By on September 23, 2014

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Cadillac will move its headquarters to New York City’s SoHo district, in a bid to establish itself as a distinct business unit and luxury brand, and put more distance between it and parent company General Motors.

Roughly 120 people in sales and marketing functions will be posted to New York City, while the remaining staff in design, engineering, R&D and product development will remain in the Detroit area.

While Reuters reported on the story, along with a host of other outlets, The Daily Kanban was the first to report the development back in August. Citing anonymous sources inside GM, Bertel Schmitt reported that such a move would take place, as well as Cadillac CEO Johann De Nysschen’s proclivity for moving both Audi and Infiniti to newer, swankier digs in Washington, D.C. and Hong Kong respectively.

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94 Comments on “Cadillac Moving Headquarters To NYC...”


  • avatar
    Speed3

    I know a lot of haters are going to point out all the reasons this won’t work, but one positive thing is access to a better and more diverse talent pool. There are a lot of talented smart folks who would work for Cadillac, but never move to Detroit.

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      It’s a very token effort with just 120 positions; I don’t put a whole lot of stock in it as GM already had lots of finance in New York, so they aren’t the debutante for the NY press, and the NY press isn’t the national opinion maker.

      If it was about talent pool, they’d save some money and get the same thing and just relocate to Plymouth Road in Ann Arbor.

    • 0 avatar
      vtecJustKickedInYo

      I Couldn’t agree more. The reason I will most likely stay in college to continue with a Master’s in Engineering is because American car companies like GM would require me to move to Detroit or Flint Michigan to work as a Powertrain Designer and Engineer. I would much rather stay in Atlanta with a non automotive R&D job.

    • 0 avatar

      You’ve got to cut it in the NYC metro area burbs. Frank Sinatra had a famous line about that.

      Westchester…the Gold Coast of Long Island..the infamous “Hamptons” The Oranges, Maplewood, the North Jersey Suburbs. Sit in Tenafly, NJ on a weekend and watch the cars go by. The motor pool looks like someone shook out Road and Track and Car and Driver’s Luxury Shootout issues on the street. Bentley has a big presence because Mercedes and BMW is done to death and unless you go Ferrari/Maserati you fall into the background. Jag has a nice niche as “none of the above”. I know that one member of the b & b will take me to task for this opinion but you have to cut it here with this group…this is the worst/best market with the most money concentrated in a small area and it is competitive Jones keeping up with…..

      I love the CTS coupe and see them occasionally. The SRX is a rarity. Caddy needs to cut the Mer-awdi-W haze in those areas.

      What Caddy needs is to take on the big dogs in these areas…Bentley, Tesla, Land Rover. I want an over the top car…a halo car. When I see them on the school run in Larchmont, THEN Caddy has reached the target audience.

      Again, they need to shoot at Bentley and Range Rover, above the typical German haze. If you look at the past, that was the traditional position of the Brand. Going downmarket (hello Mercedes ?) is what caused today’s problems.

      • 0 avatar
        kkt

        Cadillac isn’t in the same market as Bentley and Range Rover and Ferrari, or even upper end Jaguar, Mercedes, and BMW. Look at their prices.

        If GM wanted to go after the $75K+ market they’d need a completely different division, and basing in the Hamptons or La Jolla might be a good move. But not just 120 sales and marketing people, the designers and engineers too. Moving just 120 people is a useless token effort that will make it harder to make good cars, not easier.

        • 0 avatar
          jkk6

          I think he means to aim BEYOND Bentley/RR/Fer for the *avg North Jerseyen even consider Cadillac and I agree as this person has accurately put in soft words how we stunt in NJ. Please correct me if im wrong but I hear Tesla are also very common in San Diego and Beverly Hills. I see avg 5per day where I work.

  • avatar
    RHD

    Just like a teenager, moving away seems like the solution to all your problems.
    All snark aside (well, some of it), they may find that smaller, nimbler cars are just what city dwellers need, so a Smart car sized Caddy may show up on the drawing boards sometime in the near future.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      My dad’s last car was a Cadillac Sedan de Ville. Somehow “small” and Cadillac do not correlate in my mind. Oh, but what a ride!

      The approach that Cadillac has taken to be all things to all people hasn’t worked so far. In fact, some people have stated that Cadillac should have remained uniquely Cadillac, large, opulent and projecting the image of success.

      People have to be daft to even remotely link Cadillac as being in the same league as Lexus, BMW, Mercedes or Audi. Mutually exclusive! Uniquely American.

      Moving to “The City” is not going to cure what ails Cadillac.

      That said, the only thing that matters is sales and profit.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “Put more distance between it and parent company General Motors.”

    Move the division to New York but continue to use the same engines you get in a Malibu and the same gauges as my ’92 Bonneville.

  • avatar
    Pebble

    ^^^ What he said!^^^ Yeah, good luck with that. #deadmanwalking

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    They used to call this “escapism.”

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Yup better to hide from reality than to face it right?

      On a serious note look for Cadillacs to become even more bizarre as the new New Yarkers try to differentiate from mainstream GM without having the budgets or authority to do so.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Johan de Nysschen will not be denied his swanky digs.

        • 0 avatar
          wmba

          Yup, de Nysschen is one of those execs with no proven track record who has managed to parlay his past “achievements” into a solid hedonistic gig.

          He can now rub shoulders with the One Percenters and dine out in a decent restaurant every night. For free!

          Credited with bringing Audi into the mainstream looxury market, he was simply the Yes Man for Ferdy Piech. Anyone who reads the history of Audi from the late 1960s will find that Ferdy started his career there, and it’s always been his favorite in the VW Empire. No expense spared.

          De Nysschen hoodwinked Ghosn into making him head of Infiniti. When he found his Japanese underlings wouldn’t follow his orders, he decamped for Hong Kong with vapid excuses. Then GM bought his line of spiel, and now he has an all expenses paid dream vacation living high off the hog in NYC.

          Great work if you can get it.

          • 0 avatar
            Varezhka

            Yup, I wonder how much of the reason for his move to Cadillac was because his wife didn’t end up liking living in HK.

            They move back to her hometown of Detroit, but now missing the city life, he convinces GM that a NY headquarter is a good idea.

  • avatar
    bryanska

    Can Cadillac make huge New York chrome bumper guards stylish?

  • avatar
    jfbramfeld

    There is no pool of automotive talent in New York, just as there is no pool of aerospace tech in Chicago, where Boeing made a similar move. It is entirely political, and GM has more reason than most to be aware of politics. I don’t know what politics, but since we know it isn’t for tax reasons, and know it’s not for technical reasons, by definition it’s political. I suppose it could also be a way of getting 120 unfireable doofuses away from the real work.

    I understand wanting to get out of Michigan and especially Detroit, but Detroit, I’m sorry, the Detroit metropolitan area, is still a hotbed of engineering talent. I prefer Chrysler’s marketing approach of embracing its Detroit heritage. Chrysler isn’t even Chrysler anymore, so Cadillac could do it with a lot more authenticity.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      “There is no pool of automotive talent in New York…”

      But there an absolute toxic, overflowing effluent of marketing/ad firms on Madison Avenue, that master the art & illusion of selling style over substance…

      …which, after sampling all of Cadillac’s recent wares (save the XTSpala), is probably more closely aligned with GM’s strategy for Cadillac.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        Huh, I had a rental ATS which I loved. I was recently in an XTS, not impressed.

        I’m wondering what metrics you use to rate cars?

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Different bores & strokes and all that.

          I loathe the ATS from a quality (lack of), ergonomics (horrible), refinement (p!ss poor) and practicality (virtually none) perspective.

          It’s two positive traits (chassis and steering system) are sadly drowned by a tidal wave of fail elsewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            Couldn’t disagree more. But, this is certainly something about which gentlemen can disagree.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            I haven’t really followed your posts closely, being somewhat new to the blog and all, but I’m interested in what cars you DO like. Since everything you comment on you seem to regard as miserable diarreah.

            News flash: rental spec anything sucks.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “News flash: rental spec anything sucks.”

            Not true.

            https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/06/this-is-a-rental-chevrolet-cruze-with-55000-miles-on-the-clock/

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            S2K, here’s a partial list of vehicles I like (managing them quite a bit), and this short, incomplete list is based on many opinions formed while driving rentals:

            1) Ford Taurus (yep, the one that hardly sells & is fwd)

            2) Buick Regal (yep, the one that hardly sells & is fwd)

            3) Mazda 6 (yep, the one that hardly sells & is fwd)

            4) Chevy Cruze (really, and it’s fwd, but it better have the 1.4 & discs all around)

            5) Dodge Durango (DeadWeight Top Pick in its Category)

            6) Volkswagen Jetta Sportwagen (what can I say…brown with a manual)

            7) Chrysler 300 (DeadWeight Top Pick & Best Value in Large Car segment)

            8) Honda Accord (fwd again! Either the V6 coupe or 4 banger sedan, but preferably w/manual)

            9) Lexus GS350

            10) Audi A4 in black in base trim (they get ridiculously expensive quickly)

            I left off at 10, but there are more. I swear!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            @DW-

            Aside from “liking it,” since I know you’re a price-conscious person – don’t you find the Regal priced too high?

            Reading Taurus-y things is increasingly telling me I wanna try out an MKS.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Corey, I do think the Regal is priced pretty high, but I also suspect one can possibly mitigate some of that overpricing by aggressive negotiation.

            I like the Regal for mainly the reason I like most Opels; they have nailed the balance between sporty and comfort in terms of ride quality (as well as BMW or Audi), and their cabins are nicely assembled and made of good stuff. I even liked the Saturn Astra A LOT (weirdo that I am).

            The Taurus is 95% of an MKS and has a very solid presence on the road, IMO, and is the closest thing to a solid, comfortable, fwd highway cruiser in modern guise at a semi-reasonable price (especially a 2 or 3 year old depreciated one).

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Ford Taurus (yep, the one that hardly sells & is fwd)”

            I can’t stand the current Taurus. You must have an extremely different body type and driving position than me.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            DeadWeight.,

            Hum I totally agree with you on the 300. I love that car.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I don’t think the 300 is a bad car, but I would always avoid one because of the hood rat image it has.

            Good point about being aggressive on the Regal, I’m sure dealers are desperate to move them – especially as it’s surely near the end of it’s life.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            What you think of 300s and Escalades depends strictly on where you are located.

            In the South or the Midwest, they’re perfectly acceptable choices.

            In coastal cities on either the east or west coasts, you just don’t drive either car unless you live in the ghetto (or, in the case of the Slade, are an airport shuttle driver).

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I live right in the Midwest, and I see plenty of clapped out ghetto-ass 300’s.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Pimps? Drug dealers?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That sort of person yes. They might not be one of those themselves, but they certainly would KNOW people like that.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        You further describe the slow motion train wreck Cadillac is heading toward. I predict a complete divorce between the engineering realities and the marketing promises simply because the two sides will now evolve separately. Cadillac death watch a comin’?

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          ““News flash: rental spec anything sucks.”

          Not true.

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/06/this-is-a-rental-chevrolet-cruze-with-55000-miles-on-the-clock/”

          Anyone who’d rather have a 55k mile Cruze over an ATS can leave their enthusiast card at the door. Yeah, I realize DW got the crappy 2.5L instead of the 2.0T or 3.6, but still.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The model choice is irrelevant, you stated rental spec anything sucks and Baruth’s article disagrees.

            If Daewoo can design and Chevrolet build a platform which resists rental abuse, and if Cadillac cannot, then this speaks volumes about Cadillac.

        • 0 avatar
          raresleeper

          Here in St. Louis, if I received $5 for every Chrysler 300 on 20″ wheels that I saw, let’s just say I’d be able to purchase a pretty sizable, diversified stock portfolio just off that income alone.

          Lol

          The Magnum is quite the ghetto all-star, too, albeit not as common as the 300. Not my cup of tea, either.

          Fortunately, that BigTruckSeriesReview fellow isn’t here to promote his Chrysler Propaganda.

          “Nuh-uh!!”

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      “I’m sorry, the Detroit metropolitan area, is still a hotbed of engineering talent ”

      Did we miss this:???

      “while the remaining staff in design, engineering, R&D and product development will remain in the Detroit area.”

      So the engineering talent will remain. This is for marketing and sales only.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        “If Daewoo can design and Chevrolet build a platform which resists rental abuse”

        Perhaps your definition of “sucks’ and mine are different. Or I was loose with the terminology, or whatever. Point is, when I go rent a car, I don’t expect my socks to be knocked off, because I expect the dullest spec, least options, etc. That it still runs and drives OK at 55k miles is a given. I would surmise that DW is exagerating the actual flaws (not to be confused with design tastes and priorities, like interior room and gauge design) in his rental to support his oddly overt hatred of it.

        At any rate, I give zero fcks about the Cruze in any of its forms, and find it odd that one internet commentator can be so incredibly passionately vitriol-filled about a generally well-received little sports sedan unless he has mile-high expectations of his rental spec car, or is just a generally miserable person all around. Thus my wondering what, in his eyes, doesn’t suck.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I too would be interested in being given contrast as to what is “good” vs “sucks” in DW’s eyes, but speaking in general it is good to hear someone make an assessment and stick to his guns.

          I think with the rental experience it varies by class and cost. If you rent the $29.99 Yaris your expectations are much lower than if you rent the $99.00+/day “luxury” car, in this case being the ATS. I think for something which starts around $33K it should at least be as “good” as its contemporaries or its lesser brethren in the high 20s (Buick, Chevrolet, Toyota, Honda, Subaru, etc). Based on its resale alone I’d say ATS is about 6-8K overpriced, you should really get something for your money.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I had a Taurus Limited and an ATS 2.0T as rentals in the last few months. I drive the rentals on the same route from Detroit to Akron and back.

            The Taurus may have glaring flaws, but I’d buy one instead of an ATS.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          The reason I loathe the ATS isn’t because it’s close to the worst car I’ve driven.

          I loathe it because Cadillac engineers sweated the details over its excellent chassis, and (IMO) best in class steering, and then someone/something happened it’s as I’d they said “okay, let the beancounters destroy it now with circa-2002 GM gauge clusters, a Turkish prison for a back seat, NVH levels at least as good as a Sonata, circa-2002 GM shoddy quality (from the paint, to the motor mounts, to the transmission and electronics) and other ill-conceived ‘things’ .”

          They started off GREAT, and then…well, it really should be a Pontiac.

          • 0 avatar
            wmba

            I’m with you DW. In my ongoing quest to try to find a decent car to replace my Legacy GT (still not fulfilled), I test drove an ATS shortly after visiting the Honda dealer. The ATS AWD I drove had an out-of-date IP, the steering wheel trim was curling up at the back like a two-day old sandwich, it was tight widthwise inside, the backseat was a joke. The 2.0t engine was coarse, but by golly she did have good steering and handling.

            The price here in Canada was the ultimate joke, ten grand more than the new V6 Honda that was better assembled of, not surprisingly, less nice materials. A look under the hood of both cars tells the story of assembly quality, an easy Honda win.

            Anyway, since the ATS wasn’t a patch on my LGT, I crossed it off my list of contenders. These days, no cheap ATS leases in Canada unlike the US, but then Canadians still think VW is good so nobody is waving their arms about the gross overpricing of the ATS.

            You really should submit your ATS article – I’d love to read it.

          • 0 avatar
            3Deuce27

            DW_ I at least agree with you on the ATS flat panel instrumentation, which looks dead when off. And, I told Cadillac that I would never buy an ATS or any Cadillac with that type of display.

            I also told them to look again at what Merc’ does with dashes and instrument clusters to see the expressed definition and exquisite quality that we expect in this segment from dashes and instrument clusters.

            After all, what a driver sees in front of them, has to support, intimately, what they were looking for and feel about the vehicle that they chose to experience. It is more then just transportation in Cadillac’s segment. Details count at $50g’s plus.

            Back in my youth, one of my fun uncles with means, had a beautiful new 60′ Oldsmobile 88′ convertible. I noticed that for the most part he only washed the hood and top of the front fenders and windshield during the rainy NW Winter months, so one day I asked him about this, he said ‘That is all I can see when I’m driving’. The dash and clean front end were important to him, that was the strata of ambiance and perception, involvement, he lived in when involved with his car. It was mostly about what was in front of him, and the ride, handling, and mechanical feel of the car. Anything out of his view and feel was secondary and took a back seat to the dash and top front of the car.

            Of course now days, it is all about connectivity, involvement in the perceived ambiance and dynamics of a vehicle are for most, second, or third, or fourth considerations.

            For a person like me who grew up in the fifties and sixties with beautiful and fun cars, instrument clusters and dashes are visually important. And, even if its as simple as the dash on a Porsche Speedster, 56′ Lincoln Continental MK11, 57′ VW Bug, 59′ Rambler American, or 59′ Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider, or as involved as a 41′ and any number of Buicks, or 56′ Olds 88, the look and perception of what is directly in front of you and your interaction with it, is important. Don’t short change it.

            My all time favorite cluster and dash, the 59′-60′ Impala and first gen Sting Ray. The simplicity and visual elegance of those instrument clusters and dashes, has never been equaled, they also provided mechanical information, something sorely lacking in today’s vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Honestly, the older that I get, the more I appreciate simple, elegant, analogue pod gauges with white numbers against a matte black contrast.

            The closer the car’s cockpit and dash and gauges look compared to something functional, but with high quality materials (like real aluminum or stainless steel), clear, non-reflective glass casement (they can do Gorilla glass by Corning on tablets, what about gauge clusters?), and the more high quality switches and knobs (vs touch-screen), the better.

            I love the dashes & gauges of the older Porsches, the late 80s/early 90s BMWs, the Datsun 240Zs and 280Zs.

            We’re at a point now where there is such a slight difference between the gauges on a Hyundai vs a Mercedes. Some would call this democratization, but more often than not, it feels like a blogging homogenous, indistinguishable and lazy design, lacking character and fine details.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “… the older that I get, the more I appreciate simple, elegant, analogue pod gauges with white numbers against a matte black contrast.”

            Me too!

          • 0 avatar
            3Deuce27

            For a modern Dash/Cluster, the E30/E36/E39 are well done and I have appreciated and been personally involved with all of those cars for quite some time now.

            As for other newer and modern dashes, the original ‘Z’, the 240 had a great dash and I have liked a number of Mazda dashes, MX3/MX5/MX6/Third gen RX7/RX8, but nothing in recent times has grabbed me like the dash in the Ferrari 612 Scaglietti, sublime execution of one of the most important parts of a car.

  • avatar
    mjz

    Obviously De Nysschen’s wife refused to live in Detroit.

  • avatar
    MLS

    I’m surprised no one’s chimed in with that old cliché about rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic yet.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I’m more surprised that Cadillac didn’t end up with a presence in Shanghai or Beijing. Supposedly the ATS has a softer interpretation of the Art & Science design language to accommodate the Chinese market, and now it’s “coming with length” as well.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    Cadillac doesn’t need the sort of engineering that used to be done with slide rules. Platform sharing takes care of that. Cadillac needs a different style of sales and marketing expertise. Maybe the New York talent they sought put their proverbial feet down and said, “No. We’re not flying to Detroit, not even out of Teterboro on a corporate jet.”

    So, rather than flying them in from New York City, they’re moving the shop to New York City, The metro area, which boasts the highest costs of living in the country, along with the highest rents for office space. So rather than leasing the expertise, so to speak, they’re buying the fully-loaded version with all the bells and whistles. Good luck with that. We all know what happens at trade-in time.

  • avatar
    bultaco

    They should move interior design to NYC as well. I was recently in an XTS, and the cheap, shiny, tacky interior was pretty appalling. It rode fine, but the fugly interior was laughable. One of the many things New Yorkers can spot from a mile away is fakery and poor taste, and the interiors of current Caddies is the embodiment of both. Maybe they should take advantage of some of the plentiful interior design talent in NYC.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Isn’t New York pretty much the dictionary definition of fakery and poor taste?

      Automotive interiors need to be functional first, otherwise they’ll sooner or later start irritating occupants, no matter how flashy it may look. And, even in a luxury car, there has to be some cost control. Bugatti may be able to get away with such displays of good interior design taste as sticking a $1mill diamond i the middle of the steering wheel so that a Goldman Broker may display his superiority over his Morgan Stanley counterpart, but Caddy can’t relegate themselves to that niche. The NYC interior design community is centered purely around serving the need to look richer than the next guy. Perfect for a city even more monomanically obsessed with flashing wealth than the Rap community perhaps, but that stuff doesn’t really translate.

      Of course, once the last Dollar has been taxed and debased out of the last remaining non Goldman employee not on foodstamps, NYC will be the market for luxury cars….

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    How many times are we going to read this story here?! This is at least the third or fourth time this news has been relayed.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Going by GM management track record of picking winners over the past few generations, I’m calling a peak in NYC commercial real estate…..

  • avatar
    Sceptic

    Wow, interesting that this was first reported by Bertel Schmitt, TTACs very own former editor in chief. He still has the edge. TTAC is not the same since Bertel was pushed out. Still good, but missing that special Schmitt touch.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      The touch of douche and discrimination? Repression of free speech and open forum? S&M photographs delivered right to your inbox?

      Which part of that do you desire, exactly? If it’s the speed, I’ll sacrifice a couple of hours for news like this if it means the absence of the other BS.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      I miss Schmitt as well. Never did see such a tempest in a teapot as when Baruth, a tail-chaser of no small degree himself, engineered the TTAC takeover. I said I’d miss Schmitt at the time, and my posts are there to prove it.

      All of a sudden, TTAC readers became prudes, and confessed they hated Schmitt all along. What a laugh. Baruth said no racing, no fictional stories, so of course we got both. The man can write up a storm, sure, but Idon’t see much else to rave about. Nor did VerticalScope apparently.

      Schmitt had better insight into the Japanese and German industry than anyone else, and not by a little bit. So I’ve read his Daily Kanban website every day since he started it. He gets the news first when it matters.

      To me, his error has been aligning himself with Ed Niedermeyer, a know-nothing of epic proportion in my estimation and by far the poorest of TTAC editors. If Niedermeyer wrote it, you can be sure it’s way off base.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        Wmba, the difference between Baruth and Schmitt is that Schmitt used some pictures that were obviously not HR-friendly under the headline while Baruth provided external links and occasionally a marginal pictures after the break. Big difference for people who read TTAC during lunch at work. Jack also seemed to manage the comments in a way that kept them reasonably civil without having to ban many people.

        • 0 avatar
          mikey

          If it were not for Jack, and Derek, TTAC would have been dead by Xmas 2013.

          Niedermeyer was out of his depth, and had a political agenda, In fairness, Farago was a hard act to follow.

          B.S was, and still is, an ego driven, glorified VW salesman. TTAC is a far better place without him.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I certainly didn’t hate Schmitt. His articles on his time at VW were some of the most interesting automotive stories I’ve read. I’ll take racy photos of promo girls at auto shows over transgender proselytizing every day of the week and twice on Sundays. That’s not to say I loved everything about his style. I thought the contributor witch trials were pretty indefensible. It was like he was playing a game, coaxing stupid monkeys into revealing their lack of character over their desperate need for tribal cohesion.

        On the other hand, I don’t have anything against Baruth either. He’s brought plenty to the table. I strongly disagreed with his piece written in the wake of David E. Davis’s demise, so I called him out for it. I’m sure Schmitt would have banned me for objecting so strongly to something he’d written.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Lets move the Cadillac marketing guys closer to the GM beancounters in NYC – that should work great. I would take this seriously if GM announced that Cadillac was getting its own engineering and design staff to work in a skunkworks in California or perhaps China, but this shift to NYC won’t move the needle in a positive direction for the brand.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    I must be the only guy on this site not rooting for Caddy to fail. I certainly don’t think they’ve got it perfect yet, but I’ll give them this: they’re not boring. And given that almost everything else in the luxury segment is, I want to see them do well. From what I’ve read, the things standing in their way are: a crappy IP in the ATS, a crappy CUE system, a hatred of piano black, and a small back seat in their sports sedan. Plus ambitious pricing. None of that is exactly unsolvable in v2.0 (or even 1.5). Given this site’s fanatical love of the absolute unmitigated sh*tpile that is the Panther (my grandpa bought a new Grand Marquis every other year, that thing jiggled like Rosie O and swayed like a drunk trying to pound enough beers to make himself climb aboard her) you’d think they’d like a real American luxury car like Caddy is about 85% down the road to becoming.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Do you want to pay 100% for an 85% there car?

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        Maybe. It’s not boring, which to me is far more important. I’m just tired of “This car sucks so bad CUE/Piano black/gauges!” How about “man, they nailed the ride and handling, great improvement, just need to fix the CUE/piano black/gauges and they’re there!”

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Because the things that they got wrong matter. I don’t care about the piano black stuff, but the ATS is not good enough to overcome its problems. CUE and the back seat make it so I have a difficult time justifying the purchase of an ATS. A GM V8 engine would make me care less about the car’s shortcomings. The 2.0T and 3.6L do not.

          While I am interested in the CTS, it’s biggest problem is a $40K 2015 Ford Mustang. I would perfer a 4-door Lincoln version, but the new model is civilized enough that I could DD it.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            “the ATS is not good enough to overcome its problems. CUE and the back seat make it so I have a difficult time justifying the purchase of an ATS.”

            Personally, if the backseat isn’t big enough for me, I don’t consider that “wrong” I consider the car wrong for my usage (and the ATS probably is). The CUE, I get that it sucks, but honestly I find the whole things silly given the comprehensive set of steering wheel controls that I use 99.99999% of the time anyways.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It’s not big enough for me to put a car seat back there. I might as well buy a 2-door. I think it is easier to get my daughter in the back of a Mustang or Challenger than ATS. I don’t think it’s “wrong”, but it certainly isn’t right for me.

            I think an entry level luxury car should be workable for two 30 year old professionals and one child. The ATS forces me to make to many compromises with too little of a payoff. I feel the same way about the CLA and A3.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @bball

          I’d just rather have the Mustang, but if you fancy the Alpha CTS do read this TTAC article from awhile back:

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/05/mission-creep-weight-problems-compromise-haunt-gm-alpha-platform/

          @S2k Chris

          Personally I’d rather get the 100% car at a 30%+ discount off the block if I could. Hit ’em where they ain’t as Steve says, speaking of which where has he been?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I really like the CTS but the 2.0T doesn’t do it for me at $55K. The CTS will lease out better than some Mustangs, but that is all funny money. If Cadillac has a short term lease on the CTS in the Detroit area for under $325 a month, I might bite. It may be worth a 24 month experiment.

            More than likely, I’ll just factory order this generation of Mustang at some point.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            My uncle has a 1 year old (approx) CTS (his 2nd successive one) and I really do not care for it.

            I, unfortunately, made the mistake of expressing this unsolicited opinion to him while riding shotgun in it, and boy, that was a bad idea.

            And it’s already leaking oil.

            But, and I say this coming from a family of absolute GM diehard loyalists (I kicked the habit in my sophomore year of college with a Honda Civic EX, for which I was scorned and hissed at), this is not of a sufficient nature for him to be concerned, let alone angry (as I would be given what CTSs cost).

            He should have kept his 3800s – at least they were bulletproof.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I like the look of the new CTS. I did not care for the previous generation at all. Not even the V-series versions. I hated the interiors so much. The new CTS is very nice on the inside. I test drove a version with the twin turbo engine and I liked it quite a bit. Unfortunetly for Cadillac, the MSRP was $62K.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @DeadWeight

            “He should have kept his 3800s – at least they were bulletproof.”

            I won’t be making the same mistake :)

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            @28- I need to amend “the list’ to put a 3800 in as a viable alternative to a diesel (right after the durable yet supple whale peni foreskin leather seating surfaces).

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      @S2K Chris:

      “I must be the only guy on this site not rooting for Caddy to fail.”

      You have perception warp syndrome if you really think I, or most of us here for that matter, are “rooting” for Cadillac to fail.

      I live in SE Michigan. I have benefited directly from GM’s past success.

      I have grown tired of the increasingly worn out excuses from GM, and their constant habit of overpromising and underdelivering competitive products, appropriately priced, with competitive levels of reliability/durability baked into their products (there are reliable GM vehicles; it’s just that they’re the exception, unfortunately).

      I have been dealing with the self-immolation of GM by GM ever since I first heard Roger Smith’s unholy name.

      I heard, firsthand, from the sons of GM execs in my suburban neighborhood, how I should just “turn the radio up” in my GM vehicles when I complained about the sh!tty ass interiors, rattles, creaking and other symphony of noises, 20 frickin’ years ago.

      GM got a rare gift: a taxpayer funded bailout and a chance to truly reinvent themselves, and they’re not exactly lighting the world on fire with their product quality, pricing or overall competiveness, IMO, this running the very real risk of squandering that rare gift.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Personally I am not rooting for Cadillac’s failure, but I am witnessing it. GM as a whole needed to clean house and I’m not certain this happened. I have hardly sampled any post 2010 product but from what I have seen and read none of it seems Earth shaking as fanbois and MSM might suggest. Oh but its got great A, B, and C, but its lacking X, Y, and you’ll have to live with Z. Typical GM, its 75% of where its supposed to be a launch, and we might get 90% by the time of discontinuation.

        For Mr. de Nysschen/Cadillac my extemporaneous suggestions:

        Your styling sucks, and I mean more then the horrible styling of the industry at large. Your division actually built a nice coupe and then you s*** all over it with the worst rear end I have ever seen coupled with a rear view windshield I cannot believe is USDOT legal. ATS Coupe looks better but its still quite flawed. In general the trunk lid is sitting too high cutting out rear visibility and it looks stupid beyond belief. Stop this. I suggest you immediately guillotine and/or force choke the styling dept and poach some folks away from your erstwhile Audi. Evidently they understand how to style an otherwise VAG clone attractively.

        You are wise to exile your marketing department to New York and when they arrive they should be greeted by pink slips, because they have failed tremendously. I haven’t seen good marketing out of your brand since the early 2000s, and that was right around the time the product went from decent minus Northstar to what the frack is that. Shoot for the moon, are you sh*tting me? Old cougars being hot driving SRX? Really? Old cougars are never hot, you’ve got a 50/50 shot of them “knowing things” but otherwise me’h at best. What are you trying to say to people? Sure she/you are pretty used up but we know some of you have money so here’s an almost rebadge because your hips hurt now and you can’t fit into a normal car? The Equinox commercial with the hockey goalie was much more effective at conveying a point.

        You need names for cars because you and the industry play alphabet soup as if its cool. Its not cool. There are only so many oddball letters in the alphabet for you morons to use for acronyms. Try a name for once you can always drop it later (remember Catera?).

        Try to fix the Alpha platform as much as you can but it seems despite its merits its not the droids you are looking for in a “Cadillac”. Whenever this new platform comes out, put the CTS on it as the baby Omega and relegate small I4 crap to Alpha. From what I have read it was never intended for V6 applications in the first place.

        You need a crossover because evidently any brand without 64 crossover model offerings is doomed, but I wouldn’t go overboard. Spin up something on the Alpha and see how it does, just copy the X3/GLK.

        Assuming your brand turns a corner, a SLK/Z4 like roadster might not be a bad idea but design it around a hybrid or EV platform. Pch101 has pointed out ELR fails so hard in part because its not a convertible and I agree it would fail less as a ‘vert vs what you’re selling.

        Lincoln is effectively dead and you’re going to be next if you don’t get it together.

  • avatar
    mitchw

    Derek, I don’t see in Bertel’s piece that SoHo is mentioned as the new home for Caddy sales and marketing people. Just Manhattan.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    Audi’s swanky headquarters are in Herndon Virginia, not DC. To give the unfamiliar an idea what Herndon is like – my preceding sentence was the first time “Herndon” and “swanky” were ever used in the same sentence.

  • avatar
    elimgarak

    VWoA/Audi’s HQ off the Dulles Toll Road is not swanky at all. I’ve been in there a few times for meetings and it is in a non-descript 10-15 story tower in suburbia.

    Swanky in DC would be an address in Dupont Circle/farragut/mcpherson sq/metro center areas.

    Same with where Porsche’s current HQ in buckhead/dunwoody is (their new HQ north of the airport looks amazing but is in a terrible location).

  • avatar
    VoGo

    The real question: Why isn’t Buick’s HQ in Shanghai?

  • avatar
    love2drive

    A piece on Mary Barra just stumbled across – worth a read
    http://www.thegadflyreview.com/?p=267

  • avatar
    Mikein08

    Maybe the denizens of NYC will enjoy all those butt-ugly cadillacs I’ve
    been seeing lately. Honestly, I’ve not seen an uglier line of cars in
    my life. And I can’t figure out the target market. Or why someone in
    the target market would buy one, when the alternatives seem vastly
    superior. GM should have killed cadillac and kept pontiac as the
    performance division.

  • avatar
    agent534

    Dumb. Ford tried this with Lincoln already when Nasser was the CEO,moving their HQ to California, but even Bill Ford knew it was stupid and moved Lincoln back to Dearborn soon after taking control. Cadillac’s CEO must be an idiot.

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