By on May 15, 2017

2016 Mazda CX-9 - Image: Mazda“I am not comfortable with 2 percent. I’m comfortable with a good 2 percent.”
– Masahiro Moro, President and CEO, Mazda North American Operations

Mazda’s U.S. market share fell to a 10-year low in 2016 and hasn’t noticeably recovered in the first four months of 2017. A small lineup with no presence in key segments limits Mazda’s chances of becoming a major automaker.

But Mazda doesn’t want to be a major automaker. Mazda wants to be a small but profitable automaker with profitable dealers and loyal buyers.

Mazda also wants to carry greater sway in the U.S. market than it does at the moment. Only slightly. Fractionally more. Marginally, almost imperceptibly more. Only 1.7 percent of the new vehicles sold in the United States are Mazdas. Mazda wants 2 percent, surely a reasonable and easily attainable goal.

But Mazda’s North American boss, Masahiro Moro, has no intention of jumping up to that 2-percent marker rashly or hastily.

Moro wants a good 2-percent share of the U.S. auto industry, not a 2-percent figure grabbed with lofty incentives and stair-step programs and short-term gains.

Mazda is in desperate need of more loyal customers, and ruining the resale values of on-the-road Mazdas with ultra-low prices on new 3s and 6s won’t do existing customers any favors.

2017 Mazda 6 - Image: Mazda

Automakers average 53-percent loyalty, Automotive News reports, but Mazda’s brand loyalty was just 39 percent last year. As a result, Mazda is far too reliant on earning business at the expense of rival automakers rather than on the back of Mazda’s own success.

Mazda hasn’t owned more than 2 percent of the U.S. market since 1994, when Mazda’s annual volume was 26-percent higher than it is now. In fact, Mazda’s 2.5-percent result in 1994 ended an 11-year streak in which Mazda earned more than 2 percent of the U.S. market’s annual volume. Ever since, Mazda has averaged 1.7 percent market share, falling just a tick below the 2-percent marker in the midst of the recession, from 2008-2011.

Mazda wants more affluent customers to pay higher prices for its existing products while also carving out a more premium image for each new model introduction, in the vein of the second-generation CX-9. The majority of CX-9 customers choose one of the two top trim levels, Grand Touring and Signature, which sticker above $41,000 and $45,000, respectively. Granted, this hasn’t made the CX-9 a powerhouse on the three-row family crossover leaderboard, but that was never Mazda’s intention. The new CX-9 is on track for its best sales year since 2011.

Mazda says the annual household income for a Mazda buyer has risen to $93,000, a 16-percent increase over the last half-decade.

Until Mazda’s entire product lineup represents the brand’s new Mazda Premium strategy, Masahiro Moro has no intention to chase after the modest 2-percent goal. Moreover, Moro told Automotive News the fulfillment of this strategy will take,”at least 10 years,” though the 2-percent figure could be achieved much sooner.

Mazda sales climbed to a 21-year high in the U.S. in 2015 but then slid to a three-year low in 2017. Through the first quarter of 2017, Mazda rose 7 percent, a gain of more than 4,000 sales thanks to improvements across much of the lineup, even the Mazda 6. April sales, however, slipped 8 percent because of sharp decreases from the Mazda 3, Mazda 6, and Mazda CX-3. Utility vehicles now account for more than half of Mazda’s U.S. volume.

The CX-5, Mazda’s best-selling model, is America’s 20th-best-selling SUV/crossover. The Mazda 3 is America’s 23rd-best-selling car.

2006 Mazda B-Series - Image: Mazda

But those two vehicles account for nearly seven out of every ten Mazda sales, with the brand’s other products operating as niche vehicles in smaller segments.

Masahiro Moro acknowledges Mazda is a non-entity in more than 40 percent of America’s market segments, creating a real challenge if Mazda is to ever attain its 2 percent goal.

A good 2 percent goal.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net and a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

61 Comments on “Mazda Wants 2 Percent U.S. Market Share, But Not Just Any Ol’ 2 Percent Market Share...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So Mazda wants to be FWD (occasional AWD) Japanese BMW?

    I like the idea better than the idea of Cadillac being the darling of SOHO.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Both are pipe dreams.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Yeah but Cadillac’s dreams fly in the face of everything the brand actually stood for when it was successful.

        At least Mazdas have always been fun to drive.

      • 0 avatar
        caltemus

        How is it a pipe dream? By all recent accounts, Japanese FWD BMW (ultimate driving machine era, not lets-try-to-be-Mercedes era) seems to be exactly where they are right now. Interiors that are just slightly more premium than the volume players in the segment, and driving dynamics that are typically best in class. They could use larger engine choices, but they’ve been quite prudent with each move lately, as they can’t afford a misstep.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          We can agree to disagree, but there is nothing “BMW like” about FWD anything (granted, BMW is not BMW like these days either). Cadillac went the direction it did because they knew this. Geometry and weight distribution are completely different in FWD vs RWD applications.

          In my view there is nothing “cool” about being just like everyone else. Mazda could cease to exist but few would miss it outside of fanboys and the MX-5 crowd. They are trying to sell you on the little hacks they put in to try to stand out in a crowd (suspension, wheels, maybe tires). I don’t buy it. Diesel would make them stand out a bit but it would not automagically make a CX-5 equivalent to an X3/5 or GLK whatever.

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            When it comes to driving dynamics, Mazda is 7/10 or 8/10 BMW, as long as it stays off the AutoBahn, where high speeds will reveal Mazda’s limitations. But in the twisties, Mazda can almost, kind of, sort of, keep up.

            Similar can be said about the interior. Of course BMW uses nicer materials and is quieter, but Mazda has stepped up their game. If they can offer premium trim in a car that costs less to buy and maintain than a BMW, Mazda can be a niche success too.

    • 0 avatar
      brawnychicken333

      Seems like a good idea when you put it like that.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Not premium. Maaaaaaaaazda Premium.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    Right, here are my issues with this 2.0 premium percent idea.

    -Not enough dealers.
    -Run-down, bad dealers.
    -Arguably lower prestige than other options.
    -No V6 option.
    -Prices already too high.
    -Pay more for existing models – why?
    -Larger market share time was in past life, when they had a full lineup.
    -They were at their most successful recently when they were reworking Fords.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Ford and Mazda actually seemed like a really good partnership. That was a very symbiotic relationship.

      (Yes Mazda was the little bird on the back of the Ford hippo but each seemed to need the other.)

      • 0 avatar
        caltemus

        Any decent small cars that ford has made in the past thirty years were due to mazda’s involvement. They are only just starting to move away from madza engineering. The current 2.3 ecoboost engine is still derived from the mazda L engine, and I think the block is still the same.

        EDIT: Looks like they departed from the L block with the 2015 redesign of the 2.0 turbo engine.

    • 0 avatar
      quaquaqua

      I don’t think you can say Mazda has uniformly run-down dealers. In fact, I know you can’t – my local dealer in Merrillville, IN (just outside of Chicago) is one of the nicest dealers period I’ve been in. Huge, roomy, stylish, with a big gimmicky hydraulic lifter displaying the model of their choosing 20 feet up in the air in front of giant glass windows.

      I also disagree that Mazda’s prices are already too high. I mean, they’re not giving $6000 discounts on their midsizers, but Mazda, with their relatively small sales totals, sells far more high end trims than base models, which is totally opposite all of their direct competition in the categories the 3, 6, CX-5, and CX-9 compete in. And with the money going towards interior comfort/quality and ride quietness — something Mazda has basically never gotten right — it will definitely help sales. But no one thinks it’ll happen quickly.

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        A Mazda 6 in Grand Touring trim costs the same as a loaded up Accord V6.

        That’s too much money for a Mazda of four cylinders. The “driving dynamics” they hock on their ads don’t appeal to enough consumers for them to charge a premium.

        • 0 avatar
          mike978

          My local Mazda dealer is also in good shape (John Kennedy Mazda in Pottstown, PA).

          An Accord EX-L four cylinder with CVT is $29795 and a Mazda 6 Grand Touring with 6 speed auto is $31570 – so within $1800 for a car built in Japan and shipped all the way over. That small cost difference will deter some people, Honda has greater economies of scale.

        • 0 avatar
          matador

          And, when you say “Driving Dynamics” in a Japanese car, a lot of people think Nissan anyways

          • 0 avatar
            chiefmonkey

            Foolish of them! Nothing dynamic about Nissan and their CVT’s.If people fall for silly marketing, they have only themselves to blame…

          • 0 avatar
            duffman13

            Really? I think plastic interior, bad seats, too much plastichrome, and poor credit scores when I think Nissan.

        • 0 avatar
          chiefmonkey

          At least the Mazda does not show blatant contempt for the customer. Buy the fully loaded Accord V6, and you get the same hideous looking hubcaps that are on the LX! WTF Honda

        • 0 avatar
          chiefmonkey

          Did I say hubcaps? Goodness gracious, what a faux pas! Rims, rims. They are hideous! The worst looking rims on any modern vehicle. Heads should be rolling at Honda

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Huge, roomy, stylish, with a big gimmicky hydraulic lifter displaying the model of their choosing 20 feet up in the air in front of giant glass windows.

        That must be the prescribed architecture for Mazda Franchises (not saying that all follow it but..). University Mazda/VW (in Albuquerque) has the same architecture and generally puts whatever the newest Mazda release is on the hydraulic lifter so that all the traffic passing by on I-25 can see it. You can tell their dealership was really built with an eye to what it would look like from the interstate.

        • 0 avatar
          zoomzoomfan

          I just ordered some parts from them and their customer service was top notch.

          Side note: The little plastic clips that hold the trunk liner in place on a 2016 Mazda6 are the devil. That’s all.

      • 0 avatar
        Oberkanone

        If Art Hill Mazda is the example of the future of Mazda then it’s time for Mazda to sell out to a larger manufacturer. Without the larger Ford dealership next door the Mazda store closes.

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      The cars are indeed getting nicer. Getting the dealer and service center quality high and consistent across the country is probably Mazda’s next step. It’s hit or miss right now, and I’ve noticed my local dealer is working to improve. I’ve also gotten a survey from Mazda looking for honest criticism (not surveys from dealers).

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Dealers are inconsistent. Very few seem to be stand alone and are at the mercy of whatever else they are lumped in with. They are also relatively few and far between.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    well if they can bring a diesel cx 3 or 5 to the us that would sell some to ex vw oil lovers, and if they are past their rust issues slap a long warranty on their cars for rust protection, i know that is still a issue for me real or imagines I am not sure but if they fixed it, warranty it so that becomes a non issue. Also spend a little more on your interiors Mazda.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    First a specific comment. The CX-9 is having it’s best year since 2011. that may sound great but the 2011 car was essentially 5 years old and two years into a mild facelift. The 2017 car is brand new. So if the best this all new car can do is beat the 2011 version of itself, I’d say that’s not terribly good. It’s even scarier if Mazda’s plan is to milk the current CX-9 for 10 years like they did the previous one (2007-2016).

    Now a general comment. Mazda is not suffering from poor engineering or quality or reputation. It’s cars are great. Every single Mazda is at or near the top of comparison tests in its respective segment. And this has been the case for about a decade. So why don’t the sales match up? It would seem that when a great product isn’t selling, there is a sales and marketing problem that needs to be fixed.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      I would expect they will not milk the current CX9 for 10 years. They did with the last one because it was based on a Ford platform and they had other priorities (rolling out the whole Skyactive technology stuff).

      There are plenty of times when a new car doesn`t sell much more than the old one – witness going from one Camry to another they typically sell in similar volume.

      I agree with you about marketing and sales since the product is good, their economies of scale and having a lot of production in Japan does hinder their ability to offer major incentives.

    • 0 avatar
      jh26036

      Marketing is only a small part of their problem. It’ll always be dealer network that is their biggest downside. Everybody I know that isn’t a car person, they just want to shop locally. Toyota or Ford, you can’t swing a cat without hitting one. Convenience is everything. There aren’t that many Mazda dealers in the country. Fun to drive doesn’t really sell, if anything, it does the opposite.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I miss Mazda making honest utilitarian vehicles with some fun to drive sizzle thrown in (even into the pre-Ranger B series trucks and RWD MPVs). Down in Mexico and Central America where rust is virtually unknown, I’ve seen a ton of those old B series still earning their keep.

  • avatar
    readallover

    NVH, road noise, anyway you want to name it, people refused to buy another Mazda (or a first) because it was too damn loud and Mazda stubbornly refused to fix that problem. All they need to do is address this issue and sales will rise. Jacking up prices and claiming Mazda is now magically a premium car is an excellent exit strategy.

    • 0 avatar

      Well, I think that is why they are saying that it is going to take a while. The newest products (CX-9 and CX-5) have been complemented for their quietness (being at least class competitive, if not quieter than major competitors), but they that process happens during the development stage – so they know they can`t magically make existing products ride better and be substantially quieter. Once they replace the 3 and 6, they`ll be in a better position.

      One suggestion: Take the 6 and explode it out into variants. Bring the wagon as a jacked-up Outback fighter. Plan for the retirement of the sedan within 3 years and keep the raised wagon on.

      • 0 avatar
        eManual

        Add a hatchback version with fold down rear seats, manual transmission with light color interior and exterior colors other than white, silver, or black. If it came in at <$30K, I'd by it tomorrow.

    • 0 avatar
      sutherland555

      As the owner, of a last gen Mazda3, I acknowledge that’s it’s noisy and a bit cramped but I love driving it so I’m willing to overlook those flaws.

      We’re only 9 years out since Ford divested most of it’s stake in Mazda. In that time, Mazda has has put out an entirely new vehicle line-up complete with in-house developed chassis and engines. It’s a remarkable achievement by any measure. Many other manufacturers are still using chassis and engines from 9 years ago (looking at you Toyota and Nissan).

      Mazda has correctly identified that they will never be a mainstream mass market manufacturer. They’re a niche player and they know it. They can’t compete on price & incentives and not even on specs in most cases so they have to differentiate themselves from the big boys in a different way. So they’re focusing on upscale interiors and a good driving experience. Some people are willing to pay a small premium for that, most aren’t and that’s perfectly fine with Mazda.

      They want to grow organically through people who genuinely want to buy their vehicles and that’s fine. They know their cars aren’t for everyone and they’re totally OK with that.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    Is it possible that if Mazda had the same dealer network as Nissan, they’d outsell Nissan by a wide margin? IMHO, Mazda product far outstrips Nissan product in style, durability, quality and engineering. Nissan is a bare step above Mitsubishi in those criteria, IMHO.

    I suppose Moro-san has the right idea….it’s like body weight…you can gain 25 lbs. one of two ways: gorge yourself on pizza, soda, chips, and donuts for several weeks; or you can eat lean protein and lift weights and exercise for a year or more. One way is more disciplined, requires more patience and smarts. In which of these two ways will you be healthier when you reach your destination?

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      A Nissan dealer is like an all you can eat buffet where no one wants to talk about the food only how cheap it is. (And they don’t refuse service to ANYONE.)

  • avatar

    I like it, it seems fairly realistic and really the only way that they can go. Certainly, Mitsubishi hasn’t succeeded in the ‘be the cheap option’ and Nissan sells more but hasn’t built a reputation for quality, luxury, or even desirability (this has, if anything, fallen since their reincarnation in 2002).

    Like many, I was a Mazda owner that did (or hasn’t yet) come back to the fold. I had a first-gen 3 Sport GT (in that bright blue, no less – it looked great) that I *wanted* to love, but major rust and suspension issues, as well as a lack of general feeling of quality, meant I haven’t rushed back to the fold.

    My brother now owns a CX-5, and I’m watching its aging protest with interest. The new CX models are very nicely done, and could see me returning once again if the reviews are good.

  • avatar
    uberlaff

    This is easy. Add 100HP to every car in their line up.

    I own a CX-5. It handles and drives amazing. It could compete with a BMW or Audi on every level except it needs 100 more horsepower.

    I know there are all of these nuances around why this would be hard but they need to figure it out. Forget the diesels and shift resources to adding an option for the Turbo 2.5L in every model. People will find dealerships if you tick all the boxes.

    Reliability? Yes
    Handle great? Yes
    Gorgeous design inside and out? Yes
    Practical and priced competitively? Yes
    Beat someone at a traffic light or feel excited when you pass someone on a highway? NOPE

    Would I buy and pay more for another Mazda? Yes, if it had 100 more HP.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Completely agree and it is interesting that the 2.5 turbo does fit and has been mentioned. I would think it is possible when the CX5 goes for its mid cycle upgrade that a signature level with the turbo could come in. Time will tell. At least the diesel will have the same amount of torque as the turbo 2.5 and more than a typical V6.

    • 0 avatar
      gomez

      I don’t understand why Mazda won’t expand the use of the 2.5T outside of the CX-9. You would think that a company the size of Mazda would want to use it in as many models as possible to amortize the development and production costs. Especially while fuel prices are low.

  • avatar
    deanst

    The move to 2% share is really just 50,000 more vehicles, so it should be attainable. (Or less as the total market shrinks.) however, the point seems to be that the market just does not like their vehicles, no matter how many awards they win. (And I say this as a Mazda owner.) time to sell out, like Honda did – satisfy the masses and give up on “fun” cars.

  • avatar
    gomez

    The problem as I see it is that Mazda is a one-trick pony. There are just not enough mid-to-high income buyers that are willing to pay for a car that prioritizes driving fun over brand name, statistics, or just buying an appliance. I liked all of the Mazdas I’ve driven and loved my old Protege5. But statistically, all of their vehicles are smaller than the competition, have adequate power but no options for more, and have good but not class-leading fuel economy. Their designs arguably look better than the competition but often compromise interior room (sometimes even decreasing from generation to generation) and NVH (although the CX-5 and CX-9 are supposedly improved). All at prices that are at the top of their class or within striking distance of a base or CPO luxury vehicle. If you care about driving fun per dollar above all else, go for the Mazda. For everyone else, there are just too many compromises.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    I think Mazda execs have Subaru envy.
    I suspect when they cross paths, the Subie guys never miss a chance to stick it to them.

  • avatar
    John R

    Yeeeaaah…okay. “Power Matters”, Mazda.

  • avatar
    zoomzoomfan

    I’m hoping once the 2.5 Turbo SkyActiv in the new CX-9 has been around long enough to iron out any potential kinks, they’ll stick it in the 6, 3 and CX-5. Not a lot of people will buy them (car enthusiasts’ want of power doesn’t translate to the general consumer) but it’ll be pure profit for Mazda since basically no extra engineering will be required.

    For what it’s worth, my 2016 6 never leaves me in need of more power in my daily commute. But, it does typical family sedan duties with the occasional back road jaunt. It’s not driven as a performance car.

    I’ve floored it a few times to pass people or to merge onto a busy interstate and I had no issues.

  • avatar
    zip89123

    Mazda might see another quarter of one percent if it put the V6 in more vehicles. The 2.5 isn’t cutting it.

  • avatar
    nlinesk8s

    As an owner of a 2017 Mazda3GT (my wife’s actually), I have to second the nomination for more hp. There’s nothing more annoying on an automatic tranny, than to hit the gas, the engine spools up, and……nothing much happens, or at least, not quickly. The car is zippy enough in Sport mode, but really makes me want a standard transmission, and 50hp. And a straight six (sorry, bmw flashback).
    The engine is a bit buzzy (like every other 4 cyl out there), but the interior is top notch, and it’s a lot better looking than a crossover, IMO.
    $29k? I paid $26, lacking only one tech package I thought was a lot of money for some gizmos I didn’t need.

    • 0 avatar
      chiefmonkey

      Well, I have a 2016 Mazda6. When I first got the car, I felt it lacked power at the low end and was troubled by an annoying tendency for the transmission to hesitate, and then hold gears too long once power finally arrived (in fact, I think I complained about it in an earlier Mazda article on here).
      Currently, almost a year later, I don’t have either of these complaints. I actually think the 2.5 is one of the best engines in any midsize (or compact) sedan and am continually surprised by how much verve it exhibits on the highway. I should add that I once leased a 2011 328i, and the similarities are striking between this car’s performance and that of the inline six. It’s not a stretch at all to car it a Japanese BMW, and if one reads between the lines he will take that to mean good and bad things: exemplary handling, supremely linear acceleration (except when throttle lag randomly occurs), and a somewhat harsh ride.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    maybe the US roads are telling drivers it is no fun to drive a car ( at least here in the east) so why bother w a drivers car.

  • avatar
    ijbrekke

    What does Mazda offer that Honda or Toyota do not?

    1) Handling dynamics – subjective and/or irrelevant to the majority of buyers
    2) Better looks – subjective
    3) …nicer interiors? Again, subjective

    They don’t have a knockout feature over other Japanense brands, and in some areas they are notably worse. Unless a customer is subjectively drawn to a Mazda, most buyers will easily go with one of the other guys.

    The one car Mazda sells that distinguishes itself clearly does just fine – Miata.

  • avatar
    Pricha33

    I have a friend that bought several Mazdas throughout the 90’s and I drove most, if only for a few minutes total. I agree that they all have that ” drivers car ” feel to them, and only one glaring issue would keep me from ever considering a current generation Mazda. RUST …. my God , here in southern Ontario I see swiss cheesed rear wheel wells on cars that can’t be past their 10th birthday. It is ridiculous, I know we are a tough climate but only the Mazdas seem to have this rot issue to this degree.

    I think I know why owners of these rust buckets are not interested in moving into another new Zoom Zoom mobile.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Suzuki, Mitsubishi, Isuzu, and Mazda have all struggled in the US marketplace. They are all still in the business of manufacturing autos. Isuzu and Suzuki could not make a profit here.
    Mazda and Mitsubishi are both profitable in USA. Mitsubishi’s sales are growing. Mazda’s sales are declining.
    Mitsubishi now has a partner of scale in Nissan.
    Could Mitsubishi have the brighter future? Mazda’s vehicles are far superior, no contest. Is that enough?
    Mazda is chasing the an incredibly thin, incredibly competitive 2% of the market. Even if they are better than the competition I don’t see them having he resources to get the message out the buyers. And they don’t have the premium dealers to support their product.
    It’s tough out there. Been in a new Chevrolet dealership lately? High quality materials and amenities abound.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Why not bring all your crossover to the U.S. marketplace? The sporty CX-4 has been selling better then the CX-5 in China and in Japan. But it remains there with no chance of coming over to the North America market! Why not?

    Have the 2.5L turbo as an engine option for the CX-5 now instead of the 2.2L diesel! Mazda says it not needed and no demand for that either! LOL!

    Bring back the Mazda small compact pickup truck into the U.S. marketplace since Isuzu does not sell in the U.S. market anymore! Another big opportunity for Mazda but they say they not going do that either!

    • 0 avatar
      jh26036

      While I think a small pickup could help bring more people into their dealerships, their reasoning for not having it is likely because it doesn’t fit their “premium” image.

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      Mazda has no compact truck to sell. BT-50 is same size as Ford Ranger, so midsize truck.
      Mazda only sells trucks globally in markets outside of North America.
      North America is not a good market for pickup trucks. *at least not for Mazda!

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    What percent of Accords sold are v6? Camry’s? Would everyone go rush out and buy Mazda’s if v6 or turbo 4s magically appeared as option for the cx5 or Mazda 6? No.

    • 0 avatar
      SuperCarEnthusiast

      Since their competition has V6s, turbos; does it not make sense that Mazda also has to have it too; to be competitive? If no; then you are on the same wavelength as Masahiro Moro. He want to transform Mazda into upscale brands like Acura, Infiniti, Lincoln, Volvo but does not want to give customers higher performance engine choices not even the 2.5L Turbocharge engine in the CX-9! He counting on driving dynamics alone will do it solely for Mazda! He must be taking some “awesome stuff”! LOL!


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • gtemnykh: I think I might come down on the side of the G, owing to the higher build quality and reliability, and...
  • Vulpine: Uh huh. Sure Denver. We’ve heard it all before. You’ve never been able to support that...
  • Blackcloud_9: Thank you. This was my thought exactly but I was too busy yesterday to comment. This is what got Bark...
  • King of Eldorado: It’s not just the thickness of the A-pillars, it’s also the shallow angle of modern...
  • phila_DLJ: New face looks dumb. Shoulda kept it the way it was. —phila_DLJ

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff