any time in one, having to use it as a daily driver? I have and can’t think of a single vehicle within 10k of its MSRP that offers as awful rear seat (real life, not bs spec sheet) or trunk space, so that’s part of its failure (but only part, the quality sucks as do the gauges and..I’ll not speak of the ride or other issues)

            “- there werent luxury entries smaller than the CTS that were hitting their manufacturers’ intended sales targets”

            I have no idea what you speak of here. Can you be more specific regarding makes/models, ‘targets,” or more importantly, what this has to do with the ATS fail?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @sportyaccordy

            Good points.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            @DeadWeight

            The previous IS had a small back seat, and sold more copies than the ATS. Plus the CLA and A3 are way smaller than the ATS. Point being, size is not the main reason the ATS isn’t selling.

            And if size is the issue, the Cadillac Cruze should do great, as it has a bigger back seat than the ATS. So I’m not really sure what your gripe is.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “The previous IS had a small back seat, and sold more copies than the ATS. Plus the CLA and A3 are way smaller than the ATS. Point being, size is not the main reason the ATS isn’t selling.”

            For the last 5 years, the IS sold at or below ATS levels. The CLA also sells at a lower rate and the A3 about the same as the ATS. The market for small, premium, sporty cars just isn’t that big. Proclaiming the Caddy ATS a struggling failure while putting the CLA, A3 and IS on a pedestal of success is disingenuous.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            @danio3834

            Like you said, A3 is tiny compared to the ATS, but it sells about the same. Size is not the issue here. And given how hot the small CUV segment is, I would say there is definitely a big demand for small premium cars, and smaller cars in general. The CRV/RAV-4 sell more than the Pilot/Highlander etc.

            And yes, the CLA/A3/IS are successes, while the ATS is a failure. CLA/A3/IS are selling how the manufacturers want them to, without incentives. ATS/CTS aren’t. CLA/A3 are not core brand/volume products. ATS/CTS are.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Now, if Cadillac were smart… I know, stop right there, right? Really, they would make a Q3 version of the ATS.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            Why make a car that customers want and would buy, when they could make a flagship nobody but “enthusiasts” not in that market are clamoring for?

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “And yes, the CLA/A3/IS are successes, while the ATS is a failure. CLA/A3/IS are selling how the manufacturers want them to, without incentives. ATS/CTS aren’t. CLA/A3 are not core brand/volume products. ATS/CTS are.”

            BS, they sell in the same segments yet you’re holding them to different and arbitrary standards. Yes, ATS sales are down YoY, but they’re hardly out of line with the segment.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            But, Danio, they’re following the segment when they need to be leading the segment. All those cars you mention have crossover versions that significantly boost the bottom line. Where is the ATS-X crossover? FAIL

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            @danio I’m comparing them because @DeadWeight insisted the ATS’ size is why it wasn’t selling.

            And it’s not really in line with its own segment, as a new car. A4 is down but it’s old as dirt. Same with C class which has a new version coming next year. 3 series, IS, and Infiniti’s G/Q50 combo are all up, and the whole small luxury segment is up ~12% in the US. ATS is down 20% and is outsold by all its direct competitors (A4, 3, C, Q50, IS). So no, ATS is not in line with its segment at all. Similar story with the CTS, but not as bad. I’m not sure why you have an emotional investment in perpetuating Caddy’s Alpha experiment as a success, but the data is pretty easy to get and doesn’t jive at all with what you or DeadWrong are purporting.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            sportaccord – I said that a tiny backseat and tiny trunk were JUST TWO of the reasons the ATS isn’t selling as Cadillac projected (with sales still falling).

            The other reasons are:

            1) Outrageous price

            2) Horrid quality and reliability (I experienced this first hand, but don’t extrapolate from my anecdotal experience; go to the Cadillac forums and just spend 10 minutes looking at the incredibly voluminous complaints about it from Cadillac fans/owners themselves)

            3) Horrid gauges

            4) Terrible transmission

            5) Awful NVH characteristics (at least in either the 2.5 or 2.0T trim)

            6) Awful ride quality (even by “sports sedan” standards)

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            GM has got their introductions backward. Back when GM and Cadillac were on top Cadillac always got the best cutting edge stuff then a year or two later the other divisions got it. That’s what kept Cadillac on top.

            A perfect example I’ve heard was in 1961 Cadillac got a new manager, he didn’t like the grille on the ’61 Caddy, so they redesigned it for ’62. Instead of tossing
            all these old Cadillac grilles they gave them to Chevy and the old Caddy grille became the new ’63 Chevy grille. Do you think any one who bought a ’63 Chevy minded that Cadillac grille? Nope. Had it gone the other way the auto world would have had a fit.

            Somehow it flipped and now Chevy gets everything first (Volt) then it goes to Cadillac (ELR) and the auto world points and says, “tarted-up Chevy”

            They need to go back to the way it was

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Agree with you 100% on this one, SportyAccordy.

          I fail to see what all the wailing and gnashing of teeth is all about with the CLA and A3, and I too would buy an ILX over a Civic any day of the week. The instrument cluster alone is reason enough.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Have you ever seen the instrument panel of a Fiat 500? The Civic’s two-tier dash works, providing the information that a real driver needs immediately. The 500’s watch face combined guage/screen is a practical joke. Whatever it is that draws you to cars, it isn’t an appreciation of functional design or engineering excellence.

          • 0 avatar

            CJ I have. It’s just a question of choices and priorities not engineering quality lack thereof. I find the Civic dashboard unappealing though you certainly get used to it after a while. The Cincuecento’s dash is very appealing in its retro-ness, but yes, certainly more demanding at first. However, you become used to it fast and there are no problems.

            YMMV.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Given that I own a 500 Abarth, why yes, yes I HAVE seen its instrument cluster. It’s ‘OK’, not great, I appreciate that it is meant to evoke the style of the original 500. I don’t find it at all difficult to read. It’s just two gauges on top of each other. I didn’t buy the car for the dash.

            The Civic 2-level madness is just a hot mess. Which is too bad because Honda used to have delightfully simple and straightforward gauge layouts. As the ILX still does. But if you just love it, more power to ya.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I would rather have the Abarth gauge cluster to look at in my said,y driver than the one in the ATS, and I’m being absolutely serious.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I would rather have the Abarth gauge cluster to look at in my daily driver than the one in the ATS, and I’m being absolutely serious.

            *sorry for 2x post

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      “How does this make sense Johann?”

      GM will be left to figure that out once he moves to his next venture in 2016.

      The old model of luxury is dead. The auto market in the developed world is just too competitive for monkey see monkey do playbooks. Cadillac needs to build cars that offer something nobody else does, at prices people are willing to pay. Instead they build clones of the competition at prices that can only be afforded to brands with brand equity. Jumping on the CUV bandwagon is a start, but ultimately if Cadillac is truly going to succeed, and by that I mean be profitable, have meaningful volume (all brands in this space are volume brands), and hang its hat on the same rack as the Germans, they have to carve their own niches and demonstrate clear value to the market. They are failing in that regard and this guy is not helping at all.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree with you, and I’ll give Johann (or whomever made the call) a complement based on Cameron’s article: Europe does not matter for Cadillac. I personally believe Europe does not matter for any large company, the whole continent will continue to struggle for the foreseeable future: Greece, Ukraine, ECB, EU fragmentation, Ebola, negative birth rate, take your pick. The growth will be in China, SE Asia, Korea (esp in a unification scenario), Brazil, and India. If Cadillac wishes to remain relevant, it should focus its core business on those regions (which they may be doing) but limit spending and focus on North America. Most of those nations have visions of Cadillac past and still might have a positive view of the brand. Anyone who has lived in North America for the past thirty years and pays any attention, takes Cadillac with a grain of salt.

    • 0 avatar

      Thanks dude, thats list is like a bad acid flashback, I have a pain behind my eye now.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    I’m not sure what people expect, given the very mixed results shown at Infiniti.

    Infiniti has had one successful car — the [formerly] G 35/37 that managed to get itself favorably compared to the BMW 3-series, for less money and with more reliability. This guy chose to rename that car.

    After the strange, but interesting, Q45, Infiniti has failed to make a notable “large” car and it has never made a notable “medium” car . . . the so-called “M” cars.

    IIRC, this guy was billed as the “turnaround artist” for Infiniti. Now he’s the “turnaround artist” for Cadillac.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      He was also billed as a turnaround artist for Audi.

      It’s probably fair to say that he succeeded with Audi, failed with Infninti, and the jury is out with Cadillac.

      But why? My intuition (having worked for several large institutions) is that it had to do with playing politics within the instution. He could do it at VW, and couldn’t do it at Nissan.

      Can he do it again? Donno. GM sounds like the ninth circle of institutional-bureaucratic hell to me, but to does seem to have enough support to make some expensive moves, and the distance between New York the rest of the company could benefit his team’s process and allow Cadillac designers to be independent of GM’s famous bean counters and corporate culture. Maybe he can pull it off? Maybe he can only get stuff done in that kind of organization? Or maybe he can only get things done with that kind of support? Or maybe he just got lucky at Audi?…. I’m going to be interested to see what, if anything, happons next.

      I won’t buy a Cadillac either way, though. Luxury cars and/or bling just aren’t my thing, because my sense of class comes from within. But engineering-business soap operas ARE my thing, and want to see the next episode!

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “He was also billed as a turnaround artist for Audi.”

        He’s an “artist” alright… con

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          I’ve got my popcorn!

          Maybe he’s a con artist, maybe he’s a turnaround artist, maybe he’s neither and he got lucky once.

          Whenever the results become public, I’ll accept whatever the evidence shows. I don’t have a dog in this fight, but I am curious how this plays out!

          Popcorn anyone?

          • 0 avatar

            no maybe. this panhandling putz is a disaster in the making. Barra is a fool giving the reigns to a nitwit.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I don’t have a dog in this fight either, but this is what this master of diplomacy and business finesse had to say on his facebook page

            “This past week we announced a new flagship car to be built in Detroit. No reaction. Announced a product offensive which will give Cadillac coverage of 95% of premium market segment . Slight twitch of the left eyebrow of the industry media. Announce new nomenclature system, to denote hierarchy and accommodate expanded future portfolio. Every armchair marketing expert has ten opinions to share. Fortunately, I do not determine strategy based on the unfiltered observations of people who do not have a 360 degree understanding of the problem. Announce that Cadillac is to be established as separate unit of General Motors, to be more autonomous and focus on the premium business. Emails from GM retires suggesting that is the dumbest idea since the Cimmaron. I quietly wonder if any of them had a hand in creating that masterful monument to product substance.”

            continued below…

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            He also went on to say…

            “To all the indignant souls out there- this has nothing to do with Detroit. And certainly has nothing to do with where I choose to live. It has everything to do with creating an awesome car company. We must develop corporate processes, policies, mindsets, behaviors, attitudes, which are right sized for Cadillac and which are immersed in focusing on and responding to what it takes to win in the premium segment. To create this change in approach, Cadillac must put distance between itself and the parent. Not because there is anything wrong at GM- the company is getting its act together like you won’t believe – but because Cadillac needs to FOCUS. And if we don’t move, nothing will change. Physical relocation forces a change to processes. Now, it’s true, we could achieve that, by moving just about anywhere. But if you have to choose a place to set up an iconic global luxury brand, you could indeed do worse than New York. So, Detroit fans, I love your city, the success of Cadillac will be your success, the majority of our jobs remain in Detroit, and as we grow, these will increase too. But other than that – don’t mess with me.”

            Sorry for the two-parter, but these asinine spam-bots are difficult to work around

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The CT/XT naming convention is much better than what was done to Infiniti. At least the Cadillac approach appears to make some sense.

  • avatar

    Whatever, but don’t call it revitalization. It sounds like towing a dead corpse, infuse new life into crime-ridden city parts, the not yet Dr. Kervorkian approach.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I agree with moving Cadillac upmarket and the addition of luxury crossovers. What I disagree with is the addition of lower end models. GM has Buick as an entry level luxury brand that Cadillac shouldn’t seek to cannibalize. To me it seems Cadillac’s new found autonomy might end up being at the expense of other brands under the GM umbrella. GM tradition I suppose.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      You fundamentally get “it,” in my humble opinion, Danio.

      Cadillac is going full retard ahead, after some had hoped they may have already spent all their retard.

      A Cadillac Cruze, if nothing, to show that they’ll never, EVER, be able to change their corporate DNA (one chromosome short).

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      They are already Cannibalizing Buick from below with the likes of the Impala. It doesn’t surprise me they are squeezing it from above too. Prediction: Buick is going to die in the US in the next 5 years.

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    Cadillac should try something radical if it wants to succeed.

    Forget about having an entire line of cars and just focus on making and selling ONE really good vehicle.

    Put all the development dollars into a single design and go for a home run.

    No dilution of resources across an entire product portfolio.

  • avatar
    JD321

    CT = Chevrolet Twin.

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    I’m sure this plan will work. Pretty sure. I don’t know why anyone’s worried.
    Even so, this report ignores the most compelling brand feature of any recent Cadillac, it’s secret weapon for success: Stacks of cash on the hood! Every luxury buyer loves that. Oh, and $99 per mo. lease offers.
    All of the brand corruption gets kicked into high gear at retail.

  • avatar
    jimbob457

    Oh dear. Oh dear.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Let’s review: by 2020, JvN intends to have Cadillac where Mercedes, BMW and Audi are today in 2014, with a more-or-less full line of sedans, coupes, crossovers, and alternative fuel vehicles.

    Which begs the question: how are they going to stop BMW, Mercedes, and Audi from improving their lineups just as much as Cadillac intends to do in that period of time? Won’t the distance between the two be pretty much the same in six years?

    First with Infiniti and now Cadillac, JvN has had particularly back luck helming luxury marques with inadequate resources to do proper nose-to-nose battle with the Germans. His next career move is clear: Lincoln Motor.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Assuming Cadillac (funded/managed by GM) can get its quality, product mix, reliability & pricing correct is assuming 4 things too many, for just the start.

    • 0 avatar
      dtremit

      I understand your point, but I don’t really see a whole lot of market *segments* for the Germans to expand into in the next half-decade, and certainly not mainstream ones.

      The bigger challenge for Cadillac will be coming up with models that are as well designed and built as the German cars of 2020.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The future of Lincoln rests with Mark Fields. Someone like Johan won’t get an at bat if Fields’ vision doesn’t work.

  • avatar

    Cadillac’s revitalization is never ending just like “GM truck month”. Every month is GM truck month.

    There is nothing wrong with Cadillac that a new flagship will fix. The CT whatever will fail miserably and not save Cadillac. The two main problems are, just one outdated crossover when luxury crossovers are hot and jacking prices up when every other luxury maker is going down-market. Two crossovers in addition to the SRX, one 5 seat SUV, and a cheaper ATS/CTS with better rear legroom if you want to save Cadillac.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      I think you got it.

      What all the interneters think “luxury” is, and what a luxury company needs, e.g., RWD, top-of-the-world flagship, coupes, don’t actually matter and won’t affect the company’s success/failure. Having the products that people want and are willing to pay more for is what matters.

      Cadillac seems to have some problems with both. They clearly lack a couple products that people want, and the CT6 is not one of them. Filling every niche doesn’t solve the problem, either–having 12 cars people don’t want is no better than having 6 cars people people don’t want.

      They also seem to have a problem convincing people their products are worth the price tag. I don’t know how to fix that, and I don’t think anyone here does, either. I don’t believe a flagship will do the trick. Tarting up a Cruze probably won’t do it, either (if we can go on recent ELR performance). Separating themselves from the rest of GM should help, but moving to NY will have minimal effect. The CT_ naming scheme will absolutely not help as it destroys cachet they’ve already built.

      • 0 avatar
        dtremit

        They’re not worth the price tag, and that’s the problem. For the same money, BMW or Mercedes or Audi will sell you a great car and bragging rights. Cadillac only sells you the car.

        The flagship could help restore the brand’s image, but it’s going to have to be accompanied by some reassessment of their pricing strategy.

  • avatar
    KindaFondaHonda

    How in the hell is all that going to happen?

    I mean, it takes GM typically 8 years from idea (or when they reveal some silly road map) to reality before we ever see a new model. Hell, it takes them 4 or 5 years for a simple “refresh”; and now we’re supposed to believe all these new cars and SUVs will magically appear in 5 years.

    Color me (very) skeptical… unless all these vehicles were already baked-in and the new guy is just taking all the credit now.

    Even IF they get these models in showrooms by 2020, they are just chasing a moving target. The market will have had their fill of A3’s, CLA’s, Q3’s, NX’s, X1’s, and GLA’s. Those customers who will be buying those cars in the next 5 years are lost to Cadillac forever, most likely.

    Cadillac needs to set trends, not follow them in order to gain conquests (and respect). Period.

    Methinks Caddy will always be second tier.

  • avatar

    these revolving door executives remind me of Karen Carpenter… “White lace and promises, a kiss for luck and we’re on our way”. here we go again hearing how new products will save the day. these corporate suits with no sales savvy make a living holding out hope while dealers make a living selling what is currently on the lot. I make a living consulting dealers on how to do exactly that. I’d like to see GM pay for performance today rather than compensation for lip service, detrimental meddling, and half baked ideas that never pan out.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      BM, I bet the dealers just LOVE the hugely expensive forced upgrades they’ve needed to make to their dealerships give then huge pile of overpriced crap Cadillac’s lineup consists of.

      Just wait: within a year, there will be a loud Cadillac Dealer Franchisee rebellion and calls for GM Exec heads on pikes.

      • 0 avatar

        makes you wonder if they are culling the herd while increasing corporate ownership for the eventual mega merging massive IPO transferring retail distribution to the manufacturer. like Delphi, Tesla is the practice round…challenging and changing laws to set the path.

  • avatar
    JD321

    Just another bumbling/babbling MBA twit…..

    Take Verano and put Cadillac front and back and wheels…CT2
    Take Traverse and put Cadillac front and back and wheels…QT5 (or whatever they call their lifted wagons)
    Change the IP and interior a bit on both and be done with it.

    Cadillac are now stupid looking and expensive…It is really an easy fix that would take just one friggin 3 year product cycle. Just get stylists with adult minds that understand symmetry and class. Enough with childish goof designs. The infantile jackasses who like the looks of the current Cadillac offerings will never be able to earn the money to buy one new.

    This would be a good start.

  • avatar
    markf

    So 5 more badge engineered Chevs by 2020, that will work for sure. I look forward to this century’s Cimarron

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    The SUBMIT COMMENT button is acting like a flush handle for the memory hole again.

  • avatar
    EspritdeFacelVega

    Wow, lots of emotion around this. But rightly so. You can quibble about the ATS back seat, etc., but it is a serious car, as is (especially) the new CTS. And even the XTS is wholly credible. But I fear that tinkering with nomenclatures won’t change a thing, and that a lot of the damage is already done. I work in an office here in Dallas TX with about 30 people, many of them young, and all of whom commute by car. I know what everyone drives, and there is ONE Detroit car in the mix – a colleague new (and very nice) Grand Cherokee. Oh, and one of the juniors drives an old first-gen Equinox but doesn’t plan to keep it as it has been fraught with nickel-and-dime quality problems. She won’t be heading to the Chev dealer to replace it, though…

    Would you spend your own money on a new Caddy? I’m 50, and I grew up entirely dismissive of the marque, or at least anything they built after the 67 Eldo, save perhaps the 75 Seville (but when I was 11 I knew it was a cladded Nova, whereas BMW had just introduced perfection with the 530i and Audi was just around the corner with the first 5000!)). Like most of us, I had relatives and family friends who were Cadillac people, the lifestyle synonymous with flashiness, plaid suits, velour interiors, padded vinyl roofs, and a whole world of tackiness. To my generation, Cadillac was a by-word for naff, no matter how the buff books would trumpet each new faux-effort as the game-changer (the 80s FWD Caddies, the first Seville STS, the 92 Seville, the “Deville Concours”, the ETC, the 01 Deville/DTS, 03 CTS, 05 STS and so on…). Not all bad, but not first-rank and, well, for the most part Not Our Kind Of Car).

    The now have great products. But, wow, a lot to get behind them…

    Cadillac’s big shot at success remains China. I fear Caddy and Buick will remain niche brands in North America for a generation, until the “Suncoast Edition” Devilles are gone from the roads and memories of Cimarrons and gold-package 90s Eldos have faded.

    • 0 avatar

      emotions and memories are more easily driven by names not numbers. heritage mixed with loyalty equates to love for the brand.

      GM should give each make their own Tube, forget New York (I did, leaving there for Flint in 1982).

      Cadillac needs to focus on simple and consistent programs rather than “Sales”. forget price, payment, and rebate. where there is a days supply problem, have a better lease but keep from distress merchandising to uphold image. give the dealers more margin and eliminate back door stair steps and other distractions that hinder proper focus and confuse people.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      “Wow, lots of emotion around this.”

      Yeah, and that fascinates me. I wish I could click an “under 40 yrs-old” button for these comments and see what was left.

      There are myriad possible reasons for oldsters to cling to Cadillac (at least emotionally), but for younger people completely used to globalism and the current overabundance of highly competent car makers, who cares?

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Spot on!

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        @petezeiss…In one paragraph, you have captured the “Cadillac issue”. I turned 40 over twenty years ago. I’ve shopped Caddys. If I really reached, I could probably buy one. The CTS, or the ATS would look pretty fine sitting in my driveway. That being said, No way in these financial times am I going to dip into my savings , for a high depreciating vehicle. A Caddy would be nice, but I’m satisfied with an Impala. So I think my age, my attitude, and financial position, puts me in a huge demographic, of folks that would love a Caddy. The problem for Cadillac is we are never going to buy one.

        For the under 40 crowd..?.You nailed it. They don’t care. So now,and for the future, where does GM and Cadillac division figure the buyers are coming from?

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          “I turned 40 over twenty years ago.”

          Can’t be *much* over 20 years ago, I thought we were pretty much age peers. I was born in ’54.

          Yeah, I definitely hear you, for the past couple of decades I could have reached for a real luxury ride bought new. But I’ve owned a couple used ones and, guess what? They’re still made of the same rapid-rotting stuff as my sub-25K cars.

          No, I’m a firm middle-classer as far as purchasing goes. It was too hard to earn what I’ve got to just throw money at things only snobs care about.

          Snobs are just going to end-up as worm food or greasy gray powder, just like me.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          I’m with mikey, I’ve fondled the idea of an SRX, why? Like any Cadillac a 2 year old one is a steal and I no longer have the tax advantages of buying new, so 2 year old cars are now my game. I like the SRX it has a lot of features for a slightly used car under $30K . Used they haven’t been abused catering to empty-nesters and I’m about as far away from a tea-bagger as it gets

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      ” I grew up entirely dismissive of the marque, or at least anything they built after the 67 Eldo.. To my generation, Cadillac was a by-word for naff…”

      Just out of curiosity how is a ’67 Eldorado any less “naff” than the newer Cadillacs you mentioned?

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        You don’t speak Limey?

        That’s naff.

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=naff

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            @ajla, now that I get “naff”

            In 1967 Cadillac was at the top of it’s game. There were no Audis and few Beamers, Mercedes-Benz were dowdy European taxi cabs and limos for 3rd world dictators. Cadillacs had cutting edge tech (8-track tape players, A/C, power windows and locks were cutting edge in 1967) and the most powerful engines. The Eldorado came at a time when people were ready for this new “personal luxury coupe” concept

            The “Rat Pack” (Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr.) loved them and since they were the cool kids on the block all the guys wanted to emulate them.

            Back then, Cadillac and especially the Eldorado was about as cool as it got and everybody wanted one

  • avatar
    carm

    Cadilac’s biggest problem is Buick. Pick one GM.

  • avatar
    baconpope

    Sad to see Cadillac choose to go out with a whimper.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    @lie3me

    All that you say is Gospel in your post below (derp).

    In the Spring of ’67 I got to tag along with an older brother to visit the very wealthy family of his college buddy from upstate NY. The old man made his first fortune in railroad reclamation and then even more money manufacturing glass insulators for power lines.

    The place was a huge farm worked by tenant employees while the family mostly cavorted with their Caddys and Harleys, the kids busy in helping form the trustafarian class. I was carted about the area in a a couple of new Caddys (no Eldorado), my favorite being the black vinyl-topped (!), white-bodied Coupe de Ville.

    If I’ve earned any credit at all here for a triple-digit IQ, then believe me when I say that at that point in time there was no higher status vehicle in the world than a Cadillac. As an adolescent male I was supremely aware of male hierarchy badges and the sub-textual respect and resentment from the people we visited and were introduced to was as glaringly plain as a pair of boobs.

    I felt like royalty for the better part of two weeks. And then I got over it. I suppose today I’d have been squired around in a Merc or big BMW…whatever. But back then, Cadillac was it. No question.

    No wonder old folks are grieving Cadillac’s demise.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I hear you, the spambot has finally gotten to me, it took an hour to post my three little paragraphs, finally dropping one sentence did the trick but also took out three posts regarding “naff” so everything is out of order

      Hey, Derek, glad you’re “working on it”, now try succeeding

  • avatar

    So there’s been a lot of talk about Tesla’s new Model S P85D. 691hp, AWD, 11.8 second quarter mile, 275 mile range, striking, distinctive styling. Hot stuff. The self-adjusting cruise control actually reads speed limit signs and adjusts speed accordingly.

    That’s the kind of stuff Cadillac should be offering. Techno-wunderkind stuff that’s bleeding edge, well-advanced past the competition and available only for those worthy enough for Cadillac to accept their money.

    Instead, it’s taking a page from FoMoCo’s “Mercury Replacement Plan” for Lincoln while at the same time conducting a fruitless chase after MB/BMW/Audi. By the time they catch up, the three Übermenschen will already be at the next checkpoint miles ahead. MB/BMW/Audi can get away with dangling low-level premium-economy fruit to people wanting to buy into the brand at any cost. Cadillac doesn’t have the brand cachet for that.

    And speaking of brand cachet, does anyone get the feeling that Buick, in spite of Chinese affection for it, will soon go the way of Mercury so GM will (finally) be left with Chevrolet (mainstream), Cadillac (“affordable premium” just like Lincoln) and GMC (it’s all about the trucks. And the easy profits)? I can see that happening. Which makes Johan’s efforts seem all for naught, it seems.

    Tesla is where Cadillac should be right now. Not eating all the breadcrumbs left behind after the great MB/BMW/Audi feast.

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    ‘Filling every niche doesn’t solve the problem, either–having 12 cars people don’t want is no better than having 6 cars people people don’t want. ‘ – it’s true , don’t fill the segment, just produce ‘oryginal , cool automobiles .. Cadiilac would work well as ‘extravagant’, elegant, ‘american(in charcter) nishe vehicle producer.. why the need to have ‘fighters\'(especially for ‘german counterpart’) in every segment ?!?

    This uniformisation, unification (fu..’n global-product taste) is really disturbing trend…

  • avatar
    TW5

    De Nysschen flubbed his tenure at Infiniti, imo, but this plan seems respectable. Dictatorial delusions of grandeur and misplaced swagger (but not nationalistic swagger) work in the luxury space. Perhaps Infiniti was forcing de Nysschen to make too many compromises. If I were him, I’d probably try to expand the art-and-science design language to more models as well. I hope the model names correspond to the cylinder count.

    CT3 – sub-ATS with new 1.5L 3-cylinder Ecotec turbo
    CT4 – ATS with 2.0L 4-cylinder turbo
    CT6 – CTS with 3.0L 6-cylinder turbo
    CT8 – XTS successor with 4.0L V8 turbo
    CT12 – do it or don’t call yourselves Cadillac

    Elegant and simple. Just play with the boost knobs to get the V-Sport and V-Spec versions, maybe cram the new 3.0L V6 turbo into the ATS successor to win a few BMW converts. Other than that, K.I.S.S.


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