By on September 12, 2014

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Despite attempts to discourage would-be owners from reserving a copy of the upcoming Model X, Tesla has some 20,000 customers on its waiting list for the gullwinged SUEV.

Gas 2 reports a total of 20,159 reservations have been made thus far since 2012, 12,000 of which were made through March of this year. Out of those figures, around 14,000 belong to customers in the United States, while Europe and the Asia Pacific hold just 25 percent.

That said, it may be a long wait. The assembly line, currently going through upgrades to assemble 3,000 vehicles per week, must be shared with the Model S. The publication says that if the split were 50/50, it would take Tesla over a year to clear the backlog that could hit 25,000 by the time production begins early next year.

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63 Comments on “Tesla Model X Has 20,000 Reservations, More To Come...”


  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    What happens when it reaches 88mph?

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    …and it has seamless interconnectivity with the Apple watch.

  • avatar
    jdash1972

    I’m shocked that Tesla is actually doing it. They’ve successfully launched a new brand and reached significant production numbers with a great product. I hope it’s not a grand Ponzi scheme with a mountain of debt buried in a second set of books. I wish they’d break down and offer a range extender, like the BMW i3 and alleviate some of the range issues, especially on the newer models that are proposed to be cheaper, and thus lighter and with smaller batteries and necessarily reduced range. The fact that NUMMI had risen from the ashes of GM incompetence is just inspiring. 3000 cars a month is staggering in my opinion. Put a 500cc range extender motor into the Model X for a grand total of $45,000, make it a good car that is reliable, well built, unique and useful and they won’t be able to build them fast enough. More power to them.

    • 0 avatar
      NN

      never underestimate the power of great leadership. This is a company full of talented engineers, hired by talented managers, managed by talented executives and a leader with a level of vision & drive equal to, if not greater than, Steve Jobs or Howard Hughes. Musk’s story has a long way to go, and it will be fascinating to watch it.

    • 0 avatar
      probert

      Tesla is building a supercharger network with their own money. I think they’ll stay all electric – as soon as you add an ICE it becomes a better looking Prius – from a marketing perspective.

    • 0 avatar
      Ihatejalops

      Thank you for the Tesla PR comment and bad pun at the end. It’s always helpful to know that Elon Musk is amazing and that he’s managed to build something that NYC had in the late 19th century to replace horses. How does one get out of the Model X in the case of the rollover? Also, I am curious to see the range for this thing. In an SUV you get pretty great mileage, so 285 ain’t gonna cut it.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        “he’s managed to build something that NYC had in the late 19th century to replace horses”

        They had the Model S in the 1890s?

        “285 ain’t gonna cut it”

        285 miles isn’t enough? Name your number – I guarantee there’s a doubter out there who says they won’t buy until it’s one mile more than whatever you say.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          In 1899 and 1900, electric cars had the most market share in the US car market, ahead of steam- and gasoline-powered. A few things have changed since then.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          I just returned home from my 22 round trip commute. 285 miles is overkill for me. With an EV, I’m not going to have to bother with pulling into a gas station and freezing my arse off in the winter pumping gas.

          • 0 avatar
            Ihatejalops

            That’s great for you. But many people who own SUV’s have children and are driving them back and forth to practices, games, lessons, school, work etc..so the 285 is a strain. Considering that the 285 is not perfect. Also, vacations far away. Your time can be money.

          • 0 avatar
            DeeDub

            I’m pretty sure that the vast majority of drivers won’t go anywhere near 285 miles a day commuting or bouncing the kids around town. You’re grasping at straws there.

        • 0 avatar
          Ihatejalops

          Electric cars are far from new and he is hardly revolutionary is my point. The guy gets praise for doing nothing. Also, I can announce a factory no problem. Right now, I am announcing that I will introduce an all new lead smelter (they don’t exist in the US) coming soon! See how easy that is? The need for the batteries is small and there have been articles on how extra production is unnecessary. Now fuel cells is where it’s at. Our military is using them, and that’s tech that always trickles down.

      • 0 avatar
        jdash1972

        It’s just an impressive accomplishment. This isn’t some electronic crap gizmo farmed out to china with slave labor – like a useless iWatch… This is real hardware built in America at a time when another car company has gone bankrupt and can’t even build an F’ing ignition switch. They spent more time and money lying about it than they would have just fixing it. Didn’t they have any existing designs that worked? It’s like a contest between corruption and incompetence and they’re very good at both, while Mary Barra tries to explain their difficulties before congress. I find myself hoping for a comet to strike North America when I have to watch that kind of ethical train wreck. I feel as though I’ll read a story any day about how Tesla will close it’s doors because they were hiding billions in debt because if GM can’t make a damn switch, how could a brand new company manage to build an electric car that works and people actually want to buy? I don’t have much faith in the electric car because I don’t think the power density and charging capacity will ever be adequate for everyone’s needs, but they’re making it work anyway and if they can really expand down market it will be nothing short of a miracle.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          An iWatch isn’t useless. It has batteries to charge and I would guess keeps time. See, it has some uses.

        • 0 avatar
          Ihatejalops

          Gimmie a couple billion in Other people’s money, and I’ll get you whatever you want. Just saying. Oh and why do you think they want illegal immigration? Borderline indentured servitude which is the same as China. It’s an amazing similarity.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    Tesla has gotten this far by selling sedans in the era of the CUV. Business is going to be very, very good for them when they’re selling CUVs in the era of the CUV.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      Agreed. The CUV packaging and a lower price allow this to go from the technorati’s luxo commuter to suburban family runabout and practical urban appliance.

      This may be the model that gets the majors (save Nissan and BMW) to sit up and take notice.

      • 0 avatar
        DeeDub

        Have they announced pricing yet? I thought the X was going to be ‘spensive like the S, while the 3 would finally be the cheap one. I think the X is more of a Cayenne crusher than a CRV competitor.

        Porsche and BMW are going to have a hard time selling their CUVs when this trophy-wife panty-dampener hits the market.

    • 0 avatar
      Tosh

      Actually it’s a 5-door hatch, not a sedan, which in the US makes it a miracle!

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    Needs a better battery.
    Specifically higher energy density.
    None available yet.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      20000 people – so far – don’t agree.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Seriously, though, there are probably more than 20,000 who insist the earth is flat.

        To be a viable mainstream automaker, Tesla will have to be able to transition to much higher numbers than that. And even worse, the kind of early adopters who sign up to buy dreams, tend to be so removed from the “real world” that catering to their whims can be flat out detrimental to the bigger cause. But I have no doubt the Silicon Valley team at Tesla is well aware of that…

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        A mainstream automaker has to build hundreds of thousands of cars each year in order to be viable.

        To survive on low volumes, the brand has to be a luxury brand and the price points need to be high. And in the case of an EV, the costs have to be high enough to recoup the cost of the battery, which Tesla has been unable to do.

        Even as a niche operator, Tesla will have poor long-term prospects if it can’t push down the cost of the batteries or find a cheaper alternative for power storage. The company generates losses, and the volumes aren’t providing scale.

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        There are 300 million people in this country alone, stop acting like 20,000 people is a lot.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Way more than 20k people bought Cimmarons too.

    • 0 avatar
      WaftableTorque

      If I were to guess on the mindset of a Tesla buyer, they’re what I would call “respectful power seekers”. They want an EV, but it has to go 400+km, do 0-100km/h in 5.0s, and be AWD. They want an LED bulb, but it has to be at least 1600 lumen, 2700K, and have a CRI of >87. They want an Apple iPhone but they’ve held out until a phablet version with a phase detection autofocus and OIS camera becomes available.

      In other words, they want the power, but they want that power to be respectful to others and the environment while getting what they want. There’s no cross shopping a Model X P85+ with a GL63 or X5 M. They’ve stayed on the sidelines, waiting for someone to bring everything together into one package, and will pay illogical money to have it, so it’s a great untapped market.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        You’re kidding, right? Tesla buyers today are similar to MB and BMW buyers – people with ample disposable income and an interest in image.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        I know two Tesla owners who once drove Hummers….. And another who drove a Ram Crew Cab Pimploredo Limited Cowhorn edition….

        I’m sure the “caring about others while looking out for #1” dude of Bay Area mythology does exist somewhere, but he doesn’t make for much of a market…..

  • avatar

    Keep in mind that the former NUMMI plant is a very big building, and Tesla is not (yet) using a whole lot of it. At some point they’ll add an assembly line or make significant changes to speed up the one they have, it’s just a question of when.

  • avatar
    cRacK hEaD aLLeY

    This thing will sell, sell, and sell.
    And there will be catfights over EV charge points at every Whole Foods and Intelligentsia Coffee store from San Diego to Vancouver.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      Atlanta is Electric Car City, USA right now thanks to some generous tax rebates from the state. Free charge points are the newest “progressive” goodwill and good vibes statement by retailers and property managers. I never see them without a Leaf, Volt, or Tesla hooked up for a feeding.

      If the Model X CUV can manage to match the enthusiasm and value of the Leaf with the aspirational nature of the Model S, then it may become the new Prius/CR-V replacement in this market. Godspeed to Tesla, but I hope they pull it off.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    “The assembly line, currently going through upgrades to assemble 3,000 vehicles per week, must be shared with the Model S. The publication says that if the split were 50/50, it would take Tesla over a year to clear the backlog that could hit 25,000”

    25000 reservations divided by 1500 cars per week is less than 17 weeks of backlog. Plus, I’d expect that Tesla would devote more than 50% of the line’s capacity to the newer, higher-demand model.

  • avatar
    mike978

    “The assembly line, currently going through upgrades to assemble 3,000 vehicles per week, must be shared with the Model S. The publication says that if the split were 50/50, it would take Tesla over a year to clear the backlog that could hit 25,000 by the time production begins early next year.”

    Surely if 1500 are produced a week then 25,000 back orders (projected and assuming 100% follow through) would be done in 17 weeks or 4 months.

  • avatar
    redmondjp

    I’m sorry, people, but the hype surrounding the new gigafactory is just astounding.

    6500 permanent direct jobs? SIXTY-FIVE HUNDRED employees? On what planet, and how soon? Based upon what is happening at other auto assembly plants (esp. in the South), I’d hazard a guess that many positions will be temporary or contract workers.

    I can see 1/10 of that number to start, and only when they reach Toyota Camry levels of production, even coming close to the 6500 number.

    I really want to believe, but at this point all we have are forward-looking statements . . .

    There are a long line of automakers who made similar statements, including Tucker, Bricklin, Delorean, and so on.

    I’d love me a Tesla right now and there are plenty in my nabe, but they are primarily purchased by DINK techies pulling in a household gross of $250-300K.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The defining mark of an overfinancialized economy, is that “all we have are forward looking statements.” What you’ve got, is what you can borrow. And what you can borrow depends on what you claim you at some point will do, rather than what you’re actually doing or have done. It’s not called a cardhouse of empty promises for nothing.

      Musk is very well aware that tech valuations are always higher when you lose money, hence get to sell promises over substance, than once you actually have a working business, which very rarely lives up to the level of hype Silicon Valley VCs and their acolytes are capable of drumming up.

  • avatar
    thesource

    3,000 units per week? Maybe by launch of proposed Model 3 (TBD). Last quarterly result, Tesla mentioned getting Q4 2014 output up to 1,000 units per week and expectations of an annualized delivery rate of 100,000 by end of next year, which in rough approximation, might mean a production rate of 2,000 per week.

  • avatar
    gnekker

    I doubt that Tesla will keep gullwing doors on a production model. If it is for practicality, they may use sliding doors.
    Mercedes only used it because they had very high door sills and low roof, and only 1400 cars were produced from 1955 to 57.
    Other gullwing equipped cars failed miserably on the market, something I am sure Mr. Musk is aware of.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      You’re forgetting the gullwing SLS – in production for 4 years. You seem to be implying that the Bricklin and DeLorean failed because of their gullwing doors. I think there were other reasons myself.

      The gullwings on the MX are just side hatches. I think they’ll have less problems than sliding doors. Sliding doors are always a pain. Difficult to close unless they are power. Besides, with sliding doors it becomes an AWD mini van – not a smart marketing move.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        But sliding doors work SO much better then gull wings in the real world (read: mall parking lots). This is especially true for those dragging kids around, which is what the majority of SUV/CUVs are being bought for (I assume). Or maybe I’m crazy because I had Mazda 5 as a rental this week and it was the most brilliantly packaged vehicle I’ve been in a LONG time due the sliding doors.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          Have to partially disagree with you on that. In looking at photos of the gullwings on the X, they don’t seem to stick out from the side that far. Definitely not as far as a conventional door. Sliding doors tend to stick out a bit as well when you slide them open. The advantage seems to be that part of the roof is opened up, so that would be a huge advantage in getting a kid in or out. Besides, take a look at the side view of the Model X. Where would you put the tracks for the sliding doors? There’s no space for them.

          Now for the down side. I still think there will be problems in some low parking garages. Murphy’s law says that you’ll open the door under a pipe positioned perfectly to crack the window.

          The sliding doors on the smaller Mazda 5 are probably a lot easier to deal with than the MPV that we had for 5 years or my friends Chrysler vans.

          • 0 avatar
            GiddyHitch

            Yup, you can’t get into the second row of a 5 standing up unless you’re four feet tall. Also, Tesla is on record saying that the falcon doors will extend LESS laterally than a traditional minivan’s sliding door. So, an X will be better in a mall parking lot in your scenario JMII, until you have to back it out (because it’s huge). Also, I’m guessing that the doors will have proximity sensors so that they don’t get dinged up when opened in low roof garages.

            Tesla does tend to think things through, people. This isn’t GM or something.

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    Since my first car was a 1970 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme (in Sherwood Green!) built at Fremont, California does that mean my firstcar was a PreTesla?

  • avatar

    Anyone know how much it takes to reserve a Tesla Model X? Elio Motors says they have about 30,000 reservations for their little three wheeler.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    Said it before and I will say it again, Teslas are just overpriced and impractical. If you can’t own one without having to own another car to make up for its deficiencies then why own it? The entire point of owning an electric car should be to save money and this vehicle is the complete opposite. It is significantly more expensive than an equivalent car and you either need to own another car or rent one to be able to make up for its limitations. Like I have said, I would rather own a Leaf and a Lexus RX/ES rather than buy a Tesla, it would make more sense and it would actually save you money. This is a car for people that think $5,000 handbags are a good idea.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Some wag on here said it best – something to the effect of the perfect car to be seen in while sitting in heavy traffic in the silicon valley.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      I don’t see the impracticality of a Tesla. I’m typically not going to drive more than 200 miles in a car so I don’t need a car with 600 mile range. The supercharger L3 charger network is effectively more extensive than what is shown on the Tesla web site now that they have a CHAdeMO adapter and Nissan has been deploying numerous level 3 chargers everywhere. Even some truck stops and hotels now have L3 chargers.

      Then again, I’m probably going to go the LEAF (or i3) route and rely on my ICE car collection as backup. I agree with you there and I can think of a lot of nice toy cars I can add to the fleet for the price difference between the LEAF and a Model S.

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        Nobody is typically going to drive 200 miles, but there will be times when you do and that is my point, you are paying more money for an equivalent car and getting lots of deficiencies. As these cars become more popular there will be more issues. It is bad enough having to wait a ridiculous 30 plus minutes to get 150-180 miles of charge assuming there is an immediate spot when you get there, what now if there is one car ahead of you, or two, now you are stuck waiting for hours to get less than 200 miles of range, while the guy in the ICE car put gas in at one of the dozens of gas stations around him in less than 5 mins and is on his way for another 300-400 miles.

        Another point I have brought up before which seems to be largely glossed over is that eventually criminals will catch on to the fact that you have guys in 6 figure cars that are essentially trapped like sitting ducks for a half an hour charging their vehicles. Food for thought for you Tesla owners out there.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          >> 30 plus minutes to get 150-180 miles of charge …

          The last time I took a long road trip in a car was about 7 years ago, but I still remember a few things. First of all, I can’t last driving 6 hours straight without stopping. I think I was good for about an hour to hour and a half. That means a much shorter charging time – maybe 15 minutes.

          So I stop, plug the thing in, head to the bathroom, then stand in line for coffee. About 15 to 20 minutes, then my car is charged and I can leave. The ICE driver, after he gets his 15 to 20 minute break, either still has enough gas to skip the line at the pumps, or he has to go over to the pumps and fill up, which means he’s actually slower than the EV driver.

          Another thing that I remember about my road trips of past is that I always rented to keep the miles off of my cars. If I need a rental in a hurry, I have a Hertz 24hr instant rent key fob.

          If I fly, it’s about 10 miles to the municipal airport, or if I go commercial, the livery service comes in gets me in one of their new S Classes.

    • 0 avatar
      GiddyHitch

      “Teslas are just overpriced and impractical. If you can’t own one without having to own another car to make up for its deficiencies then why own it?”

      I hope you are consistent and make this rant about Porsche, Ferrari, Lamborghini, Lotus, AM, MINI, BMW M, AMG, etc. as well.

      “The entire point of owning an electric car should be to save money and this vehicle is the complete opposite.”

      Says who? That type of thinking would have bankrupted the company years ago had the produced an EV1, electric Insight, Rav4 EV type of product. There’s a limited market for a car that only appeals to a miserly, penny pinching hypermiler willing to forego creature comforts and any semblance of class or style in the interest of minimizing their cost per mile. While the Tesla does tap into a common desire to reduce one’s toll at the pump (though you could argue that all of the savings and then some are front loaded into the purchase price), it does reduce one’s contribution to greenhouse gases, keeps a few dollars out of the pockets of jihadists, produces ungodly amounts of accelerations (and tire wear), and makes you feel like the future has arrived. So, I would argue that there’s a business case beyond just economical electric cars, as would Tesla’s customers and TSLA’s share price.

      Quick, which of these companies is least likely to be around in 25 years in its current form?

      Volkswagen
      GM
      Tesla
      Mazda

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        First of all sports cars are not bought with the purpose of replacing your primary car so that point of your argument is invalid. With regards to the non 2 door variants of the makes you mentioned, as long as you put gas in them they can go anywhere you want with 4 to 5 people in them.

        Take away Tesla’s government money, tax credits and subsidies and then come talk to me about which company will be around in 25 years. Quite frankly once your rant devolved into jihadists and other nonsense it became pointless to address you any further. You do know how electricity is actually produced, right?

        • 0 avatar
          GiddyHitch

          So much good stuff, VenomV12! Where to begin?

          “First of all sports cars are not bought with the purpose of replacing your primary car so that point of your argument is invalid.”

          Are we allowed to do that – just say that an argument is invalid because we disagree with it and present absolutely no evidence? I count about 8 people that I know personally that have used a combintation of 2-door Porsches, Ferraris, AMG, and BMW M cars as daily drivers, myself included – your invalidation invalidated!

          “Take away Tesla’s government money, tax credits and subsidies and then come talk to me about which company will be around in 25 years.”

          Wait, do we get to do this to GM, VAG, FCA, etc. as well? I’m going to miss all these legacy brands in my middle age. Or are we just selectively applying these standards?

          “Quite frankly once your rant devolved into jihadists and other nonsense it became pointless to address you any further.”

          Well, at least you made it most of the way through my post. Thanks!

          “You do know how electricity is actually produced, right?”

          Mine? Sure. It’s a combination of wind, solar, and geothermal – I pay 10% extra on my energy bill but it’s worth it to me. Or were you talking about for the country as a whole? I figured mostly coal, but didn’t know for sure so I looked it up. I’m guessing you didn’t because,

          In 2013, coal was used for about 39% of the 4 trillion kilowatthours of electricity generated in the United States … 27% of U.S. electricity was fueled by natural gas … Petroleum was used to generate less than 1% of all electricity in the United States in 2013 … Nuclear power was used to generate about 19% of all U.S. electricity in 2013.

          Source: http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=electricity_in_the_united_states

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    I have a 1972 Oldsmobile Toronado hybrid. It runs on gas and oil! Paid off twenty years ago; 14 mpg fine-tuned; 350 SAE gross horsepower and style beyond any of the greenbean cars today. Insurance is $65 per year. It does have one electric car update- a 1976 Toronado GM HEI system!
    I always wanted to park a Prius in my engine bay!

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