By on September 9, 2014

Fiat-Strada-Adventure-Aggressive-and-a-Spirit-of-Offroad

 

Speculation about a Ram small truck based on the Fiat Strada has been rampant recently, and it looks like Ram is getting ready to move in that direction for the Mexican market.

A Brazilian outlet is reporting that the Strada will be sold in Mexico as the Ram 750. The 750 will be offered in both single and double cab configurations and powered by small 4-cylinder engines.

Perhaps these were the Strada mules being tested around Detroit, and there were never any plans to bring a small truck to the United States. With UNECE rules and a totally different set of market conditions (as well as no chicken tax), Mexico is a much better place to import a small, front-drive car-based pickup than the United States. Or maybe FCA will surprise us all?

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157 Comments on “Ram de Mexico Will Get Fiat Strada Based Small Truck...”


  • avatar
    danio3834

    Oh no you didn’t.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Ah!

    Ute meets Baja.

    Some Cartel Member’s lucky teenage son will be rolling around Tijuana in one of these clad in Level Three Body Armor in no time.

    The beauty of narco-culture… *sniff sniff* (tear)

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    They won’t sell these in the states because they would cut into sales of high profit margin FS trucks. Pure and simple.

    • 0 avatar
      Beerboy12

      I would disagree with that assertion purely on the fact that these two are just not in the same market. Chalk and cheese!

      • 0 avatar
        eggsalad

        Yes, because in the US, *nothing* is in this market. If I want a truck, I can buy the midsize, antiquated Tacoma or Frontier. Unfortunately, the price and MPG are about the same as a FS truck.

        If FCA could offer a truck like this with a starting price like a FIAT 500 Pop (~$15k) I think people would buy them. I would.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          At $14,995 who’d even consider a throwaway subcompact instead of this. I’m not sure what a realistic price would be, but I forget why the Plymouth Rampage and VW Rabbit pickups didn’t sell very well. You’d think everybody wanted one. And that was during the Mini-Truck Dynasty.

          • 0 avatar

            According to the Brazilian site who published the news, and changing from Mexican pesos, to Brazilian reais, to American dollars the single cab start off at USD 14.2k and the double cab USD 18.1k. Keep in mind that retail prices always take local market conditions into consideration. If built locally in Mexico, you could easily see them being sold in the US for 12k (SC) and 15-ish (DC). Would that be ebough to entice buyers? I have no idea.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Hey Marcelo! At $12K, US consumer would be forced to buy one. Maybe two! Too good to be true though. But I’m not sure Fiat would want to sell that many. What would they cannibalize?

          • 0 avatar

            Hey DenverMike! I don’t think they’d cannibalize anyone at the RAM store and that would be the beauty of it! Maybe create a niche market and seduce Versa and Rio buyers. If, that is, they can even pull it off. Anyway, for someone extremely interested, being in Mexico, could an American do a gray import? Would certainly call attention on the streets of America.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Marcelo – Doesn’t FCA build any fwds this could cannibalize? The Dart?

            There’s no grey market, except for grey area. Mexico/Canada autos in the US are simply ‘out of state’ and allowed to “visit”, for a month I think. Same as Colorado (plate) autos “visiting” California for example. It’s not legal to have an out of state auto, on an ongoing or permanent basis, but people do it all the time. Usually from a cheaper state/country to register.

          • 0 avatar

            @DenverMike, well maybe yes, didn’t look at it that way. How much does a Dart cost? Could be they cannibalize those.

            AS to gray market I was just letting a thought flow. I’m reading you guys talking about gray imports all the time, so being it will be available so close, if such a thing existed, someone might do it.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Rules created during the Reagan administration made it cost-prohibitive for most personal imports of cars that are less than 25 years old. It is almost never worth doing.

            Visitors can bring a car for up to one year, but they have to take it with them when they leave. No loophole opportunities there.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Pch101
            Reagan??

            Politcal are we;)

            The grey import changes where actually driven by the prestige German marques.

            I suppose they are as bad as you guys at the UAW.

          • 0 avatar

            Thanks, Pch!

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “The grey import changes where actually driven by the prestige German marques.”

            I can believe that since I was forced to sell in Germany the 1972 Mercedes Euro-specced 220D my mom and dad used to travel all over Europe while they visited me when I was in Germany with the US Air Force.

            I always wondered why better-engineered Euro-specced German cars could not be imported into the US unless you changed all the glass, the headlights and taillights, the brakefluid reservoir, the exhaust system, and for gas engines install an EGR system, with PCV valve.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            >There’s no grey market, except for grey area. Mexico/Canada autos in the US are simply ‘out of state’ and allowed to “visit”, for a month I think. Same as Colorado (plate) autos “visiting” California for example. It’s not legal to have an out of state auto, on an ongoing or permanent basis, but people do it all the time. Usually from a cheaper state/country to register.

            It’s perfectly permissible to permanently import cars from Canada into the US as long as they meet all FMVSS, which the majority do since most Canadian market vehicles are nearly if not completely identical to their US counterparts.

          • 0 avatar

            At those prices, these would have a huge market among auto parts stores, cable TV installers, pest control companies, and all the other companies who used to buy white 2wd stripper Rangers by the truckload.

        • 0 avatar
          Beerboy12

          I would buy one too, but I would not buy a full size, so I would not be cutting into full size sales.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      I hope so.
      Too many people have NO IDEA how well (or how poorly) these would sell, though they think they do.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    Well… there is a gaping hole in the US market right now for a baby truck like this. This would be a very good product to fill this gaping hole as it has been around a while and is well proven by now.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Beerboy12
      I do think there would be a hole for this vehicle and several other similarly used vehicles.

      What has killed these types of vehicles from entry into the US is the 25% chicken tax.

      The regulatory requirements can be met and the vehicle altered to meet those again, protectionist and differing regulations.

      The market wouldn’t be huge, but who cares? If a consumer wants one why should a small and insignificant portion of the US population stop them.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        One of the original vehicles of this type was built in Pennsylvania. It was killed by slow sales. Pre-Fiat Chrysler made one too. They dropped it because demand was sated once all the pool cleaners had one. I suspect a new one would see a bunch of novelty sales and then go the way of the Samarai.

        • 0 avatar

          Markets can and do change. I hardly know if sales would taper off after every tradesman, small business etc. bought one, but it does have something going for it. I could be mistaken, but the last time the cars you mentioned were sold there, they were not s capable and, principally, trucks were not so predominant. Could be trucks have so entered the American psyche that even these small ones could catch the fancy of a wider market. It doesn’t seem likely as no one has tried yet, and the makers do research this, but just some speculation on my part.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            The small truck market was much larger then than it is now. Small businesses are better served by vans. People that think we need small pickups willfully ignore that very few people buy the smaller versions of available popular trucks. Every privately owned F150 and Tacoma is a crew-cab. Pickup buyers aren’t buying vehicles with 20 to 40 inches of extra wheelbase because they want small trucks. Ever see a single cab, short bed Tacoma? They’re within fractions of an inch in most dimensions of old Ford Rangers. People think Tacomas are big because every one you see is big. It is big because the big ones are the ones that sell.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            When VW launched the Rabbit pickup, the compact truck market was expanding.

            The VW failed, in part because there were other trucks that were more popular, and in part because the Volkswagen brand began to nosedive after it started building in Pennsylvania. (One can debate the reasons, but the quality was terrible and VW did a poor job in its efforts to Americanize its product lineup.)

            After that time, the small truck market came, then went. The peak is long behind us.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “The small truck market was much larger then than it is now.”
            Considering that there is no coverage in said market, how do we know?

            “Small businesses are better served by vans.” Most, maybe. But certainly not all.

            “People that think we need small pickups willfully ignore that very few people buy the smaller versions of available popular trucks.”
            Maybe because the “smaller versions of available popular trucks aren’t small enough? Most of the complaints I hear is that the modern so-called mid-sized truck is much too big for their purposes.

            “Every privately owned F150 and Tacoma is a crew-cab.”
            Patently false.

            “Pickup buyers aren’t buying vehicles with 20 to 40 inches of extra wheelbase because they want small trucks.”
            Yet hundreds of thousands of people buying 20 to 40 inches of LESS wheelbase may be wanting a smaller truck than is available. You can’t buy what isn’t for sale.

            “Ever see a single cab, short bed Tacoma? They’re within fractions of an inch in most dimensions of old Ford Rangers.”
            Which were themselves significantly larger than the Ford Courier of the late-’70s, early ’80s.

            “People think Tacomas are big because every one you see is big.”
            An interesting statement, considering that the extended-cab models are among their fastest-selling models and smaller than the crew-cab models.

  • avatar
    Monty

    Sell it in Canada! Please!

    I’ll buy new if I have to, to encourage FCA to make this available in Canada.

    • 0 avatar
      Gardiner Westbound

      +1

      Not all of us want a big, honking, gas-guzzling, full-size model.

      It appears to have a sliding convertible top similar to the Fiat 500c in the Brazilian website photo.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Please get rid of that stupid plastic trim.

    • 0 avatar
      mike89

      That is the fully loaded model, poverty-spec ones are a lot easier on the eyes.

      http://i.wheelsage.org/pictures/f/fiat/strada/fiat_strada_trekking_cd_15.jpg

      You know, different strokes for different folks : North America likes chrome, South America likes plastic.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    It’s… beautiful…

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I do find the fact that they are calling it a Ram 750 interesting.

    This truck would be imported to Mexico from Brazil. That means it is made outside the NAFTA zone so it could not be imported into the USA duty free.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Why would they pay a duty? Final assembly can be done cheaply in Mexico, then imported into the US tax free.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @denverNike – “A Brazilian outlet is reporting that the Strada will be sold in Mexico as the Ram 750.”

        Sold does not mean made.

        The FTA that Canada is negotiating with the EU has specific rules governing what constitutes Canadian made and Canadian content to prevent USA made vehicles from been exported to the EU through Canada. I am sure that NAFTA has similar provisions defining “made in Mexico”.

        ………….. but if you are correct then the only barrier to trade would be technical i.e. safety and emissions. Making this vehicle compliant could kill any profit margins.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          “Making this vehicle (safety/emissions) compliant could kill any profit margins.”

          Isn’t that what kills any chances of a Ladas, Tatas, Peugeots, Renaults, Citroens, etc, from coming to the US?

          Other than lack of any real demand? But who’s gonna cry for those?

          Such an evil dictatorship, no???

          But I know Stratas are Brazilian made. I meant a CKD installed in Mexico, then to the US.

          • 0 avatar

            Renaults are already sold in the US. They’re just called Nissan. Especially the smaller Nissans are co-engineered with Renault and use some of the same systems. They are so joined at the hip by now that it’s becoming very hard to tell them apart. Also, Lada is now Renault and enjoying a massive tech transfer (one only has to look at the recent crop of Ladas at the Moscow Salon to see). Could be they could soon become US compliant or close.

            PSA could also certainly make US compliant vehicles, they certainly know how to do it. Chinese and Tatas may be a ways off though.

            And yes, the question remains if they could find a market and sell for a price and features that’d get people looking. It’s a tough nut to crack, but even Yugo did it a way back. I realize it was not a market success, that is not what I’m saying. What I am saying is that the technical difficulties can be overcome quite easily by almost any car maker on the planet.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The Renault, Citroen and Peugeot brands were in the US. They failed.

            The issue was a lack of demand. It’s hard to make money when customers aren’t interested in what you have to sell.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Marcelo,
            I see more Renaults rebadged as. Nissans being sold in the US, AsFar as Peugeot/Citroen GM was thinking of doing a Transit with a Peugeot Van

          • 0 avatar

            I agree RobertRyan, the Nissan Terrano (Renault/Dacia Duster) is a prime candidate, as is the bigger than the Strada smaller than the Ranger pickup under development and that looks like a go for 2015. The Captur could slot in as mini CUV gaining traction in the US to compete with the likes of the Jeep Renegade as is the new Nissan medium-compact (forget the name) to be sold in Europe than many say is closely related to the Mégane that could bring competition to Golf and Focus. Like I said, getting harder and harder to tell them apart.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Marcelo and RobertRyan,
            When I was in France last year I saw a significant number of Dusters.

            They actually don’t look that bad either.

            The Nissan version does look far better than the Duster.

            As for Nissan and Renault, they are almost as one.

          • 0 avatar

            Hey Big Al! What you saw in France was the Dacia Duster, not the Renault Duster. The Renault front grille is a bit different than the Dacia and looks better, to me better than the Nissan’s. I can see why you like the back of the Terrano better, though I do like the back of the Duster that looks like the back of many older Nissans. So it ll come full circle!

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Pch101: “The Renault, Citroen and Peugeot brands were in the US. They failed. ”

            So was Fiat, and Fiat’s back. As others have said, so is Renault, though admittedly not as a self-supporting brand. The point is that it is now 40 years later; two generations of new drivers have come in while two generations of old drivers have gone out. Different people means different likes and dislikes from 40 years ago and SOME of them obviously want something that’s not currently available here in the US. On the other hand, 40-year-old (and older) regulations are on the books that make it costly to even attempt to enter the US market; even you have touted how American safety regulations are different (I don’t necessarily agree with ‘better’) than European or other global regions. Modifying an existing platform in one region to meet another region’s laws is an expensive proposition no matter how you look at it.

            So is it really a lack of demand, or that the products would be priced out of the market if they even made the attempt?

    • 0 avatar
      Beerboy12

      It might be because as far as I remember it is rated to carry 750kg’s, so its a 3/4 metric ton vehicle. Could be wrong, but that is the thought I had.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The OEM gave it 600 to 750 static kg’s payload, with no regard to how it affects handling, cooling, braking, etc.

        The US DOT would bring that back to reality.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @Marcelo – I didn’t mean Brasil is lawless when it comes to autos. But we’re talking incompatible standards. When industrialized fullsize Rams can have as little as 350 kg’s payload, that says a lot.

        • 0 avatar
          racer-esq.

          “The OEM gave it 600 to 750 static kg’s payload, with no regard to how it affects handling, cooling, braking, etc.

          The US DOT would bring that back to reality.”

          The Ford Transit Connect is rated for 776 KG/1,710 LBS in the US, so 750 KG/1,653 LBS is not at all unreasonable for the Strada.

          http://www.ford.com/trucks/transitconnect/specifications/view-all/

          The BOF Rams (and F150s and 1500s) are just a joke. There must be a lot of cannibalization fear going on with the Latin American pickups not being built in Mexico (for Chicken tax purposes – no offense Marcelo) and imported.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @racer-esq
            Agreed, total joke. How can a relatively hulking beast like a RAM have such a pitiful payload

          • 0 avatar

            Hey racer! Why would I be offended? I have no skin in this game and hardly consider myself a proponent of this type of car in the US. I think if makers saw a profitable market and taking into account possible cannibalization, they’d go for it.

          • 0 avatar
            racer-esq.

            With a 750 KG payload the Fiat Strada also bests the Ford and GM utes:

            “In fact the Ford is slightly bigger in every department, but can only haul 500kg of cargo in the tray, compared to the Holden ute’s 650kg payload.”

            http://www.webwombat.com.au/motoring/news_reports/xrt_utes.htm

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @racer-esq.- agreed.

          • 0 avatar

            Hey racer. Yes, that I have always read in Brazilian press, that “our” car based pickups have had a lot of success because they are very capable. Many times I’ve seen comparisons to Australian utes showing that the Brazilian trucklets could carry more.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @racer-esq
            Unitary body ones now, yes but not older unitary body Utes, Cab Chassis Utes 2,700lb for the Falcon
            http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wR8da-8qiQQ/Uztuj3OccKI/AAAAAAAALzQ/q9d_VB_bwxM/s1600/SAM_0130.JPG

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Marcelo,
            The unitary Utes capacities have been shrinking, the spaces are for a 2000 Model year Holden , notice it had 750 kg payload. Ford Cab Chassis, heaviest load at 2,700 lb
            http://www.topspeed.com/trucks/truck-reviews/holden/2000-holden-commodore-vu-ute-ar134495.html

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Denvermike,
          Agreed RAM is pathetic, Why is FCA roistering such feeble 1/2 tons into NA public?

      • 0 avatar

        Hey Beerboy, DenverMike. Here, the Strada is rated at 750 kg the single cab and 650 kg the double cab.

        DenverMike, contrary to perception, the Brazilian car market is not a lawless mess where makers do whatever they want. There are standards and while certainly less stringent than American ones, they are stronger than in Mexico. For example, two or three years ago new standards for towing ratings were implemented. This lead to a wholesale review of what the industry claimed the cars could tow and some were even classified as zero capacity. So if Fiat claims it can, I pretty much believe it can.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Marcelo de Vasconcellos – any country that has a vehicle that makes domestic truck capabilities look bad must be because of lawlessness…..

          Better not mention tariffs related to Gallus gallus domesticus.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lou, the poulet impot.

            How can that affect a vehicle that will not even sell in the US.

            As for the payload, we have huuuuuuuuuuge crew cab F-350s that can carry the same weight and yet still tow 80 000lbs!

            Why would you want anything else!

            Why would you want one of these when you can buy a Raptor, it can go across the Baja at 100mph. Far superior.

            Need I say more;)

  • avatar
    SC5door

    Or….just sell it as a Fiat in the states……the 500L certainly isn’t making any headway in the market and will probably die off soon.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “With UNECE rules…”

    Mexico has barely any rules at all: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/money/2013/11/29/safety-standards-in-cars-manufactured-in-mexico-depend-on-where-theyre-headed/ (AP story)

    And it doesn’t participate in the UNECE harmonization forum: http://www.globalncap.org/latin-american-transport-ministers-discuss-vehicle-standards/

    “Juan Ramos, Secretary of the World Forum for Harmonisation of Vehicle Regulations (WP29) gave an overview of the importance of the wide range of vehicle safety and environmental standards available to Member States. He stressed the benefits of global harmonisation and encouraged governments from the Latin America and the Caribbean to participate in the Forum. ***At present none of the regions governments do so, even though it includes significant vehicle producing nations such as Argentina, Brazil and Mexico.***”

    • 0 avatar
      Charliej

      Mexico builds the vehicles to meet whatever standards are in effect where the vehicles will be sold. Cars for the US meet US standards. Cars for Europe meet European standards. Cars for Mexico meet Mexican standards. What is the problem? I own a car that was made in Mexico. It met all the standards in effect when it was built. I have been happy with it for nine years and will likely keep it for a few more years.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “Cars for Mexico meet Mexican standards. What is the problem?”

        Their lack of standards for their home market has a tendency to kill their own people. For at least some Mexicans, that turns out to be a problem.

        Your “it hasn’t killed me yet” argument doesn’t disprove the point,

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The problem is a vehicle that is built to meet Brazilian or Mexican standards won’t meet US standards so they couldn’t sell it here w/o spending a bunch of money to bring it up to US standards. Based on how well the Subaru Baja sold, or rather didn’t sell it is not coming to the US as doing so would be a money loosing proposition.

        • 0 avatar

          Brazilian standards are tougher than Mexican standards. The Brazilian produced Strada is sold all over Western Europe and is bought basically for commercial reasons. According to what I read in the press at the time of the beginning of the Strada being exported to Europe, changes were minimal.

          Now, the Fiat 500, Alfa 4C, just to stay in FCA, and comparing to their European Union equivalents, gained more than a hundred pounds in structural reinforcements to be sold in the US. Being the Strada already exported to Europe and meeting standards there, seems safe to say some changes would be necessary, but that these would not be insurmountable.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          “The problem is a vehicle that is built to meet Brazilian or Mexican standards won’t meet US standards…” is an argument already rebutted by a Brazilian since it would take rather little effort to adjust from European to American standards as compared to raw Brazilian or Mexican standards.

          As for the Subaru Baja–personally I believe they threw in the towel FAR too early–had they waited just one more year I would probably be driving a Baja right now instead of a Jeep Wrangler and a 25-year-old full-sized pickup truck. I will admit that I far prefer the ‘extended cab’ models to the crew-cab versions, so that was really the Subaru’s weakest point. Cut some of that cab length off and it would have had a decent bed.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Pch101
      So, smartass, what is the future direction of these countries with the harmonisation of vehicles to the UNECE??

      Why are they in the position they are currently in??

      Are they participants of the UNECE vehicle harmonisation system??

      Why would there be a LatinNCAP if not??

      Also and importantly how many years before they will align fully to the UNECE NCAP system??

      Pch101, you really are a UAW shill.

      • 0 avatar
        bosozoku

        Why all the personal attacks? Often they’re based on nothing and just leave you looking like a raving jackass. Please stop.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          He has issues (literacy being among them — it’s obvious that he doesn’t understand much of what he reads.)

          I don’t read his posts, as he has nothing of value to say. I would suggest that you do the same.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Why? Because Pch101 and others refuse to acknowledge facts even when their noses are ground into those facts. He expresses opinion (as do others) without once presenting any verifiable evidence while those who debate against him commonly link to the relevant data.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            It’s odd how illiterate you are.

            “He expresses opinion (as do others) without once presenting any verifiable evidence while those who debate against him…”

            In your fantasy world, that may be true. In reality, I posted two links above to prove the point. Two. And it certainly isn’t the first time that I have.

            Your inability to read is not proof of anything but for your difficulties with English language comprehension. That’s a particular handicap on a website that does its business in English. (And yes, I see the irony of trying to communicate in writing with someone who is unable to read.)

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Pch: Do, please, show me where I have difficulties in comprehending English. On average my grammar and punctuation are far more accurate than yours–as is my level of comprehending meaning.

            And yes, I did see your two links and found them essentially irrelevant to the argument since BOTH discuss the points we have been trying to shove into your thick skull. In essence, we ALL know there are different safety rules across national borders and we ALL know that they do NOT prevent a vehicle from being built to meet those safety standards. What you have NOT proven is that any one standard is more effective than all the rest, though some are obviously better than others.

            BUT the article is about how an Italian truck is entering Mexico, not about whose safety rules are the most stringent. As such, this whole argument is nothing but a distraction from the primary point that Fiat’s Strada is apparently headed for Mexican markets with the conjecture that success there MIGHT mean an entry into the US market.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Your inability to read doesn’t work well on the internet. Unfortunately, you’re not smart enough to know how bad it is.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            You mistake an inability to ACCEPT as an inability to READ. That is why you fail in these discussions over and over again.

            I do not ACCEPT other people’s opinions without verifiable proof of said opinion. So far, you have yet to PROVE beyond a reasonable doubt that any of your allegations about a given market is accurate. Such distractions as the articles you most recently linked do not PROVE that the truck would fail here in the US.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            If you can’t figure out that airbags save lives, then you’re even more dimwitted than I had thought.

            You need to type less and read more. There is plenty of research that shows the benefits of having these safety devices that Mexico doesn’t require. It’s not even debatable; they don’t add the equipment because it would reduce their profits, not because it is ineffective.

            And it should be obvious that your equally unintelligent Aussie friends haven’t figured out that Mexican spec is below European spec. It’s no wonder that you get along so well; the three of you are scraping the bottom of the literacy barrel.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @bosozoku
          Because I’ve had this debate with this Pch101 and presented verifiable and credible data to support my argument.

          All he ever provides is his words and nothing else.

          If his views are so correct why isn’t he able to find the information/data to support his arguments.

          His arguments aren’t for his love of the automobile, but his affiliation to a political interest.

          The guy is a leech on the American population.

  • avatar
    Marcus36

    Interesting how on the original forum, some members are complaining that the price in Mexico will be lower than in Brazil, the same can be said of Mexican built cars sold in the US, sometimes you can get the same model cheaper in the US.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do think there is a market for these in the US, abeit, not big.

    It seems the usual pro-UAW guys are already lobbying this site on how p!ss poor these vehicles are.

    If these vehicles are so p!ss poor according to you UAW Socialists, why worry??

    You really seem to worry considerably over the substandard global vehicles that we receive around the world like midsizers and these great little trucks.

    There will be plenty of young people and even retiree’s who want a relatively comfortable, cheap and basic transport, with the flexibility to throw a fishing rod (pole), tent, go to Lowes, etc, in the back.

    It seems the naysayers are showing their fear again. Why?? Because it will be competitive against some pickup sales.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I kinda already said “but if you are correct then the only barrier to trade would be technical i.e. safety and emissions. Making this vehicle compliant could kill any profit margins.

    If Mexico accepts what ever standard necessary to produce a product or accepts any set standard from a producing state then re-badging or doing “final assembly” means the Strada wouldn’t be compliant with USA regulations. Unless Brazil happens to build a compliant product (which it doesn’t).

    What would it cost to make a compliant product?
    FCA could take the high road and build a USA compliant product across the board for the Americas which would amortize costs over a greater product base.
    BUT with that being said, we see car companies take the high profit low moral road.
    That is why there can be 20 – 40% variance in parts between what is supposed to be the exact same vehicle.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @racer-esq.
    I do think the reduced payload capacity in the current Ford and Holden utes is due to the fact that the Ranger and Colorado now have the one tonne market sown up.

    Our one tonne full chassis pickups generally have a payload capacity of up to/just over 3 000lbs (1.4 tonnes).

    Some even exceed this and can even carry more than some of your HDs. They don’t come close to the tow capacity of an HD or ever will.

    The norm for towing appears to be around 3.5 tonnes, with a 6 000kg GCM.

    VW is the only full chassis pickup manufacturer that has a pickup with around a 800kg (I think) payload.

    I would think these Strada’s or Micro Rams wouldn’t have much more than a couple thousand pound tow limit. Enough for a small trailer.

    But, the 750kg payload these have will make them more than useful for day to day use.

    Imagine one of these with a 2.4 litre engine. They would motor very well indeed. Probably faster than any V6 1/1 ton pickup.

    • 0 avatar

      Checked the Fiat website and weird, for Strada 1.4 single cab is rated to tow a 400 kg load without breaks, and the Strada double cab 1.8 is rated the same in the same condition. Whatever that means.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Hey Marcelo,
        I’ve noticed you are ‘getting amongst it as of late!’

        Interesting, isn’t it?

        As for the towing, I have only one question. What is the braked limit?

        As for the low unbraked to weight, I would assume this indicates that the vehicle is actually engineered and gauged similarly to the way the US and even Australia assess the physical limits of a vehicles capacity to perform work.

        Imagine that? Engineering is the same in Brasil as Australia or the US;)

        It also means this is based on some Fiat FWD car.

        • 0 avatar

          Hey Big Al! Yeah, it depends on the day, nd the subject at hand, I guess.

          On the Fiat website I couldn’t find that info, neither in my quick internet search before answering to you. BTW, couldn’t find any of those figures for the Saveiro on VW’s website, though they do offer a PDF download with info on the little truck.

          And yes, the Strada in engineered from a car, the old Palio in fact, stretched and beefed up. The same chassis underpins the Brazilian Palio SW (though not as re-inforced) and the Brazilian Doblò, which will soon be or already is available in the US as a Ram imported from Turkey (and different from the Brazilian Doblò).

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Marcelo,
            Yeah, most who blog here probably don’t realize the GM/Fiat Small/Wide platform exists. It’s an incredibly versatile and flexible platform.

            It’s funny that some will rant and rave about some GM product, ie, Trax and forget it’s heritage.

            Here’s a great Doblo, that would sell in the US (as a work truck) and it’s a pickup that will carry more than most US half ton pickups.

            Oddly enough, it’s rated up to 56mpg in the UK.

            If they can get a Doblo to do this, they can easily increase the Ram 750’s tow capacity to more than a few thousand pounds.

            It all engineering;) But, as we’ve witnessed Brasil has different physics than the US;)

            http://vans.autotrader.co.uk/van-news-reviews/fiat/doblo/fiat-doblo-work-up-2013-expert-van-review/02d5bdea-5535-4625-8ecf-a268c634e167

          • 0 avatar

            Hey Big Al, found the figures, for Strada 1.4 Double Cab 86 hp the braked limit is 1,100 kg and the same 1,100 kg limit for the Strada Adventure Double Cab with the 1.8 16v 132 hp.

            But this is all academic. The Mexican pick up will use the 1.6 16v 115 hp engine for both singe and double cabs. We don’t use this engine in the Strada here.

            Found also the figures for the Saveiro SIngle cab 1.6 8v 104 hp that exists here and in Mexico (couldn’t find for the double cab), the not braked limit is the same 400 kg, but the braked limit is a hair lower 1,060 kg.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Marcelo, thanks.

            I thought the 400kg limit seem low.

            But the braked 1 100kg seems more realistic.

          • 0 avatar

            You are welcome, Big Al. I was curious, too!

  • avatar
    ccode81

    Just curious, assuming these are relatively light weight FF vehicle, loading 700kg in the back doesn’t mess the traction?
    Alternative in Japan, the 660cc kei trucks can carry 350kg but all built as midship engine, RWD or AWD, 2 seater. (supercarish..)

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @ccodes81,
      So what is the difference to carrying 4 adults in a FWD car?

      Or have a FWD car’s boot (trunk) loaded with a bit of weight?

      Prime movers are a classic example of traction. How are they able to pull those huge trailers or even road trains.

      FWD cars actually offer better traction than rear wheel drive cars in slippery conditions. Look at the weight over the drive wheels in the FWD vehicle.

      The reason for rear wheel drive cars was it was initially cheaper to produce a rear wheel drive vehicle and not have the steer wheels drive.

      But, now, FWD is cheaper lighter, etc to produce.

      • 0 avatar
        ccode81

        Sorry too less words were on my post, I was more curious on extreme conditions such as wet pavement uphill with lots of stuff at butt.
        We have a lot of such terrain in hilly rainy country, but if the car works at where it sold, no issue i have.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Front wheel drive light commericals seem to do okay in the EU.

          I do think it gets icy and snowy there.

          These are FWD and seem to do okay.

          http://www.trakka.com.au/model_images/Trakkaway-860/gallery/TWAY_860_ext.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Scoutdude,
            Maybe auto manufacturers can become innovative and design a 4×4 pickup?

            Or the operators of vehicles have enough common sense to understand the capability of what they are operating.

            FWD will work fine.

            How do semi trailers move?

            By common sense?

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      FWD sucks when it is loaded up and you are trying to climb a slippery hill. A couple of weeks ago I was showing a house that was on a pipe stem lot down a hill. There was a nice turn around platform at the bottom so I did so before trying to head up the driveway back to the street. Got a few feet the tires started to spin, the traction control engaged and all forward motion stopped. I tried again with as much of a run at it as I could. Got a couple of feet further. Then again with the traction control switched off and a got a similar result. Finally I turned back around and was able to back up the hill but it was scary when I got to the road and couldn’t see if there was any traffic coming. This was on a asphalt drive and it was not raining though there were a few pine needles. I’ve had similar problems though less dramatic with switching from an RWD minivan to a FWD minivan as my employer supplied vehicle and I didn’t carry but about 600-700lbs of equipment in the back. FWD may be fine in the flat lands but if you’ve got hills and anything in the vehicle RWD is the way to go.

      • 0 avatar
        ccode81

        Thanks for giving example, this is what I exactly worry if having a lot of weights on rear axle, floating the front axle which drives the car.
        Seems strada has rigid leaf springs for the rear, might prevent from wheelie style ride, so assume it is ok for most scenes.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        That must be one STEEP driveway. Let’s hope the buyer owns a Jeep or other 4WD vehicle to take that hill in bad weather. And yes, I’ve even seen RWD vehicles fail such a hill in dry conditions if the tires aren’t the best.

        As for being a “flagpole” property–you just described the one reason never to own one; no direct access to the street if your driveway is blocked for ANY reason.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @HDC,
    I started a new thread, the other thread was complex, for me anyway.

    Yep, the German prestige companies lobbied the government to stop the grey imports, part of the deal was to set up German manufacturing in the US.

    I suppose our UAW shill, Pch101 is upset that they aren’t UAW inspired auto manufacturers.

    As you know there is another article in TTAC regarding the attempted socialisation of workers at a German auto manufacturer in the US;)

    The UAW will lose out, they have nothing to offer the workers.

    The workers only have to look at what’s become of Detroit to realise they are better as they are.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    What would be the worst that could happen if Ram brought this rebadged Strata to the US? It won’t sell as well, or then possibly it might sell better than expected? I doubt that full size truck owners are going to stampede the Ram dealers to trade their full size pickups for this, but it is possible that there are enough buyers that don’t want to drive a semi pickup around and want something smaller. Some of these guys must really be worried about this. I doubt Ram will bring this to the US and if they do it will not happen anytime soon. I seriously doubt that in the future we will have the large pickups with the big block V-8’s that we have now. We will see the future half ton full size pickups closer to the size of the current midsize trucks (global) possibly a little large but smaller than they are now. If the full size pickups do get reduced in size will the World as we know it end, will there not be any real red blooded American males left? I think much of this anxiety is much to do about nothing. The US as survived much greater crisis as it survived the disappearance of the land yacht cars of the 70’s. I don’t think they can make us drive little tiny trucks because most Americans are getting larger in size. I don’t think you have to worry about Ram Stradas replacing F-150’s so why sweat it over a few smaller trucks. Toyota Corollas have not killed off Mustangs, Camaros, Challengers, and Chargers.

    If some are really concerned about towing and hauling capacities and want the most capacity available then Kenworth and Peterbuilt make some very capable semis that will definitely out haul and out tow a Ram or an aluminum F-150.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Pch101–So will the World as we know it end if a company loses money? Is this the first time in history that an auto company or any company has lost money? As I said, but that you are not capable of comprehending that I doubt that this rebadged truck will ever see it in the US. If you want to worry about it be my guest, but remember the Russians are coming. An article about a smaller truck coming to a market outside of the US seems to stir McCarthy fear into the hearts of red blooded middle age American men that this might come to our shores and invade us. Fear not we have the best government money can buy and they will keep us safe from this invasion. Despite this it will not happen.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Companies are supposed to make money. It can be really bad when they don’t. Or have you already forgotten that Chrysler emerged from bankruptcy only five years ago?

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Of course with no help from your bretheren in the UAW.

        To make money you need competition. Then the weak can be weeded out.

        Protecting and propping up an industry doesn’t equate to profit.

        Especially when every vehicle manufactured in the US has some form of subsidization of $3 000.

        Boy, how can you not make a profit?

        Unless you are governed and managed by fools like the UAW and the Detroit old school.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Never said companies are not suppose to make money, you did. Not every product that a company makes produces a profit. Companies want to make a profit on every product they make and sell but that is not realistic. If companies could be successful on every product they ever produced and sold they then we would never have any business failures and their stocks would never go down. Again you are arguing about something that is not going to happen, so you must be worried about these trucks coming to the US. My comprehension of this article is just a small Fiat truck that is going to be rebadged as a Ram in the Mexican market. We could also fear that the Elio will become popular as well and take over our market. Not going to happen but a great idea for a commuter car.

    Not to worry the UAW is safe for now until the Chinese enter our car and truck market.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Why are companies supposed to make a vehicle that is destined to lose money?

      GM is quite good at that. Not exactly something for everyone else to emulate.

      Automaking is a business. It’s supposed to be profitable. This wouldn’t be profitable in the US.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Pch101
        What f4cking planet do you really live on? WTF??

        GM FAILED.

        It only exists because of the taxpayer.

        GM profit has risen, but it’s profit per vehicle is still very small compared to many of it’s competitors.

        Another little shock will see GM like the UK manufacturers. Tata will own a piece, BMW another, the Chinese some, etc.

        You don’t have a clue. Sort of like ‘Clueless in Winnipeg’.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          It never ceases to amaze me how revisionists re-interpret the “facts.”

          I agree. GM died. Chrysler died. No two ways about that. Like Christ, GM has risen from the dead.

          Maybe we should call that day the second coming of GM.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            GM hasn’t “risen from the dead” yet; it’s more like the un-dead still seeking something to restore it to life. That cancer that caused the deaths of three full marques–two legacy and one one carrying a surprisingly loyal following for its young age–ate deep and GM has yet to fully recover.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        The first problem is that you make invalid assumptions. You don’t KNOW that a vehicle is “destined to lose money” until it DOES lose money; before that it is ONLY a guess.

        But be that as it may, certain states in these here United States DEMAND that auto companies build a vehicle that loses money–albeit in the hopes that visibility on the streets will drive more purchases and allow said company to start making a profit on them. Toyota was one of the first ‘victims’ of this ruling and the Prius has now become a very profitable car for them–having been on the market for 14 years. GM on the other hand still isn’t doing all that well with its Volt or Cadillac version EREV.

        Sometimes you simply can’t get around legislation no matter how hard you try.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Big Al–Isn’t competition Unmerican? We should increase the tariffs and get rid of those Japanese and Korean manufacturers that threaten the American way of life. We should support Merican companies even if they are foreign owned. Sorry I couldn’t resist, ignorance is bliss.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    That’s a very spiffy looking vehicle. If it could really sell for the prices Marcelo suggests it would undoubtedly do well. I think it would appeal to young people. They have bicycles to transport. They change apartments every six months. They buy starter tract houses that need landscaping.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Yeah right BAF0 – I’m sure the UAW is in Full Panic Mode right now… ALL HANDS ON DECK!!! Except of course, most US pickups are non UAW or hecho en Mexico.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Yep, DiM or as you’ll now be known firefly, not quite bright enough to be a light.

      Why is it then that the UAW is desperately attempting to increase it’s tax base?

      Look south of Detroit at the activity from the UAW.

      They assisted in destroying Detroit and now they want to destroy the South.

      Sort of like a virus or parasitic intestinal worm.

      I’m not anti union, just pro competition.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @BAF0 – Everyone here is pro competition. But if anyone here looks at seeking a truthful viewpoint, you scream “UAW!!!”.

        And it’s the “Truth” in the logo/web name that probably lands most here. It did me. What about you?

        But where are you when those you accuse to being “UAW shills” are speaking out against the UAW, UAW autos/pickups/CUVs/etc, and their parent companies?

        It’s obviously when your argument takes a nosedive, you start up with the personal attacks and wild accusations out of nowhere.

        You just confirm the troll designation you worked so hard to earn and keep alive.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          The 25% chicken tax isn’t anti-competitive?

          End of discussion.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Who say’s any OEM can’t easily get around the 25% Wouldn’t they be crazy/stup!d to pay it?

            I’m not saying the workaround/loophole isn’t an anti-competitive measure to some small degree, but so is the 2.5% imposed on autos imported into the US that no one seems to ever troll on and on about.

            Similarly, that 2.5% on cars is a tremendous barrier to cars not much in demand and would have a similar marginal to non existent, return on investment.

            But somehow when you ask trolls to explain what public policy or regs changed between the early beginning of the Mini-Truck Craze and the end, they vanish. Or skirt the question altogether.

            Or are dumbfounded when asked why the Ranger and S10 failed right along side of the ‘import’ branded small pickups.

            They don’t have an answer for either and simply scamper off.

            Then they bring up the same silly, hit-n-run statements again, days later… Repeat. Rinse. Do it again.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            This argument AGAIN, Denver? Even after we’ve proven you wrong every time?

            “But somehow when you ask trolls to explain what public policy or regs changed between the early beginning of the Mini-Truck Craze and the end, they vanish.”
            No, we don’t vanish; you just ignore our rebuttals or try to belittle us with insults.

            “Or skirt the question altogether.”
            Yeah. Skirt the question–by presenting expert documents that PROVE you are wrong, while you avoid presenting your own proofs by any possible means.

            “Or are dumbfounded when asked why the Ranger and S10 failed right along side of the ‘import’ branded small pickups.”
            They didn’t. The S-10, Ranger and Dakota lasted 20 years longer, though admittedly the S-10 got renamed and made larger. Even now, the S-10, Ranger and Dakota are highly-sought vehicles around the country and are very, VERY visible in regions where they don’t get destroyed by the environment.

            “They don’t have an answer for either and simply scamper off.”
            No, you don’t ‘scamper off’, you just ignore the facts and insist your OPINIONS are the real facts.

            “Then they bring up the same silly, hit-n-run statements again, days later… Repeat. Rinse. Do it again.”
            Yes you do–and still without ANY evidence to support your arguments.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The following is a direct quote for the article above, “Perhaps these were the Strada mules being tested around Detroit, and there were never any plans to bring a small truck to the United States. With UNECE rules and a totally different set of market conditions (as well as no chicken tax), Mexico is a much better place to import a small, front-drive car-based pickup than the United States. Or maybe FCA will surprise us all?”

    Where does it say for certainty that Ram is bringing this truck to the US? Telling us businesses are profit oriented is a given, this is not breaking news. I will agree with Big Al that government subsidies and protection make it a lot easier for American auto and truck manufacturers to make a profit. The main beneficiaries of profits are the CEOs and the UAW and not so much the stockholders and bondholders. Since you brought this open then I want to give an honest answer. Business should make a profit but in the case of the large American auto manufacturers the real owners of the corporations the stockholders and bondholders they are the last to share in the wealth and the first to take a hair cut if business goes bad.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @Jeff S – No Chicken tax? The EU imposes a 22.5% tax on import pickup trucks. It’s not called the Chicken tax, but surprisingly has no loopholes. And UNECE rules are different than US’ for a reason. To protect EU OEMs from US cars/trucks. There’s specifically “zig” where our’s “zag”. Blatant protectionism… And guess which regs came 1st? Yep, ours did.

      And their tax on import cars is a straight up 10%. That’s 4X ours!
      The US is the friendliest meaningful market to import OEMs. Don’t kid yourself.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        UNECE standards ARE NOT European only standards, they are global outside the US standards. do not know about Canada

        I would love to know your references for these import duties, sound like a load of hot air. I know the US is very restrictive, but where are these European standards and laws you refer too. Must be links? If they are that restrictive, therefore easy to find

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          It’s as if you’re addicted to being wrong. Does it give you a sort of high to get pretty much everything wrong?

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Nice idiotic ,non reply Have you any relevant information? Links ?

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Not only have I explained this to you on numerous occasions, but I posted two links on this very post that prove you wrong.

            Does being inaccurate give you some kind of rush? It’s as if you can’t help yourself.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Robert Ryan – I didn’t say UNECE regs were EU only. But since you’re calling them “global”, I have to call you out on that. It’s simply not true.

            But if you’re truly that ignorant about what the UNECE regs and tariffs are, why do you even comment on something you know absolute zero about???

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @Robert Ryan – Anyone that’s been trolling these pages as long as you have, already knows the facts you’re asking for, inside/out.

          Show me where I’m wrong or quit. I’m not gonna scramble around searching/dropping links on stuff that’s common knowledge around here. Nice trolling.

          And show me a meaningful market that’s as kind to import OEMs as the US.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Denvermike and @PcH101
            Give us the official UAW position, at least I am unclear what it is and explain why the UNECE regs are such a problem,
            No doubt it will not be hard to find as you have a strong objection to the issue
            Some URL’s to illustrate your points as I have notice you talk about this previously in a very unclear manner, even then talking to Big Al from Oz or @Lou_BC

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            UNECE standards are generally inferior to FMVSS standards.

            The US led the world in implementing safety requirements. It was the Europeans who decided to go their own way by creating their own separate regulations (and if you’ve bothered to read the links that I provided, then it should be becoming clear to you that not everyone outside of Europe follows those, either.)

            If you don’t like the differences, then go complain to the Europeans — they’re the ones who decided to split off and do their own thing. I’m not complaining — they have a right to do things differently if they so choose — but you’re obviously obsessed with it.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @PCH101
            That as you know is not an answer to my question. Website references? That is what I asked for We are not Europe and come under the UNECE regulations ? Not US ones.
            . Question why has the UAW got such a beef about regulations? Cannot fathom that out. Ask your researcher, may have a more complete history

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Firefly,
        Then why is it that the US want an FTA with the EU removing the chicken tax and yet it wants the chicken tax to remain with the Japanese?

        Sort of blows your argument out of the water.

        The EU isn’t the problem with the US it’s the Japanese and Asians.

        Look at where the two biggest pickup markets are globally. North American and SE-E Asia/Oceania.

        It all about protecting the geese that lays the golden eggs. Not about fair trade.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @BAF0 – It’s just fair play. Japan is virtually a closed market to US OEMs.

          But you forget Toyota and Nissan (pickups) are equally “protected” geese, but far from laying golden eggs. Why isn’t that???

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Here is an article in Spanish in which I have little comprehension of. But the photographs do look good.

    http://es.autoblog.com/2013/10/16/el-fiat-strada-recibe-otro-restyling/

    I did read that the platform the Strada sits on/or is related to (Fiat Albea/Perla) has an overall 3.5 Star ENCAP rating. That is with only a driver and passenger airbag.

    It seems quite viable that the Strada can be improved to meet US safety standards easier than some of the Luddites will admit too.

    The cut and paste;

    Safety rating[edit]

    The Albea was tested by the Russian magazine Autoreview, according to the EuroNCAP latest regulations. It scored 8.5 points in the frontal crash test, equivalent to three stars in the EuroNCAP testings. The tested vehicle was equipped with standard driver airbag and regular seatbelts.[10]

    The Fiat Perla, a Chinese version of the Albea, was tested in China by the China-NCap in three different tests: a 100% front crash test with a wall (similar to the US NTHSA test), a 40% offset test (similar to the EuroNCAP test) and a side crash test similar to the EuroNCAP.

    The Perla scored 8.06 points in the 100% frontal crash test, equivalent to three stars, 12.02 points in the 40% offset crash test, equivalent to four stars, and 10,96 points in the side crash test, equivalent to three stars, with an average result of 31 points and three stars. The tested vehicle was equipped with standard driver and passenger airbag and regular seatbelts.[11]

  • avatar

    I would love to drive a Strada Adventure around Seattle! It has the right looks and size… it would be the perfect city truck, and it wouldn’t look out of place at Mount Rainier National Park, either.

    • 0 avatar

      Hey Cameron. Why would you want a truck around Seattle? Rains all the time there it seems. Cars like the Strada have been outfitted with 4×4 systems for the show circuit before, but the extra weight would penalize the small engines and fuel economy would suffer. Or you have to carry around some weight in the back. Like any truck, the tail spins and spins that much easier in the rain.

      • 0 avatar

        It doesn’t rain that much in Seattle, thanks to the Olympic Peninsula taking most of the rain before the system moves further east. The rain thing was meant to discourage people from moving here way back, but Jimmy Amazon changed all that.

        We do have plenty of grey days, though. ;)

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Considering the basic platform, the Strada could easily adopt the AWD/4WD drivetrain of the Fiat 500X or the Jeep Renegade. The Cherokee itself is proving wildly popular and hasn’t cannibalized any of the other Jeep or Chrysler products to any measurable extent. Yes, it would jack up the price a few thousand dollars, but if it gets priced parallel to the Jeep Renegade, I’m betting that wouldn’t hurt sales all that much.

        • 0 avatar

          The Strada doesn’t use the same platform as the 500X and Renegade. That’s new. The Strada sits on al older Fiat platform, heavily revised and improved, and in the case of the Strada very reinforced, but that harks back to the 80s Uno’s bones. But they have put 4×4 systems on it, too.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Ok, no argument. But that doesn’t mean the Strada can’t use the drivetrain. About the only changes required would be the length of the driveshafts and maybe the gauge of the materiel. Please note that the Cherokee is significantly heavier than the 500X/Renegade yet uses essentially the same drivetrain with an available V6 engine that has more torque and hp than the smaller rigs. The new drivetrain could make the Strada much more appealing and less expensive to maintain than a one-off proprietary system.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    The Strada is called a truck.

    You can carry more in a Fit with the rear sears folded and still have Japanese refinement and reliability.

    Whatever sexy and fun little thing the Strada may become with all the options and aftermarket, it’s not a truck.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      Heh… I googled “fiat strada truck toys” and the first hit was:

      Fisher-Price® Toys – fisher-price.com‎

      I like Wiki’s description, a “supermini coupé utility”.

    • 0 avatar

      As to the Fit, not everybody likes it. I think it has the clever seating and that’s about it. The engine and transmission and suspension are that pleasant, the engine specifically seems to have gotten a bit worse over time. The thing is, the Fit looks very different and fresh there, nut here there are direct competitors (not indirect one like there where people include the Fiesta as a competitor). Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with it and it’s a fine car, but from driving other cars like it, the Fit is among the ones I like least.

      Having said that, why would you not call a Strada a truck? The back suspension is completely truck for example. I think this sort of discussion would go off into that nether world of arbitrary definitions (like are Jeeps SUVs, even though they are unibody?). I think it might be a different truck, but it’s still a truck.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Denver Mike & Pch101–You guys are really worried about this Brazilian made Fiat trucklet coming to the US. I think you need to take a pill and relax because it will come here when pigs fly and when the Cincinnati Bengals win the Super Bowl. Not going to happen. Fiat is not going to do introduce any smaller trucks in our market unless all barriers are removed and unless other manufacturers introduce a successful small truck to our market. You are probably too young to remember but Fiat left the US market 30 years ago because of severe rust issues and a reputation for making bad cars. Haven’t ever heard “Fix It Again Tony”. You can buy as big a truck is you want. As a matter of fact if you have a commercial license you can buy a Peterbuilt or a Kenworth which should be as big as you need. Small trucks and real sized minivans are about as likely to happen as Congress getting along and passing meaningful legislation. Don’t worry the UAW will survive until all our domestic based manufacturers start making our cars and trucks in China to get around the UAW and to lower costs.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Everyone’s an expert when it comes to evil/horrid US regs/tariffs, but when these same experts are asked how EU regs/tariffs are less so, they suddenly claim to be ignorant on the whole topic.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @DenverMike–It would be better if global standards were adopted by all the major industrial nations. As for tariffs and regulations every country has them. It is silly and wasteful to have a vehicle like the Transit imported with seats and then remove them before they can be sold to get around a tariff. The same with emission standards on diesels it would be better to agree on one global standard. You and others talk about profitability and costs–global standards would lower costs and increase profitability. If the consumer has to be forced to take one or two choices on interior colors and limited exterior colors then at least standardize safety and emissions standards and pass the savings on to the consumer. As for the marketability of a certain size truck or car that is up to the manufacturers but I do not want to force a choice on any consumer. If a consumer finds a competitive product that better meets their needs and it is not from Ford, GM, or Fiat-Chrysler then they should be allowed to make that choice.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @Jeff S – Yeah No doubt. And when you and I run the world, thing’s will be different.

      But TTAC only gives one side of the argument. There’s been absolutely no coverage on EU regs, tariffs, protectionism, etc.

      I realize it’s not their job to be fair and balanced. Only to create max clicks, max drama.

  • avatar
    Magnusmaster

    This Strada wouldn´t work in USA, the interior is way too cheap and its carrying capacity is pathetic. Maybe the next generation which should be ready in a couple of years.

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