By on October 1, 2014

2015-escalade-exterior-masthead-family-960x540

Cadillac’s new alpha-numeric scheme has entered the crossover and SUV space, with the brand’s future offerings to be dubbed XT. However, like the Lincoln Navigator to the MKs, the Escalade will keep its name among the CTs and XTs.

According to Forbes, Cadillac CMO Uwe Ellinghaus says both CT and XT models will have a number appended at the end of the designation to signify the size of the vehicle in relation to the rest of the lineup. The designations — created a year ago by Ellinghaus soon after becoming the brand’s CMO — form a framework for Cadillac to expand and overhaul its lineup while also eliminating consumer confusion on the showroom floor:

It’s a logical thing to give some mental space like this in your naming scheme. So many other brands have done that sort of thing, across industries. It’s not rocket science. It doesn’t fit our immediate business needs, but this simple logic will help us build this brand and enhance recognition over the long term.

One exception to the new scheme is the Escalade. According to Road & Track, product manager Dave Schiavione explained that there had been a plan to move the SUV onto the Lambda crossover platform, but was punted because Escalade owners wanted their SUV — with all of the power, towing capacity and other associated aspects — to remain an SUV. Representative David Caldwell summed it up as such:

Escalade remains. No reason to mess with it. Everything you say about it is valid.

The premium SUV will likely remain the brand’s default halo vehicle until the flagship CT6 arrives in the near future.

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109 Comments on “Cadillac Escalade Keeps Its Name, Other SUVs, CUVs Christened XT...”


  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    I always thought they should have named it the Spectacade.

  • avatar

    If they can keep the Escalade’s name, then in time, they can also have an Eldorado at the top of the car range. I will not be surprised if that’s how it shakes out.

    • 0 avatar
      anti121hero

      I am in full support of this idea. A guy down the road from me has a tricked out late nineties Eldorado with huge rims labeled as the El-do-Rod. This just made me think of that ridiculous car for some reason. Same guy has some asc black spider edition chrysler crossfire that I can’t find any info on.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Imagine that. The model with the most brand equity and sales loyalty is the one with an actual name rather than alphanumeric codes. Food for thought.

  • avatar

    Don’t mess with the name on the only money maker.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Why even include saying “other SUVs” get the XT name, the chance GM gives cadillac another honest SUV is practically nil.

    Honest Cadillacs get names
    Fake BMW wannabes get letter/number combos.
    Good way to help consumers see what is what.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      I was just about to respond that the CTS is holding its own, but then I realized you wrote “Honest Cadillacs” and it reminded me that the CTS is the ultimate BMW wannabe model, complete with the V-spec “M” clones.

      Carry on.

    • 0 avatar
      caltemus

      Your “honest cadillac” is still just a Chevy Suburban with more money spent on it. The oft-lambasted Cimmaron was the same idea, just executed with less differentiation from its cheaper relatives. At least the CT* and AT* have platforms that aren’t shared with cheaper cars. The next Camaro will ride on alpha, but I don’t see that as a detraction from the Cadillac models.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Suburban or whatever, it doesn’t change the fact it is the only honest cadillac.

        Saying the ATS/CTS represent the cadillac brand is saying the fiat 500 can be rebadged a Ferrari.
        Just because it has a badge or its own platform doesn’t mean it fits the brand image.

        And it’s funny, the only true cadillac is the only cadillac vehicle that owns its segment.

        • 0 avatar
          caltemus

          Just because they don’t fit your idea of what the brand should be doesn’t mean that they don’t represent the brand. They DO represent the brand because that’s what Cadillac sells now. By that same argument you could say that the Buick Verano doesn’t “fit the brand.” Your fiat example contradicts itself, if it were rebadged as a Ferrari, it wouldn’t be it’s own platform. Brand image is what they decide to make of it; a result of their actions. It is not something predetermined by the customer or enthusiast.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Can you make the same argument that Mercedes Smart could appropriately introduce a fullsize truck with V8? Yea, it would sell better, but it doesn’t fit the brands image, just puts it into a sea of confusion.

            There’s nothing at cadillac distinguishable from the premium Buick brand, RWD makes little difference when a Malibu engine is pushing the car.

            The fiat example is if Ferrari introduced such a car themselves.
            Ferrari doesn’t sell economy cars
            The Ram brand doesn’t sell supercars
            Mini/smart don’t sell fullsize vehicles
            Fiat doesn’t sell large highway cruisers

            It doesn’t work, customers don’t come to cadillac for euro style performance cars. If they can’t seperate themselves from that then they should just fold the brand and keep Buick as the premium brand.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    My XT60 is bigger than your XT50.

    Wow, white old men all over the country are pissing in their golf pants with excitement.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      I’m an old white man pissing in my pants imagining the complete and utter outrage DeLorenzo (nothing but the naked unvarnished truth) over at Autoextremist.com will express at this complete disregard of his always 100% correct “advice”.

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    GM screws up a lot, but the one thing they do right is the Escalade/Yukon/Tahoe BOF big SUV. I had to ride in one of those recently a long distance – and I think it was the Chevy – it was sublime.

  • avatar
    SMIA1948

    A Cadillac is either big, flashy, and distinctively American, or it is nothing, and it doesn’t sell. I see that GM is determined to finish killing off the storied Cadillac brand by trying to turn it into Audi.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    Replacing actual model names with alphabet soup designations will “eliminate customer confusion”?

    That’s some top shelf Orwellian doublethink right there.

    • 0 avatar
      GiddyHitch

      There’s a perverse logic there if your potential customers don’t know the model names. At least with an alphanumeric designation, it should be relatively easy to figure out the pecking order. Most Caddies haven’t had a proper model name in quite some time – STS, DTS, etc. has been around for what, 20 years now?

      • 0 avatar
        Stumpaster

        Right, 20 years, and to date I have no idea what they mean. Except for DTS – Deader than S..t.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Seville Touring Sedan. Until 2005, the STS was a Seville trim.

          DTS was for Deville Touring Sedan. Likewise, DTS was a trim until 2006.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Add:

            DHS Deville High-Luxury Sedan
            SLS Seville Luxury Sedan

            Primary differences between STS and SLS were the suspension, exterior trim (wheels, landau, two-tone availability) and center console (bench only in SLS).

            Deville was the base model with a bench seat, whereas the DTS had more available options, different more sporty exterior trim, the available night vision system, and a center console. I believe the DHS was available with center console or bench seat, and was the only way to get rear heated seats and a sunshade, and a couple other things.

      • 0 avatar
        fr88

        And most American still can’t keep it straight. Can’t fathom Cadillac going down the Lincoln path littered with squandered name equity. I still can’t remember which MK Lincoln is which. I call them the MK Zephyr because that one used to have a great name. The rest of the line-up I call the MK Fat Sedan, the MK Big Truck, the MK Little Truck.

        Good News. Now I get to do the same thing with Cadillac. If Rolls Royce, Bentley, Maserati on one end of the market and Chevrolet, Buick, Hyundai and Honda on the other end can have proper names for all their cars internationally, why can’t the pride of GM, Cadillac, do the same? After all there are a ton of names to call upon from their history. Michael Banovsky said it best in a recent blog and came up with a far superior naming scheme:

        ” But before I go into why this particular Cadillac was so special, I was reminded of the Eldorado Brougham when hearing the news that the future Mercedes-Benz S Class-fighting Caddy will be called… CT6. (Seriously.)

        Not Eldorado, Evoq, Elmiraj, de Ville, Calais, Converj, Celebrity, Castilian, or Catera. Not Sixteen, Cien, Ciel, Cyclone, or St. Moritz. Not La Salle, La Espada, Le Mans, Palomino, Orleans, or Florentine. Other than apparently not wanting to live in Detroit (sorry, but I don’t blame him), the new Cadillac boss Johan de Nysschen is famous for re-naming entire car ranges. To do this, he works hard to create a cauldron of alphanumeric glue that binds every model together. At Audi, he did A_; Infiniti, Q_; and now, at Cadillac, CT_.If only there was a moniker from the past that united most of Cadillac’s models under a common name…like…”Series.”

        Now that would have been a great direction to go in – not the creatively bankrupt alphanumeric plan just announced. “Series 60” would be a great alternative to CT6. I mentioned CT6 to someone and they said, “Wasn’t that a Catera?” Cadillac Series 60 brings to mind the top-of-the-line Cadillac Fleetwoods of the past, thus would be a great name for the flagship. If Cadillac ever moves further upmarket, Series 70 could be used, the designation of the Eldorado Brougham.

        • 0 avatar
          th009

          CT4, CT5, CT6 etc is better than MKC, MKZ, MKX etc, I think. At least it’s clear where the vehicle fits in the line-up, similar to Audi’s or BMW’s numbering. Mercedes or Lincoln, you have no idea.

          That said, I do like the “Series 60” suggestion.

        • 0 avatar
          morbo

          The Lincoln naming scheme is easy. There’s the Lincoln Taurus, the Lincoln Fusion, the Lincoln Escape, Lincoln Flex, & Lincoln Edge.

          Oh and the Navigator. The only one that doesn’t need the Lincoln pre-fix.

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        They could have named the Catera the STD.

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    That just incredible. Undermines the whole point of doling out new names.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      You can bet they wanted to, but were either too cowardly to try or were given an emphatic “No” by upper management.

      Either way, it doesn’t speak well for Cadillac’s new boss.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I’m convinced they’re going for these alphanumeric naming schemes not because it’s easier for the customer to understand, but because it’s easier for the marketing types than coming up with an acutal name.

    • 0 avatar
      GiddyHitch

      This is very true as well. Between trademarks in various countries that would make a name legal in one place but not another, along with cultural sensitivities to certain names, there are many hoops to be jumped through with proper names.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I suppose another exception will be the class-leadingn’t ELR.

  • avatar
    hachee

    I have to admit, I thought “Escalade” was a stupid name when it was introduced, but whatever, it’s stuck and I’m used to it, and now I’m glad they’re keeping it.

    While Cadillacs HAD to change – I don’t necessarily think they all need to be big and have V-8’s – I can’t fathom how they’ve lost the momentum they had, and the direction they’re headed is questionable. Like it or not (I did and still do), the last CTS at least stood out, just like the Escalade. Toning it down and raising the price has just killed it. They’re clearly resisting lowering prices (but of course that’s what’s happening since they have to heavily discount), so at least load them up and offer a compelling reason to buy one over competitors.

    This new naming scheme is insane, just like Infiniti’s.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I see a pic like the one above, and I think “Yes, an Escalade is a prestigious car. It’s worth the money.”

    For only a moment though. Then I think of the actual costs of the damn thing, how the interior isn’t really nice in reality, how it’s based on a Tahoe, and how it costs as much as a Range Rover or a Lexus LX or an X5M.

    It’s just not worth it.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Honestly, I’d buy an Expedition (Limited or King Ranch) and call it a day. It’s by far the cheapest of the big SUVs. I like the Tahoe/Yukon too, but I’ll take the Expedition and more cash in my pocket.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The Expedition carries two-tone paint well also. In the King Ranch, I’m assuming they have fixed up the interior by now? When I sat in a 2012 model Limited at a closed dealership, the panel gaps and cheap plastics inside didn’t mesh well with the big price tag on the front. It was either $47 or $52.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I’m trying to reply to you, it won’t let me.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I will try different formatting.

        -In the King Ranch, did they fix up the interior yet?
        -Sat in a 2012 Limited and was not pleased with the interior panel fits and cheap plastics, for a $47k or $52k car (can’t recall).
        -The Expedition looks nice in two tone paints!

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The 2015 is much better. There are still cheap plastics in many places, but the fit is so much better. There isn’t a padded dash or anything in the Expedition (Navigator has a padded and stitched dashboard). Ford basically stuffed the 2014 F150 center stack and dash into the Expedition. I also really like the two tone King Ranch paint.

          Once Ford does a complete clean sheet Expedition and Navigator, I’ll buy a used copy of this version. Depreciation is my friend.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The impression of value will go away the minute you ride in the thing. It rides like a Tahoe with slightly better damping, not like other $100k SUVs.

    • 0 avatar
      genuineleather

      Escalade buyers don’t cross-shop. If they did, they’d all own Mercedes GLs.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        A Mercedes GL….

        Really, your going to compare a midsize crossover to a fullsize SUV?
        The best selling luxury SUV in America at that.

        The GL while it has a decent tow rating can’t match the escalade, neither can the car frame handle constant loads the escalade can.
        8.2 seconds to 60 for the Gl… Really?
        5.9 for the escalade, much better especially for something a size larger and the addition of a seperate frame.
        The only thing one should cross shop a Gl with is a traverse or similar ilk.
        Next your going to compare the encore to the 7 series BMW.

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        I would argue that there are a damn lot of GL owners that were previously Escalade owners or even Range Rover owners. I’ll bet if there was a longer GL, as long as the ESV, you would see Mercedes snag quite a few Escalade ESV sales. Don’t forget that BMW has an X7 coming soon also. Despite being called hideous I see lots of Infiniti QX80s on the road, imagine if it was actually super attractive.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Tell you what – even though I do NOT like QX80 styling, when I poked around a new one at the dealer it was a very solid feeling car with high end materials inside and a lot of space. Buttery leather and lots of wood.

  • avatar
    fr88

    Just more proof that a good model name trumps alphanumeric gibberish every time.

  • avatar
    SteelyMoose

    “It’s not rocket science.”

    No, it’s marketing/branding BS.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Does anyone remember when sts, sls, CTS, and DTS actually stood for something?

    Seriously, this is lame, fix the cars shortcomings, the naming or hq location are not the problem.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      Absolutely. If they made a truly excellent car they could badge it as “Cimarron Deuce” and it would still sell. The names, while confusing and far from compelling, are the least of their problems right now.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Fixing products is expensive and hard. Moving deck-chairs is easy and makes it look like a manager is “Doing Something”

      Either way, this and the Infiniti Q-whatever debacle makes de Nysschen look less like a whizz kid and more like a ladder-climbing PHB.

  • avatar
    mjz

    Um, doesn’t Subaru already use “XT” for the turbo version of the Forester? Better check those trademarks there Uwe.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      Glad I read before I commented. I agree with you, to me, certain alphanumeric combinations immediately evoke a specific thought. And XT immediately makes me think “the Forester I want.”

  • avatar
    bunkie

    I’m sorry that the other news that came out of this story, somehow, got left out.

    That would be the news that Cadillac plans to develop its own new powertrains and not “just take them from the GM parts bin”. That’s a major change in direction which directly addresses some of the harshest criticism.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Only when they use the crap engines, no one complained about the supercharged 6.2.

      No one wants another North Star or worse yet a 2.0T.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The Chinese want a 2.0T, because it’s the biggest and most powerful engine they can get without being slapped with enormous displacement taxes. So we’ll all get a 2.0T.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Come on Hummer, how on Earth can you compare GM’s excellent 2.0T to the Northstar. Theres nothing wrong with a 2.0T in a car appropriately sized for it. (ie ATS only, in Cadillac terms.)

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Well then use th GM 2.0T, don’t invest resources into a cadillac built 2.0T, that’s a waste of money just so they can say its “exclusive”. Which is BS because you can only do so much to a 2.0T as shown by the 20 other 2.0Ts made by other automakers.
          Class exclusive my arse, put a OHV V6 with similar power to the 3.6L in the ATS, that solves the weight and fuel economy issue, then add a turbo, that’s class exclusive out the rear end.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Hey Hummer, I agree with those notions for sure.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Yep. OHV. That’ll work in the luxury market. Because luxury customers love noise, vibration, and coarseness at high revs.

            OHV engines are great at lots of things. Refinement isn’t one of them.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            As if you can’t add mass to the output to smooth out any imperfections, reduction of weight and the better developed technology availible for OHV engines really make them a prime candidate for a large scale comeback. If only it weren’t for years of advertisements telling people an engine with a more complicated top end design meant a better vehicle.
            Anecdotal but my 87 S10 with a 3.4 crate with a 4.3l throttle body and injectors running the 4:11 axle ratio in a extremely poorly tuned (my first time) had no problems getting 26 on the highway with tons of passing power. Yet ford with billions spent can’t get a 4 cyclinder escape with 28 years of technology to do much better?
            I’ll admit it crashes much better, but low profile tires, air dams, aerodynamics, FWD setup, 2 more gears, direct injection, better spark system, better gearing, computers that constantly tune the engine to its peak efficiency etc etc, can’t over come a few hundred pounds of safety equipment?

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        Jeez, here we go again…

        The Northstar was a great motor once they fixed the head bolt issues. I *loved* mine. It was smooth, powerful and made a great noise when driven in anger. I’d take any Cadillac with a later Northstar. I wish my CTS had one.

        I know I’m in the minority here, but I have *actual experience*. I swear, sometimes this place sounds like an echo chamber with all the self-reinforcing shibboleths bouncing off the walls.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “The Northstar was a great motor once they fixed the head bolt issues. I *loved* mine.”

          So that means no complaining allowed for the folks that owned a Northstar in their first decade of existence then?

          For the record I have 4.5 Allante and Northstar STS in my garage right now. The V8’s reputation makes them quite affordable.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      No, that is very bad. Remember 20 years of northstar hell? 8-6-4? Ht4100? Cadillac should never again be allowed unique power trains or motors. How much better off would caddy have been without the northstar and instead with the supercharged 3.8 used in the park avenue ultra? Stick the new Lt in there and call it good.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Cadillac was better off with the Northstar than the 3800SC because Cadillac sold cars to new car buyers and lessees who wanted the latest and greatest powertrains. The Northstar is a sweet engine until they get older, carbon up, overheat and stretch head bolts, problems which aren’t of much concern to a lesee or buyer who flips every few years.

        Sure, in the long term they probably lost a few spurned buyers, but at the time the N* was the right engine and drew a lot of attention to the brand. They just needed to address it’s faults earlier on, rather than use the Buick motor.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Cadillac could have done a transverse LS after the motor was introduced in 1997 and made it brand exclusive, a move which GM ended up doing anyway in 2006. Northstar was always a bad idea and should have been pulled or held back to “sport trims” once the problems became known three or four years in. Leasers could have had their N* toy but a solid motor could have been available to those who wanted it. The 4.9 could have soldiered on with OBDII until at least the millennium, hell they got OBDII working with LT1 and LT6 in the Corvettes starting in MY94. Typical “next quarter” thinking which resulted in many “never again” customers/families and contributed from the loss of US market share from 3.2% in 1992 to 1.1% in 2012.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            The Northstar was in production really before the LS was even on a piece of paper. Like I said, they are a sweet and smooth performing engine and were a high tech positive selling point in Cadillacs. Cadillac needed that engine and I dare say still does.

            Had they addressed the faults earlier on, they could have saved those spurned customers. The N* is a better Cadillac engine than the LS, and I like LS engines.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “The Northstar was in production really before the LS was even on a piece of paper.”

            This may be true but by MY98, five years after Northstar was introduced and three since it became standard, they knew it had problems. So what did they do? Revert to the 4100 playbook and replace motors. Stupid, stupid, stupid. I’m going to guess B-O-C wasn’t on day-to-day speaking terms with C-P-C and let their pride get in the way. Instead of reaching out within the company and either fixing the issue or finding a suitable replacement they chose inaction at the time. Perhaps though they just didn’t care by that point, after all this is right around the time Catera was being imported and Escalade was cloned from Tahoe. The “future”!.

            I agree with this:

            “Had they addressed the faults earlier on, they could have saved those spurned customers.”

            but disagree with this:

            “The N* is a better Cadillac engine than the LS, and I like LS engines.”

            Northstar was a boutique motor and suffered from design flaws which did not become apparent until it went mainstream. It could have been 600hp with 500lb ft-tq get 35mpg city and give its owners handys on long drives, it had glaring issues the LS did and does not. The LS AFAIK does not suffer from the same sort of design flaws in and of itself. It was/is a worthy successor to the SBC, nothing Cadillac has produced since the 368 is worthy of succession of the legendary OHV family dating to the 472 and earlier (and this includes the somewhat ok 4.9).

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            I’m familiar with their issues, I’ve worked on more than a few (and owned one), but I still like them.

            Like I said, when they were new, the Northstars were better Caddy engines than the LS could hope to be, smoother and more refined. All they had to do was put the redesigned head bolt/threads into production sooner and the engines would have been completely legendary.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            “What about the Northstar System?”

            “I don’t think we even use it.”

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @danio3834

            To each his own old boy, by the time I saw them they were money pits.

            @bumpy ii

            What’d you get for it?

            Jack Klompus gave us six grand.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Cadillac could have done a transverse LS after the motor was introduced in 1997 and made it brand exclusive, a move which GM ended up doing anyway in 2006.”

            The engine and transmission longevity on the LS4 cars is so bad that it probably would be wash with even the earlier Northstars.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @ajla

            I’m delving into memories here but I believe the primary issue with the LS4 was the torque converter. If GM had not cheaped out using transmission 4T65-HD and used the 4T80-E -which was designed for Northstar power- I imagine its torque converter could have handled LS4 power. 3800 enthusiasts have swapped in 4T80s when modifying their motors due to the known limitations of 4T6x in terms of power over time (the gearing may also be better now I’m not sure). GM had all the pieces to do the LS4 and what I am suggesting correctly, they chose to blow it.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_4T60-E_transmission

            Additional: Here’s probably why GM did not use 4T80 in LS4 applications:

            “It reportedly cost 80% more than a similar GM 4T60 transmission and weighed 60 lb (27 kg) more.”

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_4T80_transmission

  • avatar
    mjz

    So, let me get this straight:

    CT6 = New flagship sedan that was to be LTS.
    CT5 = CTS
    CT4 = ATS

    Escalade = Escalade
    XT6 = New crossover above SRX but below Escalade.
    XT5 = SRX
    XT4 = Sub SRX crossover.

    Or, will it be:
    CT6 = LTS
    CT5 = Coupe version of CT6
    CT4 = CTS
    CT3 = Coupe version of CTS
    CT2 = ATS
    CT1 = Coupe version of ATS

    Escalade = Escalade
    XT6 = Crossover above SRX
    XT4 = SRX
    XT2 = Sub SRX crossover.

    Or, will it be:

    CT7 = Coupe version of LTS
    CT6 = LTS
    CT5 = Coupe version of CTS
    CT4 = CTS
    CT3 = Coupe version of ATS
    CT2 = ATS

    My head is spinning.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Cadillac CMO Uwe Ellinghaus says both CT and XT models will have a number appended at the end of the designation to signify the size of the vehicle in relation to the rest of the lineup. The designations — created a year ago by Ellinghaus soon after becoming the brand’s CMO — form a framework for Cadillac to expand and overhaul its lineup while also eliminating consumer confusion on the showroom floor”

    “Representative David Caldwell summed it up as such:

    Escalade remains. No reason to mess with it. Everything you say about it is valid.”

    Mr. Ellinghaus you are a fracking idiot if you can’t even maintain consistency in naming. Here’s a thought Herr Dummkopf, MODEL NAMES *but* the top for “sport” trim use your beloved acronyms. If d-bags really identify with a tiered naming system then they’ll pay extra for the privilege won’t they?

    D-BAG1: “I heard you bought a new Cadillac, which one did you buy?”
    D-BAG2: “The Seville” [said proudly]
    D-BAG1: “Oh… well I sprung for the STS with sport suspension and twin turbo” [said smugly]

    BTW RenCen, if you want to pile in a bunch of foreigners to run Cadillac, they should be of a Chinese or possibly the Brazilian persuasion. Follow the money, the West is broke.

  • avatar
    mjz

    By the way, Infiniti sales were down 13% in September, almost outsold by Lincoln! Apparently Infiniti customers are just as confused by THEIR new naming system as everyone else. This same fate awaits Cadillac. Good job there Johan.

  • avatar
    mjz

    The Escalade is selling like hotcakes because it represents the Cadillac brand image the best: big, blingy, over-the-top AMERICAN luxury. Not some wannabe GERMAN luxury. Cadillac needs to “Escalade” it’s entire model range, not “BMW” it.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      This I mostly agree with. Cadillac should be luxury, pure and simple. BMW for the most part isn’t luxury, why benchmark them so hard?

      • 0 avatar
        geeber

        The problem is that Cadillac wants to steal customers from BMW and Mercedes, and it isn’t going to do that with the Escalade or vehicles with an image or design philosophy similar to that of the Escalade.

        • 0 avatar
          hachee

          I think the problem is that BMW and Mercedes have out-Cadillaced Cadillac. They’ve become smoother and quieter and more comfort-oriented, so why buy a Cadillac? By trying to be like BMW’s of old (i.e., performance oriented), perhaps they will, eventually, appeal to the enthusiasts. Problem is, that’s not a big crowd, which is why BMW’s sales have exploded as they’ve become more broadly appealing. Cadillac needs to be bold; subtle’s not working.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          It’s not going to steal products from BMW or Mercedes because of that badge, that and they think its worth 25% more than it really is.
          They can’t appeal to the cadillac demographic or the euro demo with their products. The caddy demo wants big, comfy, bold, vehicle presence, and reliability. The euro demo (wanted) performance handling and everything that goes with that, now it wants a badge saying “I can be fun/behold b***hes I’m important because I buy a glamorous accessory”.
          Obviously caddy has 1 product that fits into the former category, and it sure as hell aint cracking the second category.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      @mjz: Agreed. They can’t out-BMW BMW, nor should they try.

  • avatar
    Hurf

    Should have gone with XS.

  • avatar

    at Cadillac, this year it’s Buzz Lohan…

    To Infinity and Beyond!

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    Nothing mirrors Cadillac’s decline more than the “me too” switch to alphanumeric jibberish names. It will be as successful for them as it was for Pontiac, y’all remember the J2000 right?

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It appears grapheme from the Latin alphabet is most commonly used in vehicles that sold on a global scale.

    I would assume the reason for this is the actual naming convetions we are accustomed to can be awkward or even near on impossible for other cultures to use.

    So, I would expect GM/Caddy has no intention of ever exporting the heavily blinged Silverado station wagon Escalade. Why? Because there are plenty of finer examples of this style of vehicle available outside of the US.

    It would be uncompetitive.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Is it possible that graphemes from the Latin alphabet and Arabic numerals are used on prestige vehicles of global significance for a reason?

    Is this an illusion the marketing whips at GM and Ford are attempting to project. That is a global flavour for their globally uncompetitive prestige marques?

    I would assume that the alpha-numeric naming conventions used by true global prestige vehicles is due to the difficulty some cultures and languages would have with ‘Western’ naming conventions.

    If this is the case then the Chev/Caddy Silverado station wagon Escalade would never be sold overseas.

    This is understandable as it would be uncompetitive. How many $100k Toyota Hilux station wagons are their? Even Toyota has it’s own platform for the Landcruiser/Lexus, not to mention Porsche, BMW, Audi, MB, Rover, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Years ago I worked at a cruise line and when our new ships came out instead of giving them a proper names our CEO decided that letter/number combos were great because (and I quote) “that how Lexus does it”. Somehow he thought letter/number combos had some prestige. Our customer’s hated it, as it ruined the romantic nature of telling people want ship you sailed on. It basically dumped things down to airline equipment terms: “oh you went on a 737”?

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    So the best selling vehicle is the one with an actual name, hmm. God I hate this idiot JdN, he really can’t figure it out. That was one of the things Cadillac had going for it, some pretty great names for their cars. I really like Eldorado and Seville.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “Representative David Caldwell summed it up as such:

    Escalade remains. No reason to mess with it. Everything you say about it is valid.”

    This is GM Cadillac-speak for “Try as me might to screw-up our biggest, longest-running money maker by rebadging yet another lessor Chevrolet and try to pass it off as a Cadillac Escalade, someone with half a brain stepped in and stopped us, even though it’s traditionally what we do”

    *sigh*

  • avatar

    The new slogan should be “If you don’t drive an Escalade, FU”

    Too big, too thirsty, too expensive, and too ancient! A $27K Charger comes with an 8 speed ZF transmission. A $25K F150 will be all aluminium. An $80K Escalade will have neither. My parents bought an AWD Tahoe LT for $38K and some change in 2010. The same truck is now priced at $54,000! I would love to see GM’s inflation calculator.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    The only people who get bent out of shape over alpha-# names are hobbyists and tire kickers, not actual buyers.

    • 0 avatar

      Caddies should have names, not numeric descriptions of how big the engine, type of fuel, driving how many wheels, the owner’s organ size and credit card tier.

      I want an ElDorado…a Seville…a CoupeDeVille….a Cimarron…(ok, maybe not that one :) STS sounds like a social disease, but Caddy still has my favorite car name of all time…the ETC.

      Don’t forget one great reason for Escalade sales is that the GVWR is over 6,000 lbs, so it qualifies for way better tax write offs if you own your own business. The X5, MDX (newer ones), the XC (only the top version, thank you Volvo), the big MB SUV, etc all get writeoffs that more practical conveyances only dream about.

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