By on September 24, 2014

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When Johan De Nysschen took over at Infiniti, his first moves were to move the brand’s headquarters and revamp its naming structure. That led to a jumble of confusion as industry observers and enthusiasts struggled to make sense of the new naming convention. Fresh off of moving Cadillac from Detroit to NYC, we have word that De Nysschen will implement a new nomenclature for Cadillac.

The first car to use the new convention will be the unnamed flagship, dubbed the CT6. According to Cadillac, the new system “…will only change a product’s name when the product itself is redesigned or an all-new model is created.”

There’s also no word on how this will relate to trucks and SUVs, but surely destroying the Escalade brand equity in favor of some alphanumeric combination is a criminally stupid idea.

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106 Comments on “Meet The New Boss, Same As The Old Boss...”


  • avatar
    Vojta Dobeš

    … and I thought that nothing can be worse than current three-letter mish-mash.

    Well, it wasn’t. They managed to make it worse.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      I was hunting through the trademark registrations last week looking for the name and saw the CT6 registration, but didn’t think it was “the” name. I guess I was wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      Michael500

      They should just call it the 6000SUX because that’s what it will end up being. Moving Cadillac from Detroit to “Delta City” ain’t going to save it. This new Cadillac guy is a no talent fool, no one remembers “part numbers” only names, unless the brand is strong like BMW, but that’s rare. GM is a complete joke making cars that leak oil at 60K miles. Wow, this guy really turned Infiniti sales around- NOT. Of course the fools at GM hired him.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        “They should just call it the 6000SUX because that’s what it will end up being.”

        +1 big time! (What a dumba$$ idea)

        • 0 avatar
          ellomdian

          So much impotent ‘Enthusiast’ rage at a non-issue.

          Believe it or not, the people who actually buy cars from a showroom don’t remember, know, or care what an Eldorado or DeVille is.

          This is a Non-issue, easily one of the smallest tempests in Cadillac’s current teapot.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I can’t figure out today’s nomenclature. I honestly don’t know the difference between most of these cars:

    ATS
    CTS
    DTS
    ELR (I know this one)
    Escalade (I know this one, too, and so does everyone else)
    STS
    SRX
    XLR (I knew this one)
    XTS

    Maybe the “City 6” will be better than a “City 4”, or whatever, and then people can understand the differences better.

    Whatever happened to real names, like “Seville”, “Eldorado”, and… “Cimarron”?

    • 0 avatar

      2 things, I guess:

      – imitating the Germans in the sense “real cars” don’t have “real names” (don’t laugh, I’ve read and heard that statement before);
      – focusing on the brand and trying to transfer prestige and focus to it (when asked, most BMW owners simply say, “I have a BMW”, instead of saying, I have a Mustang).

      Can’t really speak to the effectiveness of it, but it’d seem Acura, Lexus, Volvo, among others, agree.

      • 0 avatar
        akatsuki

        It is a combination of easy internationalization and laziness. No need to worry about having a terrible name like the Nova appear and screw you.

        Of course the best part is just as Cadillac is getting traction, they jack the prices, start changing the names, and basically making a hash of everything. Stupid, stupid, stupid. Completely not in it for the long haul if this is how you play.

        • 0 avatar

          Sort of. Deville, Eldorado really mean very little from an international view point, while the name Cadillac has a degree of recognition. More and more this kind of decision will be based on a global view, afterall globalization is bringing people closer. Some suggest that GM used Buick in China because that was easier to pronounce than Chevrolet.

          It is hard to understand and accept but looking at it that way it explains what makers, especially American ones are doing. Case in point, FCA’s Cherokee, the new Mustang, the whole Cadillac idea.

          If it works or not remains to be seen, but the signs are good.

          • 0 avatar
            nickoo

            This is why Buick is popular in China:

            http://www.thedetroitbureau.com/2014/01/credit-a-communist-chinese-leader-for-buicks-survival-and-record-sales/

            Having said that, there is no reason at all for GM to keep buick as a brand here in the US of A. I would like to think that despite the naysayers, GM is more than capable of getting rid of buick here and keeping buick alive in China.

          • 0 avatar

            Thanks. That’a another story.

            As to having Buick in both US and China, why not? You can use similar add campaigns, logos, dealer decorations and style and repeat for greater volume and profit. The cars don’t have to be exactly the same, but the more commonality, the better for the company.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        “… when asked, most BMW owners simply say, “I have a BMW””

        Since when do you have to ask them?

      • 0 avatar
        CRConrad

        That whole “putting ‘real’ names on the ‘wrong’ kind of thing” really is pretty freaky sometimes, though. It bugs the heck out of me, for example, when people give their dogs “people names” like Max, Otto, or Sara, in stead of “dog names” like Rex, Spot, or Fido.

        – “This is our new dog, Max. And hey, look, you have a new baby! What’s he called?”
        – “Eh, his name is… Max.”

        • 0 avatar

          As to people names for dogs and other pets agree, completely, animals, no matter how loved, are not people. As to things, still remain unconvinced either way. When a product is great, it owns the name. Though the brand does have a point in protecting its turf, sort of like the Yankees not putting player names on their jerseys. I can easily see the wisdom behind that thinking.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The *TS naming convention arose almost by default. STS was an acronym for Seville Touring Sedan, and then DTS became an acronym for DeVille Touring Sedan. Then the regular Seville disappeared and the regular DeVille became “DHS,” and other names followed from there.

      • 0 avatar
        formula m

        ATS rides on the Alpha platform so I’m thinking its Alpha Touring Sedan. CTS name is based off the Catera Touring Sedan.
        What Cadillac needs is German fit and finish. Not the cold vagueness of their naming system

    • 0 avatar
      rickentropic

      So I tried to register POS as an automobile trade/model designation and guess which U.S. automaker has reserved it?
      Yeah, you’re right, all of them. I have owned a few of them POS cars over the years, but no more. I won’t get fooled again.
      So I’ll just chill out, have a good ole American beer… a PBR…and then see if I can trademark it for… hey wait a minute…it’s Russian?Cypriot now???
      Anybody got WTF yet?

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      They should resurrect the Cimarron. Just bling up a Cruze or a Sonic sedan and voila, the 2016 Cadillac Cimarron. Of couse it would have to come with the 1.8 non-turbo engine, Bonneville SSEi style body cladding and a red velour interior complete with bench seats. It would sell like crazy to rental fleets. Then people would get one and say “this is a Cadillac? Gross! I’m going to buy an A3/A4/CLA”. And the GM cycle of $hitiness would continue to infinity.

    • 0 avatar

      It’s very easy, actually. They only have 3 products: Escalade (the gilded truck), CTS (the old awesome), and ATS (the cheap thing that rides CTS coattails, like the C-klasse to E-klasse). Everything else is immaterial and you don’t need to remember all the dumb acronyms.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Funny. I can tell you what each of those models are as far as type, how old they are, and if they’re based on anything else GM, as well as whether they are FWD/RWD/AWD.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “CTS
      DTS

      STS”

      Catera, DeVille, Seville.

      “The little one, the medium one, the big one”.

      Works for me.

      The others? No.

  • avatar

    I wonder what the significance of 6 is? The Chevrolet Cruze hatch is called Cruze Sport6. Never really got a satisfactory answer as to why that is.

    Oh, and I’m also happy this is not about the new Mustang! Last thing Ford needs is a Boss the same as the old (from an international perspective).

  • avatar
    mcs

    I looked at the registration database again and in addition to CT6, they’ve registered CT5 (serial number 86343063).

  • avatar

    goes to prove, to me at least, that this new fella is as clueless as John Smith, Ron Zarrella, Joel Ewanick, and the rest of the pack. much as I never cared for the guy, at least Pete Gerosa had some sense in his head. I’m convinced that GM will never get it. great cars, wonderful employees, and dumb as they come leaders.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I know that at least you, Dan & I are just in awe at the incompetency illustrated by GM regarding Cadillac as of late.

      It’s really incredible what they’re doing & quite perverse.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    CT6. Interesting. Leaves a lot of room for growth above. Could the CT7 be the Range Rover-ized, de-Suburbanized Escalade replacement I’ve been harping about? Could the CT8 be a Pullman or even Bentley competitor?

  • avatar

    Is this just another guy who, like Ferdinand Piëch, no one can say ‘NO’ to?

    Not that the current naming scheme is great, but at least it is more recognizable, with less confusion (i.e. ‘A’ is smaller than ‘C’, but doesn’t refer to the number of cylinders it has). Infiniti switched schemes because they had no where to go, but I can’t imagine Cadillac is having the same struggle.

  • avatar

    Oy. Cadillac has been fortunate in that its names were at least *somewhat* easier to keep up with than those of Lincoln and post-2013 Infiniti. Not anymore. But at least Cadillac will wait until the next redesign to change each product over to this new naming scheme.

    And I’m sure the Escalade will keep its name.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    More lipstick on pigs.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Get back to me when Porsche starts doing this nonsense.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Quick someone patent every unused 3 letter sequence.

    Just when you think someone gets it, they pull this crap, I thought they were trying to grow cadillac sales not lose potential customers in a sea of confusion.

    CT6, seriously? Name it the Aztek, that name, soiled as it is, has more value.

  • avatar
    wmba

    What, de Nysschen at it already before his NY penthouse suite is even remodeled?

    I do declare this person is a one man automotive wrecking ball. Secretly on the Piech executive compensation scheme to ruin other premium automakers while appearing semi-rational on the surface.

    That 1+1+1+1 Infiniti Q something or other can be easily outdone by a USA supersized 2+2+2+2 Cadillac ST8 and yes, wait for it, a real trunk will be included.

    Should be a major hit worldwide.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Before looking overseas wouldn’t it be prudent for Cadillac to reclaim its status in the North American market?

    And popular culture is rife with references to Coupe De Villes, Fleetwoods, etc.

    Stand out from the alpha-numeric pack.
    Reclaim your throne.

    Bring back names that reflect the prestige of what owning a Cadillac once represented.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      Let’s ignore China as that luxury market explodes to pause and try to fix the US. Good strategy. You should apply for the positions available in New York because they should definitely not move into China until they get back to where they used to be in the US.

      By chance, were you ever employed by Zenith TV back in the early 90’s?

      • 0 avatar
        agent534

        China is the worlds 3rd biggest economy, with 1/2 the GDP of either the US or the EU. Plus to do business in China, GM has to be partnered with a Chinese company. Buick is perfect for GM to focus on in China, as it was dead in the states so if it is lost in China, like during the GM bankruptcy when their Chinese partner owned 51% of their joint venture, they will not take such a huge hit in the states or elsewhere as if they gambled on the Chevy or Cadillac name there.
        Buick is doing well in China, keep on that path, and rebuild Cadillac starting in the US where it has some brand equity left, using names that mean something to the market, like Fleetwood, and DeVille, and expand the brand in the EU as you can. Position the brand correctly in those markets, and the rest of the luxury buyers will come to it.
        Really, China is so overrated as a market, especially for a true luxury brand like Cadillac should be. The only attraction to China right now is that it is fragmented between so many automotive manufacturers, and if you are in the right position when consolidation happens soon, it will be a good market for winners, but again, GM has to partner with a local manufacturer to do business in China which limits their gains. So let the Buick brand play its role in China, and let Cadillac get it done in the US and EU.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          The US may be king of the luxury car market for now, but China has more growth potential than any other car market in the world.

          Any automaker that wants to be around thirty years from now needs to have a China strategy. Any automaker that ignores China runs a serious risk of being on the endangered species list. It’s as simple as that.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          The people who want to buy Fleetwoods and DeVilles are dying faster everyday. That’s not a strategy to build on for the future.

          Meanwhile, China surpassed the US as the largest auto market in 2009, and the population of people there who want to buy cars exceeds the US two-fold, at least.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        ‘Sundridge’ It appears that ‘Agent534’ not only answered your questions but demonstrated the fallacy of your argument.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          I often differ with Sunridge, but he got this right and you did not.

          There’s nothing holy and sacred about the US market. There is no good reason why the US has to come first, when the momentum is clearly coming from somewhere else.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Any strategic sampling will demonstrate that if you lose your home market, you will eventually either fade away or move to the market where you are strongest.

            Therefore Cadillac would either permanently move to China (China only sales, China only manufacturing or sell of the name to a Chinese manufacturer) or just become extinct.

            North America is still Cadillac’s biggest market. Should they just walk away from it? Meeting the needs of the North American market is akin to ‘picking the lowest hanging fruit’. And therefore cost efficient and effective.

            Remember that the US is still the 2nd largest market. And in sales the truism is that it costs less than 1/3 the price to retain/upsell an existing customer than it does to gain a new customer.

            That is how you build momentum.

            GM demonstrated that they learned this lesson when the retained the Buick nameplate. Keeping it allowed them to retain a strong presence in its strongest market, China.

            Building new Cadillacs with the Chinese market as the primary target would currently be an unsound business policy for the Cadillac marque.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “Any strategic sampling will demonstrate that if you lose your home market, you will eventually either fade away or move to the market where you are strongest.”

            Is that supposed to mean something? Yes, if a business declines in one place and does well in another, then it will decline in one of them and grow in the other. Seems kind of obvious.

            As are all of these companies, GM is a multinational. The world is its home. China is part of the world. If that’s where the profits are, then it would be foolish not to pursue them.

          • 0 avatar
            agent534

            Pch101, they do have a strategy for China, its called Buick.
            And even then, the forced partnerships eat into their profits.
            Sure they sold 1 million Buicks because of China, but North American remains their top market.
            Minus recall costs, in Q2 GM’s revenue was $2.4 billion from North America compared to about $500 million from its China income.
            http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-07-24/gm-sets-aside-at-least-400-million-for-ignition-recall-victims.html

            GM has market share in North America, owns it all themselves.
            Buick should be doing its thing in China as the brand was dead here, and Cadillac and Chevy shouldn’t be bent with things like silly names that ignore the value of known names to chase a potential in China
            http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/04/29/is-gm-investing-too-much-in-china.aspx

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Again, China is the future. It isn’t just about today.

            Any automaker that doesn’t have a China strategy is potentially setting itself up for failure.

            The math is fairly obvious: China has four times the US population and more growth potential. It isn’t just about today.

          • 0 avatar
            agent534

            @PCH101
            As GM’s China sales are already more than the US, but their revenue is a fraction of the US revenue, if GM is banking on a China as the future to the detriment of the North American market by making it secondary or beholden to the Chinese market, then the future doesn’t look too good for GM.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “And popular culture is rife with references to Coupe De Villes, Fleetwoods, etc”

      Not these past two decades or so, really.

      And even then, the only ones I can think of are BBoys songs.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    Go where the big guys aren’t. Infiniti’s new scheme is still totally unrecognizable. There’s also zero automatic prestige in just stringing together some letters and numbers on your cars. Mazda does it. NBD.

    The problem however is that Cadillac doesn’t have the historical naming heritage that Lincoln had and subsequently threw in the garbage for no good reason.

    Aside from the Calais which I doubt anyone remembers, Cadillac has the DeVille and the Fleetwood. Does anybody really want those back? The Cimmaron and the Allante are obviously tarnished beyond repair.

    They’d have to come up with completely new stuff, and that’s not easy. CT-blah on the other hand takes one second to think up.

    • 0 avatar
      Drewlssix

      I want a last run fleetwood brougham badly. I would love to see a modern version also. Bespoke long wheel base sedan with rwd a 6.2L and perhaps the option of three across front seating. It would be a truely obcene thing today dwarfing Rolls Royce’s Bentlys the new Phaeton and equal the Escelade in every direction but up. And I would totally buy one fifteen years later at my nearest Buyherepayhere.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Whoops! Johann, I take it all back! Well some of it anyway.

    Bertel Scmitt reports the Infiniti Q80 is a 2+2, not a 1+1+1+1. Straight from the mouth of Andy Palmer, departing Infiniti Europe chief who was saying his goodbyes in Japan, before departing for Aston Martin and sales that outdo Infiniti in Europe. Well, not far off. Cubic money hasn’t stirred Euro taste for Infiniti.

    So where did TTAC come up with the Q80 being a centipede anyway. Which other blog can be blamed for TTAC’s mistake this time?

    • 0 avatar

      From Infiniti’s own press release

      “A concept as impactful as Q80 Inspiration is set to push boundaries in more ways than through the beauty of its attention-grabbing skin. The cabin is able to bring together the four occupants in a highly stylized and personalized ambiance of the highest quality. Carbon fiber, aluminum and leather surround those inside in spacious “1 + 1 + 1 + 1″ seating.”

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        That could mean 2 + 2 with a little extra space between the seats. Hopefully it won’t be a stretched Elio.

        Edit: From USA Today:

        “Infiniti describes the car as having “1 + 1 + 1 + 1″ seating. That would be four seats each offset from the one ahead, loosely grouped into two rows. Such an arrangement could keep the car narrower than if two front seats were side-by-side and the two rear seats likewise.”

      • 0 avatar
        cargogh

        I misread again. Instead of “personalized ambiance,” I got …highly stylized and personalized embrace of the highest quality. It made no sense, but seemed like a good time.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Without hyperbole, I can say that the Infiniti naming scheme is the worst idea anyone ever came up with in the history of everything.

    Alphanumeric names wouldn’t be so bad if they actually stood for something.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    This guy’s gotta be trolling.

  • avatar
    CX1

    For those saying it’s forgettable, just remember:
    CT = Cimmaron Today

  • avatar
    danio3834

    If true, that name for the flagship is a big pile of meh. Just calling it an Elmiraj would have been great.

  • avatar

    Cadillac will be fine. GM’s real luxury sales are $50,000 Tahoes/Silverados and $60,000 Denalis. Most companies would kill to sell 650,000 high margin full size trucks a year.

    Cadillac is starved for product the price increases aren’t helping. They’ve got one CUV that is 5 years old when luxury cuvs are hot. The Escalade is too expensive to provide any meaningful volume to the brand. A new 4 cyl CTS is way more expensive than a 2013 6 cyl CTS. Domestic car buyers care about getting at least a 6 cyl when paying $40K or more. An Audi or BMW buying badge whore wouldn’t mind paying $40K for an underpowered 4cyl engine car. Cadillac has too much internal competition too. Buicks and GMCs are too close in price to luxury vehicles. The Acadia and Enclave for example have ATPs very close to several luxury CUVs. Cadillac needs to screw moving to NYC and concentrate on product. It would need two more cuvs, one smaller than the SRX, one larger, an emergency SRX refresh and one AWD BOF SUV based on the GMC canyon. This would help Cadillac in China too where luxury CUVs sales are exploding.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      BOF and luxury don’t go together. You can’t get a well-controlled ride with it. If you want a SUV/CUV that’s trucky but has a luxury feeling it needs to be unibody (or at least unibody-with-frame) with serious off-road hardware, like… well, every big luxury SUV currently on the market except the Escalade and G-Class. Range Rover, GL-Class, LX 570, QX80, Q7… not a true BOF product among them.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    So now Cadillac owners of the future can put up with the question – oh you drive a CT6, is that the car Oprah gave away?

  • avatar
    elimgarak

    How do failures and/or dullards keep getting great jobs in the industry whereas if the B&B applied to product planning positions (even entry level), many would be rejected?

  • avatar

    I hope this is some sort of sad joke, if not this new boss has lost any respect I might have had for him.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I await the irony of a V8 powered CT6.

  • avatar
    Duaney

    Finally a chance to comment on the absurd 3 letter number nonsense that Cadillac is using for their “Nameplates”. These so-called names just make me sick, an alphabet soup that is meaningless to me, so uninspiring, that I have no desire to own one of these XYZ things as a gift. Look at Chevrolet, GM’s price leader with wonderful names like “Volt, Impala, Malibu”. Where did Cadillac go wrong? Until they have a new “Eldorado”, or DeVille”, I’m not the least bit interested in what Cadillac has to offer. If this idiot turns the Escalade into a ABC, I predict that sales will tumble.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    The 6000 SUX can’t be far behind! Another Robocop prediction eerily comes true…

    What’s next, using Taurii for police interceptors?

  • avatar
    kmoney

    I don’t get how anyone can think this could work. I remember being at the Vancouver Auto Show shortly after Infiniti changed to their new nomenclature and basically giving up and walking away on translating the old vs new names so I could re-picture their vehicle hierarchy in my head.

    It’s cool to keep classifying cars by digit and engine size (i.e., LS460, S600, 540i, et al.) if it’s been done since the beginning and at least has logic to it, but shifting to this for a company that has never done it before is just nuts. Wasn’t this move at Infiniti considered basically the biggest branding mistake of the year (I know it was by many on here).

    • 0 avatar
      FractureCritical

      because no one cares about Infiniti’s names any more than they do about Cadillac’s names. They’re stupid, they don’t make a lick of sense, and no one will miss them.

      everyone is crying about brand recognition and name value. You know what? There is no value. It’s just a name. It doesn’t matter. The only thing that should matter about the naming convention of a car line is that it’s easy for a 3 year old to look at two names and instantly figure out which is bigger/more expensive. That’s it. That’s all. Nothing more. XTS? ATS? CTS? who gives a flying fornication. A/B/C/E/S? good. 1/2/3/4/5/6/7? good. A3/A4/A5/A6/A7/A8? good. MKS/MKZ/MKS? not good.

      And I’m sorry but the move to NY is a good move in my opinion. the vast, vast majority of luxury car sales, particularly the Germans, are made at the coasts. you can argue the east/west vibe differences, but the left and right edges of the country are pretty much a different country than the rest of the country. Might as well be where the customers are.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        There’s money on the coasts, but no one there wants a Cadillac. The middle of the country is where domestics still reign supreme, and that’s the only place where anyone still dreams of owning a Cadillac.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Many smart, successful and articulate people comment here.

    *Somebody* should be able to tell me just what would be lost if Cadillac went extinct.

    • 0 avatar

      I don’t know how successful or articulate I am, but here goes a shot.

      From a business perspective, in the Sloan model, why not try to keep someone who has been a frequent buyer of yours in your line? Outside that model, the same question, why not try to bring that person who would buy lux German over? Remember, these are high margin cars. Doing like VW and being smart in the sharing of parts, you can have clients not feel it, while profiting from volume at Chevy and margins at Caddy.

      From a more ethereal point of view, it’s a dream you know? If GM can make Cadillacs and they are so good, aren’t Chevies good? It does have a halo effect on the rest of the line, lending credence to the “real” business. Being successful, it becomes a real business unto itself.

      I’m sure others will explain it better and have better reasons as to why.

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        Sorry, Marcelo, I was unclear. I meant what, in 2014 and to highly car-literate people, would the general market lose if Cadillac disappeared. Why do the B&B appear to care so much?

        Is it just some vestigial patriotism of the baby boomers? What in the entire world of automotive needs and preferences would suddenly become unfufilled by Cadillac’s demise?

        • 0 avatar

          Well, in that case you lose an alternative. Not everyone is in love with the German lux trio or the Japanese pretenders. It’s always good to have choices. As Cadillac cars have become more and more credible alternatives with each new car launch, you just have more choice.

          But you are right. If they closed shop today not many would miss it and there are plenty who would find satisfaction in owning the cars currently on offer.

          Finally, guess it provokes discussion partly out of the vestigial nationalism you mention, partly out of a misguided nostalgia for days gone by and partly because there are those not satisfied with being the Germans and Japanese the only purveyors of luxury automotive appliances.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            I think much of the American fondness for the marque must stem from happy childhood associations. Parents, grandparents, other positive adult influences who owned Caddys have kept a warm spot glowing.

    • 0 avatar

      *Somebody* should be able to tell me just what would be lost if you went silent.

  • avatar

    If cadillac were lost so would be America’s reputation as a builder of world class vehicles.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    I don’t see what’s so bad about names. Names work, ask Land Rover. They even decided to ditch the LR# business here in the USA because it was dumb and had no name recognition.

  • avatar
    shaker

    MB got it “right” for themselves a long time ago (300SL, 250SE, 280SL, etcetera), and they’ve even mucked it up.

    So, naming conventions, especially for the international buyers, is going to be increasingly difficult going forward.

    The only answer is to send out surveys to existing and potential customers with a list of copyrighted/patented names in each potential market for the vehicle, and selecting a name based on customer preference.

    If the survey reveals that the majority of people (in the USA) looking at the Cadillac pictured above should be the “Eldorado”, then — (in a deep male voice) “Cadillac Introduces The NEW, 2016 Eldorado… Just For YOU.”

    In the EU, such things will be tougher, due to the multiple languages, so an alphanumeric naming convention may be more appropriate.

    Well, except in France, where this car could be the “Cadillac du Soixante-Neuf” or some such thing – the automotive equivalent of both men and women getting everything they want from this car.

  • avatar
    DM335

    From the time I heard about the new flagship sedan, I assumed it would be either a Fleetwood or an Eldorado. Bringing back the meaningful names would be the best attention-getting move Cadillac could make. The CT6 name does not evoke any luxurious image. The “C” is too low on the scale and the “6” indicates to me a 6-cylinder engine.

    There are not a lot of historical “names” to choose from, but it certainly seems like Cadillac could do better. If I were in charge, I would go with Eldorado for the new sedan (yes, I know Eldorados have always been 2-doors). The name has magic and oozes class. The other names get a bit tough. The XTS seems like a DeVille, but the CTS line has coupes and sedans that go with the DeVille name nicely. Seville, Biarritz and Fleetwood are all good Cadillac names of the past. I personally like the Cimarron name, but it could never be used again by Cadillac. None of these names work well for the SRX, so something new might need to considered there.

    The alpha-numeric names have to stop at some point. Infiniti’s new scheme is a nightmare. BMW has completely destroyed its original concept, which made some sense at one time. Mercedes seems to be trying to consolidate its system, but it’s not working well. The days of a car name creating an exciting image seem to be long gone.

  • avatar
    agent534

    Anyone that works in a corporate environment knows this is just the new manager trying to put his mark on Cadillac and make it his, no matter how dumb and pointless this appears to the rest of us. So now any new products that have success will distinctly be remembered as being launched as under Johan De Nysschen, especially the new flagship.
    Its a cornflower blue stamp on a product that pretty much wouldn’t have any other input from him. As other redesigns come out, it will be ‘oh the xxx-stupid name launched under Nysschen’, not the redesigned DTS was released. And it creates some separation for him from past Cadillacs- oh that DTS wasn’t mine, I had the xxxother stupid name. It doesn’t really cost much money to do, so its easy for him to push through. Stupid Stupid Stupid.

  • avatar
    koshchei

    They should have just called their new flagship “Fleetwood”.

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    I have a 1985 Cadillac Eldorado “Business Coupe” in my storage garage and am about to purchase a 2000 Eldorado ETC. I’ll ship the 2000 Eldorado to Ft. Worth, Texas to Carroll Classic Cadillac for the new Northstar headbolts and get it back better than new!
    In 2002 I bought a 1983 Coupe deVille from Spokane, Washington and drove it to southern California in three days. I remember stopping at Hubacher Cadillac in Sacramento and seeing all the customers lined up to test drive the NEW Catera (CTS!).
    I agree on the naming of cars properly. ETC means Eldorado Touring Coupe but the ELDORADO name is there as well!
    Too bad 2002 was the last year.
    ATS, CTS, DTS and the rest don’t do it for me…
    Ask the folks in Fleetwood, Pennsylvania!

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